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Can Diabetes Be Reversed With Weight Loss

‘reversal’ Or Remission Of Type 2 Diabetes

‘reversal’ Or Remission Of Type 2 Diabetes

Research into diet and stopping the symptoms of type 2 diabetes are still in their infancy, but there are some interesting developments, writes Clair Naughton. ‘Reversing’ type 2 diabetes is something that is discussed regularly in magazines and on television with stories of people being ‘cured’ of diabetes. On closer inspection, all these stories have a common thread; the people who have reversed their diabetes have done so by losing large amounts of body weight, often the equivalent of 10-15% of their total body weight. It is generally accepted as true that with massive weight loss, a person can potentially reduce the demands on their body so much that they now acquire sufficient working insulin to control their glucose levels. Visceral fat and type 2 diabetes When fat stores build up in the liver the fat eventually extends over into the pancreas (the organ in the body that makes insulin). The build up of fat in the pancreas over time prevents the pancreas releasing insulin after meals, thereby causing high blood glucose levels and type 2 diabetes. Professor Roy Taylor of Newcastle University in England has been carrying out research in the area of reversing type 2 diabetes for the past few years. He suggests that too much fat in the liver, the pancreas and around the abdomen preventing normal insulin release and normal insulin action are defects that can be reversed by substantial weight loss. Professor Taylor’s research focused on radical weight loss by means of a very low calorie diet (<800 calories) in a bid to reverse type 2 diabetes. The idea being that when the body isn’t taking in enough calories in food, fat that is stored in the wrong part of the body (in the pancreas and liver) is used up first for energy. Removal of fat from the pancreas can po Continue reading >>

How Diet Shakes And Dropping Sodas Reversed Diabetes

How Diet Shakes And Dropping Sodas Reversed Diabetes

Eric Smith comes from the part of Ohio where fizzy soft drinks are called “pop.” He also called them his beverage of choice — for lunch, dinner and snacks. So when he was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in November 2016, Smith knew he was going to have to cut down. In fact, he cut out all sugary soft drinks and switched to water. He stopped eating fast food, white bread and other junk and, in the space of a few months, he turned around his diabetes and has normal blood sugar now. On Tuesday, a large study confirmed what Smith and other people like him have found — a strict weight-loss diet can reverse the progression of Type 2 diabetes and bring many people back to normal. “I was drinking maybe six cans of pop a day if you averaged it out,” said Smith, a 40-year-old bookkeeper. “Every meal I would have one, maybe two with lunch, two with dinner. If it wasn’t pop it was a sugary drink somewhere.” And Smith was, like so many Americans, obese. “I was up to 390,” he said. He joined the Cleveland Clinic's Lifestyle Essentials program, which includes a series of six appointments to help people learn how to improve their habits. By changing his diet and adding in just a little exercise, he’s dropped weight and controlled his blood sugar. “I am down to 345, 350 right now,” Smith said, and his blood sugar is in the normal, healthy range. It’s more evidence that weight loss alone can control diabetes, which kills more than 70,000 Americans every year. Other studies have shown that weight-loss surgery can help reverse diabetes. But that’s an extreme option. The study released Tuesday showed people can do it with diet. “If this study shows that a low-calorie diet is an effective and practical way to put Type 2 diabetes into remission, now and in the Continue reading >>

There's Actually A Way To Reverse Diabetes—here's How You Can Do It

There's Actually A Way To Reverse Diabetes—here's How You Can Do It

Can you actually cure type 2 diabetes? Talk to just about any credible source, and it’s typically called a chronic condition—but that may not always be the case, according to a new analysis published in The BMJ. After reviewing remission criteria, blood sugar guidelines, and recent clinical trials, the authors of the paper found that maintaining a weight loss of 33 pounds can actually reverse diabetes for specific patients. Past research has led to promising findings. For instance, one Newcastle University study found that limiting diabetic patients to 700 calories a day for two months led to an average 31-pound weight loss. As a result, nearly half of the people studied experienced a significant drop in their blood sugar levels, taking many patients to pre-diabetic levels instead. When the researchers followed up with those people after 6 months of maintaining their weight loss, they were still diabetes-free. If you’re diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, your doctor will generally prescribe medication and offer general advice about improving your diet and exercise—but the key to this study, and others like it, is weight loss. (If you want to shed pounds right now, check out Metashred Extreme from Men's Health, a series of high-intensity workouts designed to help you burn fat. Or, check out the video below.) 13 Exercises That Are Better Than Burpees For Fat Loss: This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. End of dialog window. That’s because too much fat buildup in your pancreas tampers with the organ’s ability to produce insulin, which helps control your blood sugar. When you lose weight, you first lose fat in your organs, Roy Taylor, M.D., author of the Newcastle University study and the recent analysis explain Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Really Can Reverse Diabetes, New Study Finds

Weight Loss Really Can Reverse Diabetes, New Study Finds

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects 422 million people worldwide. For decades, doctors have treated it with medications designed to keep blood sugar levels down. But in a paper published in the Lancet, researchers in the UK describe a landmark study in which people with diabetes went into remission—just by losing weight. Nearly half of people in the study who were given a six-month diet plan and lost an average of 30 pounds went into remission and no longer had diabetes. None took any medications during that time to control their disease and relied on weight loss alone. TIME Health Newsletter Get the latest health and science news, plus: burning questions and expert tips. View Sample Sign Up Now Type 2 diabetes is caused by the body’s in ability to break down sugars from the diet. Normally, cells in the pancreas work to release insulin, a hormone that can process sugar and either send it to cells that need it for energy or store it as fat for future energy needs. Cells in the liver are responsible for clearing insulin from the circulation. But excess fat in the pancreas and liver can start to shut down these insulin-producing cells, leading to spikes in blood sugar levels. Diabetes medications can bring sugar levels down but do not address the compromised insulin machinery. In the study, Dr. Roy Taylor, professor of medicine and metabolism at Newcastle University, and his colleagues randomly assigned nearly 300 people to either a weight management program or their usual treatments, including diabetes medications. All of the people had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the six years preceding the study. The people assigned to the diet group stopped any diabetes drugs they were taking on the same day they b Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal — The Quick Start Guide

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal — The Quick Start Guide

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal — The Quick Start Guide How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes — The Quick Start Guide Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides. Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual. Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way. Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I could write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, done too) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is your quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes. A Fully Reversible Disease Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing this truth is the crucial first step in reversing your diabetes or pre-diabetes. Actually, it something that most people a Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: Study

Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: Study

Losing weight — without exercise — and maintaining a healthy diet can cause Type 2 diabetes to go into remission and allow patients to stop taking medications, according to a study that challenges the long-held medical belief that the acquired disease is a lifelong illness. Published Wednesday in the medical journal Lancet, the study shows that patients who committed to a strict diet and then managed their new weight were able to stay off medication to manage their diabetes. “Especially in the United States, there’s a widespread belief that diabetes can only be managed by drugs,” Roy Taylor, one of the study’s co-authors, told the Washington Times. “We’ve got quite an uphill battle of getting a buy-in from [doctors] that this is possible, but I think the results of the Lancet trial should overcome that.” According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 30 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, with up to 95 percent of them suffering from the Type 2 form of the disease. Diabetes occurs when the body can’t produce enough insulin to manage glucose levels. Nearly 80,000 people died from diabetes-related complications in the U.S. this year. A Type 2 diabetes diagnosis usually occurs in adults over the age of 45 who are overweight and inactive, but numbers are rising among young people and even children, a result of the ongoing obesity epidemic in the U.S. Recommended treatment options include healthy eating and exercise, medication and in some cases insulin replacement. For the study, participants were between 20 and 65 years old, overweight or extremely obese, diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in the past six years and on anti-diabetes and antihypertensive medications but not insulin replacement. The intervention group received a strict Continue reading >>

Reversing Diabetes Through Weight Loss: How Much Should You Lose?

Reversing Diabetes Through Weight Loss: How Much Should You Lose?

Your doctor probably preaches healthy eating habits and exercise to manage type 2 diabetes, and while both of those things work to help keep your blood sugar in check, they can also help you lose weight. And weight loss may be the key to reversing type 2 diabetes, according to an analysis published in September 2017 in the journal BMJ. The authors noted that losing 33 pounds (lbs) often helps put diabetes into remission. Yes, that sounds pretty specific, but it makes more sense if you consider that the data is based off of losing 15 kilograms, which equals 33 lbs. It's a bold statement, considering many people think type 2 diabetes is a chronic, lifelong condition. The specific figure is taken from previous research: A study published in May 2016 in the journal Diabetes Care found that 40 percent of people who lost about 33 lbs and kept it off for six months through a low-calorie diet were able to send the diabetes into remission. In that study, the authors concluded that type 2 diabetes “is a potentially reversible condition.” That said, it doesn’t mean that you should aim to lose 33 lbs specifically. “Further work on this is ongoing, regarding the actual weight loss needed,” says study coauthor Louise McCombie, RD, research associate at the University of Glasgow in Scotland. Indeed, this is part of a larger body of research that will be presented at the International Diabetes Federation in December 2017. And while 40 percent of people sending diabetes into remission is an impressive figure, it also suggests that this is possible for some people but not everyone. The Connection Between Diabetes and Weight Loss It’s well established that losing weight if you have prediabetes can prevent the condition from developing into full-blown diabetes. According to the Continue reading >>

How To Reverse A Diabetes Diagnosis By Losing Weight

How To Reverse A Diabetes Diagnosis By Losing Weight

Here's something shocking to think about: 40 percent of Americans are obese — and that number is the highest it's ever been. And here's another jaw-dropping statistic: 29 million Americans have type 2 diabetes. If you fall into either of these categories, the good news is there are simple steps you can take to make lasting changes. For example, you only need to lose 5 percent of your body weight to seriously start reducing your risk for type 2 diabetes. And you only need to lose 1 gram of fat from your pancreas (where your insulin lives) to reverse the symptoms of diabetes, according to one small study. The connection between a small amount of weight loss with a large health benefit is not new. A 2012 study found reducing body mass index (BMI) by just five units could help reverse diabetes, regardless of your initial BMI. Diabetes can be a confusing topic — here are a few things you should know. There are two very different types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes involves the absence of insulin, a critical hormone needed to help control blood sugar levels. It has often been referred to as juvenile diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes. Type 1 diabetes represents a very small percentage of total diabetes cases and has nothing to do with being overweight or obese. The other form is called type 2 diabetes (often referred to as adult onset or noninsulin dependent). Type 2 diabetes makes up 95 percent of all diabetes cases and it’s highly correlated to weight. Individuals with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but the hormone is not sensitive enough to the rise and fall of blood sugar levels. This form of the disease may start as insulin resistance or prediabetes. Both types of diabetes are serious and can lead to several adverse health outcomes, like nerve damage, impaired Continue reading >>

Study: Successfully Reversing Pre-diabetes With Weight-loss

Study: Successfully Reversing Pre-diabetes With Weight-loss

discovered that adults who managed to reduce their weight and their waist circumference within a year of being diagnosed with pre-diabetes were twice as likely to reverse their pre-diabetes diagnosis and thus have a lower overall diabetes risk. Dr. Danielle Bodicoat, a lecturer in epidemiology at the University of Leicester in the UK and fellow researchers examined a pre-diabetes cohort study group of participants who received yearly type 2 diabetes screening over the course of five years. The adults in the study who lost 3% of their baseline body weight within a year were much more likely to return to normal glucose tolerance than those who did not lose any weight or gained weight. Dr. Bodicoat and team looked at data from 817 adults who were diagnosed with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance at baseline (using 75 grams of oral glucose) who took part in the ADDITION-Leicester study. The average A1c of the participants was 5.9%. There were about the same number of men as women participants. Their average age was 60. Of the participants, 68% had impaired glucose tolerance, 18% had impaired fasting glucose, and 14% had both. The study participants received yearly type 2 diabetes screening for 5 years or until they became diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Dr. Bodicoat and team decided to use logistic regression models to explore changeable risk factors for regression to normal glucose tolerance at 1 year. How Big An Impact Can Weight Loss Have? After 1 year, researchers found that 54% of the participants returned to normal glucose tolerance, effectively reversing their pre-diabetes diagnosis. Of the participants, 6% ended up developing type 2 diabetes. Researchers adjusted for risk factors and reported that 18.6% of the participants who lost a mean of 3% o Continue reading >>

You Can Potentially Reverse Type 2 Diabetes—if You Lose This Many Pounds

You Can Potentially Reverse Type 2 Diabetes—if You Lose This Many Pounds

More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Even more alarming is the fact that many don’t even realize they have the deadly condition—and those are just two of the many surprising facts about type 2 diabetes. Despite the staggering numbers, there is a way out: Not only do exercise and a good diet help, researchers now know exactly how much weight type 2 diabetics need to lose to resolve many or all of their symptoms. In research from Scotland that was just published in BMJ, investigators tracked patients with type 2 diabetes for almost 10 years, and found that those who had followed a restricted-calorie diet and lost at least 33 pounds no longer had diabetes. These findings built on a series of clinical trials begun in 2011, in which people who had recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were able to maintain a normal blood sugar level while staying on a calorie-restrictive diet, Time magazine reports. One of the study’s authors, Mike Lean, professor of human nutrition at the University of Glasgow in Scotland explained to Time that type 2 sufferers need to act within the first five years of their diagnosis to see the most effective results. “Type 2 diabetes is a disease best avoided by avoiding the weight gain that drives it,” he said. “For people who do develop it, evidence-based weight-loss programs could help them achieve lasting remission. Not all can do it, but they should all be given the chance with good support. Taking tablets or injections for life to reduce blood sugar is a poor second-rate treatment.” Many people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes aren’t aware the cure is in their hands, Lean explained. Doctors must also take the lead, he says, so that patients under Continue reading >>

Can You Reverse Diabetes?

Can You Reverse Diabetes?

Can you change your diabetes fate? It's key to understand that type 2 diabetes is a progressive illness often preceded by years of elevated blood glucose (also known as blood sugar) levels high enough to be diagnosed as prediabetes. When most people with type 2 diabetes are finally diagnosed, experts believe they've been on this path for five to 10 years and have lost more than half of their natural insulin-making capability in the beta cells of their pancreas. While you cannot undo your lifestyle habits of the last decade or more, you can take steps to put your diabetes in remission. Don't despair and don't give up. Research shows that losing weight and keeping it off can help delay the onset of prediabetes, delay progression of prediabetes to type 2 diabetes, or slow the progression of type 2. The keys to diabetes prevention and preventing diabetes complications include: Eat healthfully, exercise often, seek out knowledge and support, and create an environment that fosters healthful living. Losing even just a few pounds early on when glucose begins to rise can dramatically improve your blood sugar levels, cholesterol levels, triglycerides, blood pressure, and more. "People should get to their ideal weight if they have prediabetes or type 2," says Robert Huizenga, M.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles and doctor for The Biggest Loser, where he is known as Dr. H. "People should have no excess fat and be athletically fit. Ninety minutes of exercise six days a week and a steady diet of healthy eating is the best prescription to manage type 2 diabetes without medications." That's easier said than done for most people, who have to adopt a healthier lifestyle outside the bubble of the ranch where The Biggest Loser is filmed or the Continue reading >>

Lose 10-15 Kg Weight And Reverse Diabetes, Says Study By Uk Scientists

Lose 10-15 Kg Weight And Reverse Diabetes, Says Study By Uk Scientists

NEW DELHI: Type 2 diabetes can be reversed if you can lose weight radically, according to a study by UK scientists who managed to reverse the chronic condition in nearly half the participants who followed their weight management programme. All participants had been diagnosed with the condition within the past six years. The results published in the international journal, The Lancet, show remission of diabetes was closely related to the degree of weight loss+ . As many as 86% of participants who achieved at least 15kg of weight loss had beaten back the disease while 73% of those with weight loss of 10kg or more had the same result. Why it's a big deal: Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90-95% of all cases Doctors withdrew the anti-diabetic and antihypertensive drugs of those opting for weight loss for diabetes remission. They were put on a total diet replacement phase for three months thereafter, extendable up to five months if wished by participant. During this period, the patients were given a low energy formula diet (825 - 853 kcal/day). This was followed by structured food reintroduction of two to eight weeks and an ongoing structured programme with monthly visits for long-term weight loss maintenance. There was no increase in physical activity during total diet replacement. TOI spoke to top endocrinologists in Delhi who held the findings as pathbreaking and of far reaching consequence. "With knowledge of remarkable results from this study, we could remove 'Diabetic for life' label from many patients," said Dr Anoop Misra, chairman, Fortis C-doc hospital for diabetes. There are two predominant types of diabetes. In Type 1, the immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. In Type 2, which accounts for an estimated 90 to 95% of all cases, the body's c Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: Study

Weight Loss Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes: Study

A UK trial study has found that type 2 diabetes could potentially be reversed through weight loss, and with the long-term support of a medical professional. The initial findings come from an ongoing trial study called DiRECT (Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial), which aims to find an effective accessible way to put type 2 diabetes into remission long-term. Led by Professor Roy Taylor, from Newcastle University, and Professor Mike Lean, from Glasgow University, the study recruited 298 people and gave half standard diabetes care from their GP, while the other half were placed on a structured weight management program which included a low calorie, nutrient-complete diet for three to five months, food reintroduction, and long-term support to maintain weight loss. The team found that diabetes remission was closely linked with weight loss, with almost nine out of 10 people (86%) who lost 15kg or more putting their type 2 diabetes into remission. Over half (57%) of those who lost 10 to 15kg also achieved remission, along with a third (34%) of those who lost five to 10kg. In comparison, only 4% of the control group, who received standard care, achieved remission. Professor Taylor, lead researcher of the DiRECT trial, commented on the first year results saying, "These findings are very exciting. They could revolutionise the way Type 2 diabetes is treated." "The study builds on the work into the underlying cause of the condition, so that we can target management effectively. Substantial weight loss results in reduced fat inside the liver and pancreas, allowing these organs to return to normal function. What we're seeing from DiRECT is that losing weight isn't just linked to better management of Type 2 diabetes: significant weight loss could actually result in lasting remission." T Continue reading >>

Gp Based Weight Loss Programme Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Gp Based Weight Loss Programme Can Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Nearly half the people with type 2 diabetes who lost weight as part of a trial in primary care did not have the disease a year later, prompting calls for widespread use of weight management programmes as a routine part of care. Previous research by the current study team from Glasgow and Newcastle confirmed the “twin cycle hypothesis”—that type 2 diabetes is caused by excess fat within the liver and pancreas—and established that the disease can go into remission by consuming a very low calorie diet. But it has not been known whether this type of intensive weight management works in routine primary care. The Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT), … Continue reading >>

Weight Can In Fact Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, Study Shows

Weight Can In Fact Reverse Type 2 Diabetes, Study Shows

Mario Anzuoni—Reuters A new study discovered that weight loss really can cure diabetes. In a paper published in the Lancet, researchers in the United Kingdom discovered that patients with Type 2 diabetes went into remission when they lost weight, Time reports. Half of the patients in the study went on a 6-month diet plan, while the other half did not. Those that dieted and lost an average of 30 pounds saw their diabetes start to disappear. None of the patients took any daibetes medication for the disease during the study and instead focused exclusively on the effects of weight loss on the chronic condition. The diet involved three to five months of a liquid diet averaging no more than 850 calories a day, followed by two to eight weeks of reintroducing food. Patients were also given nutritional education and cognitive behavioral therapy. Researchers hope to point out with the study that diabetes doesn’t have to be a life-long sentence, and instead is something that can be fought with hard work. However, the weight loss treatment is only effective if done during the first few years of the onset of Type 2 diabetes. Patients who have been living with the disease for 10 years or more have also suffered a loss of some cells which make the weight loss method alone ineffective. Continue reading >>

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