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Can Diabetes Be Detected In A Urine Test?

Urine Test

Urine Test

When is a urine test needed? Urine tests are very useful for providing information to assist in the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of a wide range of diseases. In addition, a urine test can determine whether or not a woman is ovulating or pregnant. Urine can also be tested for a variety of substances relating to drug abuse, both as part of rehabilitation programmes and in the world of professional sport. The urine can be tested very quickly using a strip of special paper, which is dipped in the urine just after urination. This will show if there are any abnormal products in the urine such as sugar, protein, or blood. If more tests are needed to get more details, the urine will be analysed at a laboratory. How is a urine test done? If the doctor suspects a case of cystitis (infection of the bladder), a sample of urine can be sent to the laboratory for culture, which will confirm the type of bacteria present and which antibiotics are best for treating the infection. Urine is normally sterile, but it can get contaminated through bacteria on the skin and the genitals on its way out. For this reason, it is very important for men to pull back their foreskin and wash their penis before the sample is taken, whereas women should wash around the entrance to their urethra before providing a sample. It is also important that the woman keeps her labia (vaginal lips) separated during urination, so that the urine does not get contaminated with bacteria from the skin and the vagina. Adults and children who do not have difficulty passing urine on demand, can take the sample by urinating first in the toilet, then a little into a sterile specimen container (obtained from your GP or pharmacy) and then the rest in the toilet. This gives what is known as a midstream specimen. For younge Continue reading >>

Urine Test For Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Urine Test For Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Urine tests can check for a range of things, including blood in the urine, infection, and other systemic conditions. They are frequently used for diagnosing and monitoring diabetes. In this article, we look at types of urine tests for diabetes and how to understand the results. Contents of this article: What is a urine test for diabetes? Urine tests are important for both the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. Urine testing is less accurate than blood testing but is useful as a screening test for people who already know they have diabetes. Urine tests can also be used to check for glucose in the urine of people who are undiagnosed. A urine test will be looking for three things: glucose, ketones, and protein. Glucose Having glucose in the urine may indicate diabetes, although it can also be caused by other conditions. For example, pregnant women who do not have diabetes may have glucose in their urine. Glucose is not normally found in urine, but it can pass from the kidneys into the urine in people who have diabetes. Ketones Ketone is a chemical that the body produces when there is a shortage of insulin in the blood. It is a by-product produced when the body starts to break down body fat for energy. The presence of ketones in a person with diabetes may indicate a high blood glucose level, usually because a person with diabetes cannot use glucose as energy and has to use fat instead. Ketones in the blood can then spill into the urine. Ketones in the urine are more common in people who have type 1 diabetes but can occur in those with type 2 diabetes as well. Protein A doctor will check for the presence of protein in the urine of people with diabetes, as this can indicate kidney problems or a urinary tract infection. Types of tests If someone is concerned that they may h Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Diabetes In Dogs

Diagnosing Diabetes In Dogs

How Diabetes is Diagnosed The primary symptoms of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in dogs are increased thirst and water consumption, increased urination, increased appetite, increased food intake and weight loss. While the presence of these symptoms can lead to a tentative diagnosis of diabetes, in order to confirm the diagnosis the veterinarian must perform a number of tests to rule out other possible causes of the dog’s symptoms and to determine an appropriate course of treatment. Fortunately, diabetes mellitus is not particularly difficult to diagnose, and it is one of the more manageable metabolic diseases of companion dogs. Dogs with diabetes mellitus cannot properly metabolize or use dietary sugars either due to insulin insufficiency or insulin resistance. Unprocessed sugars will build up in circulating blood, which is called “hyperglycemia.” Eventually, glucose will start to be excreted in the urine (this is called “glycosuria”). Hyperglycemia and glycosuria can easily be detected through simple blood and urine tests that can easily be conducted at almost any veterinary clinic. One of those tests involves fasting the dog for a period of time and then assessing a blood sample for its glucose levels. Dogs with fasting hyperglycemia probably have diabetes. Routine blood work (a complete blood count and serum biochemistry profile) can also help identify kidney or liver disease. Any detectable amount of glucose in a dog’s urine is abnormal and highly suggestive of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes also causes the dog’s body to enter starvation mode. Because the dog is unable to process and use glucose normally, over time its body begins to break down and use stored proteins and fats for energy, so that essential bodily functions can continue. The breakdow Continue reading >>

Should I Test My Urine For Glucose And Ketones?

Should I Test My Urine For Glucose And Ketones?

Finding glucose in the urine of someone who has not yet been diagnosed will sometimes be a tip-off that they have developed diabetes, but glucose doesn’t appear in the urine unless the blood sugar is around 240 or even higher for many people, so there is no real reason to test the urine for sugar because it isn’t helpful in managing your diabetes if all you know is that you are roughly under 240. On the other hand, ketones in the urine is a sign that you may be getting seriously ill. Routine monitoring of ketones isn’t necessary, but it should be done if you feel sick, especially if you have type 1 diabetes. If you have diabetes and there are ketones in your urine, it’s time to contact your healthcare provider. Diabetes experts don't recommend testing your urine for glucose because this method is not as accurate as checking your blood. But testing your urine for ketones can be very important in managing your diabetes. Check with your doctor to see if you need to monitor your ketone levels. You may need to do ketone urine checks if your blood glucose is more than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or if you're sick with the flu, a cold or a stomach bug. If you are having symptoms of high ketones -- feeling tired all the time, thirst or dry mouth, flushed skin, mental confusion, difficulty breathing or a fruity smell on your breath -- it can be a good idea to check your ketone levels. Urine testing is not an accurate way to measure blood glucose. It is the way to check for ketones when you cannot eat or are ill. A buildup of ketones tells you that you are developing ketoacidosis. Ketones are breakdown products of fat that produce acid in the body. Too much acid can result in you being hospitalized. Therefore, when you are sick with a cold or the flu, you should Continue reading >>

How Does You Detect Glucose In Urine?

How Does You Detect Glucose In Urine?

The glucose urine test measures the amount of sugar (glucose) in a urine sample. The presence of glucose in the urine is called glycosuria or glucosuria. After you provide a urine sample, it is tested right away. The health care provider uses a dipstick made with a color-sensitive pad. The color the dipstick changes to tell the provider the level of glucose in your urine. If needed, the health care provider may ask you to collect your urine at home over 24 hours. Your provider will tell you how to do this. Follow instructions exactly so that the results are accurate. Certain medicines can change the result of this test. Before the test, tell your health care provider which medicines you are taking. Do not stop taking any medicine before talking to your provider. This test was commonly used to test for and monitor diabetes in the past. Now, blood tests to measure glucose level in the blood are easy to do and used instead of the glucose urine test. The glucose urine test may be ordered when the doctor suspects renal glycosuria. This is a rare condition in which glucose is released from the kidneys into the urine, even when blood glucose level is normal. The examples above are common measurements for results of these tests. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results. A rare condition in which glucose is released from the kidneys into the urine, even when blood glucose levels are normal (renal glycosuria) Pregnancy -- Up to half of women have glucose in their urine at some time during pregnancy. Glucose in the urine may mean that a woman has gestational diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Urine Test For Sugar - Topic Overview

Diabetes: Urine Test For Sugar - Topic Overview

Sugar (glucose) normally is not found in urine. But when blood sugar levels rise well above a target range-which can occur in type 1 and type 2 diabetes-the kidneys often release some of the excess sugar from the blood into the urine. In pregnant women, the kidneys sometimes release sugar into the urine even when blood sugar levels are within a safe range. You can test urine for sugar by using plastic strips you can buy at a pharmacy. You dip a strip into a urine sample. The strip changes color to show how much sugar is in the sample. You compare the resulting color to a chart of colors. Each color indicates a level of glucose. Urine testing for sugar is not an accurate way to measure how much sugar is in your blood. So most doctors no longer recommend it for people who have diabetes. A sample of urine often is stored in your bladder for several hours before you test it. Also, because sugar does not show up in urine until it is much higher than normal in the bloodstream (180 mg/dL), urine cannot be used to check for slightly high or low blood sugar levels. Continue reading >>

How Useful Is A Urine Test In The Diagnosis Of Diabetes?

How Useful Is A Urine Test In The Diagnosis Of Diabetes?

Question: How useful is a urine test in the diagnosis of diabetes? Answer: Urine tests, that was the way we measured glucose in the past, and, you know, urine tests may be the only thing available in some populations, but most people now use blood glucose testing, because it tells you what's happening that minute. So if you have diabetes, you want to know what's happening now. Urine collects overtime, so lets say for example, you tested in the morning and you tested your urine, well you might have sugar in your urine, but that might be sugar in your urine from midnight, because you held your urine in your bladder all night long. The blood test tells you exactly what's happening when you test at 8 o'clock in the morning. Urine glucose doesn't show up until blood glucose is about, we call it the renal threshold or the 'spilling point,' is up to about 180. Now that number's a little different in everyone, but you don't spill sugar in your urine until your blood glucose is pretty high, so it's not really a good gauge of how well you're doing. Next: What Are The Most Important Nutritional Principles For Someone With Type 1 Diabetes? Previous: What Is A Hemoglobin A1c Test And When Is It Done? Continue reading >>

Are There Any Home Tests For Diabetes?

Are There Any Home Tests For Diabetes?

Are There Any Home Testing Kits For Diabetes? Yes, there are home tests for diabetes (which also work for testing for prediabetes). If you suspect you or a loved one is showing signs of diabetes then you may wish to test at home before contacting your doctor. There are two main types of home tests which are available without prescription through pharmacies, online pharmacies and stores like Walmart. These are urine test strips and home A1C Kits. However, it should be noted, neither kit is FDA approved for self-diagnosis, but rather for ongoing blood sugar monitoring. If you are worried about diabetes, contact your doctor for appropriate testing. 1. Urine Test Strips: Testing Blood Glucose Levels Urine tests are not invasive, meaning no blood sample is needed. Most kits contain 1 to 3 specially coated strips which, when inserted into a urine sample, turn a particular color according to the level of blood sugar detected. Usually you are instructed to wait for 2 hours after your last meal before testing to ensure the results are not artificially high. Some tests are even sensitive enough to indicate prediabetes - an elevated level of blood sugar which isn't quite high enough (yet) to be considered full-blown diabetes (see diabetes diagnosis). The results are available in 60 to 90 seconds. Most kits cost under $10 or £8. • Choice DM In-Home High Sugar Level Test Kit, Early Detection. • Testmedica Diabetes Home Scan. • Suresign Diabetes Urine Screening Test Kit. • Boots Diabetes Home Test (Europe only). Points To Consider If you test positive, you should call your doctor immediately for more clinical tests. While home tests if you follow the instructions are generally accurate, they can occasionally produce false-negative or false-positive results (exercise, your me Continue reading >>

Urine Test?

Urine Test?

Thanks for that, its interesting how opinions differ because on another medical forum like this someone has told me that the urine test is meaningless and dated and you need a proper blood test (fasting glucose test etc..) so what do you think? What symptoms might you suffer from if you had diabetes anyway, I have been suffering from headaches, dizzyness and a hot sensation across my forehead for almost 5months now (all minor and not major), it was bad in the first 3months but its allot better now but I do still get the hot sensation from time to time (no temp when I do feel hot). Its very odd and just came about one day when I woke up out of the blue, was perfectly fine one day then bang! woke up feeling odd the next. The diabetes thing is just me being curious really but I'm guessing I would be feeling allot worse after 5months if I had diabetes right? I've recently had blood tests for liver n kidney (4months ago) plus B12 deficiencies (1month ago) which were all clear, would either of those give any indication or issues in the blood that could be diabetes or anything? Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Diagnosed?

How Is Diabetes Diagnosed?

Out of the estimated 24 million people with diabetes, one third, or eight million, don’t know they have the disease. According to Martin J. Abrahamson, M.D., Medical Director and Senior Vice President at Joslin Diabetes Center, this is because people with type 2 diabetes often have no symptoms. However, a simple blood test is all you need to find out if you are one the millions with untreated diabetes. Who should be tested? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that everyone aged 45 and over should be tested for diabetes, and if the results are normal, re-tested every three years. Testing should be conducted at earlier ages and carried out more frequently in individuals who have any of the following diabetes risk factors: You have a parent or sibling with diabetes You are overweight (BMI higher than 25) You are a member of a high-risk ethnic population (African American, Hispanic American, Native American, Asian American or Pacific Islander) You had gestational diabetes or a baby weighing over 9 pounds Your HDL cholesterol levels are 35 mg/dl or less, and/or your triglyceride level is 250 mg/dl or above You have high blood pressure You have polycystic ovarian syndrome On previous testing, had impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting tolerance What tests are used for diagnosis? Fasting Plasma Glucose –This blood test is taken in the morning, on an empty stomach. A level of 126 mg/dl or above, on more than one occasion, indicates diabetes. Casual or Random Glucose - This blood test can be taken anytime during the day, without fasting. A glucose level of 200 mg/dl and above may suggest diabetes. If any of these test results occurs, testing should be repeated on a different day to confirm the diagnosis. If a casual plasma glucose equal to 200 mg/dl or Continue reading >>

Diabetes Urine Tests

Diabetes Urine Tests

Urine tests may be done in people with diabetes to evaluate severe hyperglycemia (severe high blood sugar) by looking for ketones in the urine. Ketones are a metabolic product produced when fat is metabolized. Ketones increase when there is insufficient insulin to use glucose for energy. Urine tests are also done to look for the presence of protein in the urine, which is a sign of kidney damage. Urine glucose measurements are less reliable than blood glucose measurements and are not used to diagnose diabetes or evaluate treatment for diabetes. They may be used for screening purposes. Testing for ketones is most common in people with type 1 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes: What Are The Symptoms? This test detects the presence of ketones, which are byproducts of metabolism that form in the presence of severe hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar). Ketones are formed from fat that is burned by the body when there is insufficient insulin to allow glucose to be used for fuel. When ketones build up to high levels, ketoacidosis (a serious and life-threatening condition) may occur. Ketone testing can be performed both at home and in the clinical laboratory. Ketones can be detected by dipping a test strip into a sample of urine. A color change on the test strip signals the presence of ketones in the urine. Ketones occur most commonly in people with type 1 diabetes, but uncommonly, people with type 2 diabetes may test positive for ketones. The microalbumin test detects microalbumin, a type of protein, in the urine. Protein is present in the urine when there is damage to the kidneys. Since the damage to blood vessels that occurs as a complication of diabetes can lead to kidney problems, the microalbumin test is done to check for damage to the kidneys over time. Can urine tests be used to Continue reading >>

Testing

Testing

There are a range of tests which will need to be done to monitor your health and your diabetes. Some of these, such as your blood glucose levels, you will be able to do yourself. Others will be done by healthcare professionals. Self-monitoring of blood glucose can be a beneficial part of diabetes management. As part of the day-to-day routine it can help with necessary lifestyle and treatment choices as well as help to monitor for symptoms of hypo- or hyperglycaemia. Monitoring can also help you and your healthcare team to alter treatment which in turn can help prevent any long-term complications from developing. Some people with diabetes (but not all) will test their blood glucose levels at home. Home blood glucose testing gives an accurate picture of your blood glucose level at the time of the test. It involves pricking the side of your finger (as opposed to the pad) with a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. Some people can't see the point of testing as they think they know by the way they feel, but the way you feel is not always a good or accurate guide to what is happening. Blood glucose targets It is important that the blood glucose levels being aimed for are as near normal as possible (that is in the range of those of a person who does not have diabetes). These are: 3.5–5.5mmol/l* before meals less than 8mmol/l, two hours after meals. There are many different opinions about the ideal range to aim for. As this is so individual to each person, the target levels must be agreed between the person and their diabetes team. The target blood glucose ranges below are indicated as a guide. Children with Type 1 diabetes (NICE 2015) on waking and before meals: 4–7mmol/l after meals: 5–9mmol/l.after meals: 5–9mmol/l. Adults with Type Continue reading >>

Glucose In Urine Test

Glucose In Urine Test

What is a Glucose in Urine Test? A glucose in urine test measures the amount of glucose in your urine. Glucose is a type of sugar. It is your body's main source of energy. A hormone called insulin helps move glucose from your bloodstream into your cells. If too much glucose gets into the blood, the extra glucose will be eliminated through your urine. A urine glucose test can be used to help determine if blood glucose levels are too high, which may be a sign of diabetes. Other names: urine sugar test; urine glucose test; glucosuria test What is it used for? A glucose in urine test may be part of a urinalysis, a test that measures different cells, chemicals, and other substances in your urine. Urinalysis is often included as part of a routine exam. A glucose in urine test may also be used to screen for diabetes. However, a urine glucose test is not as accurate as a blood glucose test. It may be ordered if blood glucose testing is difficult or not possible. Some people can't get blood drawn because their veins are too small or too scarred from repeated punctures. Other people avoid blood tests due to extreme anxiety or fear of needles. Why do I need a glucose in urine test? You may get a glucose in urine test as part of your regular checkup or if you have symptoms of diabetes and cannot take a blood glucose test. Symptoms of diabetes include: You may also need a urinalysis, which includes a glucose in urine test, if you are pregnant. If high levels of glucose in urine are found, it may indicate gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is form of diabetes that happens only during pregnancy. Blood glucose testing can be used to confirm a diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Most pregnant women are tested for gestational diabetes with a blood glucose test, between their 24th Continue reading >>

Getting Diagnosed

Getting Diagnosed

Type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed following blood or urine tests for something else. However, if you have any symptoms of diabetes you should see your GP straight away. To find out if you have type 2 diabetes, you usually have to go through the following steps: Speak to your GP about your symptoms. Your GP will check your urine and arrange a blood test to check your blood sugar levels. It usually takes about 1 to 2 days for the results to come back. If you have diabetes, your GP will ask you to come in again to explain the test results and what will happen next. If you’re diagnosed with diabetes What your GP will discuss with you during your appointment depends on the diagnosis and the treatment they recommend. Generally, they’ll talk to you about: what diabetes is what high blood sugar means for your health what medication you’ll have to take your diet and exercise your lifestyle, for example alcohol and smoking Your GP will do their best to discuss the diagnosis with you but this first appointment might only be 10 to 15 minutes. If you have questions about your diagnosis It’s usually difficult to take in everything the GP tells you during the appointment. Talk to family and friends about what the GP told you and write down all the questions you have. Then make another GP appointment and take your list of questions with you. There’s also a lot of information on diabetes available. What happens after the diagnosis Usually the following things happen after your diagnosis: Your GP will prescribe medication. It might take time for you to get used to the medication and to find the right amounts for you. You might need to make changes to your diet and be more active. You’ll have to go for regular type 2 diabetes check ups. You’ll have to look out for certain s Continue reading >>

Urine Testing For Diabetic Analysis

Urine Testing For Diabetic Analysis

Urine testing is relatively cheap and easy to do. Urine testing can be used to check for blood in the urine, to check for infection (by detecting the presence of white blood cells or protein) and can show up other systemic problems such as liver problems (by showing abnormal bilirubin levels). Urine testing can also detect ketones in the urine. Ketones are by-products of metabolism which form in the presence of severe high blood glucose. The presence of ketones in the urine therefore indicates that patients' blood glucose level is likely to be very high and that they may have ketoacidosis, which is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes and needs urgent treatment. Early signs of ketoacidosis include passing large amounts of urine, severe thirst, feeling nauseous, tiredness, abdominal pain and shortness of breath. Advanced signs include rapid breathing, rapid heartbeat, vomiting, dizziness, confusion and drowsiness; patients may even lose consciousness. Urgently refer patients with any of the above signs. Although not as accurate as a blood glucose test, urine testing can be used as a screening tool in patients known to have diabetes. Even in patients with no ketoacidosis, high glucose levels may be an indication that their diabetes is poorly controlled. These patients can be referred for counselling, patient education, and-as soon as possible -for an eye examination to look for signs of diabetic retinopathy. Urine testing can also be used to detect glucose in the urine in undiagnosed patients; they will need to be referred for further tests and perhaps a diagnosis of diabetes. All patients with diabetes should have an eye examination once a year. Go to: What you need Personal protective equipment: gloves, eyewear (plus apron if available) Reagent strips Continue reading >>

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