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Can Cows Get Diabetes

Diabetic Cows | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetic Cows | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community So the cows need to go on a LC diet............oh hang on...........the cows natural diet is grass...........except in the last 50 or so odd years cereal products have been part used as cattle feed.................go figure! Want to take bets on what they're feeding these poor animals? I'd be surprised if 100% grass fed cows get it: Probably pushing them on to the bovine version of the Eatwell Plate Next week from that font of truth, knowledge and absolutely no scaremongering at all, the Daily Mail! : Scientists Cure Diabetes in Cows by Turning Down The Heating! douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 Well-Known Member Who still buys there milk from the milkman? We all moved to supermarkets, because it was cheaper. That pushed the cost cutting on the farmer. That pushed yield up, and cow feed became necessary to increase yield cheaply. so did overfeeding the junk food to fatten cows to produce more milk. So, as with all things in life, you get what you pay for. If you want to support the industry, buy organic, fresh milk direct from your local farm. (Same applies to all the meat you buy from supermarkets, it's purely yield driven) Who still buys there milk from the milkman? We all moved to supermarkets, because it was cheaper. That pushed the cost cutting on the farmer. That pushed yield up, and cow feed became necessary to increase yield cheaply. so did overfeeding the junk food to fatten cows to produce more milk. So, as with all things in life, you get what you pay for. If you want to support the industry, buy organic, fresh milk direct from your local farm. (Same applies to all the meat you buy from supermarkets, it's purely yield driven) A milkman still d Continue reading >>

Calf Diabetes - Irish Moiled Cattle Society

Calf Diabetes - Irish Moiled Cattle Society

Calf Diabetes - Irish Moiled Cattle Society Over recent years a rare Diabetic problem has occurred in a small number of newly born Irish Moiled calves. The Irish Moiled Cattle Society has been working closely with the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) in London to help identify the so- called 'Rouge gene' that is responsible for the problem. Once this gene can be identified then a genetic test can be developed to identify 'carriers of this gene' in the breed population so that eventual elimination of the problem can be achieved. However, it is the responsibility of all breeders to send in DNA (Hair) samples of calves that have had this condition and died consequently, so that research can be carried out by the RVC. Clinical Signs of a Diabetic Calf (Classic Case); Calf born alive and appears to be healthy. 2; Calf may appear slightly hyperactive with more playing/skipping than normal. May be seen drinking water from troughs or puddles and also can be noticed to be urinating more frequent than normal. 4; Calf takes a 'Downward' turn. Calf becomes dull and lethargic 6; Calf becomes dehydrated and very weak, unable to stand. Death is imminent. 4 day old calf is clinically very similar to a calf with septicaemia (common in calves not having received enough colostrum) however in contrast to septicaemic calves, diabetic calves do not respond to antibiotics and fluids given via an intravenous drip. Also when the blood glucose level of such calves are tested levels exceed 30 mmol/l. (Normal = 8 mmol/l) It is important to note that the above describes the classic diabetic case, however, some calves that are born dead (still births) may have the diabetic condition and in 1 case it was reported that a diabetic calf survived until it was 2 weeks old. DNA research and Gene identificat Continue reading >>

Spontaneous Diabetes Mellitus In Animals

Spontaneous Diabetes Mellitus In Animals

1. Introduction Diabetes mellitus is considered as a common metabolic disease diagnosed frequently in canine and feline pathology. On the other hand, clinical syndrome of diabetes is described rarely in other domestic species (cattle, small ruminants, swine and horses) [1-3]. Many similarities with human counterpart are clearly emphasized in the literature, considering the mechanism of this disease. This is the reason why the animals are frequently used in many research studies with respect to etiopathogenesis and treatment [4]. The most of the cases present as main clinical sign the failure of β-cells to produce insulin to support the metabolic needs of the organism. The insidious onset of diabetes may be induced by various causes: diminished synthesis of insulin, decreased sensitivity of target cells and organs to insulin, excess of other hormones and drugs or multiple combinations of these causes [1]. Polyphagia, polyuria and polydipsia are mentioned as the most common clinical signs of uncomplicated diabetes mellitus (non-ketoacidotic). The animal presents persistent hyperglycemia generated by a low cellular uptake of glucose, increased glycogenolisis and gluconeogenesis from amino acid source. All these metabolic disorders are linked with a diminished glucose oxidation. Abnormal gluconeogenesis from amino acids will be clinically expressed as atrophy of the muscles and weight loss. High level of serum lipids is generated by increased lipolysis and decrease entry of fatty acid into adipocytes. Subsequently, the liver exhibits large quantities of mobilized lipids that cannot be used or transformed in lipoproteins. Grossly, the liver appears enlarged, even with hepatomegaly. Prolonged hyperglycemia will generate persistent high level of glucose in primary urine; thes Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cows | To Health With That!

Diabetic Cows | To Health With That!

Thoughts from Amy Neuzil, ND* Naturopathic Doctor, Author, Speaker, Teacher and Ally. And a bit of a goofball. Grass-fed beef is a trendy idea right now, and sometimes its difficult to distinguish the real information from the trend, so lets talk about beef, because god knows we all love beef. There are a number of factors to think about when evaluating this whole issue some of them have been researched and some havent. So lets dive in with cow happiness, cow health, health implications for you and your family and just keep going from there. I know, that sounds like kind of a dumb questions obviously grass fed means the cow has been fed grass. But, does that mean its been fed grass for part of its life, all of its life, only grass or grass mixed with other things? So lets get into the legal nitty gritty. In October 2007 the USDA set voluntary standards to define the term grass fed. These standards suggest that beef should be grass or forage fed for the duration of its life, meaning that it doesnt get grain except as an incidental part of the grass. In general all cattle eat grass for the first 6-12 months, so this really only restricts the last portion of their life. This sounds great but here are the drawbacks: Verification is voluntary, and unless beef displays the USDA process verified shield, were just taking the farmers word for it. In this sense grass-fed is different than pastured. These cows could still be in a penned feed-lot environment, but instead of being given corn or soybeans, theyre given hay. So essentially it still isnt cows in their natural environment. These regulations have no bearing on hormones and antibiotics given to the cattle. Cows can be labeled as grass fed and still be getting daily growth hormones and antibiotics with their hay. This tend Continue reading >>

Argentine Cow Clones To Produce Insulin In Milk

Argentine Cow Clones To Produce Insulin In Milk

BUENOS AIRES (Reuters) - Argentine scientists said on Tuesday they had created four cloned and genetically modified calves capable of producing human insulin in their milk, a step they said could cut the cost of treating diabetes. The newborn Jersey heifers -- who the scientists have named Patagonia 1, 2, 3 and 4 -- will start producing the human hormone when they reach adulthood, said the biotechnology company behind the project, Bio Sidus. “This model of a genetically modified cow is a model that allows us to produce large quantities of products at very low cost,” said managing director Marcelo Criscuolo, adding that insulin produced by cows would be at least 30 percent cheaper. “The cattle-ranching know-how we have in Argentina has really given us a startling advantage in generating the technology,” he said at a news conference. To produce pharmaceutical products from cow’s milk, scientists insert the human gene of interest into an embryo before implanting it into a surrogate mother cow. In this case they used a gene for insulin. Once milk is obtained from the genetically modified cow, it will be purified and refined to extract the insulin. Similar techniques have already been used to produce human proteins in goats and cows. Argentina, the world’s third-biggest beef exporter, is famous for its sweeping Pampas grazing lands and it is one of a handful of countries to have cloned livestock. Bio Sidus started with a cattle fetus taken from a slaughterhouse, removing selected cells from it and splicing in the human insulin gene. Then they used cloning techniques to take the genetically modified nuclei from these cells and fuse them into cattle eggs. The cloning process starts the egg dividing as if it had been fertilized and they were able to implant four emb Continue reading >>

Range Cow Weight Loss Linked To Seasonal Diabetes

Range Cow Weight Loss Linked To Seasonal Diabetes

Range Cow Weight Loss Linked to Seasonal Diabetes LAS CRUCES - An estimated 16 million Americans have type 2 diabetes, and about 6 million of them don't even know it. Now, New Mexico State University scientists have unexpectedly found that range cows can become seasonally diabetic too. New Mexico State University graduate student Richard Waterman, left, and range animal nutritionist Mark Petersen examine a recently developed and patented cattle supplement loaded with protein and a high-calorie ingredient called calcium propionate. NMSU's new range cubes will provide a boost for cows grazing dry winter forage. (01/05/2004)(NMSU Agricultural Communications Photo by J. Victor Espinoza) Instead of putting themselves at risk with unhealthy diets and little exercise, these cattle develop symptoms during the early spring when there's little to eat but crackling dry, dormant grasses. As the summer range greens up, the seasonal effect fades along with the cow's diabetes symptoms, which include weight loss and delays in conceiving calves. To head off this pricey diabetic tendency, NMSU researchers have developed and patented a new feed supplement packed with protein and a beneficial, high-calorie chemical additive called calcium propionate. Calcium propionate is already widely used in the dairy industry to treat ketosis, a condition that causes the cows to burn a large amount of fat in response to milk production after calving. Calcium propionate is also used in breads as a preservative, since it slows mold growth. "We now know that calcium propionate enhances energy metabolism," said Mark Petersen, a range animal nutritionist with NMSU's animal science department. "It will make cows more efficient when grazing dormant winter forage." The new supplement should allow affected cow Continue reading >>

New Research Finds Link Between Cow’s Milk And Diabetes

New Research Finds Link Between Cow’s Milk And Diabetes

A new paper has revealed a connection between dairy consumption and type 1 diabetes. Seven researchers have analyzed over 70 studies, producing a paper which has been accepted by the Journal of Nutrition & Diabetes. The paper explores individuals with genetic risk factors. The researchers state that they have evidence that the protein A1 beta-casein, which is found in cow’s milk “is a primary causal trigger of type 1 diabetes”. There was a positive correlation between the consumption of the protein (found in dairy) and the incidence of type 1 diabetes. The link between A1 beta-casein, cow’s milk, and diabetes was previously confirmed by a study in 2003. The paper notes the possibility that “intensive dairy cattle breeding” may be the cause of milk which has “adverse effects in humans”. Diabetes affects over 30 million adults in America. 1 in 16 people in the UK are living with the disease. In New Zealand, where the paper was partly researched, 5.4% of the population are reported to have diabetes. Publication NZ Farmer highlight one notable example, found in Shanghai. Cases of diabetes increased over 14% between 1997 and 2011. “These increases are mirrored by China’s increased per capita dairy consumption from 6 kilograms in 1992 to 18kg in 2006, and with further substantial increases thereafter. There are no other apparent explanations for this rapid rise in type 1 diabetes in China”. The same publication share that the dairy herds could be bred to produce milk free of the diabetes-linking protein, “but it would take at least 10 years”. Thankfully, recent studies show that younger generations are consuming 550% more plant-based milk. Some alternatives to cow’s milk include almond, oat, rice and soy milk, to name a few. The vegan milk market i Continue reading >>

Why Doesnt Cattle Suffer From Diabetes?

Why Doesnt Cattle Suffer From Diabetes?

Cattle can, in fact, suffer from diabetes. Most commonly, cattle will contract type two diabetes; type one diabetes is far less likely to be seen in cows (although it is not unheard of). Diabetes in cattle can be caused by cows being overweight, or being fed poor quality feed. If cattle are exhibiting signs of diabetes, they should be examined by a vet. The condition is treatable, like it is in humans, with regular injections of insulin. There is no need to keep a diabetic cow separate from other cows (except perhaps for feed reasons) as diabetes is in no way contagious. Diabetes is a medical condition that can be seen in both humans and animals. An individual with the condition will have high levels of sugar in their bloodstream. This is because the person's pancreas does not produce enough insulin, which is needed by the body to help cells absorb glucose (a form of sugar). Alternatively, it could be that insulin is produced but the body is unable to absorb it properly. Luckily, diabetes can be managed with injections of insulin that replace the insulin the body should have produced on its own. Unless you are constantly with your cattle or other animals, it could be very difficult to spot diabetes. Most commonly, the condition is brought to attention if the animal is suffering from frequent kidney or urine infections. Also, there could be a rapid change in appetite and weight - although these two factors may not correlate. For instance, a cow may be seen to eat more but then lose weight. Something else to look out for is excess urination, which could occur more regularly than usual. If you think one of your animals could have diabetes, you should have a vet inspect it just in case. This is a very simply procedure and won't be too expensive. Continue reading >>

Formula Made With Cows Milk Does Not Increase Diabetes Risk

Formula Made With Cows Milk Does Not Increase Diabetes Risk

Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) A 15-year global study of children genetically predisposed to developing Type 1 diabetes found that drinking formula made with cows milk did not increase their risk for developing the disease. A 15-year global study of children genetically predisposed to developing Type 1 diabetes found that drinking formula made with cows milk did not increase such childrens risk for developing the disease. The findings provide a long-awaited answer to the question of whether infant formula made with cows milk plays a role in the development of Type 1 diabetes, according to an international team of researchers that includes scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings are published Jan. 2 in JAMA. Previous studies have indicated that early exposure to complex foreign proteins, such as the proteins in cows milk, may increase the risk of Type 1 diabetes in people with genetic risk for the disease, said one of the studys authors, Neil H. White, MD , a Washington University professor of pediatrics and of medicine. The question was whether delaying the exposure to complex foreign proteins will decrease the risk of diabetes. The answer is no. In the U.S., about 200,000 youth under the age of 20 have Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease caused when the pancreas stops producing the hormone insulin, which regulates the bodys blood-sugar levels. Beginning in 2002, White and his research colleagues examined 2,159 infants in 15 countries. Each infant had a family member affected by Type 1 diabetes, as well as a genetic propensity for the disease that was determined with a blood test given at birth. The babies were assigned randomly to one of two formulas designed for the study. A group of 1,078 infants receive Continue reading >>

Do Cows Get Diabetes?

Do Cows Get Diabetes?

Would you like to merge this question into it? already exists as an alternate of this question. Would you like to make it the primary and merge this question into it? So your answer to your question is yes cows CAN get diabetes!however it is not really heard of that much it is possible. Allliving breathing things can get diabetes, it is mostly in humansbut it can be found in many animals too like cats and dogs, horses,cows and other animals! Anything that eats, drinks, poops etc.. canget it because we all may be different but our bodies all needsugar to function properly. I have a friend who had a cat that wasdiabetic and they had to give him shots... its sad but its true. Helived to be 18 years old! So animals can get it just like us! I would say that the more.... um... how would you say.. refinedsugars like "treats" you give to an animal it would probrablyincrease their chances of contracting the disease. For example. itis more commonly found in cats and dogs because we tend to give ourcats and dogs lots of treats etc... refined sugars... where as acow? they get fed corn and other feed that contain a more naturalsugar therefore their bodies can regulate their sugars better...hence their pancreas are not out of wack because unlike humans theydont eat lots of refined sugars like us! Refined sugars are natural sugars, but they are a most concentratedform of sugar because everything else naturally present isextracted. Thus they give our bodies the greatest sugar impact.Remember, simple carbohydrates are broken down quickly. Sugars area simple carbohydrate. Complex carbohydrates take longer. All ofthe compounds naturally present in the sweet juice of the sugarcane plant are extracted so that all that is left is a pure sugar.It's great for baking because it doesn't add any Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In A 6-month-old Charolais Heifer Calf

Diabetes Mellitus In A 6-month-old Charolais Heifer Calf

Diabetes mellitus in a 6-month-old Charolais heifer calf Copyright and/or publishing rights held by the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association This unthrifty heifer calf was thin, weak and had a dull haircoat. Urinalysis and blood work revealed glycosuria, ketonuria, hypoproteinemia, and hyperglycemia. Euthanasia and necropsy were performed, revealing multifocal intersitial lymphocytic infiltration, an absence of islet cells, and a positive stain for bovine viral diarrhea virus in the pancreas. A January born Charolais heifer calf was presented to the Leduc Veterinary Hospital on June 11, 2002, with a history of progressive weight loss and general unthriftiness. Initially, she was a large, healthy calf that had been selected as a show animal. In a period of 3 wk to 1 mo, she had lost weight and become depressed. The owner noted that she seemed to urinate frequently. The calf was still on the cow; the owner had seen her nursing but did not think that there was an increased frequency in suckling. In this herd, the heifers were vaccinated twice in the fall against bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, parainfluenza-3 virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and Haemophilus somnus (Triangle 4; Ayerst Laboratories, Guelph, Ontario), and heifers and cows received booster vaccinations in the spring. This calf was born to a heifer. No vaccines had been administered to the calf. On physical examination, the calf was thin, slightly weak, and had a dull hair coat. She was slightly depressed. Her temperature (38.5C) and respiratory rate (36 breaths/min) were within normal limits, but her heart rate was slightly elevated (120 beats/min; normal, 100 to 120 beats/min). The calf was approximately 6% dehydrated (based on eye position and skin tent) and her manure was p Continue reading >>

What Is The Link Between Cow's Milk And Diabetes?

What Is The Link Between Cow's Milk And Diabetes?

What is the link between cow’s milk and diabetes? Early exposure to cow’s milk formula has been linked to an immune response that can lead to type 1 diabetes in some children. The immune response involves the body’s immune system reacting to a trigger (which may be cow insulin or a protein called casein from cow’s milk). Structural similarities between the triggering molecule and the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells confuse the human immune system and it attacks the cells in the pancreas. This limits the ability to produce insulin and may lead to diabetes. The avoidance of cow’s milk during the first few months of life may reduce the risk of type I diabetes in some children. See our special section on diabetes for more information or see Viva!Health’s fully-referenced scientific report The Big-D: Defeating Diabetes through Diet and a practical guide The Big-D: defeating diabetes with the D-Diet, both can be downloaded here. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Fatty Liver In A Cow: Case Report

Diabetes Mellitus And Fatty Liver In A Cow: Case Report

, Volume 13, Issue2 , pp 8285 | Cite as Diabetes mellitus and fatty liver in a cow: case report A 5-year-old HolsteinFriesian cow was referred to the Veterinary Clinic of Shiraz University in May 2003 with a history of continuous weight and milk loss for 32days after calving. On clinical examination the animal was moderately depressed. Pulse, respiratory rate and temperature were normal. Rumen motility was decreased in strength and rate. The faeces were dry, firm and scanty. Polyuria and polydypsia were noticed. The results of biochemical analysis revealed a significant rise in urine ketones and glucose. The blood glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride and -hydroxybutyrate levels were considerably above the normal range. At necropsy the liver was enlarged, pale, and yellow and in the cut section the liver parenchyma had a fatty quality. The gross anatomy of the pancreas and kidneys was normal. On microscopic examination severe fatty change in the liver was observed. Fatty change in the acinar tissue of the pancreas was also seen. The number and size of islets were reduced. On the basis of characteristic staining reaction, depletion of beta cells was diagnosed. According to the history, clinical signs and laboratory findings, a combination of diabetes mellitus and fatty liver was diagnosed. Beta CellFatty LiverLiver GlycogenFatty ChangeHepatic Lipogenesis These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves. This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access The authors would like to thank Mr. Shirvani, Mr. Usefi and Mrs. Ghodrat for technical assistance. The authors are very grateful to Mrs. Minoo Arshadi for proof reading and editing the manuscript. Berge Continue reading >>

Is ' Gomutra ' Cows Urine A Good Medicine For Diabetes And Obesity? - Quora

Is ' Gomutra ' Cows Urine A Good Medicine For Diabetes And Obesity? - Quora

Nitin , played at inter unit levels and domestic levels. Answered 82w ago Author has 82 answers and 82.9k answer views Cow urine has amazing germicidal power to kill varieties of germs. All germ generated diseases are thus destroyed. According to Ayurveda the cause of all diseases is the imbalance in three faults (tri-dosas) i.e. mucous, bile and air. Cow urine balances the tri-dosas, thus diseases are cured. Cow urine corrects functioning of liver. So, liver makes healthy pure blood. It gives disease resistance power to the body. There are some micro nutrients in our body, which give life strength. These micro nutrients are flushed out through urine. Therefore gradually ageing steps in our body. Cow urine has all elements, which compensate for deficiency of nutrients in our body, which are required for healthy life. Thus Cow urine stops ageing process. So it is called an elixir and also life giving. Cow urine contains many minerals especially Copper, gold salts, etc. It compensates for bodily mineral deficiency. Presence of gold salts protects body against diseases. Mental tension hurts nervous system. Cow urine is called medhya and hradya, which means it, gives strength to brain and heart. Thus cow urine protects heart and brain from damages caused by mental tension and protects these organs from disorders and diseases. Excessive use of any medicine leaves some residue in our body. This residue causes diseases. Cow urine destroys the poisonous effects of residues and makes body disease free. Electric currents (rays) which are present in the environment keep our body healthy. These rays in form of extremely small currents enter our body through Copper in our body. We get Copper from cow urine. To attract these electric waves is quality of Copper. Thus we become health Continue reading >>

Could Diabetes Spread Like Mad Cow Disease?

Could Diabetes Spread Like Mad Cow Disease?

Prions are insidious proteins that spread like infectious agents and trigger fatal conditions such as mad cow disease. A protein implicated in diabetes, a new study suggests, shares some similarities with these villains. Researchers transmitted diabetes from one mouse to another just by injecting the animals with this protein. The results don’t indicate that diabetes is contagious like a cold, but blood transfusions, or even food, may spread the disease. The work is “very exciting” and “well-documented” for showing that the protein has some prionlike behavior, says prion biologist Witold Surewicz of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, who wasn’t connected to the research. However, he cautions against jumping to the conclusion that diabetes spreads from person to person. The study raises that possibility, he says, but “it remains to be determined.” Prions are misfolded proteins that can cause normally folded versions of the same protein to misfold themselves. When this conversion occurs in the brain, the distorted proteins bunch up inside cells and kill them. Although prion diseases are rare in people, they share some similarities with more common illnesses. In Alzheimer’s disease, for instance, globs of a misshapen protein known as β amyloid build up in the brain. Parkinson’s disease and Huntington disease, two other brain maladies, also feature aggregates, or lumps of misfolded proteins. Get more great content like this delivered right to you! By signing up, you agree to share your email address with the publication. Information provided here is subject to Science's privacy policy. At first glance, type 2 diabetes, in which people lose the ability to control their blood glucose levels, doesn’t seem to have any connection to prions Continue reading >>

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