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Can Diabetes Be Caused By Smoking?

Smoking And Diabetes: Risks, Effects, And How To Quit

Smoking And Diabetes: Risks, Effects, And How To Quit

Smoking and diabetes: Risks, effects, and how to quit Reviewed by Natalie Olsen, RD, LD, ACSM EP-C The health risks of smoking are well known, and most smokers already know the risks they are taking. For people with diabetes , however, smoking is a serious risk factor for numerous health issues they may face. Smoking may even cause diabetes. Quitting is the best course of action smokers can take for their health. However, some strategies may reduce the health effects for some of those with diabetes. Smoking and diabetes: Can smoking cause diabetes? Smokers are more likely to develop diabetes than non-smokers. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for at least 90 percent of cases worldwide. Type 2 diabetes is also closely linked to certain lifestyle factors, including smoking. In fact, smokers are 30-40 percent more likely than non-smokers to develop diabetes. People who have diabetes already and who smoke are more likely to have uncontrolled diabetes. Smoking damages cells and tissues, increasing inflammation . It also causes oxidative stress , which is when molecules called free radicals damage cells. Both these conditions are linked to an increased risk of diabetes. They can cause other health problems, as well, including cardiovascular disease. Research further suggests that heavy smoking increases abdominal fat . Even in people who aren't obese or overweight, excess abdominal fat is a risk factor for diabetes. The health risks of smoking are numerous, and researchers are constantly uncovering new health concerns associated with smoking. The habit of smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, while more than 16 million Americans have a smoking-related disease. cancer , including lung, oral, bladder, colon, pancr Continue reading >>

Smoking Linked To Raised Diabetes Risk Including Passive Smoking

Smoking Linked To Raised Diabetes Risk Including Passive Smoking

Smoking linked to raised diabetes risk including passive smoking Smoking linked to raised diabetes risk including passive smoking "Passive smoking raises risk of type 2 diabetes," The Guardian reports. A major new analysis of previous studies found a significant association between exposure to tobacco smoke including secondhand smoke and type 2 diabetes . People who had never smoked, but were exposed to secondhand smoke, were at a 22% higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than people who had never smoked, but had been exposed to secondhand smoke. The study crunched data on almost 6 million people an impressive feat meaning it had lots of statistical power to pick out links accurately. It also having took account of many known contributory risk factors for diabetes, including diet and physical activity. The data for passive smokers came from around 150,000 people. The diabetes risk increase varied in line with smoking intensity and length of time a person had quit suggesting that a direct cause and effect link is possible. A randomised controlled trial would be needed to know for sure; however, it would be unethical to allocate people to something that is known to harm. It is unclear why smoking would increase diabetes risk. Speculations offered in the paper include the fact that smoking can increase inflammation levels and cause cell damage. Interestingly, astudy earlier this week found an association between cannabis smoking and diabetes . Giving up smoking , if you smoke,is one of the biggest steps you can take to improve your health. The study was carried out by researchers from universities based in China, Singapore and the US. It was funded by the Chinese National Thousand Talents Program for Distinguished Young Scholars, US National Institutes of Health, the Continue reading >>

Why Smoking Is Especially Bad If You Have Diabetes

Why Smoking Is Especially Bad If You Have Diabetes

Smoking is a health hazard for anyone, but for people with diabetes or a high risk of developing the disease, lighting up can contribute to serious health complications. Researchers have long known that diabetes patients who smoke have higher blood sugar levels, making their disease more difficult to control and putting them at greater danger of developing complications such as blindness, nerve damage, kidney failure and heart problems. Now a new study offers the most definitive evidence why: the nicotine in cigarettes. Xiao-Chuan Liu, a professor of chemistry at the California State Polytechnic University, presented results from his study of blood samples from smokers at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition. He found that nicotine, when added to human blood samples, raised levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by as much as 34%. Liu expects a similar effect occurs with diabetic smokers, whom he hopes to test in a follow up study. Hemoglobin A1c — a combination of hemoglobin (which ferries oxygen) and glucose — is a standard indicator of blood sugar content in the body. Doctors always knew smoking can make diabetes worse, but, Liu says, “now we know why. It’s the nicotine. This study also implies that if you are a smoker, and not diabetic, that your chances of developing diabetes is higher.” The higher A1c levels rise in the blood, he says, the more likely it is that other protein complexes, which build up in various tissues of the body, from the eyes, heart and blood vessels, can form, leading to blockages in circulation and other complications. But perhaps more importantly, the results also suggest that nicotine replacement products such as patches and nicotine-containing electronic cigarettes, aren’t a safe option for diabetes patients Continue reading >>

3.16 Smoking And Diabetes

3.16 Smoking And Diabetes

Suggested citation: Bellew, B, Greenhalgh, EM & Winstanley, MH. 3.16 Smoking and diabetes. In Scollo, MM and Winstanley, MH [editors]. Tobacco in Australia: Facts and issues. Melbourne: Cancer Council Victoria; 2015. Available from Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is an umbrella term for a number of metabolic diseases which affect the body's ability to control blood glucose levels; it is a disease marked by high blood glucose levels resulting from defective insulin production, insulin action or both. The hormone insulin is produced in the pancreas, and helps the body use glucose for energy. If insulin production or the effectiveness of an individual's insulin is impaired, then diabetes may result.1 There are three major types of diabetes: type 1 (sometimes referred to as 'insulin dependent diabetes'), type 2 (sometimes referred to as 'non-insulin dependent' or 'adult onset' diabetes); and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes most often occurs in childhood or young adulthood (though it can occur at any age), and is the result of low levels of or the inability to produce insulin. People with type 1 diabetes need insulin replacement for survival.1 Based on data from the 2007–08 National Health Survey, 10% of people with diabetes reported that they had type 1, while the majority (88%) of people with diabetes reported type 2. Another 2% of people reported diabetes, but did not know which type.2 These figures correspond to an estimated 818 200 persons (4% of the population) in 2007–08 with diabetes mellitus who had been medically diagnosed (excluding those with gestational diabetes).2 As noted, type 2 is the most common form of diabetes; it occurs mostly in people aged 40 years and over and is marked by reduced or less effective insulin. Although uncommon in childhood, it is Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Tobacco Use

Diabetes And Tobacco Use

It is a known fact that smoking poses serious health risks, negatively impacting vital organs like the lungs and the heart.2 But did you know that smoking can increase your risk for Type 2 diabetes?2 What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which the body’s blood sugar levels are abnormally elevated. When digested, carbohydrates from food are turned into a natural sugar called glucose, which is used by the body’s cells for energy. Glucose is ushered into the cells by a hormone called insulin. People with diabetes are unable to make or efficiently use insulin, causing glucose to build up in the blood without making its way to the cells.3 There are two types of diabetes. The most common of these is Type 2, or adult-onset diabetes, which accounts for more than 90% of all diabetes cases3 and is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States.1 Research has found that smoking is a direct cause of Type 2 diabetes. In fact, smokers are 30-40% more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than nonsmokers, and smoking is responsible for about 9,000 diabetes deaths in the U.S. per year.2 Diabetes is a serious yet manageable health condition, but smoking can worsen the disease, causing additional problems.4 Smokers with diabetes are more likely to have trouble regulating their blood sugar levels with treatment than diabetic nonsmokers.1 Diabetics who smoke are also at a higher risk for disease complications than nonsmokers with diabetes, including: 1,3 Poor blood circulation in the legs and feet that can lead to infections, ulcers, and even amputation of toes and feet Heart disease Kidney disease Retinopathy (an eye disease which can lead to blindness) Nerve damage in the arms and legs that can cause numbness, pain, weakness, and poor mobility How Can You Lower Your Risk fo Continue reading >>

Smoking & Diabetes

Smoking & Diabetes

Smoking is bad for everyone. It increases your risk for lung cancer, heart attack and stroke. Each day, 100 Canadians die of a smoking-related illness.1 People with diabetes face an even greater risk from smoking: just like high blood glucose (sugar) levels, the poisonous chemicals in cigarette smoke attack blood vessels. This contributes to hardening of the arteries (or what is known as atherosclerosis) which impairs the blood’s ability to carry oxygen throughout the body. Together, the deadly combination of high blood glucose (sugar) and smoking dramatically increases damage to the blood vessels that feed the heart, brain, eyes, kidneys and peripheral nerves, speeding up the long-term complications of diabetes. How can I quit? The first critical step is to make the decision to quit. It may help to set a firm, short-term quit date. In the meantime, get as much information as you can from your doctor or pharmacist about options to help you quit, including medications that can increase your chances of success. Similar to the day-to-day process of managing your diabetes through diet, exercise and regular blood glucose (sugar) testing, managing to quit smoking is something that is best approached by incorporating it into your daily routine. Why is it so hard to quit? Simply put, nicotine is among the most addictive drugs. Smoking is not a habit or a lifestyle choice. It’s an addiction that over time, changes brain chemistry. Nicotine has its effect by attaching to certain receptors in the brain, and when you become a smoker these receptors increase in number. If not regularly stimulated with nicotine, the increased receptors begin to make a person feel very unpleasant, a phenomenon known as withdrawal. Both withdrawal and the craving it causes are tied to changes in br Continue reading >>

Study: Quitting Smoking Raises Diabetes Risk

Study: Quitting Smoking Raises Diabetes Risk

(Health.com) -- People who quit smoking are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes after they kick the habit, most likely due to post-quitting weight gain, a new study has found. Experts caution, however, that the benefits of quitting smoking -- including a lower risk of heart attack and lung cancer -- far outweigh the risk of developing diabetes, which can be treated with diet, exercise, and medication. The study, which was published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine, followed nearly 11,000 middle-aged people without diabetes -- 45 percent of whom were smokers -- over a nine-year period. Compared to those who had never smoked, the people who quit smoking during the study had a 73 percent increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes three years after quitting. The increased risk was even more dramatic in the years immediately after quitting. "Based on our analysis, [it's] probably 80 percent or even 90 percent," says the study's lead author, Hsin-Chieh (Jessica) Yeh, an assistant professor of internal medicine and epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. By contrast, the smokers who continued to light up were only 31 percent more likely than non-smokers to have developed diabetes at the three-year mark. Previous research has shown that smokers are at higher risk of developing diabetes. Watch Dr. Gupta explain how quitters can lower diabetes risk There was some good news in the study: The increased risk of diabetes does not appear to last over the long term. After 12 years without cigarettes, the ex-smokers were at no greater risk for diabetes than the people who had never smoked, the study showed. Health.com: Smoking ads through history In all, 1,254 participants in the study developed type 2 diabetes, a chronic disease in which the bo Continue reading >>

Smoking And Diabetes‏

Smoking And Diabetes‏

Smoking has been proven conclusively to cause a wide range of health problems. Tobacco users are far more likely to succumb to heart disease, lung cancer, emphysema, and stroke than non-smokers. Additional health problems are also commonly caused by smoking, and some existing health problems can also be greatly exacerbated by tobacco use including several types of cancer, eye diseases, lung infections, and allergies, among others. As dangerous as smoking is to people as a whole, it is far more dangerous for those with diabetes, both type one and type two. This is, in part, because both smoking and diabetes can lead to similar health complications. Additionally, tobacco products may make diabetes symptoms worse. One reason smokers who also have diabetes may encounter health issues is because both tobacco products and diabetes deteriorate the body in similar ways. For instance, both can lead to eye diseases like glaucoma and cataracts. Both also damage blood vessels and arteries over time, leading to heart disease, stroke, and other cardiopulmonary conditions. While not everyone who smokes will get these conditions, those who are also diabetic have a much higher risk. There are also many other issues which may arise for those who are diabetic and smoke. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, smoking has been discovered to actually cause Type II Diabetes. Those who smoke are between 30% and 40% more likely to get the condition than those who don’t, when comparing individuals with similar dietary habits. Among those who are already diabetic, smoking also makes the condition much harder to control. Use of tobacco products raises blood sugar levels. In those who already have problems controlling their blood sugar, this can be detrimental. Not only that Continue reading >>

Smoking And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Smoking And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: INTRODUCTION Smoking is one of the modifiable risk factors for many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease, asthma, and diabetes. However, the adverse effects of smoking on diabetes have been generally under recognized. In the guidelines from the Korean Diabetes Association, smoking cessation is recommended as one of the most important steps in preventing the cardiovascular complications of diabetes [1]. Many studies have shown that the adverse effects of smoking on diabetes mellitus are not only diabetic macrovascular complications but the causal nature of its association with diabetes and the progression of diabetic microvascular complications has yet to be explored. Although smoking is known to decrease body weight, it is associated with central obesity [2]. Smoking also increases inflammation and oxidative stress [3], to directly damage β-cell function [4] and to impair endothelial function [5]. The prevalence of smoking in Korean men is near 50%, which is the highest smoking rate in the Western Pacific region. In addition to obesity, the high prevalence of smoking is one of the major health problems for Korea's public health. This review is about the various smoking effects on diabetes mellitus, diabetic complications, and diabetic incidence. Understanding the hazardous effects of smoking on diabetes mellitus may lead to more emphasis on smoking prevention and smoking cessation as important strategies in the management of diabetes mellitus. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Smoking

Diabetes And Smoking

Smoking is bad for everyone, and it's especially risky if you have diabetes. The nicotine in cigarettes makes your blood vessels harden and narrow, curbing blood flow around your body. And since diabetes makes you more likely to get heart disease, you definitely don't want the extra risk that comes from smoking. No matter how much or how long you have smoked, quitting helps your health. You'll feel better, look better (since smoking gives you wrinkles before you're old), and you'll save money, too. If you have diabetes, here are some tips to help you quit, based on guidelines from the American Cancer Society. 1. Set a quit date. You don't have to quit immediately. If you know it's more realistic for you to kick the habit after a big event or deadline, make that your quit date. 2. Tell your doctor the date. You'll have built-in support. 3. Make smoking inconvenient. Don't have anything you need to smoke on hand, like ash trays, lighters, or matches. 4. Breathe deeply when you crave a cigarette. Hold your breath for 10 seconds, and then exhale slowly. 5. Spend time in places where you can't smoke because it's banned, such as a library, theater, or museum. 6. Hang out with friends who are also working on kicking the habit. Go to places that don't allow smoking. 7. Reach for low-calorie, good-for-you foods instead of smoking. Choose fresh fruit and crisp, crunchy vegetables. 8. Exercise to ease your stress instead of lighting up. 9. Go decaf. Pass up coffee, soft drinks that have caffeine, and alcohol, as they all can increase the urge to smoke. 10. Keep your hands too busy for cigarettes. Draw, text, type, or knit, for examples. 11. Hack your habits. If you always had a cigarette on your work break, take a walk, talk to a friend, or do something else instead. 12. Wrap a ci Continue reading >>

Impact Of Cigarette Smoking In Type 2 Diabetes Development

Impact Of Cigarette Smoking In Type 2 Diabetes Development

Impact of cigarette smoking in type 2 diabetes development 1Center for Metabolic Biology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 852873704, USA; 2Division of Neurology, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ 850134496, USA; 3Division of Clinical Research, Hirosaki National Hospital, Hirosaki 0368545, Japan Received 2009 Mar 1; Accepted 2009 Mar 22. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Many patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) are at risk for micro and macro vascular complications, which could be observed in heavy smokers. Cigarette smoking increases the risk for type 2 diabetes incidence. Nicotine, acknowledged as the major pharmacologically active chemical in tobacco, is responsible for the association between cigarette smoking and development of diabetes. This minireview summarized recent studies on nicotine effects on insulin action and insulin secretion, indicating the impact of nicotine on type 2 diabetes development. Keywords: smoking, diabetes, nicotinic receptor Smoking is a well-known risk factor for coronary heart disease 1 , 2 , which is caused probably by vascular disability via its pathological change such as arteriosclerosis through the mechanisms of inflammation and endothelial dysfunctions 3 , 4 , 5 . Smoking also increases sympathetic nerve activity, which in turn increases vascular tone, increases energy expenditure, secretes corticoid 6 , 7 , 8 , and leads to heart overburden. Diabetes also causes micro- and macro vascular complications resulted from prolonged-hyperglycemia 9 , 10 . To some extent, the effects in physical conditions of smoking and diabetes are similar, which brings a question if there is association between smoking and diabetes. After decades of studies, accumulating lines of epidemic evidence have suggested Continue reading >>

Can Smoking Cause Diabetes?

Can Smoking Cause Diabetes?

Diabetes is caused by a combination of genes and triggers. If your DNA, the genetic blue print that makes you...well, YOU...carries the foundation for diabetes, then the right combination of age and weight sets the process in motion. So you cannot give yourself diabetes simply by eating too much sugar, by smoking, or by kissing a diabetic. But, before you go away, now that you have diabetes, smoking is an even worse idea than it was before you had diabetes. And what I’m worried about is your heart. Most diabetics actually die from heart disease. Diabetes is a huge risk factor for heart disease. Others include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and yep—you guessed it—smoking! Now smoking is not good for anyone, regardless of the rest of their health. It can quite literally kill you overtime. The great news is that once you stop smoking your body begins to repair the damage in a matter of days. Of course, it takes years to repair all the damage but consider the following: 20 minutes after your last cigarette your blood pressure drops to normal, your pulse rate falls to normal levels, and your body temperature in your hands and feet rises to normal. 8 hours after your last cigarette the carbon dioxide level in your blood drops to normal and the oxygen level in your blood returns to normal levels. 24 hours after your last cigarette your chance of a heart attack drops measurably. 48 hours after your last cigarette nerve endings start to re-grow, increasing your ability to smell and taste. 72 hours after your last cigarette your body is free of nicotine, your bronchial tubes relax and your lung capacity increases. 2 weeks after your last cigarette your circulation improves, walking becomes easier again. 3 months after your last cigarette your lung function has incre Continue reading >>

Quitting Smoking Carries Diabetes Risk

Quitting Smoking Carries Diabetes Risk

Smoking Cessation Temporarily Increases Diabetes Risk, but Researchers Say the Benefits of Quitting Outweigh the Risk Jan. 4, 2010 -- Cigarette smoking is linked to an increased risk of diabetes , but quitting the habit, ironically, may increase diabetes risk in the short term, a new study says. Researchers say people who quit smoking typically gain weight , which may explain the temporary period of increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes , which is closely linked to obesity . The findings are reported in the Jan. 5 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. The authors stress that their findings should not deter people from quitting smoking, which is also a risk factor for heart disease , stroke , atherosclerosis , and cancer . They say that the health benefits of smoking cessation outweigh the short-term risk. The message is: Dont even start to smoke, Hsin-Chieh Yeh, PhD, an epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and lead author of the study, says in a news release. If you smoke, give it up. Thats the right thing to do. She says smokers who quit have to also watch their weight because obesity is tied to diabetes, cardiovascular disease , and other health problems. Researchers in 1987-1989 enrolled 10,892 middle-aged adults who did not have diabetes and followed them for nine years. The study found that overall, people who smoked had a 42% higher risk of developing diabetes during the follow-up period than nonsmokers. However, smokers who quit had a 70% higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first six years after quitting than people who had never smoked. The risks of developing type 2 diabetes were highest in the first three years after quitting smoking, then returned to normal after 10 years, the researchers say. Among those who Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Does Alcohol And Tobacco Use Increase The Risk Of Diabetes?

Yes, alcohol and tobacco use may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Alcohol Although studies show that drinking moderate amounts of alcohol may actually lower the risk of diabetes, the opposite is true for people who drink greater amounts of alcohol. Moderate alcohol use is defined as one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. Too much alcohol may cause chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which can impair its ability to secrete insulin and potentially lead to diabetes. Tobacco Tobacco use can increase blood sugar levels and lead to insulin resistance. The more you smoke, the greater your risk of diabetes. People who smoke heavily — more than 20 cigarettes a day — have almost double the risk of developing diabetes compared with people who don’t smoke. Continue reading >>

Smoking & Diabetes

Smoking & Diabetes

Smoking is bad for everyone. It increases your risk for lung cancer, heart attack and stroke. Each day, 100 Canadians die of a smoking-related illness.1 People with diabetes face an even greater risk from smoking: just like high blood glucose (sugar) levels, the poisonous chemicals in cigarette smoke attack blood vessels. This contributes to hardening of the arteries (or what is known as atherosclerosis) which impairs the blood’s ability to carry oxygen throughout the body. Together, the deadly combination of high blood glucose (sugar) and smoking dramatically increases damage to the blood vessels that feed the heart, brain, eyes, kidneys and peripheral nerves, speeding up the long-term complications of diabetes. How can I quit? The first critical step is to make the decision to quit. It may help to set a firm, short-term quit date. In the meantime, get as much information as you can from your doctor or pharmacist about options to help you quit, including medications that can increase your chances of success. Similar to the day-to-day process of managing your diabetes through diet, exercise and regular blood glucose (sugar) testing, managing to quit smoking is something that is best approached by incorporating it into your daily routine. Why is it so hard to quit? Simply put, nicotine is among the most addictive drugs. Smoking is not a habit or a lifestyle choice. It’s an addiction that over time, changes brain chemistry. Nicotine has its effect by attaching to certain receptors in the brain, and when you become a smoker these receptors increase in number. If not regularly stimulated with nicotine, the increased receptors begin to make a person feel very unpleasant, a phenomenon known as withdrawal. Both withdrawal and the craving it causes are tied to changes in br Continue reading >>

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