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Can Diabetes Be Reversed In Children?

Children And Diabetes

Children And Diabetes

Tweet Throughout the world, incidences of diabetes are on the rise, and consequently so is diabetes amongst children. Most children are affected by type 1 diabetes in childhood. However, the number of children and young adults affected by type 2 diabetes is beginning to rise, particularly in America. Approximately 90% of young people with diabetes suffer from type 1 and the number of patients who are children varies from place to place. A figure of 17 per 100,000 children developing diabetes each year has been reported. As metabolic syndrome, obesity and bad diets spread, so too have the first incidences of type 2 diabetes, previously incredibly rare. Further relevant pages Diabetes & pregnancy Juvenile diabetes Keeping your kids free from diabetes Teenage diabetes and blood glucose testing How is diabetes caused in children? The actual causes of the diabetic condition are little understood, in both children and adults. It is widely speculated that diabetes occurred when inherited genetic characteristics are triggered by environmental factors such as diet or exercise. Many type 1 diabetic children do not have diabetes in their families however, so the exact cause remains a mystery. Type 2 diabetes amongst children is usually caused by an extremely bad diet from a very young age, coupled with a sedentary lifestyle without exercise. What symptoms do children with diabetes exhibit? Like adults, a number of symptoms may give early warning that diabetes has developed. One or more of the following symptoms may be associated with diabetes: Thirst Tiredness Weight loss Frequent urination Amongst children, specific symptoms may include stomach aches, headaches and behavioural problems. Recurrent tummy pains and an unexplainable history of illness should be treated as possible he Continue reading >>

When A Child Has Type 2 Diabetes

When A Child Has Type 2 Diabetes

Healthy eating and regular exercise can prevent or slow the onset of type 2 diabetes in children. A child with diabetes has trouble regulating blood glucose, or blood sugar. There are two major kinds of the disease: type 1 and type 2. If a child has type 2 diabetes (T2D), the body doesn't produce enough insulin -- the hormone that turns food into energy -- or the cells ignore insulin altogether. With type 1 diabetes, or T1D, the pancreas simply stops producing insulin. T2D is by far the most common form, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Of the nearly 26 million Americans who have diabetes, between 90 and 95 percent of them have T2D. And in that group, 215,000 of them have diabetes (type 1 or type 2) and are under the age of 20, says the American Diabetes Association. Between 2002 and 2005, 3,600 youth were diagnosed with T2D each year. More than 90 percent of kids with T2D have a family history of the disease, says Parents advisor Lori Laffel, M.D., M.P.H., chief of the Pediatric, Adolescent and Young Adult Section at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. "Previously this was a disease of adults in their 40s, 50s, and 60s. Now we see kids getting type 2 diabetes at around the time of puberty," says Dr. Laffel. This is in large part due to the rise in childhood obesity. But there is good news. In many cases of pre-diabetes, which is when a child shows some but not all of its symptoms, you can delay reliance on injected insulin by making sure your child is active and has a healthy diet. And if it's caught early enough, you can reverse the disease entirely. SPONSORED LOCAL OFFER Signs While the signs of T1D are clear and can be severe (weight loss, sickness, vomiting), those for T2D are more subtle. Look for: excessive drinking and urination extreme fa Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What's True And False?

Diabetes: What's True And False?

en espaolLa diabetes: Qu es cierto y qu es falso? There's a lot of info and advice out there about diabetes, but some of it is wrong or bad. And following advice that's wrong could make people with diabetes really sick. Ask your doctor or a member of your diabetes health care team if you ever come across information that doesn't seem quite right or sounds too good to be true. Here's some stuff you might hear about diabetes and the facts about what's true and what's not. True or False: Eating Too Much Sugar Causes Diabetes False: When kids get type 1 diabetes , it's because their bodies can't make insulin anymore. The insulin-making cells in the pancreas (say: PAN-kree-us) get destroyed, and it doesn't have anything to do with eating sugar. This isn't true for type 2 diabetes either, but there is a connection between type 2 diabetes and being overweight. With type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can still make insulin (say: IN-suh-lin), but the insulin doesn't work like it should. Eating too much sugar (or foods with sugar, like candy or regular soda) can cause weight gain, and if someone becomes overweight , it can lead to type 2 diabetes. True or False: Kids With Diabetes Can Never Eat Sweets False: Kids with diabetes can eat some sweets as part of a balanced, healthy diet. Like everyone else, a person with diabetes shouldn't eat too many sweets because they are high in calories and they don't have many vitamins and minerals. True or False: Kids With Diabetes Can Exercise True:Exercise has many benefits. It can help you get to a healthy weight, it's good for your heart and lungs, it can improve your mood, and it's great for your diabetes. Your diabetes health care team can help you and your parents come up with an exercise plan that's good for you. True or False: You Can't C Continue reading >>

Reversing Diabetes Is Possible

Reversing Diabetes Is Possible

Bethesda, Maryland (CNN) -- When Jonathan Legg of Bethesda, Maryland, got a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes at 39, he was shocked. "I had always been pretty active," said Legg. "But it was a big wake-up call, that what I was doing and my current weight were not OK." That was two years ago. Since that time, the Morgan Stanley executive decided to make some changes and reverse his diabetes. Although his doctor recommended he go on medication to control his illness, Legg took a different approach. Instead of meds, he began to exercise every day and changed his diet, cutting out alcohol, fatty foods and watching his carbs. Do you have diabetes? How well are you managing it? "I wanted to be able to know the changes I was making were making a difference, and it wasn't the drug," said Legg. According to new statistics just out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 25.8 million people, or 8.3% of the U.S. population, are affected by either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Most, like Legg, have type 2 diabetes, which in many people develops later in life. Caused primarily by genetic makeup, a sedentary lifestyle and poor eating habits, type 2 diabetes can be reversed in some cases. By making changes to their lives such as adding exercise and improving their diets, many type 2 diabetics can drop their glucose or sugar numbers back to the normal range, reversing their condition. "We have seen numerous people reverse their condition," says Dr. Michelle Magee, director of the MedStar Diabetes Institute in Washington. "But it takes a real dedication for the rest of their lives," she notes. So why do exercise and diet help reverse diabetes? To answer that question, we first need to know why people get diabetes in the first place. Diabetes is caused when there is too much glucose Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious, long-term medical condition. It develops mostly in adults but is becoming more common in children as obesity rates rise across all age groups. Several factors contribute to type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor. Type 2 diabetes can be life-threatening. But if treated carefully, it can be managed or even reversed. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. When your blood sugar (glucose) levels rise, the pancreas releases insulin. This causes sugar to move from your blood to your cells, where it can be used as an energy source. As glucose levels in your blood go back down, your pancreas stops releasing insulin. Type 2 diabetes impacts how you metabolize sugar. Either your pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or your body has become resistant to its effects. This causes glucose to build up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia. There are several symptoms of untreated type 2 diabetes, including: excessive thirst and urination fatigue increased hunger weight loss, in spite of eating more infections that heal slowly blurry vision dark patches on the skin Treatment for type 2 diabetes includes monitoring your blood sugar levels and using medications or insulin when needed. Doctors also recommend losing weight through diet and exercise. Some diabetes medications have weight loss as a side effect, which can also help reverse diabetes. If you start eating healthier, get more exercise, and lose weight, you can reduce your symptoms. Research shows that these lifestyle changes, especially physical activity, can even reverse the course of the condition. Studies that show the reversal of type 2 diabetes include participants who have lived with the condition for only a few years. Weight loss is the primary fact Continue reading >>

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for 25 years now. The relentlessness of type 1, and the fact that I will probably live with this non-preventable condition for the rest of my life never goes away, but I have almost made peace with it. A few days ago, I saw something that gave me pause. “British man with type 1 diabetes to receive tests after coming off insulin,” read Diabetes.co.uk’s headline. The article goes onto say that, “Daniel Darkes, from Daventy in Northamptonshire, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes seven years ago. But his recent tests have baffled doctors as his pancreas has shown signs of working properly again.” My first thoughts upon reading this were, “this can’t be true,” and “what’s the real explanation here?” There are many types of diabetes including type 2, LADA, and monogenic. Maybe he actually had one of those types instead of type 1. Usually, tests can determine this quickly though, so why was it not the case with Dan? I live in the UK and I wanted to get to the bottom of things. I managed to get in touch with ‘Miracle Dan’, as he’s been called by his friends. Although he is saving the specific details of his recent test results from the U.S. for an upcoming exclusive interview with another media outlet, he spoke to me and answered some of my questions about everything that has been happening. Please tell us a bit about yourself and your diabetes. When were you diagnosed? I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes back in February 2011 at the age of 23, after just leaving the army. I started a new engineering job and within two weeks of starting, I noticed the traditional symptoms of type 1 diabetes: thirst, weight loss, blurry vision, and a lot of vomiting. I collapsed and was taken by ambulance to hospital where I wa Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed In Just Four Months, Trial Shows

Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Reversed In Just Four Months, Trial Shows

Type 2 diabetes can be reversed in just four months, trial shows Lifestyle changes coupled with drugs reversed diabetes in 40 per cent of patients in just four monthsCredit:Alamy Type 2 diabetes can be reversed in just four months by cutting calories, exercising and keeping glucose under control, a trial has shown. Although the condition is considered to be chronic, requiring a lifetime of medication , Canadian researchers proved it was possible to restore insulin production for 40 per cent of patients. The treatment plan involved creating a personalised exercise regime for each trial participant and reducing their calories by between 500 and 750 a day. The participants also met regularly with a nurse and dietician to track progress and continued to take medication and insulin to manage their blood sugar levels. After just four months, 40 per cent of patients were able to stop taking their medication because their bodies had begun to produce adequate amounts of insulin again. Encouraging exercise and cutting calories allowed the pancreas to rest, scientists believeCredit:Getty The researchers at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, said the programme worked because it gavethe insulin-producing pancreas a rest. "The research might shift the paradigm of treating diabetes from simply controlling glucose to an approach where we induce remission and then monitor patients for any signs of relapse," said the study's first author, Dr Natalia McInnes, of McMaster. "The idea of reversing the disease is very appealing to individuals with diabetes. It motivates them to make significant lifestyle changes. This likely gives the pancreas a rest and decreases fat stores in the body, which in turn improves insulin production and effectiveness." The number of people in the UK with ty Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 1 Diabetes: New Research From Boston Children’s Hospital

Reversing Type 1 Diabetes: New Research From Boston Children’s Hospital

Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital recently published the results of research that could ultimately lead to a cure for Type 1 diabetes. The strategy behind the study is based on the knowledge that Type 1 diabetes occurs when T-cells from the immune system attack beta cells in the pancreas — the cells that produce insulin. Previously, one method researchers have used in an attempt to neutralize this attack is to reboot a patient’s own immune system by infusing that patient with his or her own blood stem cells through what’s known as an autologous bone marrow transplant. The problem has been that the blood stem cells of people with diabetes tend to be defective, which can promote inflammation. Researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital, however, said they found a way to fix the defect in the patient’s blood stem cells. They do this by treating the blood stem cells with small molecules or with gene therapy. The treatment stimulates the cells to produce more of a protein called PD-L1, which has a strong anti-inflammatory effect. Then, when they’re introduced into the pancreas, the treated cells bind to receptors on the T-cells. The T-cells either die or become inactive. According to Paolo Fiorina, MD, senior investigator on the study, “There’s really a reshaping of the immune system when you inject these cells.” Researchers tested the procedure on mice and reported they reversed Type 1 diabetes in the animals. All mice were cured of diabetes temporarily, and one-third of them were cured for the rest of their lives. The next step, of course, is to try the treatment on people with diabetes. Accordingly, Boston Children’s researchers are partnering with a California therapeutics firm to refine the procedure for modifying the blood stem cells and the Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 Can Be Reversed In Children

Diabetes Type 2 Can Be Reversed In Children

Diabetes Type 2 Can Be Reversed in Children Children diabetics with Type 2 diabetes can beat the disease. Children with Type 2 diabetes are able to return to a normal lifestyle through changes in lifestyle changes and medication, an endocrinologist said in a published report on Monday. KK Women's and Children's Hospital (KKH) in Singapore has seen a reversal in 12% of children with Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin to deal with blood sugar, or when the insulin produced does not do its work properly. Among children with impaired glucose tolerance, also called pre-diabetes, the reversal can be as high as a third to half the number, Dr. Warren Lee, head of endocrinology at KKH, told The Straits Times.Such reversals can also happen to adults with Type 2, but only if the diabetes has not reached the stage when the body stops producing insulin altogether, he said. Lee will be sharing this information with more than 2,000 delegates at the International Diabetes Federation Western Pacific Region Congress being held in Bangkok. Four in five of the diabetic children were obese, said Dr. Fabian Yap, a paediatric endocrinologist from KKH. When they lost weight, their cells became more efficient at dealing with their blood sugar. Exercise can itself make a big difference. Exercise makes a critical difference. It reduces unspent calories and it uses muscles where insulin receptors are found and it keeps sugar levels down better. Such children are still at a high risk of becoming diabetic again, the experts said. They need to work at keeping their bodies free of the disease. For some, this means continuing to take medication. While the KKH figures are for the young, Lee said the reversal is theoretically similar for adults. Continue reading >>

Can You Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

It sounds too good to be true: reversing type 2 diabetes through exercise and healthy eating. While certain lifestyle changes are key to managing diabetes, whether you can actually turn back time so that it's like you never had diabetes is a different matter. That depends on how long you've had the condition, how severe it is, and your genes. "The term 'reversal' is used when people can go off medication but still must engage in a lifestyle program in order to stay off," says Ann Albright, PhD, RD. She's the director of diabetes translation at the CDC. Shedding extra pounds and keeping them off can help you better control your blood sugar. For some people, reaching a healthier weight will mean taking fewer medications, or in rarer cases, no longer needing those medications at all. Losing 5% to 10% of your body weight and building up to 150 minutes of exercise a week may help you to slow or stop the progress of type 2 diabetes. "If you sit [inactive] most of the day, 5 or 10 minutes is going to be great," Albright says. "Walk to your mailbox. Do something that gets you moving, knowing that you're looking to move towards 30 minutes most days of the week." In one study, people with type 2 diabetes exercised for 175 minutes a week, limited their calories to 1,200 to 1,800 per day, and got weekly counseling and education on these lifestyle changes. Within a year, about 10% got off their diabetes medications or improved to the point where their blood sugar level was no longer in the diabetes range, and was instead classified as prediabetes. Results were best for those who lost the most weight or who started the program with less severe or newly diagnosed diabetes. Fifteen percent to 20% of these people were able to stop taking their diabetes medications. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes May Be Reversible With Immune Suppressor Protein

Type 1 Diabetes May Be Reversible With Immune Suppressor Protein

A professor in Melbourne, Australia, who is on a mission to find a cure for type 1 diabetes, believes that the answer, or part of it, lies with an immune suppressor protein called CD52. And if it works for type 1 diabetes, then it may well work for other immune disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, where disruption in the balance of different kinds of T cell in the immune system causes it to attack the body's own healthy tissue. In a new study published this week in Nature Immunology, diabetes researcher and professor Len Harrison and colleagues from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute's Molecular Medicine, suggest it may be possible to use CD52, which naturally stops the immune system overreacting and killing insulin-producing pancreatic cells, to stop or even reverse type 1 diabetes in the early stages, before all the insulin-producing cells have been destroyed. In a statement to the media Harrison says: "Immune suppression by CD52 is a previously undiscovered mechanism that the body uses to regulate itself, and protect itself against excessive or damaging immune responses." Type 1 Diabetes Is An Autoimmune Disease Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that typically starts in childhood and teen years. It happens because an imbalance in the immune system causes it to destroy insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Without insulin, the body cannot regulate blood sugar, and if this gets too high, it causes serious damage to organs. It is a "lifelong disease", says Harrison, adding that in Australia alone there are around 120,000 people with it, a number that has doubled over the last two decades. He says the disease makes life "incredibly difficult" for children and teenagers, and also for their families. "It also causes significant long-te Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose , the main type of sugar in the blood. Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients we need, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream from the gastrointestinal tract. The glucose level in the blood rises after a meal and triggers the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly. Insulin works like a key that opens the doors to cells and lets the glucose in. Without insulin, glucose can't get into the cells (the doors are "locked" and there is no key) and so it stays in the bloodstream. As a result, the level of sugar in the blood remains higher than normal. High blood sugar levels are a problem because they can cause a number of health problems. The two types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Both make blood sugar levels higher than normal but they do so in different ways. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas loses its ability to make insulin because the body's  immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin. No one knows exactly why this happens, but scientists think it has something to do with genes. But just getting the genes for diabetes isn't usually enough. A person probably would then have to be exposed to something else — like a virus — to get type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes , the pancreas still makes insulin but the body doesn't respond to it normally. Glucose is less able to enter the cells and do its job of supplying energy (a problem called insulin resistance ). This raises the blood sugar level, so the pancreas works hard to make even more insulin. Eventually, this strain can make the pancreas unable to produce enough ins Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Go Away? | Joslin Diabetes Center

Can Diabetes Go Away? | Joslin Diabetes Center

There is no cure for diabetes. Neither type 1 (juvenile onset or insulin-requiring) diabetes or type 2 (adult-onset) diabetes ever goes away. In type 1 diabetes, patients sometimes experience what physicians have come to call a "honeymoon period" shortly after the disease is diagnosed. During the "honeymoon period" diabetes may appear to go away for a period of a few months to a year. The patient's insulin needs are minimal and some patients may actually find they can maintain normal or near normal blood glucose taking little or no insulin. It would be a mistake to assume that the diabetes has gone away, however. Basically, type 1 diabetes occurs when about 90 percent of the body's insulin-producing cells have been destroyed. At the time that type 1 diabetes is diagnosed, most patients still are producing some insulin. If obvious symptoms of type 1 diabetes emerge when the patient has an illness, virus or cold, for example, once the illness subsides the body's insulin needs may decrease. At this point, the number of insulin-producing cells remaining may be enough for the moment to meet the person's insulin needs again. But the process that has destroyed 90 percent of the insulin-producing cells will ultimately destroy the remaining insulin-producing cells. And as that destruction continues, the amount of injected insulin the patient needs will increase and ultimately the patient will be totally dependent on insulin injections. Scientists now think that it is important for people with newly diagnosed diabetes to continue taking some insulin by injection even during the honeymoon period. Why? Because they have some scientific evidence to suggest that doing so will help preserve the few remaining insulin-producing cells for a while longer. Patients diagnosed with type 2 d Continue reading >>

Can Early Diabetes Be Controlled Or Completely Stopped?

Can Early Diabetes Be Controlled Or Completely Stopped?

Type 2 or adult-onset diabetes is one of the most significant threats to health today. Most cases are linked to the epidemic of obesity. The long-term consequences of diabetes include cardiovascular diseases such as stroke, heart attack and peripheral vascular disease. Diabetes is also a leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and leg amputation. Attention to diet, exercise and even a small weight loss can help someone with diabetes, or especially pre-diabetes. This is a metabolic disease, meaning it is an issue of energy balance. In normal physiology, when the amount of food energy consumed, measured in calories, exceeds the amount of energy burned, the body converts and saves the excess energy as fat. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a resistance to the hormone insulin, which causes sugar or glucose to enter muscle and organs of the body. For reasons that are poorly understood, some people's tissues become less sensitive to insulin as the body stores more fat. The results are a rise in blood sugar levels and the long-term consequences described above. I prefer to think of diabetes as a disease with a white-to-black spectrum of severity and a broad gray area. For those who have pre-diabetes or even mild diabetes, one can take steps to move toward the lighter gray or white area of the spectrum, with small improvements in diet, small increases in activity and loss of just a few pounds. I am hesitant to say that diabetes is cured, but it can often be controlled, and one can return to normal blood sugars without the need for diabetes medicines, and the risk of diabetic complications are significantly reduced. This is rare and more difficult but not impossible for severe diabetics. Many who progress to diabetes could have prevented it by maintaining a lower and not necessaril Continue reading >>

The Stages Of Type 1 Diabetes (it Starts Earlier Than We Thought)

The Stages Of Type 1 Diabetes (it Starts Earlier Than We Thought)

My daughter Bisi was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes three years ago at the age of six. The first night after she was diagnosed, once she finally fell asleep in her hospital bed, tossing and turning despite the IV in her arm, I remember standing outside in the hall with my husband and a couple of medical residents, talking with them about her diagnosis. “Could this have been coming on for a while?” we asked them. I described how for a couple of years, Bisi had been almost unbearably cranky when she was hungry—to the point where I’d asked her pediatrician more than once if something might be wrong. No, the residents told us. Type 1 diabetes comes on very suddenly, in a matter of weeks, as the body’s beta cells suddenly die out under attack from the immune system. Every doctor or nurse we spoke with during the three days in the hospital (except for one, who said that our instincts were probably right), echoed what the two residents, fresh from medical school, told us. But it turns out they were wrong. JDRF and the American Diabetes Association, supported by other organizations in the field, recently put forth a new staging system for type 1 diabetes, where full-blown disease, like what landed Bisi in the hospital, is characterized as stage 3, part of an extended auto-immune process that often starts in infancy. This fall, Dr. Richard Insel, JDRF’s Chief Scientific Officer, explained the classification system to a group of reporters, talking through the importance of early diagnosis, and the hope that diagnosing the disease at an earlier stage could lead to breakthroughs in stopping the beta-cell destruction process—essentially, stopping the disease before it starts. Insel explained that stage 1 is when people test positive for multiple pancreatic islet auto-a Continue reading >>

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