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Can Diabetes Be Detected In A Routine Blood Test?

Diabetes - Tests And Checkups

Diabetes - Tests And Checkups

See your diabetes doctor for an exam every 3 to 6 months. During this exam, your doctor should check your: Blood pressure Weight Feet See your dentist every 6 months, also. Your doctor should check the pulses in your feet and your reflexes at least once a year. Your doctor should also look for: If you have had foot ulcers before, see your doctor every 3 to 6 months. It is always a good idea to ask your doctor to check your feet. An A1c lab test shows how well you are controlling your blood sugar levels over a 3-month period. The normal level is less than 5.7%. Most people with diabetes should aim for an A1C of less than 7%. Some people have a higher target. Your doctor will help decide what your target should be. Higher A1C numbers mean that your blood sugar is higher and that you may be more likely to have complications from your diabetes. Continue reading >>

How Is Diabetes Diagnosed?

How Is Diabetes Diagnosed?

If your physician determines that you are showing symptoms of diabetes, they will perform a Oral Glucose Tolerance Test to test your blood for appropriate glucose levels. After fasting (not eating) for at least 12 hours, your blood sugar will be measured for a baseline result. Next, you will drink some type of beverage that includes sugar, and your blood sugar levels will be monitored over several hours to determine how your body processes it. Gestational Diabetes is usually detected with a routine blood test during pregnancy. If you are diagnosed with diabetes, you will be referred to an Endocrinologist, a physician that treats illnesses related to hormones. Unfortunately, if your diabetes is not managed properly, it can cause secondary health issues, including venous insufficiency (when your veins don’t transport blood as well as they are supposed to, causing a lack of blood flow). If this is the case, you will be referred to a Vascular Specialist. If left untreated, and your limbs don’t get circulation, tissue will begin to degrade and you could require toe, foot, or even leg amputation. The American Diabetes Association states that: “About 60% of non-traumatic lower-limb amputations among people aged 20 years or older occur in people with diagnosed diabetes” Although this is a harrowing statistic, it’s important to note that amputation CAN be avoided with proper vascular interventions. If you are experiencing ulcers, or sores that won’t heal, contact us today and avoid amputation. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tests

Diabetes Tests

Diabetes is a condition that affects the body’s ability to either produce or use insulin. Insulin helps the body utilize blood sugar for energy. Diabetes results in blood sugar, or blood glucose, that rises to abnormally high levels. Over time, diabetes results in damage to blood vessels and nerves, causing a variety of symptoms, including: difficulty seeing tingling and numbness in the hands and feet increased risk for a heart attack or stroke An early diagnosis means you can start treatment and take steps toward a healthier lifestyle. In its early stages, diabetes may or may not cause many symptoms. You should get tested if you experience any of the early symptoms that do sometimes occur, including: extreme thirst feeling tired all the time feeling very hungry, even after eating blurry vision urinating more often than usual have sores or cuts that won’t heal Some people should be tested for diabetes even if they aren’t experiencing symptoms. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends you undergo diabetes testing if you’re overweight (body mass index greater than 25) and fall into any of the following categories: you’re a high risk ethnicity (African American, Latino, Native American, Pacific Islander, Asian American) you have high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, or heart disease you have a family history of diabetes you have a personal history of abnormal blood sugar levels or signs of insulin resistance you don’t engage in regular physical activity you’re a woman with a history of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or gestational diabetes The ADA also recommends you undergo an initial blood sugar test if you are over the age of 45. This helps you establish a baseline for blood sugar levels. Because your risk for diabetes i Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Diabetes In Dogs

Diagnosing Diabetes In Dogs

How Diabetes is Diagnosed The primary symptoms of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in dogs are increased thirst and water consumption, increased urination, increased appetite, increased food intake and weight loss. While the presence of these symptoms can lead to a tentative diagnosis of diabetes, in order to confirm the diagnosis the veterinarian must perform a number of tests to rule out other possible causes of the dog’s symptoms and to determine an appropriate course of treatment. Fortunately, diabetes mellitus is not particularly difficult to diagnose, and it is one of the more manageable metabolic diseases of companion dogs. Dogs with diabetes mellitus cannot properly metabolize or use dietary sugars either due to insulin insufficiency or insulin resistance. Unprocessed sugars will build up in circulating blood, which is called “hyperglycemia.” Eventually, glucose will start to be excreted in the urine (this is called “glycosuria”). Hyperglycemia and glycosuria can easily be detected through simple blood and urine tests that can easily be conducted at almost any veterinary clinic. One of those tests involves fasting the dog for a period of time and then assessing a blood sample for its glucose levels. Dogs with fasting hyperglycemia probably have diabetes. Routine blood work (a complete blood count and serum biochemistry profile) can also help identify kidney or liver disease. Any detectable amount of glucose in a dog’s urine is abnormal and highly suggestive of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes also causes the dog’s body to enter starvation mode. Because the dog is unable to process and use glucose normally, over time its body begins to break down and use stored proteins and fats for energy, so that essential bodily functions can continue. The breakdow Continue reading >>

Hidden Diabetes—you Can Get A Clean Bill Of Health…but Still Be At High Risk

Hidden Diabetes—you Can Get A Clean Bill Of Health…but Still Be At High Risk

With all the devastating complications of diabetes, such as heart disease, stroke, dementia and blindness, you might assume that most doctors are doing everything possible to catch this disease in its earliest stages. Not so. Problem: There are currently no national guidelines for screening and treating diabetes before it reaches a full-blown stage. Research clearly shows that the damage caused by diabetes begins years—and sometimes decades—earlier, but standard medical practice has not yet caught up with the newest findings on this disease. Fortunately, there are scientifically proven ways to identify and correct the root causes of diabetes so that you never develop the disease itself. Diabetes is diagnosed when blood sugar (glucose) levels reach 126 mg/dL and above. “Prediabetes” is defined as blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to indicate diabetes. Normal levels are less than 100 mg/dL. What most people don’t know: Although most doctors routinely test blood sugar to detect diabetes, it’s quite common to have a normal level and still have diabesity, a condition typically marked by obesity and other changes in the body that can lead to the same complications (such as heart disease, stroke and cancer) as full-fledged diabetes. Important: Even if you’re not diabetic, having “belly fat”—for example, a waist circumference of more than 35 inches in women and more than 40 inches in men—often has many of the same dangerous effects on the body as diabetes. Important finding: In a landmark study in Europe, researchers looked at 22,000 people and found that those with blood sugar levels of just 95 mg/dL—a level that’s generally considered healthy—already had significant risks for heart disease and other complications. E Continue reading >>

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring Of Diabetes

According to the latest American Heart Association's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics, about 8 million people 18 years and older in the United States have type 2 diabetes and do not know it. Often type 1 diabetes remains undiagnosed until symptoms become severe and hospitalization is required. Left untreated, diabetes can cause a number of health complications. That's why it's so important to both know what warning signs to look for and to see a health care provider regularly for routine wellness screenings. Symptoms In incidences of prediabetes, there are no symptoms. People may not be aware that they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes because they have no symptoms or because the symptoms are so mild that they go unnoticed for quite some time. However, some individuals do experience warning signs, so it's important to be familiar with them. Prediabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes No symptoms Increased or extreme thirst Increased thirst Increased appetite Increased appetite Increased fatigue Fatigue Increased or frequent urination Increased urination, especially at night Unusual weight loss Weight loss Blurred vision Blurred vision Fruity odor or breath Sores that do not heal In some cases, no symptoms In some cases, no symptoms If you have any of these symptoms, see your health care provider right away. Diabetes can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. Who should be tested for prediabetes and diabetes? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are: If your blood glucose levels are in normal range, testing should be done about every three years. If you have prediabetes, you should be checked for diabetes every one to two years after diagnosis. Tests for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes There are three ty Continue reading >>

Routine Tests

Routine Tests "can Identify People With Diabetes At Risk Of Chronic Liver Disease"

Save for later Routine blood tests can help identify people with Type 2 diabetes at increased risk of advanced chronic liver disease, according to a new study presented at Diabetes UK’s annual Diabetes Professional Conference. The study, carried out by researchers at the University of Edinburgh, analysed a wide range of liver blood tests on 922 participants over a four-year period and found that participants with abnormal tests for liver function and structure were significantly more likely to develop chronic liver disease than those with normal readings. People with Type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of advanced chronic liver disease; however, there is currently no consensus on the best way to identify these people. This study shows that routine liver blood tests can help to find those with Type 2 who are at risk. Risk factors Advanced chronic liver disease, which refers to a wide range of conditions including cirrhosis of the liver and liver cancer, has multiple causes. In people with Type 2 diabetes it is most commonly caused by having a fatty liver. One of the major risk factors for it is being overweight, which is also an important risk factor for Type 2 diabetes. Research conducted in 2011 by the University of Edinburgh suggested that people with diabetes are 70 per cent more likely to die from liver disease than those without the condition. Simon O’Neill, Director of Health Intelligence and Professional Liaison for Diabetes UK, said, "This study suggests that routine liver tests can help identify people with Type 2 diabetes at increased risk of advanced chronic liver disease. While more research is needed to work out the exact association between the abnormal liver readings identified in the study and advanced chronic liver disease, this is an interesting Continue reading >>

When Will A Veterinarian Order Blood Tests For Cats

When Will A Veterinarian Order Blood Tests For Cats

Sometimes in the case of an eye or ear infection, your feline friend's medical condition affords a veterinarian the opportunity for a relatively straightforward diagnosis. However, other times the results in the need for further examination. In such a case, your veterinarian will order feline blood tests to aid in his or her investigation. The following situations can result in the need for blood tests for cats: This is recommended to establish healthy baseline tests, and also check for any congenital abnormalities or potential concerns This is recommended if your veterinarian suggests it as part of a thorough physical examination because cat blood work, along with other bodily fluids like urine, can help identify conditions the examination portion of a physical cannot Cat blood tests are suitable for cats that are not displaying any overt signs of illness, disease or injury, but are acting abnormal Cat bloodwork is used to determine the general health of the liver and kidneys, which helps a veterinarian select the safest form of anesthesia. Blood work can also help determine the surgical risk level in infirmed, elderly or injured patients Cat blood tests are usually recommended for mature, senior and geriatric cats as part of their periodic wellness exams. These are extremely beneficial, as we often see senior cats return to a more youthful state of being when blood tests identify an issue that can be easily treated On the first veterinary visit During semi-annual wellness exams If a cat seems not quite right Pre-surgical tests During senior wellness exams At The Drake Center for Veterinary Care, blood tests for cats are processed and analyzed on premises at our in-house laboratory. Having an on-site laboratory allows us to quickly and reliably determine and diagnose a Continue reading >>

6 Unexpected Diseases An Eye Test Can Spot

6 Unexpected Diseases An Eye Test Can Spot

They may be the windows to the soul, but eyes can also give a clear view of what's occurring in less ethereal parts of the body. In fact, an eye test could reveal a life or death situation. As well as detecting vision problems and eye diseases, such as glaucoma or macular degeneration, they can sometimes also reveal whether you're suffering from a number of serious health conditions. [Read more: What is lymphoma? Everything you need to know] Kelly Plahay, chairman of the Eyecare Trust, comments: "Poor uptake of sight tests is probably the biggest risk to the nation's eye health," she says. "Around 20 million of us fail to have our sight tested once every two years, yet a simple sight test can detect glaucoma years before you notice lost vision, and many childhood eye conditions which can be permanently corrected if diagnosed early enough. "Sight tests really are essential health checks." Still not convinced? Here's how a simple eye test could help save your life... 1. Diabetes Around 750,000 people in the UK have undiagnosed diabetes, according to Diabetes UK. Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes can creep up very slowly and are often dismissed as normal tiredness, or just part of growing old, but Dr Schallhorn points out that he's diagnosed cases from eye tests. High blood-sugar related to diabetes can cause problems in the small blood vessels resulting in diabetic retinopathy, which can lead to blindness. An optometrist will be able to spot early characteristic changes, such as tiny leaks from damaged blood vessels. "Nowhere are the blood vessels more important than in the retina at the back of the eye," explains Dr Schallhorn. "Eyecare professionals have a window to look at this, and we can see very early signs of diabetes and the effect it has on blood vessels in the back of Continue reading >>

Blood Tests

Blood Tests

If you are being evaluated for stroke, it is likely that your doctor will order some blood tests. Stroke cannot be diagnosed by a blood test alone. However, these tests can provide information about stroke risk factors and other medical problems which may be important. Please note that the first set of tests are commonly used for routine or emergency evaluation of stroke, while the others are used only in very specific situations. Unless otherwise noted, each of these tests require just one tube of blood (a few teaspoons) drawn from a vein. Commonly Used Blood Tests CBC (Complete blood count) This is a routine test to determine the number of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets in your blood. Hematocrit and hemoglobin are measures of the number of red blood cells. A complete blood count might be used to diagnose anemia (too little blood) or infection (shown by too many white blood cells). Coagulation tests PT (Prothrombin time) PTT (Partial thromboplastin time) INR (International normalized ratio) These tests measure how quickly your blood clots. An abnormality could result in excessive bleeding or excessive clotting (which is difficult to measure). If you have been prescribed a blood-thinning medicine such as warfarin (Coumadin or similar drugs), the INR is used to be sure that you receive the correct dose. It is very important that you obtain regular checks. If you are taking heparin, the PTT (or aPTT) test is used to determine the correct dose. Blood chemistry tests These tests measure the levels of normal chemical substances in your blood. The most important test in emergency stroke evaluation is glucose (or blood sugar), because levels of blood glucose which are too high or too low can cause symptoms which may be mistaken for stroke. A fasting blood gl Continue reading >>

Test Center

Test Center

Test Guide Laboratory Testing for Diabetes Diagnosis and Management This Test Guide discusses the use of laboratory tests (Table 1) for diagnosing diabetes mellitus and monitoring glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Diagnosis Tools for diagnosing diabetes mellitus include fasting plasma glucose (FPG) measurement, oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT), and standardized hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) assays (Table 2). FPG and OGTT tests are sensitive but measure glucose levels only in the short term, require fasting or glucose loading, and give variable results during stress and illness.1 In contrast, HbA1c assays reliably estimate average glucose levels over a longer term (2 to 3 months), do not require fasting or glucose loading, and have less variability during stress and illness.1,2 In addition, HbA1c assays are more specific for identifying individuals at increased risk for diabetes.1 Clinically significant glucose and HbA1c levels are shown in Table 2.1 The American Diabetes Association® (ADA) recommends using these values for diagnosing diabetes and increased diabetes risk (prediabetes). Management Following a diagnosis of diabetes, a combination of laboratory and clinical tests can be used to monitor blood glucose control, detect onset and progression of diabetic complications, and predict treatment response. Table 3 shows the recommended testing frequency and target results for these tests. Different laboratory tests are available for monitoring blood glucose control over the short, long, and intermediate term to help evaluate the effectiveness of a management plan.1 Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is useful for tracking short-term treatment responses in insulin-treated patients, but its usefulness is less clear in non–insulin-treated patients.1 By co Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer Symptoms - This Test Could Detect Cancer Years Before Signs Appear

Pancreatic Cancer Symptoms - This Test Could Detect Cancer Years Before Signs Appear

Researchers have found the blood test accurately picks up mutations for several different types of cancer including pancreatic cancer - which is one of the most deadly cancer. It is hoped the test could come to GP surgeries as part of health checks which include blood pressure and cholesterol. The test is based on the knowledge that all cells in the body release information into the bloodstream through secretion or as they die. Cancer tumours are also known to shed this information - known as circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA). By analysing ctDNA, experts are already able to tailor treatments for people with advanced cancer. They also know that larger amounts of ctDNA in the blood signify more advanced disease. But now, researchers are now working to use this knowledge to create a test specifically for early-stage disease. Anna Jewell, Director of Operations at Pancreatic Cancer UK, said: “We urgently need to find new ways to diagnose pancreatic cancer earlier. “80 per cent of people with the disease are diagnosed at an advanced stage, when surgery, the only treatment that can save lives, is not possible. “Currently, there isn’t a reliable blood test to detect pancreatic cancer at an early stage and finding such a test would be a game changer for tackling the disease. “This research looks promising as it has the potential to lead to a test to pick up pancreatic cancer earlier, in time for surgery to be an option. Thu, November 17, 2016 Pancreatic cancer symptoms to look out for. “However, it is important to remember that any new screening tool would be several years away. “We now need more research to be undertaken and for a larger study to be carried out to see if this research could lead to an effective early diagnosis tool for pancreatic cancer.” The rese Continue reading >>

Blood Tests

Blood Tests

SHARE RATE★★★★★ Blood tests play a key role in helping healthcare providers to diagnose a person with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). If the physical exam and medical history suggest that IBD and its complications may be the cause of a person’s symptoms, then healthcare providers will usually recommend blood tests. These laboratory tests help providers to learn more about how the person’s body is functioning. To diagnose IBD, healthcare providers use the results of blood tests together with stool tests and diagnostic procedures, such as endoscopy and imaging. What happens during a blood test? Drawing blood for laboratory testing is usually a relatively simple and quick procedure.1 A healthcare provider will typically draw a small amount of blood from a vein in your arm, which is then sent to a laboratory for analysis. Blood may be drawn in your primary care physician’s office, or at a laboratory collection site. What is the role of blood tests in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease? IBD cannot be diagnosed on the basis of blood testing alone.1 Though blood tests can be used to reveal signs of inflammation in a person’s body, they are not able to show precisely what the cause of the inflammation is for certain. However, the results of blood tests can be used to help healthcare providers decide what further diagnostic procedures, such as endoscopy and imaging, would be helpful in figuring out whether the cause is CD, UC, or something else. For people who have been diagnosed with IBD, regular blood testing is also an important way that healthcare providers can monitor the activity of the disease during periods of remission as well as during flare-ups. There are two general categories of blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diagnosis

Diabetes Diagnosis

It is important for diabetes to be diagnosed early so treatment can be started as soon as possible. Diabetes is diagnosed by a blood test. Most people with type 1 diabetes and many with type 2 diabetes will present with symptoms of diabetes such as increased thirst, urination and tiredness. Some people will also have signs of slow healing of wounds or persistent infections. However, many people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms at all. A blood test is taken from a vein and sent to a pathology lab. The test may be either: a fasting sugar (glucose) test - fasting is required for at least eight hours, such as eating or drinking overnight a random glucose test taken anytime during the day an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) - where a patient who has fasted drinks a sugary drink and then has a blood test done 1 and then 2 hours later. The patient needs to eat and drink adequate (150 grams a day) of carbohydrates (starchy foods) for 3 days before the glucose tolerance test. Another blood test that can diagnose diabetes is the HbA1c test, which measures the percentage of haemoglobin molecules (the molecules that makes red blood cells red) in the blood that have a sugar molecule attached to them. Diabetes is diagnosed when: The fasting sugar level is >7mmol/L (on 2 separate occasions) The glucose tolerance test is >11mmol/L 2 hours after the sugary drink (on 2 separate occasions) The HbA1c level is >6.5% (on 2 separate occasions) Can diabetes be diagnosed with a blood glucose meter or urine test? A diagnosis of diabetes should not be made only by using a blood glucose meter and finger prick, or by urine glucose test. Although your doctor may take a blood test with a finger prick in the consulting room, you will still need a further blood test sent to pathology to confirm Continue reading >>

What Is A Standard Blood Test?

What Is A Standard Blood Test?

Laboratory blood tests can help doctors to diagnose problems in their patients. While there is no such thing as a "standard blood test," there are several common blood test panels that your doctor may recommend. These can be ordered as part of a routine checkup, or may be ordered if the patient complains of symptoms. Some medications can cause problems in the body that can be easily detected through blood testing. If you do not know why your doctor is recommending a particular blood test, be sure to ask. In many cases, blood tests rule out illnesses before having to resort to more invasive testing. Video of the Day Doctors often order a complete blood count, or CBC, as part of a routine or yearly exam. A CBC measures the amounts of red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and iron in your blood. This test can detect anemia, inflammation, infections and bleeding disorders. A CBC can also help the doctor determine if medications that you are on need to be adjusted. Blood Chemistry Tests A doctor may order a basic metabolic panel, or a BMP. This is a series of tests that is run on the plasma of your blood. These tests measure how much glucose and calcium is in your blood, and whether you have the right amount of electrolytes and minerals in your blood. A BMP can detect diseases such as diabetes, cancer, bone disease, kidney disease and other disorders. Some tests require that you fast beforehand, and others don't. Ask your doctor if you are unsure. Enzyme tests can show your doctor whether you have damage or disease in various organs of the body. A creatine kinase, or CK, test can help your doctor determine if you've had a heart attack. A troponin test is another test that can indicate a heart attack. Creatinine tests measure kidney function. Liver enzyme tests can he Continue reading >>

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