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Can Diabetes Be Reversed With Weight Loss

Reverse Type 2 Diabetes - This Is How Much Weight You Should Lose To Cure Condition

Reverse Type 2 Diabetes - This Is How Much Weight You Should Lose To Cure Condition

Type 2 diabetes is generally perceived as incurable, but for many patients it can be reversed with sustained weight loss of around 15kg, experts have revealed in the BMJ. Louise McCombie at the University of Glasgow and colleagues have said some patients and doctors might not realise that type 2 diabetes can be reversed. The team has called for greater awareness, documentation, and surveillance of remissions to improve health outcomes and reduce healthcare costs. Type 2 diabetes now affects about 3.2 million people in the UK. The NHS currently spends almost £1 billion a year - £22 million a day - on antidiabetes drugs, and costs are rising worldwide as diabetes rates and drug prices escalate. Emily Burns, Head of Research Communications at Diabetes UK, said: “The ability to put type 2 diabetes into remission could be transformative for millions of people around the World, and evidence is building to suggest that it's possible. “In the meantime, we need to ensure that those who do achieve remission are recognised in the right way and receive the right care. “Diabetes UK is funding crucial research to find out how to put type 2 into remission, who might benefit and whether it's effective for the long-term." Current guidelines advise reducing blood sugar levels and cardiovascular risks, primarily with drugs and general lifestyle advice. But many patients still develop complications and life expectancy remains up to six years shorter than in people without diabetes, the authors have said. The diagnosis also carries important social and financial penalties for individuals, as well as poor health prospects. In contrast, consistent evidence shows that weight loss is associated with extended life expectancy for people with diabetes. The experts said weight loss of aroun Continue reading >>

Study: Successfully Reversing Pre-diabetes With Weight-loss

Study: Successfully Reversing Pre-diabetes With Weight-loss

discovered that adults who managed to reduce their weight and their waist circumference within a year of being diagnosed with pre-diabetes were twice as likely to reverse their pre-diabetes diagnosis and thus have a lower overall diabetes risk. Dr. Danielle Bodicoat, a lecturer in epidemiology at the University of Leicester in the UK and fellow researchers examined a pre-diabetes cohort study group of participants who received yearly type 2 diabetes screening over the course of five years. The adults in the study who lost 3% of their baseline body weight within a year were much more likely to return to normal glucose tolerance than those who did not lose any weight or gained weight. Dr. Bodicoat and team looked at data from 817 adults who were diagnosed with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance at baseline (using 75 grams of oral glucose) who took part in the ADDITION-Leicester study. The average A1c of the participants was 5.9%. There were about the same number of men as women participants. Their average age was 60. Of the participants, 68% had impaired glucose tolerance, 18% had impaired fasting glucose, and 14% had both. The study participants received yearly type 2 diabetes screening for 5 years or until they became diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Dr. Bodicoat and team decided to use logistic regression models to explore changeable risk factors for regression to normal glucose tolerance at 1 year. How Big An Impact Can Weight Loss Have? After 1 year, researchers found that 54% of the participants returned to normal glucose tolerance, effectively reversing their pre-diabetes diagnosis. Of the participants, 6% ended up developing type 2 diabetes. Researchers adjusted for risk factors and reported that 18.6% of the participants who lost a mean of 3% o Continue reading >>

Will Diabetes Go Away?

Will Diabetes Go Away?

There is no cure for diabetes. Neither type 1 (juvenile onset or insulin-requiring) diabetes or type 2 (adult-onset) diabetes ever goes away. In type 1 diabetes, patients sometimes experience what physicians have come to call a "honeymoon period" shortly after the disease is diagnosed. During the "honeymoon period" diabetes may appear to go away for a period of a few months to a year. The patient's insulin needs are minimal and some patients may actually find they can maintain normal or near normal blood glucose taking little or no insulin. It would be a mistake to assume that the diabetes has gone away, however. Basically, type 1 diabetes occurs when about 90 percent of the body's insulin-producing cells have been destroyed. At the time that type 1 diabetes is diagnosed, most patients still are producing some insulin. If obvious symptoms of type 1 diabetes emerge when the patient has an illness, virus or cold, for example, once the illness subsides the body's insulin needs may decrease. At this point, the number of insulin-producing cells remaining may be enough — for the moment — to meet the person's insulin needs again. But the process that has destroyed 90 percent of the insulin-producing cells will ultimately destroy the remaining insulin-producing cells. And as that destruction continues, the amount of injected insulin the patient needs will increase — and ultimately the patient will be totally dependent on insulin injections. Scientists now think that it is important for people with newly diagnosed diabetes to continue taking some insulin by injection even during the honeymoon period. Why? Because they have some scientific evidence to suggest that doing so will help preserve the few remaining insulin-producing cells for a while longer. Patients diagnosed wi Continue reading >>

Losing Weight Can Reverse Diabetes Without Drugs

Losing Weight Can Reverse Diabetes Without Drugs

Putting a person with type 2 diabetes on an intensive weight loss programme can reverse the disease with no need for medication, according to a landmark study. The findings could revolutionise the way it is treated, researchers said, benefiting both patients and the NHS. Almost half of the participants in a weight-loss programme that used low-calorie shakes and soups were in remission after 12 months, despite some having had type 2 diabetes for six years. Almost one in ten adults in Britain has type 2 diabetes and the condition costs the NHS about £14 billion a year. Mike Lean from the University of Glasgow, lead researcher of the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (Direct), said: “Putting type 2 diabetes into remission as early as possible after… Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Very Low-Calorie Diet and 6 Months of Weight Stability in Type 2 Diabetes: Pathophysiological Changes in Responders and Nonresponders (Diabetes Care 2016;39:808815. doi: 10.2337/dc15-1942) What is the problem and what is known about it so far? Type 2 diabetes is generally thought to be an irreversible chronic condition. Studies have shown that, with worsening blood glucose control, the disease is inevitably progressive. At diagnosis, patients are told to accept having a lifelong disease. Within 10 years of diagnosis, 50% of individuals need to use insulin to control their blood glucose levels. Why did the researchers do this particular study? Diabetes may be reversible! Normal blood glucose control is possible after weight loss in some individuals. This happens most commonly after bariatric surgery, but it can also happen when eating dramatically fewer calories. This return to normal can happen when following a very-low-calorie diet, but researchers wanted to see if blood glucose could remain under control after a return to eating normally and maintaining weight loss for 6 months. The study included 30 people with type 2 diabetes. Some of the subjects had diabetes for a shorter time (short-duration diabetes, less than 4 years), and some had diabetes for a longer time (long-duration diabetes, more than 8 years). The study had three parts. First, subjects were put on a very-low-calorie liquid diet for 8 weeks after stopping all diabetes medications. Next, over two weeks, they returned to solid food. Last, the subjects spent 6 months maintaining their weight loss. Fasting blood glucose levels were measured before the diet, at the end of the diet after the return to solid food, and again after 6 months. Immediately after the 8-week very-low-calorie diet, 12 of 30 participa Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet Reversing diabetes is a term that usually refers to a significant long-term improvement in insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes that are able to get their HbA1c below 42 mmol/mol (6%) without taking diabetes medication are said to have reversed or resolved their diabetes. This also known as putting diabetes into remission. Loss of body weight can be particularly beneficial in helping to reverse the progression of diabetes. With time and dedication, type 2 diabetes can be reversed and the results can be very rewarding, with less tiredness and better all-round health. If you think you need to come off your diabetes medication, ensure you speak to your healthcare team before doing so. Understanding how diabetes progresses The most common cause of type 2 diabetes is obesity-related, which generally follows a vicious cycle pattern: Diet high in calories -particularly if high in refined carbohydrates. Insulin levels in the bloodstream rise to cope with the high- and quick-acting carb intake. Weight is gained around the belly (central or truncal obesity). Consistently high insulin levels lead to the body’s cells becoming resistant to insulin and commonly lead to weight gain. High insulin levels also increase weight gain. Insulin resistance leads to an increase in blood sugar levels, particularly after meals. The pancreas produces more insulin to cope with rising blood sugar levels. High sugar levels lead to feelings of lethargy and high insulin levels lead to increased hunger. Hunger often leads to overeating and lethargy, with less physical activity being taken. Overeating, less activity and high insulin levels all lead to further weight gain and more insulin resistance. Consistently high demand on the pancreas to produce ext Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: Study

Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: Study

A UK trial study has found that type 2 diabetes could potentially be reversed through weight loss, and with the long-term support of a medical professional. The initial findings come from an ongoing trial study called DiRECT (Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial), which aims to find an effective accessible way to put type 2 diabetes into remission long-term. Led by Professor Roy Taylor, from Newcastle University, and Professor Mike Lean, from Glasgow University, the study recruited 298 people and gave half standard diabetes care from their GP, while the other half were placed on a structured weight management program which included a low calorie, nutrient-complete diet for three to five months, food reintroduction, and long-term support to maintain weight loss. The team found that diabetes remission was closely linked with weight loss, with almost nine out of 10 people (86%) who lost 15kg or more putting their type 2 diabetes into remission. Over half (57%) of those who lost 10 to 15kg also achieved remission, along with a third (34%) of those who lost five to 10kg. In comparison, only 4% of the control group, who received standard care, achieved remission. Professor Taylor, lead researcher of the DiRECT trial, commented on the first year results saying, "These findings are very exciting. They could revolutionise the way Type 2 diabetes is treated." "The study builds on the work into the underlying cause of the condition, so that we can target management effectively. Substantial weight loss results in reduced fat inside the liver and pancreas, allowing these organs to return to normal function. What we're seeing from DiRECT is that losing weight isn't just linked to better management of Type 2 diabetes: significant weight loss could actually result in lasting remission." T Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – Study

Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – Study

Researchers in the United Kingdom (UK) yesterday recorded a breakthrough in a landmark study in which people with diabetes went into remission just by losing weight. Findings of the new study published in the ‘Lancet,’ will raise hopes for millions of world’s population that were afflicted by Type 2 diabetes, a chronic metabolic condition that was characterised by having excess sugar in the blood system. For decades, medical doctors had treated Type 2 diabetes with medications designed to keep blood sugar levels down. To this end, a Professor of Medicine and Metabolism at Newcastle University in the UK, Dr. Roy Taylor, who was involved in the study said: “People newly diagnosed with diabetes for the first time can look at this and know it isn’t necessarily for life. “It isn’t an irreversible, inexorable condition that you can never escape from – at the moment, people are told that.” From 100 million in 1994, there were now 415 million people worldwide affected by the medical condition and projections for the future put the prevalence in 2030 at 642 million, most of the increase coming from Africa and Asia. Presently, the World Health Organisation (WHO) estimated that there were about 15 million diabetics in Africa and a quarter of this number resides in Nigeria. Nearly half of people in the study, who were given a six-month diet plan and lost an average of 30 pounds, went into remission and no longer had diabetes. None of the participants in the research took any medications during that time to control their disease and relied on weight loss alone, according to a report in the ‘Time.’ Type 2 diabetes is caused by the body’s in ability to break down sugars from the diet. Normally, cells in the pancreas work to release insulin, a hormone that can p Continue reading >>

Lose 10-15 Kg Weight And Reverse Diabetes, Says Study By Uk Scientists

Lose 10-15 Kg Weight And Reverse Diabetes, Says Study By Uk Scientists

NEW DELHI: Type 2 diabetes can be reversed if you can lose weight radically, according to a study by UK scientists who managed to reverse the chronic condition in nearly half the participants who followed their weight management programme. All participants had been diagnosed with the condition within the past six years. The results published in the international journal, The Lancet, show remission of diabetes was closely related to the degree of weight loss+ . As many as 86% of participants who achieved at least 15kg of weight loss had beaten back the disease while 73% of those with weight loss of 10kg or more had the same result. Why it's a big deal: Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90-95% of all cases Doctors withdrew the anti-diabetic and antihypertensive drugs of those opting for weight loss for diabetes remission. They were put on a total diet replacement phase for three months thereafter, extendable up to five months if wished by participant. During this period, the patients were given a low energy formula diet (825 - 853 kcal/day). This was followed by structured food reintroduction of two to eight weeks and an ongoing structured programme with monthly visits for long-term weight loss maintenance. There was no increase in physical activity during total diet replacement. TOI spoke to top endocrinologists in Delhi who held the findings as pathbreaking and of far reaching consequence. "With knowledge of remarkable results from this study, we could remove 'Diabetic for life' label from many patients," said Dr Anoop Misra, chairman, Fortis C-doc hospital for diabetes. There are two predominant types of diabetes. In Type 1, the immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. In Type 2, which accounts for an estimated 90 to 95% of all cases, the body's c Continue reading >>

More Proof A Low-calorie Diet Can Effectively Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

More Proof A Low-calorie Diet Can Effectively Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

In early November, we reported how a team at Yale University had uncovered the key metabolic mechanisms responsible for lowering blood glucose concentrations in those on a very low calorie diet. Now a new study published in the prestigious medical journal The Lancet is offering more evidence to support the theory that type 2 diabetes can be effectively cured through intensive dieting and weight management. The latest study, conducted by a team led by researchers at the University of Glasgow, has successfully demonstrated that type 2 diabetes can indeed be reversed through a weight management program alone. The study found nearly half of all participants had reverted to, and maintained, a non-diabetic state without using antidiabetic medications, one year after undergoing the program. "Our findings suggest that even if you have had type 2 diabetes for six years, putting the disease into remission is feasible," says Michael Lean, who co-led the study. "In contrast to other approaches, we focus on the need for long-term maintenance of weight loss through diet and exercise and encourage flexibility to optimize individual results." The trial followed 298 adults over two years. Half the participants underwent the new weight management program, while the other half served as a control group following general best-practice diabetic treatments. The weight management program comprised of the subjects withdrawing from all anti-diabetic drugs and undergoing a total diet replacement. For three to five months each participant consumed a formula diet adding up to around 800 calories per day. The results were remarkable, with nearly half of all participants displaying full diabetes remission one year after the program. Even more interesting was the correlation between remission and deg Continue reading >>

Can You Reverse Diabetes?

Can You Reverse Diabetes?

Can you change your diabetes fate? It's key to understand that type 2 diabetes is a progressive illness often preceded by years of elevated blood glucose (also known as blood sugar) levels high enough to be diagnosed as prediabetes. When most people with type 2 diabetes are finally diagnosed, experts believe they've been on this path for five to 10 years and have lost more than half of their natural insulin-making capability in the beta cells of their pancreas. While you cannot undo your lifestyle habits of the last decade or more, you can take steps to put your diabetes in remission. Don't despair and don't give up. Research shows that losing weight and keeping it off can help delay the onset of prediabetes, delay progression of prediabetes to type 2 diabetes, or slow the progression of type 2. The keys to diabetes prevention and preventing diabetes complications include: Eat healthfully, exercise often, seek out knowledge and support, and create an environment that fosters healthful living. Losing even just a few pounds early on when glucose begins to rise can dramatically improve your blood sugar levels, cholesterol levels, triglycerides, blood pressure, and more. "People should get to their ideal weight if they have prediabetes or type 2," says Robert Huizenga, M.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles and doctor for The Biggest Loser, where he is known as Dr. H. "People should have no excess fat and be athletically fit. Ninety minutes of exercise six days a week and a steady diet of healthy eating is the best prescription to manage type 2 diabetes without medications." That's easier said than done for most people, who have to adopt a healthier lifestyle outside the bubble of the ranch where The Biggest Loser is filmed or the Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal — The Quick Start Guide

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal — The Quick Start Guide

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal — The Quick Start Guide How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes — The Quick Start Guide Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides. Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual. Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way. Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I could write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, done too) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is your quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes. A Fully Reversible Disease Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing this truth is the crucial first step in reversing your diabetes or pre-diabetes. Actually, it something that most people a Continue reading >>

You Can Potentially Reverse Type 2 Diabetes—if You Lose This Many Pounds

You Can Potentially Reverse Type 2 Diabetes—if You Lose This Many Pounds

More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Even more alarming is the fact that many don’t even realize they have the deadly condition—and those are just two of the many surprising facts about type 2 diabetes. Despite the staggering numbers, there is a way out: Not only do exercise and a good diet help, researchers now know exactly how much weight type 2 diabetics need to lose to resolve many or all of their symptoms. In research from Scotland that was just published in BMJ, investigators tracked patients with type 2 diabetes for almost 10 years, and found that those who had followed a restricted-calorie diet and lost at least 33 pounds no longer had diabetes. These findings built on a series of clinical trials begun in 2011, in which people who had recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were able to maintain a normal blood sugar level while staying on a calorie-restrictive diet, Time magazine reports. One of the study’s authors, Mike Lean, professor of human nutrition at the University of Glasgow in Scotland explained to Time that type 2 sufferers need to act within the first five years of their diagnosis to see the most effective results. “Type 2 diabetes is a disease best avoided by avoiding the weight gain that drives it,” he said. “For people who do develop it, evidence-based weight-loss programs could help them achieve lasting remission. Not all can do it, but they should all be given the chance with good support. Taking tablets or injections for life to reduce blood sugar is a poor second-rate treatment.” Many people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes aren’t aware the cure is in their hands, Lean explained. Doctors must also take the lead, he says, so that patients under Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes With Zero Weight Loss

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes With Zero Weight Loss

Since the 1970’s when the Atkins diet first gained popularity, carbohydrates have been thrown under the bus and blamed for a host of metabolic disorders including diabetes, obesity, heart disease, cancer and insulin resistance. This anti-carbohydrate literature will lead you to believe that carbohydrates cause total-body inflammation, setting the stage for a host of complex metabolic disorders that can only be solved by eliminating carbohydrates from your diet. In this article you will learn exactly how to reverse type 2 diabetes in a matter of weeks following a highly "unconventional" approach. It’s easy to believe these claims, because they are always backed up by scientific research and communicated using fancy words that are very convincing. Because of this, low carbohydrate diets have taken the world by storm, resulting in millions of people who actively avoid eating any form of carbohydrate, whether from refined sources like bread, cereal, pasta, rice and artificial sweeteners, or from whole sources like fruits and starchy vegetables. As a society, we have come to fear carbohydrates. The words “low carb” and “no carb” are printed on labels, boxes and packages, feeding the anti-carbohydrate frenzy and strengthening the stance against this alleged dietary criminal. Visit your nearby bookstore and you’ll find entire books written on the subject of carbohydrates, with authors making wild claims that “there is no biological need for carbohydrates in your diet,” arguing that our Paleolithic ancestors subsisted for thousands of years on diets low in carbohydrate energy or completely devoid of carbohydrate altogether. Is any of this true? Are carbohydrates the cause of our generation’s ailing health? Is it possible to reverse type 2 diabetes eating car Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Reversed With Weight Loss: Super Low-calorie Diet May Cure The Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Reversed With Weight Loss: Super Low-calorie Diet May Cure The Disease

Update | Hundreds of people went on an extreme diet with the hopes of curing their Type 2 diabetes. For some of them, it worked. A study published in The Lancet on Tuesday chronicles a remarkable change in the health of its participants. One of the findings—that a calorie-restricted diet leads to weight loss—is hardly groundbreaking. But the effect that losing weight had on diabetes was dramatic. For nearly half of the people on the diet (86 percent of the 36 people lost more than 30 pounds), their diabetes appeared to be gone a year later. The technical term the authors used was “remission.” That term indicates that the levels of red blood cells connected to sugar molecules had fallen below a certain limit even without medication. That limit, often used as a shorthand to diagnose diabetes, is known as HbA1c. It's an indicator of average long-term blood sugar levels and may also be related to the risk of developing complications from diabetes. "'Cure' implies absolute and lasting absence of disease—such as curing tuberculosis. Remission recognises that the person is still susceptible to diabetes and emphasises that continued attention to weight control is vital," said Dr. Roy Taylor, a researcher at Newcastle University and one of the authors of the paper. If the people in this study regain the weight, "then it is certain that the diabetes will come back." Dr. Sona Shah, an endocrinologist at NYU Langone Health, said that doctors knew that if a person lost between 5 to 10 percent of their weight, it could help improve their HbA1c levels. “I’ve seen that many times in many of my patients.” “It gives more evidence and credibility to what we’ve been doing,” she said. "If we can get them controlled by lifestyle alone, I think that’s a huge goal for m Continue reading >>

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