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Can Copd Cause Diabetes

Copd And Diabetes: Whats The Deal?

Copd And Diabetes: Whats The Deal?

By John Bottrell, RRT September 1, 2017 While not all people with COPD have diabetes , some do. In fact, studies seem to show that just under 20% of people with COPD also have diabetes. Heres all you need to know about links between COPD and diabetes. (1) Those of you who have diabetes probably know more than I ever will about this disease. So, you can just skip to my next question. For the rest of us, heres a quick summary of diabetes. It begins with Glucose. Its is a simple sugar, and is a source of energy used by cells of your body. It comes from carbohydrates in the foods you eat, such as fruits, breads, rice, potatoes, oatmeal, vegetables, dairy, etc. As these foods are metabolized (broken down) by your digestive system, glucose is the byproduct. It is released into your bloodstream where it is referred to as blood glucose or blood sugar. Under normal conditions, your pancreas measures the amount of glucose in your blood. If it is too high it secretes Insulin. If it is too low it secretes glucagon. (1) Insulin. Glucose cannot enter cells on its own. So, when the pancreas recognizes glucose levels are rising (like when youre eating), it secretes Insulin. Its a protein secreted from beta cells in the pancreas that bind with receptors on cells of muscle tissue, skeletal muscle tissue, and fat tissue telling them to take in glucose from the bloodstream. These cells then use this glucose as energy to do whatever that cells job is. Insulin also signals your liver to absorb Insulin and convert it to glycogen which is stored in the liver and muscles. Glycogen acts as an energy reserve between meals. (1, 3-4) Glucagon. Say its been awhile since youve eaten. In this case, glucose levels start to decline. Your pancreas recognizes this and secretes glucagon from alpha cells. Continue reading >>

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease And Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review Of The Literature

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease And Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review Of The Literature

Abstract The objective of this systematic review was to discuss our current understanding of the complex relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We performed a systematic search of the literature related to both COPD and diabetes using PubMed. Relevant data connecting both diseases were compiled and discussed. Recent evidence suggests that diabetes can worsen the progression and prognosis of COPD; this may result from the direct effects of hyperglycemia on lung physiology, inflammation or susceptibility to bacterial infection. Conversely, it has also been suggested that COPD increases the risk of developing T2DM as a consequence of inflammatory processes and/or therapeutic side effects related to the use of high-dose corticosteroids. In conclusion, although there is evidence to support a connection between COPD and diabetes, additional research is needed to better understand these relationships and their possible implications. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel Introduction Sixty-five million people are estimated to suffer from moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is predicted to become the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2030 [1]. COPD is characterized by persistent and usually progressive airflow limitation, which occurs in response to long-term exposure to noxious particles or gases (e.g. air pollution or smoking). These irritants cause an inflammatory response in the lungs, leading to shortness of breath, coughing and sputum production. In addition, in the majority of cases, acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) is triggered by respiratory tract infections. Diagnosis of COPD severity is based on symptoms, exacerbation frequency and the degree of airflow limitation as as Continue reading >>

Inhalers Linked To Diabetes In Asthma, Copd Patients

Inhalers Linked To Diabetes In Asthma, Copd Patients

Inhalers Linked to Diabetes in Asthma, COPD Patients Anew study suggests those frequent puffs from an asthma inhaler could lead to another chronic condition: diabetes. Weasked thelead researcher and other experts toexplain the risks. Plus, a popular inhaler is recalled... You depend on inhalers to breathe, but now, scientists say,you could face another health risk: diabetes. Inhaled corticosteroids widely prescribed drugs for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) increased userschances of developing or advancing type 2 diabetes by as much as 34% per year, according to a Canadian study published in the November issue of The American Journal of Medicine. By comparison, in the general population, you can expect about 14 out of 1,000 people [or 1.4%] annually to develop diabetes, says the studys lead investigator, Samy Suissa, Ph.D., director of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology at Jewish General Hospital in Montreal, Canada. But asthma experts aren't recommending that you toss your inhaler yet. Inhaled corticosteroids are very effective in treating asthma,Suissa says. In most cases, the benefits outweigh the[diabetes] risk. Researchers have long known that oral corticosteroids, such as prednisone, increase the odds ofdeveloping diabetes, but this is the first study connecting the disease to the inhaled form. Inhaled corticosteroids, which come as aerosolized sprays or dry powder inhalers, include budesonide (Pulmicort, Symbicort), fluticasone (Flovent, Advair), beclomethasone (Qvar) and mometasone (Asmanex). We wanted to see if inhaled corticosteroids entered the system and caused the same side effects as oral drugs,Suissa says. The study looked at health records of nearly 400,000 Canadians with asthma, COPD or both over 18 years. The theory: Steroids Continue reading >>

Copd Symptoms, Stages, Causes, Guidelines, And Life-expectancy

Copd Symptoms, Stages, Causes, Guidelines, And Life-expectancy

The stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease range from stage I to stage IV. As the stage number increases the disease progressively becomes worse; stage IV is also known as "end stage" chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Depending upon the stage of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, other doctors besides the patient's primary care physician may be involved and may include pulmonologists, lung surgeons, and/or other professionals such as pulmonary rehabilitation specialists and other team members. Individuals should contact their doctors about COPD if they experience any of the signs or symptoms of COPD. The diagnosis of this health condition is by taking the patient's breathing history and exposure to irritants such as cigarette smoking or other agents. A pulmonologist usually determines the stage of COPD by their FEV1 level. The treatment for this health condition includes avoiding any of the risks and causes of COPD such as cigarette smoke or toxic fumes, medications, or in a small number of patients, lung surgery or lung transplant. Individuals with this health condition should contact their health-care professional before treating themselves with home remedies (for example, vitamins , antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids ). Medical treatments for COPD include medications to stop smoking , various bronchodilators , anticholinergics, steroids, and enzyme inhibitors. Other therapies for this health condition may include antibiotics, mucolytic agents, oxygen, endurance exercises, and yoga . Surgery for COPD may include bullectomy, lung volume reduction or lung transplant. Prevention or lowering the risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease includes avoiding the causes and irritants (for example, smoking ) or vaccines that protect the lungs from Continue reading >>

Lung Institute |copd And Diabetes

Lung Institute |copd And Diabetes

Which came firstthe chicken or the egg? Asking the same question regarding chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) versus diabetes yields a similar conundrum,an ongoing debate in medical research and literature circles. Both COPD and diabetes are serious diseases requiringproper diagnosis and treatment. The term COPD encompassestwo other lung diseases, chronic bronchitis and emphysema . COPDis progressive and currently incurable, and without proper diagnosis and treatment, health will continue to deteriorate. With COPD, pulmonary inflammation prevents the proper exchange of air. Diabetes or diabetes mellitus is a term used to describe a group of diseases that affect blood sugar, also known as blood glucose, throughout the body. People with diabetes suffer from high amounts of glucose in the blood, which can lead to numerous health complications and adversesymptoms. The hormone insulin regulatesglucose levels. Two top factors cause COPD to developsmoking and environmental or occupational pollution. For the most part, diabetes occurs because of genetic and environmental factors. The end result for COPD is that the blood is not properly oxygenated, and for diabetes, low levels of insulin result in skyrocketing glucose in the blood which cannot reachthe bodys cells to provide energy. Appearing in Cardiovascular Diabetology , a literature search looked at COPD as a risk factor for diabetes development and vice versa. COPD was viewed as increasing the incidence of diabetes due to its effect on physiological changes like inflammation, resistance to insulin and weight gain. The presence of diabetes was seen to increase the occurrence of lung infections and worsen COPD symptoms causing an increase in flare-ups. Published in the journal, Thorax , a study looked specifically Continue reading >>

Exploring The Impact Of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (copd) On Diabetes Control In Diabetes Patients: A Prospective Observational Study In General Practice

Exploring The Impact Of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (copd) On Diabetes Control In Diabetes Patients: A Prospective Observational Study In General Practice

Article | Open Exploring the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on diabetes control in diabetes patients: a prospective observational study in general practice npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine volume 25, Articlenumber:15032 (2015) Little is known about the association between COPD and diabetes control parameters. To explore the association between comorbid COPD and longitudinal glycaemic control (HbA1C) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in a primary care cohort of diabetes patients. This is a prospective cohort study of type 2 diabetes patients in the Netherlands. In a mixed model analysis, we tested differences in the 5-year longitudinal development of HbA1C and SBP according to COPD comorbidity (present/absent). We corrected for relevant covariates. In subgroup effect analyses, we tested whether potential differences between diabetes patients with/without COPD were modified by age, sex, socio-economic status (SES) and body mass index (BMI). We analysed 610 diabetes patients. A total of 63 patients (10.3%) had comorbid COPD. The presence of COPD was not significantly associated with the longitudinal development of HbA1C (P=0.54) or SBP (P=0.33), but subgroup effect analyses showed significant effect modification by SES (P<0.01) and BMI (P=0.03) on SBP. Diabetes patients without COPD had a flat SBP trend over time, with higher values in patients with a high BMI. For diabetes patients with COPD, SBP gradually increased over time in the middle- and high-SES groups, and it decreased over time in those in the low-SES group. The longitudinal development of HbA1C was not significantly associated with comorbid COPD in diabetes patients. The course of SBP in diabetes patients with COPD is significantly associated with SES (not BMI) in contrast to those Continue reading >>

Recognizing Serious Copd Complications

Recognizing Serious Copd Complications

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) refers to a collection of lung diseases that can lead to blocked airways. This can make it hard to breathe and cause coughing, wheezing, and mucus production. People with COPD can often develop other conditions and diseases related to COPD. For those living with COPD, every breath can be difficult. People with COPD can be at risk for serious complications that can not only put their health in jeopardy, but can also be fatal. Here are a few of those complications, along with some tips for preventing them. Pneumonia Pneumonia occurs when bacteria or viruses enter the lungs, creating an infection. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, bacterial pneumonia is the most common form of pneumonia in the United States. It’s ranked evenly with influenza as the eighth leading cause of death in the country. The illness is especially dangerous for those with a weakened pulmonary system, such as those who have COPD. For these people, pneumonia can further damage the lungs. This can lead to a chain reaction of illnesses that can weaken the lungs even further. This downward spiral can lead to a rapid deterioration of health in people with COPD. Overall good health is key to preventing infections in people with COPD. Here are some tips for reducing your risk of infection: Drink plenty of fluids, especially water, to maintain healthy bronchioles while thinning out mucus and secretions. Quit smoking or avoid smoking to maintain a healthy immune system and lung health. Wash your hands consistently. Avoid contact with people you know are ill. Discourage sick friends and family from visiting your home. Get pneumonia vaccines and a yearly flu vaccine. COPD heart failure One of the most critical complications of COPD is heart Continue reading >>

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (copd)

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (copd)

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) A slowly progressive airway disease that causes the gradual loss of lung function. COPD is an umbrella term that includes chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive bronchitis, emphysema, and combinations of these diseases. The symptoms of COPD include chronic cough and sputum (a mixture of saliva and mucus) production and severe shortness of breath. As the disease progresses, people increasingly lose their ability to breathe. COPD is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The most common risk factor for COPD by far is cigarette smoking. A number of studies have suggested that COPD is a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes. A study published in Diabetes Care in 2004 followed over 100,000 female nurses enrolled in the Nurses Health Study from 1988 to 1996. They were periodically surveyed about whether they had been diagnosed with emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma, or diabetes. Those with COPD were nearly twice as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes as those without COPD. (Women with asthma, however, were no more likely to develop diabetes than those who didnt have asthma). Although the study was carried out in women, the researchers saw no reason not to believe the same association would apply to men. The researchers suggested that inflammation and oxidative stress may explain this association: Increasingly, inflammation is thought to play a major role in causing Type 2 diabetes, and some of the same inflammatory markers that are increased in diabetes are increased in COPD. Both conditions have also been linked to a phenomenon called oxidative stress, in which highly energized compounds called reactive oxygen species, which react strongly with other molecules, damage tissue. In the case of COPD, oxidative stress in Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease-the Impact On Mortality

Diabetes Mellitus In Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease-the Impact On Mortality

Diabetes mellitus in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-The impact on mortality We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Diabetes mellitus in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-The impact on mortality Te-Wei Ho, Chun-Ta Huang, [...], and Chong-Jen Yu Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is evidence to support a connection between COPD and diabetes mellitus (DM), another common medical disorder. However, additional research is required to improve our knowledge of these relationships and their possible implications. In this study, we investigated the impact of DM on patient outcomes through the clinical course of COPD. We conducted a cohort study in patients from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database between 2000 and 2013. Patients with COPD were identified and assessed for pre-existing and incident DM. A Cox proportional hazards model was built to identify factors associated with incident DM and to explore the prognostic effects of DM on COPD patients. A propensity score method was used to match COPD patients with incident DM to controls without incident DM. Pre-existing DM was present in 332 (16%) of 2015 COPD patients who had a significantly higher hazard ratio (HR) [1.244, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0101.532] for mortality than that of the COPD patients without pre-existing DM. During the 10-year fo Continue reading >>

Lung Conditions

Lung Conditions

Eating fatty foods and living an unhealthy lifestyle, such as being a smoker, can eventually restrict the lungs' ability to breath, and these negative effects on the lungs tend be more common people with diabetes. The average adult breathing rate at rest is between 12 and 20 breaths per minute. This averages about 8 million breaths per year, and each one is needed to keep us alive. Lung infections and the immune system Diabetes patients, especially those with type 1 diabetes, have an immune system with a lower ability to respond to and deal with infections of any type. This means they are more prone to illnesses than the general population. As a result, people with diabetes are more likely to catch a cold, flu, or other communicable illness and will likely take longer to recover. This can have a significant effect on the blood sugar levels and overall diabetes management. See here for the page on how illness can affect your blood sugars. Two of the biggest lung infections are pneumonia and tuberculosis, which can both cause huge problems to your health. Pneumonia Pneumonia is caused by an infection and consequential inflammation which puts pressure on the lungs and makes it hard to breath. The most common form of pneumonia is caused by a bacterial infection, named Streptococcus pneumoniae. Despite popular belief, pneumonia is not caught because of cold weather. At most, cold weather impairs our immune systems to the point where bacteria already in our lungs can colonise and cause an infection. Other than uncontrolled diabetes, kidney, liver or heart conditions as well as asthma or cystic fibrosis can all increase the risk of catching pneumonia due to their individual effects on the lungs and by making them more susceptible to infections. Symptoms of pneumonia The typica Continue reading >>

Copd And Other Health Problems

Copd And Other Health Problems

If you have COPD, you are more likely to have other health problems, too. These are called comorbidities. People with COPD tend to have more health problems than people who do not have COPD. Having other health problems can affect your symptoms and treatments. You may need to visit your doctor more often. You also may need to have more tests or treatments. Having COPD is a lot to manage. But try to stay positive. You can protect your health by understanding why you are at risk for certain conditions and learning how to prevent them. Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diabetes And High Blood Sugar On Copd

The Effects Of Diabetes And High Blood Sugar On Copd

It is becoming increasingly evident that chronic inflammation is at the root of many chronic diseases, including COPD and diabetes. What the Research Says About COPD and Diabetes While you may have a greater chance of having diabetes if you have COPD, there is no prospective data demonstrating that people with COPD have a greater risk of developing diabetes. In fact, an article published in the journal Thorax reports that there is a reduction in diabetes in older-aged patients who have COPD. If diabetes is associated with COPD, the greatest effects are seen in the youngest of COPD patients who smoke and those between the ages of 45-55 who have never smoked. Diabetes does appear to worsen both the progression and prognosis of COPD. This may be because diabetes increases susceptibility to infections, such as those associated with COPD exacerbations. Research has shown that hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) is linked to impaired lung function. One study showed that diabetes was associated with a lower FEV1 and FVC, an association that was made worse by smoking. The same study found that an increase in fasting blood sugar was associated with a lower residual FEV1. Why would diabetes and subsequent high blood sugar affect the lungs? Possible links include: Loss of respiratory compliance (the ability of the lungs to distend) associated with diabetes Damage to the nervous system ( diabetic neuropathies ) High blood sugar has also been associated with poor outcomes in hospitalizations due to COPD exacerbation , leading to longer hospital stays and premature death. Does Smoking Make the Effect of Diabetes on the Lungs Worse? In people who smoke, the adverse effects of diabetes on lung function are even greater. Diabetics who smoke can minimize the consequences related to smoking Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Your Lungs

How Diabetes Affects Your Lungs

This content is created by Healthgrades and brought to you by an advertising sponsor. More This content is created or selected by the Healthgrades editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to the Healthgrades medical review process for accuracy, balance and objectivity. The content is not edited or otherwise influenced by the advertisers appearing on this page except with the possible suggestion of the broad topic area. For more information, read the Healthgrades advertising policy. A diabetes specialist, called an endocrinologist, has the right skills and insight to help you stay in control of your diabetes. Your feet. Your heart. Your kidneys. When you think of the body parts affected by diabetes, these are the ones that likely come to mind. But diabetes also affects another part of your body. And its one you use every second of your life: your lungs. If you have diabetes, youare more likely to have certain lung conditions. Diabetes also has an impact on lung function, or how well you breathe. A study published in Diabetes Care compared the health records of more than 1.8 million California residents with and without diabetes. The research found that adults with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes are: 22% more likely to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) 54% more likely to have pulmonary fibrosis, a disease in which scarring in the lungs interferes with your ability to breathe Nearly twice as likely to have been hospitalized for pneumonia If you have type 2 diabetes, youhave decreased lung function compared with people who dont have diabetes. Lung function is a measure of how well youre breathing. It also refers to how well your lungs deliver oxygen to your body. If you have type 2 diabetes, youtend to have 3% to 10% Continue reading >>

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease And Diabetes

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease And Diabetes

Abstract Diabetes occurs more often in individuals with COPD than in the general population, however there are still many issues that need to be clarified about this association. The exact prevalence of the association between diabetes and COPD varies between studies reported, however it is known that diabetes affects 2–37 % of patients with COPD, underlining the need to better understand the link between these two conditions. In this review, we evaluated the epidemiological aspects of the association between diabetes and COPD analyzing potential common issues in the pathological mechanisms underlying the single disease. The close association suggests the occurrence of similar pathophysiological process that leads to the development of overt disease in the presence of conditions such as systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, hypoxemia or hyperglycemia. Another, but not less important, aspect to consider is that related to the influence of the pharmacological treatment used both for the patient affected by COPD and from that affected by diabetes. It is necessary to understand whether the treatment of COPD affect the clinical course of diabetes, it is also essential to learn whether treatment for diabetes can alter the natural history of COPD. Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common comorbidity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) [1]. A series of studies have shown that DM is associated with impaired lung function [2]. The chronic complications of diabetes include a number of pathological changes involving different districts and, among these, lung represents a target organ for diabetic microangiopathy in patients with diabetes [3]. The Framingham Heart Study has reported an association between glycemic status and reduced lung function [4]. The dia Continue reading >>

The Link Between Diabetes And Copd

The Link Between Diabetes And Copd

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary disease and Diabetes Mellitus are both common and under-diagnosed diseases. COPD is considered as a risk factor for Type 2 Diabetes due to inflammation, oxidative stress, insulin resistance and weight gain. On the other hand Diabetes may act as an independent factor as it negatively impacts upon pulmonary structure and function. It also results in an increased risk of infection and worsened COPD outcomes. Recognising the inter-relations between these two diseases can help to improve the outcome and medical control for both conditions. Patients with COPD have an increased risk of developing Diabetes. Not only directly but indirectly as COPD patients often suffer from other medical conditions like elevated blood pressure and high cholesterol levels, which are linked to diabetes. The combination of these medical problems is often referred to as ‘metabolic syndrome’. The specific pathology as to why COPD patients are at a high risk of developing diabetes is unclear, but it is thought that it is due to inflammation associated with lung disease and the use of corticosteroids. Elevated levels of glucose are associated with abnormal lung function. Those with type 1 diabetes experience a 20% decline in lung function and it may contribute to worsening symptoms in COPD patients. Diabetes can affect the lungs in different ways. It has been associated with decreased lung volume, reduced lung expiration volumes and reduction in the ability of the lung tissue to diffuse oxygen. It is thought that glucose affects the diaphragm, breathing muscles and nerves in the lungs. Diabetes is also associated with abnormal brain control of breathing pattern and can cause sleep-breathing disorders. Studies show that COPD patients with diabetes have an accelerated d Continue reading >>

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