diabetestalk.net

Can Diabetes Affect Driving?

Driving And Type 2 Diabetes

Driving And Type 2 Diabetes

Having diabetes is not an issue for driving but if you are taking medications that leave you at risk of hypoglycaemia you must take extra precautions and you must inform the National Driver Licence Service. CHECK WITH YOUR PHARMACIST IF YOUR MEDICATIONS LEAVE YOU AT RISK OF HYPOGLYCEAMIA e.g. Insulin or Sulphonylureas such as Gliclazide (Diamicron®) or generic versions such as Diabrezide, Diaglyc, Diacronal MR, Diaclide MR, Gliclazide, Zycron MR.or the post prandial regular Nateglinide (Starlix®). If you are not at risk of hypoglycaemia you do not need to inform the National Driver Licence Service (NDLS). Medicine regimes change therefore remember to tell the NDLS if you start any of the medications that increase the risk of hypoglyceamia. Drivers at risk of hypoglycaemia are advised to take the following precautions: • You must always carry your glucose meter and blood glucose strips with you. You must check your blood glucose before the first journey and every two hours whilst you are driving. • In each case if your blood glucose is 5.0mmol/l or less, take a snack. If it is less than 4.0mmol/l or you feel hypoglycaemic, do not drive and take appropriate action to correct glucose level. • If hypoglycaemia develops while driving, stop the vehicle as soon as possible. • You must switch off the engine, remove the keys from the ignition and move from the driver’s seat. • You must not start driving until 45 minutes after blood glucose has returned to normal. It takes up to 45 minutes for the brain to recover fully. • Always keep an emergency supply of fast-acting carbohydrate such as glucose tablets, lucozade or sweets within easy reach in the vehicle. • You should carry personal identification to show that you have diabetes in case of injury in a road tra Continue reading >>

Driving & Your Rights

Driving & Your Rights

What is Diabetes Canada’s position on driving? People with diabetes have the right to be assessed for a license to drive a motor vehicle on an individual basis in accordance with Diabetes Canada guidelines for private and commercial driving. Read the Diabetes Canada's full position statement on driving and licensing, including background and rationale. What are Diabetes Canada's recommendations for private or commercial drivers? In October 2015, the Clinical and Scientific Section of the Diabetes Canada published Diabetes and Driving: 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association Updated Recommendations for Private and Commercial Drivers. I have been diagnosed with diabetes. Can I keep driving? Most likely. In consultation with your doctor, a decision will be made as to whether you are medically fit to drive. In assessing the suitability of people with diabetes to drive, medical evaluations document any complications and assess blood glucose (BG) control, including the frequency and severity of any hypoglycemic incidents. Diabetes and its complications can affect driving performance due to: Impaired sensory or motor function Diabetic eye disease (retinopathy) Nerve damage (neuropathy) Kidney disease (nephropathy) Cardiovascular disease (CVD) Peripheral vascular disease and stroke Incidents of hypoglycemia Motor vehicle licensing authorities can require licensed drivers to be examined for their medical fitness to drive. You should not have difficulty obtaining and maintaining an operator’s license if you: Properly manage your diabetes; Are able to recognize and treat the early symptoms of hypoglycemia; and Do not have complications that may interfere with your ability to drive. Do I have to report diabetes to the motor vehicle licensing authority? Yes. As a rule, anyone applyin Continue reading >>

Driving

Driving

The guidelines for diabetes and driving have recently been updated. This page and resources are currently under review. Please visit the Austroads website for more information. In March 2012, new medical standards came into effect for drivers of both private and commercial vehicles. The new standards are contained in the Austroads document Assessing Fitness to Drive 2012, which replaces the previous standards (Assessing Fitness to Drive 2003). The new standards include the following: Private vehicle drivers treated by glucose-lowering agents other than insulin may generally drive without licence restriction but should be required to have five-yearly reviews. In addition to the sections on hypoglycaemia, there is now a new section on hyperglycaemia for commercial drivers whose diabetes is treated by either insulin or other glucose lowering agents and for private drivers whose diabetes is treated with insulin. The new medical standards address ‘satisfactory control’ of diabetes and state that satisfactory control “will generally be defined as a glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level of less than 9.0% measured within the preceding three months”. The use of the term ‘generally’ is intended to allow medical practitioners to make their own clinical judgements on the ‘satisfactory control’ of diabetes on a case-by-case basis. ‘Satisfactory control’ of diabetes is required for a conditional licence to be considered by the driver licence authority. If you take medication for diabetes and you are a commercial driver, you must have an annual review by a specialist in endocrinology or diabetes to ensure you meet the specific criteria to hold a conditional licence. If you are a private driver and your diabetes is treated with insulin you must have a review at least e Continue reading >>

Driving When You Have Diabetes

Driving When You Have Diabetes

d For most people, driving represents freedom, control and competence. Driving enables most people to get to the places they want or need to go. For many people, driving is important economically – some drive as part of their job or to get to and from work. Driving is a complex skill. Our ability to drive safely can be affected by changes in our physical, emotional and mental condition. This brochure is designed to give you the information you need to talk to your health care team about driving and diabetes. How can having diabetes affect my driving? In the short term, diabetes can make your blood glucose (sugar) levels too high or too low. As a result, diabetes can make you: Feel sleepy or dizzy Feel confused Have blurred vision Lose consciousness or have a seizure In the long run, diabetes can lead to problems that affect driving. Diabetes may cause nerve damage in your hands, legs and feet, or eyes. In some cases, diabetes can cause blindness or lead to amputation. Can I still drive with diabetes? Yes, people with diabetes are able to drive unless they are limited by certain complications of diabetes. These include severe low blood glucose levels or vision problems. If you are experiencing diabetes-related complications, you should work closely with your diabetes health care team to find out if diabetes affects your ability to drive. If it does, discuss if there are actions you can take to continue to drive safely. What can I do to ensure that I can drive safely with diabetes? Insulin and some oral medications can cause blood glucose levels to become dangerously low (hypoglycemia). Do not drive if your blood glucose level is too low. If you do, you might not be able to make good choices, focus on your driving or control your car. Your health care team can help you Continue reading >>

Driving With Diabetes

Driving With Diabetes

Tweet Having diabetes does not mean you cannot drive a car or a motorbike. Given that your diabetes is well controlled, and your doctor states that you are safe to drive, there is no reason why you cannot have a driving licence or hang on to your existing licence. Nonetheless, you may need to let your car insurance company and the Driving and Vehicle Licence Agency (DVLA) know that you have diabetes depending on your type of diabetes and how it is controlled. You should also keep up to date with the latest DVLA guideline changes to driving with diabetes. Who do I need to inform about my diabetes? No matter how your diabetes is treated, you must by law inform your insurance company that you have diabetes. If your diabetes is treated with insulin, you must inform the DVLA. If you are applying for a driving licence for the first time, and your diabetes is treated with tablets or insulin, you also must inform the DVLA. In addition: You must inform the DVLA if any diabetes complications develop that may affect your ability to drive safely. If you fail to inform the DVLA or your insurance company then your driving insurance will be invalid. You do not need to tell the DVLA if you are treated by diet alone or by tablets that do not bring on hypoglycemia. However, if you change from tablets to insulin treatment, then they must be informed. You do not need to tell the DVLA if you are treated by: Diet alone By tablets which carry no risk of hypoglycemia Non-insulin injectable medication such as Byetta or Victoza (unless you are also on tablets which do carry a risk of hypos) Tablets which are deemed to carry a risk of hypoglycemia are sulfonylureas and prandial glucose regulators. Unless you have other complications or reasons that may affect your ability to drive. For informatio Continue reading >>

Driving With Diabetes: Preparation Is Key

Driving With Diabetes: Preparation Is Key

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. Driving With Diabetes: Preparation Is Key Parallel parking, left turns ... and glucose monitoring? For a diabetic seeking a driver's license, a good bill of health is just as important as passing driver's ed. A history of poor glucose control can be a red flag for diabetics, as extreme blood sugar levels can adversely affect driving. And new drivers must be particularly aware of these added medical factors. According to Carol Grafford, president of the Michigan Organization of Diabetes Educators, or MODE, blood glucose readings below 70 mg/dL can cause slower response times and affect a person's ability to make good road choices. Other common symptoms for hypo- and hyperglycemia include feeling drowsy and confused, having blurred vision and being disoriented -- a hazardous list of problems for anyone who finds themselves behind the wheel of a car. "It would be fair to say that having a very low or very high blood sugar is equivalent to drunk driving," she said. Fortunately, a low blood-sugar incident while driving is a problem that can be avoided. "People with diabetes, even people who take insulin, should have no problems with driving," Dr. Irl Hirsch, professor of metabolism, endocrinology and nutrition at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle told ABCNEWSs.com's OnCall+ Diabetes Resource. "The key to driving and diabetes is being responsible, no different for any other chronic medical condition." And being responsible, he said, means that those with diabetes should be certain to check their blood glucose levels before driving -- especially if they take insulin. "What we encourage our patients to do is check the blood sugar if it has been more than one hour after eati Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Affect Your Driving Licence?

Does Diabetes Affect Your Driving Licence?

If you are taking medication for diabetes, you are required totell the Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads aboutyour condition, but it doesn't apply to everyone living with thecondition. If you apply for or renew your Queensland driver licence, youmust notify the department about any medical conditionthat is likely to adversely affect your ability to drivesafely. Assessing fitness todriveoutline the requirements for private and commercialdrivers. An updated version was released in October last year. Withregards to diabetes, the guidelines take into account how theeffects of diabetes may affect a person's ability to drive safely,in particular hypoglycaemia and when organs have been seriouslyaffected. Looking at the guidelines for private vehicles, people withdiabetes who do not take diabetes medications do not need to notifythe driving authority between licence renewals and there is nolicence restriction. People with diabetes taking oral medication/s are to notify thedriving authority, there is no conditional licence, and it isrecommended the status of the licence is reviewed every fiveyears. People with diabetes requiring insulin should also notify thedriving authority and a two-yearly review is required forlicensing. If your diabetes and medication impact your ability to drive andyou don't inform Transport, you may be fined more than $7,300 andhave your driver's licence cancelled. Keep in mind, your health professional is legally required toinform the department about your medical condition. You can advise the department in person at a transport and motoring customerservice centre or by emailing or mailing a completed medical conditionnotification (form F4355) to the address on the form. If you are unsure about your individual requirement, speak withyour Continue reading >>

Driving

Driving

Are you safe to drive? If you drive when you’re diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you must notify the DVLA using the confidential medical form DIAB1. It’s possible that the DVLA might write to your doctor to check whether you should continue to drive. The main concern is the possibility of you having a hypo while you are at the wheel, which could cause an accident. This could lead to you being charged for driving under the influence (of insulin), dangerous driving or driving without due care and attention. Even a mild hypo can affect your driving. Legally you need to test your blood glucose 30 minutes before you start driving, and then every two hours of your journey. You don’t have to test before each journey if you are doing lots of smaller trips at one time, as long as you test every two hours. You also need to make sure you have a hypo treatment and a snack with long-acting carbs in your car. If you feel your levels are low, stop driving as soon as it’s safe, remove the key from the ignition and get out of the driver’s seat. Don’t check your glucose level or treat your hypo while you’re driving. Once you’ve treated your hypo, wait for 15 minutes, recheck your blood glucose and eat some carbohydrate. When you feel completely normal, wait 45 minutes until you drive again. If you are considering learning to drive, or have just been diagnosed with type 1, consider discussing your driving and blood glucose management routine with your healthcare team. Driving other vehicles Being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes can also affect your entitlement to drive a minibus, coach, bus or lorry. You’ll need to fill out your medical questionnaire and report, then a specialist medical questionnaire you’re given by your diabetologist or GP. You’ll then need an appoin Continue reading >>

Driving

Driving

If you have diabetes, you can hold a driver’s licence or learner permit as long as your diabetes is well managed. The main concern for licensing authorities is the possibility of hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) while driving. Diabetes complications like eye problems are also of a concern as it affects your ability to drive safely. You must inform the licensing authorities if you develop diabetes. You should also advise your motor vehicle insurance company. For the past few years there has been great concern about the national guidelines being used to assess fitness to drive for people with diabetes. Diabetes Australia and our state and territory member organisations have led the way on advocating changes to these guidelines on behalf of all people with diabetes to make sure they only address aspects directly affecting someone’s ability to drive. We are very pleased to advise that, from 1 October 2016, revised and clearer guidelines will help Australians with diabetes and their healthcare teams decide if it is safe to drive. Diabetes Australia has worked closely with diabetes specialist clinicians and researchers in the Australian Diabetes Society (ADS) and credentialled diabetes educators in the Australian Diabetes Educators Association (ADEA),and together we have advised and collaborated with the National Transport Commission (NTC), to make the guidelines fairer and safer for people with diabetes. The old guidelines used a person’s average blood glucose measurement over a three-month period (the HbA1c measurement) to determine if their diabetes management was adequate to indicate they were safe to drive. This number was only ever intended as a guide for doctors, but unfortunately many people with diabetes had their licences suspended because this ‘guide’ me Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Affect Ability To Drive Safely

Diabetes Can Affect Ability To Drive Safely

A - A + Diabetes affects more than 25 million people in the United States alone, the majority of whom are over the age of 16 and a number of whom are licensed to drive a vehicle. The operation of a motor vehicle requires complex interactions of motor and cognitive functions; medical conditions that affect these functions many times increase the risk of motor vehicle accidents. Where diabetes is concerned, hypoglycemia is the most common factor that has been demonstrated to increase motor vehicle accident rates. When people with diabetes are compared with those who do not have diabetes, analysis has shown that the relative risk of motor vehicle accidents are increased by 12-19%. In comparison, the rate for sleep apnea is 2.4% and attention deficit disorder is 4.4%. Research suggests that people who are at risk for hypoglycemia-related motor vehicle accidents might have some characteristics in common, to include a history of severe hypoglycemia or hypoglycemia-related driving accidents. Studies have also demonstrated that people with a history of hypoglycemia-related driving accidents have counter-regulatory responses to hypoglycemia and experience greater cognitive impairments during moderate hypoglycemia. Driving and Diabetes For the majority of people who drive, doing so represents freedom, control and competence. Driving a vehicle enables most people to go to the place they want or need to. For many people, driving is economically important because they drive as a part of their job, or they drive to get to and from their place of employment. Driving really is a complex skill. A person's ability to drive safely might be affected by changes in their physical, mental, or emotional condition. Diabetes can make a person's blood sugar levels too low or high. Due to low or h Continue reading >>

Driving With Diabetes: The Facts

Driving With Diabetes: The Facts

Given it’s World Diabetes Day today (Monday 14 November) what better time to highlight the potential effects of diabetes mellitus on one aspect of daily life so many people take for granted: driving. Diabetes mellitus, commonly known as diabetes, is a chronic disease linked to high levels of glucose in the blood. Statistics show that the number of people with diabetes is increasing every year. The effects on living with diabetes day to day are well known, but what’s not so well known is how diabetes can also affect your driving. How does diabetes affect your driving? Millions of people with diabetes live full and busy lives. For many, being able to drive plays an important part in that. However, if you have diabetes, there is a risk of developing hypoglycaemia and ‘severe hypoglycaemia’ (a diabetic emergency that will affect your fitness to drive). Hypoglycaemic episodes can be very sudden events, with symptoms ranging from feeling nauseous to a loss of concentration, and potentially loss of consciousness. An episode of ‘severe hypoglycaemia’ means you’ll need assistance from another person. This is why it’s so important that you keep your diabetes under control. Treating diabetes Diabetes can be treated with insulin, tablets and/or diet control – it all depends on the individual. The treatment aims to control your blood glucose levels, and attempt to avoid the extremes of hyper and hypoglycaemia. Do you need to tell DVLA that you have diabetes? If you’re keeping your diabetes under control with diet only, then you don’t need to tell DVLA. However, if you're taking medication to control your diabetes, the following applies: So, to summarise, it’s a legal requirement to tell DVLA if you have a medical condition that could affect your driving. Of c Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Driving

Diabetes And Driving

Of the nearly 19 million people in the U.S. with diagnosed diabetes (1), a large percentage will seek or currently hold a license to drive. For many, a driver's license is essential to work; taking care of family; securing access to public and private facilities, services, and institutions; interacting with friends; attending classes; and/or performing many other functions of daily life. Indeed, in many communities and areas of the U.S. the use of an automobile is the only (or the only feasible or affordable) means of transportation available. There has been considerable debate whether, and the extent to which, diabetes may be a relevant factor in determining driver ability and eligibility for a license. This position statement addresses such issues in light of current scientific and medical evidence. Sometimes people with a strong interest in road safety, including motor vehicle administrators, pedestrians, drivers, other road users, and employers, associate all diabetes with unsafe driving when in fact most people with diabetes safely operate motor vehicles without creating any meaningful risk of injury to themselves or others. When legitimate questions arise about the medical fitness of a person with diabetes to drive, an individual assessment of that person's diabetes management—with particular emphasis on demonstrated ability to detect and appropriately treat potential hypoglycemia—is necessary in order to determine any appropriate restrictions. The diagnosis of diabetes is not sufficient to make any judgments about individual driver capacity. This document provides an overview of existing licensing rules for people with diabetes, addresses the factors that impact driving for this population, and identifies general guidelines for assessing driver fitness and de Continue reading >>

Driving & Diabetes

Driving & Diabetes

Save for later Having diabetes does not mean that you need to give up driving, but it does mean that you need to plan in advance before you get behind the wheel. We have been campaigning for many years to ensure that you will be able to continue driving safely and without any unnecessary restrictions. This information can help you ensure that your driving is hazard-free. If you require further information, please see theDriver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA)website (or theDVAin Northern Ireland), or call ourHelpline. Group 1 driver (cars and motorbikes) If you are on insulin, you must tell the DVLA (in the UK) or DVA (Northern Ireland). Your licence will then be renewed every one, two, or three years. Any changes to your condition or treatment which occur between renewals (e.g complications which might affect your ability to drive safely) should be reported when they happen. Drivers who are under medical supervision by a doctor do not need to notify if insulin is used for a temporary period only (less than three months, or for gestational diabetes less than three months after delivery) unless they have problems with hypos/severe hypos/hypo unawareness. If you are a Group 1 driver on non-insulin medication for diabetes you do not need to notify unless: You have had two episodes of severe hypoglycaemia within the last 12 months (where you were completely dependent on another person to treat your hypo). You develop impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia (where you are unable to recognise the hypo when it starts). You experience a disabling hypo whilst driving. You have other medical conditions or changes to existing medical conditions which could affect your ability to drive safely. Examples are: problems with vision (e.g. laser treatment/injections), circulation, or sens Continue reading >>

Driving With Diabetes

Driving With Diabetes

Has diabetes affected your experience of driving? It can. How about getting licensed to drive? In some states, diabetes can make obtaining a driver license much harder. The biggest risk in driving with diabetes is low blood glucose. Our brains run on glucose, and when glucose gets low, it’s very hard to think or react. This is why authorities can be suspicious of people’s ability to drive with diabetes. One of the largest studies on safe driving with diabetes was published by University of Virginia researchers in 2003. At diabetes specialty clinics in seven US and four European cities, about 1,000 adults with Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes, and without diabetes completed an anonymous questionnaire concerning diabetes and driving. The results showed that drivers with Type 1 reported significantly more crashes and moving violations. Drivers with Type 2 did not, even when they were on insulin. Nearly all the accidents were related to hypoglycemic (low blood glucose) episodes. People who injected insulin were more likely to crash than those who used an insulin pump. Fewer than half of people with either type had discussed driving with their doctor. The researchers found that not checking glucose before driving was a big risk factor for accidents, and “encouraged [all physicians] to talk to their type 1 diabetic patients about hypoglycemia and driving.” There may not be studies, but on many Internet bulletin boards, people with Type 2 have reported difficulty driving from either high or low blood glucose. People talk about “brain fog” as a symptom that can come from lows or highs. Some commented that for people who typically run high, getting down to “normal” can feel like having a low and fog your thinking. If you ever feel fuzzy while driving, the America Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Driving

Diabetes And Driving

You can be fined up to £1,000 if you don’t tell DVLA about a medical condition that affects your driving. You may be prosecuted if you’re involved in an accident as a result. Check with your nurse or doctor if you don’t know what type of medication you’re on. Read leaflet INF188/2 for more information about driving a car or motorbike with diabetes. Diabetes treated by insulin Car or motorbike licence You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated with insulin. You can also fill in form DIAB1 and send it to DVLA. The address is on the form. Bus, coach or lorry licence You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated with insulin. Fill in form VDIAB1I and send it to DVLA. The address is on the form. Read leaflet INS186 if you want to apply for vocational entitlement to drive larger vehicles (C1, C1E, D1, DIE, C, CE, D or DE). Diabetes treated by tablets or non-insulin injections Car or motorbike licence Check with your doctor or nurse to find out if your treatment means you need to tell DVLA. If you do need to tell DVLA, fill in form DIAB1 and send it to the address on the form. Bus, coach or lorry licence You must tell DVLA if your diabetes is treated by tablets or non-insulin injections. You must fill in: form VDIAB1SG if your diabetes is treated by sulphonylurea or glinide tablets form VDIAB1GEN if your diabetes is treated by any other tablets or non-insulin injections Send the form to DVLA. The address is on the form. Diabetes treated by diet Car or motorbike licence You don’t need to tell DVLA. Bus, coach or lorry licence You don’t need to tell DVLA. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes