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Can Carrots Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Are Carrots Really That Bad?

Are Carrots Really That Bad?

Friend T2 as of June 2009 but probably way before. Before my T2 diagnosis, my favorite vegetables were potatoes and carrots. I used to eat carrots raw, after washing them. Sometimes a whole carrot or two. Other times, I used to make carrot slices and keep them in the fridge, and periodically eat them over a month or two. I do miss carrots. Dr. Bernstein classifies carrots as a "starchy/sweet" vegetable that should be avoided, whether cooked or raw. Well, I put a few carrot slices into my veggie medley today. When I was entering data to calcualte daily calories, I noticed that the carb content doesn't seem that bad. 1 slice (3g) = 0.3 carbs, 0.3 fiber and 0.3 sugar. [Does this translate to 0 net carbs?] I am planning on eating maybe 8-10 slices per meal, mainly for the flavor. I'm not gonna fill my stomach with it. That's still only 3 total carbs, tops. No worse than, say, green beans, celery, or spinach. I just don't think carrots are elevating my BG very much. However, the glycemic index classifies carrots as having "a medium effect" on blood sugar. What am I missing here? Did Dr. Bernstein somehow feel that one would consume an entire carrot per meal? I wasn't thinking about doing that. But let's say I do: one medium size carrot is 61g and still has only 5.8g carbs (though 1.7 fiber and 2.9g sugars). I have to confess, the Glycemic Index is very mysterious to me still. But doesn't this equal to 4.1g net carbs per carrot? Perhaps the Sugar-to-Carb ratio (50%) is bad? What am I missing here? A1c: 8.4 (5/09); 7.2 (8/09); 6.9 (10/09); 6.4 (11/09); 5.8 (1/10); 5.4 (9/10); 5.7 (3/11); 5.5 (8/11) Supps: Cod Liver Oil 1.6g; ALA 300; Biotin 5; Vit D3 4k; CoQ10 100; Mg 250; EPO 1.3k; Vit K-2 100; Vit B-12 1k; I 3k; Chrom 200; Se 200; Vit C 500; Zn 10; Cu 1; NAC 300 Weight: 215 Continue reading >>

Can Carrots Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Can Carrots Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Nonstarchy vegetables don't usually cause large increases in blood sugar.Photo Credit: Howard Shooter/Dorling Kindersley RF/Getty Images Carrots are a nutrient-rich vegetable, providing significant amounts of fiber, potassium and vitamins A, C and K. They also contain carbohydrates, making it possible for them to raise your blood sugar levels. Carrots, however, aren't likely to cause large spikes in blood sugar if you eat them in moderation due to their low glycemic index and glycemic load. A cup of raw carrot slices contains 11.7 grams of carbohydrates, and the same amount of cooked carrot slices has 12.8 grams of carbohydrates. This is just a little less than the 15 grams of carbohydrates that make up one serving of carbohydrates for a diabetic. Diabetics usually limit their carbohydrates to 45 to 60 grams per meal to help maintain the proper blood sugar levels. You can use the glycemic index to estimate how a particular food will affect your blood sugar levels. Foods with a score below 55 are considered low on this scale and unlikely to cause spikes in your blood sugar levels. Boiled carrots have a GI between 32 and 49, while raw carrots have a much a much lower score of about 16. The longer you cook foods, the higher the GI is likely to be. The glycemic load takes into account not only the glycemic index of a food but its typical serving size as well, making it an even better indicator of the potential effect of a food on your blood sugar levels. Any score under 10 is considered low; boiled carrots have a glycemic load between 1 and 2, and raw carrots have a score of just 1. This low GL may be partly due to the relatively high fiber content found in carrots, since foods higher in fiber tend to have less of an effect on blood sugar. Whether you cook your carrots, ho Continue reading >>

How Does Food Affect Your Blood Sugar?

How Does Food Affect Your Blood Sugar?

When you have diabetes, your blood sugar level reflects the foods you choose. "For over a year, my sugar ran from 250 to 350 every day," writes WebMD Diabetes community member chui55. After switching from chips and sweets to fruits, vegetables, and lean meats, "my sugar is ranging between 110 and 185... I am so glad I have turned a major corner now and [am] on my way to a healthier me." Do you know which foods can help you control blood sugar? Take this quiz to find out. 1. The glycemic index ranks foods based on: a. The amount of sugar they contain b. How much weight gain they cause c. How much they raise blood sugar d. Their calorie count 2. Which of these breads is lowest on the glycemic index? a. White b. Pumpernickel c. Whole wheat d. 100% whole grain you might like 3. Which of these vegetables is your best choice if you have diabetes? a. Baked potato b. Carrots c. Corn on the cob d. Sweet potato 4. Which of these nuts might help control your blood sugar? a. Cashews b. Hazelnuts c. Pecans d. All of the above 1. c. The glycemic index ranks carbohydrate-based foods based on how much they raise blood sugar levels. Foods that are high on this index can cause blood sugar to spike, making diabetes harder to control. 2. d. Breads that are 100% whole grain are made with the entire grain -- unlike refined grains, which are processed to remove some of the nutrient-dense layers. Whole-grain foods are high in nutrition and are slow-burning, so they help keep your blood sugar steady. 3. b. Though carrots can be sweet, they’re lower on the glycemic index than the other vegetables on this list. Green, leafy vegetables are an even better addition to your plate. Ideally buy vegetables fresh, or look for frozen or canned options with no added sauces or salt. 4. d. A review of 12 s Continue reading >>

Nature's Best Sugar Blockers

Nature's Best Sugar Blockers

You may have heard that whole grain products are high in fiber. However, the starch in grains quickly turns to sugar and overwhelms any blood sugar-blocking effect the fiber might have. Of course, all fruits and vegetables contain sugar; that's what makes them carbohydrates. Nevertheless, most contain proportionately more soluble fiber than sugar, so they don't raise blood sugar as much as grain products and other refined carbohydrates do. Keeping blood sugar steady is an important tool for preventing insulin spikes, which can lock fat into your cells and prevent it from being used for energy. The substance in our diet that's most responsible for these blood sugar surges is starch. But the good news is you can blunt the blood sugar-raising effects by taking advantage of natural substances in foods—like fiber in fruits and veggies—that slow carbohydrate digestion and entry into the bloodstream. You can tell which fruits and vegetables have the best balance of fiber to sugar by looking at their glycemic loads (Not sure what that means? See Glycemic Impact 101.). All of the carbohydrates that have been associated with increased risk of obesity or diabetes have glycemic loads greater than 100. On the other hand, fruits and vegetables with glycemic loads less than 100 have been associated with reduced risk. Thus, you should avoid fruits or vegetables with glycemic loads higher than 100, even though they contain soluble fiber. Fruits and vegetables whose glycemic loads are between 50 and 100 are themselves acceptable to eat, but they release enough glucose to nullify their usefulness as sugar blockers. The best fruit and vegetable sugar blockers are those with glycemic loads less than 50. It takes about 10 grams of fiber to reduce the after-meal blood sugar surge from a s Continue reading >>

Healthy Foods That Do Not Spike Blood Sugar

Healthy Foods That Do Not Spike Blood Sugar

Your blood sugar levels rise when you consume foods with easily accessible carbohydrates, potentially increasing your risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity or other health problems. Selecting foods based on their glycemic index, a system that ranks foods based on their potential effect on your blood sugar levels, helps you to find foods that keep your blood sugar levels low; the lower the GI ranking, the less of an impact on your blood sugar levels. Glycemic Index of 20 or Lower Foods without carbohydrates, including meats, eggs and fish, do not have a GI index ranking and do not have a notable impact on your blood sugar levels. Ranked foods with a score of less than 20 also have minimal impact. Such foods include carrots, eggplant, cauliflower, green beans, broccoli, peppers, onions, lettuce, zucchini, tomatoes, peanuts and walnuts. These foods are generally safe for you to eat at each meal without spiking your blood sugar. Cooking raw vegetables makes their carbohydrates more bioavailable and increases their GI ranking -- eat vegetables raw for the smallest impact on your blood sugar. Glycemic Index of 21 to 40 A GI ranking of 21 to 40 represents a small impact on your blood sugar levels. Many vegetables with an otherwise low GI ranking, such as carrots, jump into the 21 to 40 category when cooked. Examples of foods in this small-to-moderate category include peas, beans, lentils, whole wheat pasta, egg noodles, wheat tortillas, pearled barley, rye, cherries, plums, grapefruit, apples, apricots, milk, yogurt and soy milk. Enjoy these foods in moderation to keep your blood sugar in check. Glycemic Index of 41 to 60 Foods with a GI rank of 41 to 60 have a moderate impact on your blood sugar. Examples include rolled oats, kidney beans, chickpeas, popcorn, sweet potatoe Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

1 / 8 7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar If you have type 2 diabetes, you know about the importance of making healthy mealtime choices. But just as important is staying away from the wrong foods — those that can spike your blood sugar. That's because simple carbohydrates, like white bread and sugary soda, are broken down by the body into sugar, which then enters the bloodstream. Even if you don't have diabetes, these foods can lead to insulin resistance, which means your body's cells don't respond normally to the insulin produced by the pancreas. Here are seven foods you should avoid for better blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

Why Do Potatoes Raise Blood Glucose More Than Sugar?

Why Do Potatoes Raise Blood Glucose More Than Sugar?

It can be surprising to find out that potatoes are generally high on the glycemic index (GI), which rates how much certain foods raise your blood glucose. After all, it's a staple in diets throughout the world because potatoes are an affordable and nutritious vegetable. Plus, most people associate blood sugar with foods that contain sugar. How is it that a potato has a higher GI than white sugar? It's all about the starch and how it converts to glucose in your body. However, not all potatoes are created equal and there are ways to lower their impact on your blood glucose. You may still be able to enjoy a few potatoes here and there, you'll just want to keep your servings in check. Too often, glucose is associated with sweetness and regular white potatoes are not a food that's generally considered sweet. Potatoes are almost all starch, though, and that starch is made up of long strings of glucose. Since the starch in potatoes is rapidly digested, the glycemic index of potatoes can be almost as high as that of glucose alone. The glycemic index of glucose is 100 points where potatoes are usually listed as being in the high 80s or low 90s. Sucrose (table sugar), on the other hand, has a GI of 59 and is a disaccharide (two sugar) molecule. It is made up of one glucose molecule and one fructose molecule joined together. Fructose is processed differently in your body than glucose, and it doesn't affect your blood sugar as much. However, fructose causes problems of its own when you eat too much of it. With that, it's fair to say that an ounce of carbohydrate from potatoes has twice the glucose as sugar. When you think of it that way, it's only logical that potatoes would raise blood glucose more. There are many varieties of potatoes and it would not be accurate to say that eve Continue reading >>

15 Foods That Can Lower Your Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

15 Foods That Can Lower Your Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

As the years go on, even though medical science is purportedly improving, diabetes is becoming more and more of a problem. In the US alone, the figures are rising and that is without input from other countries such as Canada and India. In America alone, between 2010 and 2012, the figures rose by 3.3 million people; that equates to roughly one in eleven people with diabetes. This is a significant rise in a short time, and unfortunately one of the biggest contributes to such a hike in numbers is increasingly bad diets. Diabetes is the seventh biggest cause of death in the states, ranking it up there with heart disease and stress, but it is often underreported, meaning that the severity of it isn’t known until it is progressed and become unmanageable. Canada, a close neighbor of the States, saw its own rise in numbers. In 2011, the numbers rested at around 1.8 million people. By 2014, this number had increased to 2, 011, 347, giving it a rise of 2,180,00, roughly. That’s a lot more people that are being diagnosed across the whole of Canada, with studies showing that more and more males are being diagnosed. India has one of the highest rates of diabetes, with approximately 40 million people suffering from the illness. The number has increasingly continued to climb up as the years go on with very little done to manage the situation. Unlike the rest of the world, however, type 1 is the rare form of diabetes, and most of the people who suffer from type 2 are not classed as medically obese or overweight. Size, however, is not an indicator of health or of a healthy diet and there are some steps that can be taken to reduce your blood glucose levels, not only helping manage the illness but also prevents type 2 diabetes from striking. So, how can we improve our blood glucose​ Continue reading >>

Personal Health; Fear Not That Carrot, Potato Or Ear Of Corn

Personal Health; Fear Not That Carrot, Potato Or Ear Of Corn

When someone at a party said, ''I don't eat carrots -- they have too much sugar'' and his companion replied, ''I don't eat corn or potatoes for the same reason,'' I realized there was an urgent need to put the so-called glycemic index into proper perspective before anyone else decided to avoid delicious, nutritious foods packed with health-protective substances. The glycemic index is a measure of how much carbohydrate-containing foods raise a person's fasting level of blood glucose and consequent need for insulin in two hours. According to this index, carrots have a value above that of table sugar. Instant rice, baked potatoes, corn flakes, watermelon and white bread are even worse. A baked potato is on a par with a Mars bar. But does this mean these foods are to be avoided at all costs, and especially by people with diabetes? The answer, according to those well versed in the field, is ''not at all.'' Dr. Daniel Nadeau, an endocrinologist and medical director of the Health-Reach Diabetes Center in Hampton, N.H., said in an interview: ''The glycemic index is best used as a research tool. It has tragically given foods like carrots, brown rice and corn a bad name. People should eat the whole range of colorful low-calorie foods and leave the glycemic index in the laboratory where it belongs.'' Others, like Dr. David S. Ludwig, director of the obesity program at Children's Hospital in Boston, maintain that the glycemic index has value in helping people choose healthful diets, but that in doing so it is important to appreciate its limits, prime among them that the index does not take into account the caloric density of a food. A glycemic index ranking is defined as the blood glucose response after a person consumes 50 grams of available carbohydrates in a food. Depending on w Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Carrots?

Can Diabetics Eat Carrots?

Managing blood sugars as a diabetic is a lot more complicated than just avoiding sweets. Many seemingly-healthy foods can cause a rapid rise in blood glucose, and carrots are often listed among that number. In truth carrots are a healthy option for diabetics despite their naturally sweet flavor, and they can be eaten regularly as part of your balanced diet. Many diabetics and health conscious non-diabetics use a tool called the Glycemic Index, or GI, to help manage their blood sugar levels. The GI compares how much a fixed quantity of a given food raises blood sugars, comparing it against the same quantity of pure glucose. As the reference point, pure glucose is assigned a GI of 100. The higher the GI of a specific food, the more it boosts your blood sugar, so the lower the number the better. Carrots currently are assessed at a GI of 41 by the Glycemic Index Institute, which is a moderate level, but earlier and less-stringent testing resulted in a higher figure. This made intuitive sense, given that carrots taste naturally sweet, so people with diabetes have often been warned to limit their consumption of carrots because of that flawed early test. They're Part of a Healthy Diet There's more to a food than its impact on your blood sugars though, and by any reasonable standard carrots are a superbly healthy mealtime option. A half-cup of cooked carrots supplies over two grams of dietary fiber – nine percent of your daily value – in its six grams of carbs, with just 27 calories. You'll also get more than double your daily value of vitamin A, and 13 percent of your day's vitamin K. That one-cup portion of raw carrot provides three grams of fiber, or 14 percent of your daily value, against 12 grams of total carbs and 50 calories. You'll also get more than four times your Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Evil Carrot

Diabetes And The Evil Carrot

Poor little guy. The moment someone gets high blood sugars they turn their back on him as if he is soley to blame. It's an unusual phenomenon. People come to me for diabetes counseling and often tell me they have been avoiding carrots because they will raise their blood sugar. Well there are lots of things that will raise your blood sugars: bread, potatoes, pasta, rice, cereals, grains, fruits, dairy and sweets. Yet carrots tend to get eliminated before most things time and time again. Let's look at it in numbers: 1 cup of chopped carrot has about 12 grams of carbohydrate (the nutrient in our food that our body breaks down into sugar). Of those 12 grams of carbs, 4g are fibre (fibre is something the body can't turn into sugar) and 6g are sugar. The rest would be starches. An average slice of whole wheat bread has about 12g of carbohydrate. Of those 2 grams are fibre and 2 grams are sugar. The rest would be starches. As I said above, fibre is the one type of carbohydrate we don't break down into sugar. So if we subtract the fibre from both, that would leave 8g of carbohydrates in the cup of carrots and the slice of bread has 10g of carbs. So carrots do not contain tons of sugar. They may contain more than some vegetables but not so much that they cannot be included in your diet. They are a good source of fibre, vitamin A and quite frankly, they are tasty. You don't need to restrict them just because of high blood sugars. If you eat balanced reasonable portions, they can be just as much a part of a healthy diet as everything else. Continue reading >>

Carrot Juice For Diabetics

Carrot Juice For Diabetics

The glycemic index, or GI, of a food indicates how quickly and how high a food will raise blood glucose levels. By following a diet rich in low GI foods, such as carrot juice, those with diabetes can work to better manage blood glucose levels. While carrot juice does contain sugar and carbohydrates, because it is a low GI food, it will not cause a rapid rise in blood glucose levels. A diet based on GI can be difficult to follow and, like all diets, may not work for everyone. Glycemic Index When you eat carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into sugars called glucose. The body uses glucose for energy. Different foods contain different types of carbohydrates, which can affect how quickly the food is broken down into glucose and used by the body. The GI measures how much a food raises your blood glucose level. Foods with a high GI are broken down faster and may raise your blood glucose levels more quickly than foods with a low GI. Foods with no carbohydrates, such as fats and meats, have no GI rating. High GI Foods Foods that have a high GI can cause blood sugar levels to spike very quickly after meals. You may even feel energized, but the feeling will not last long. When blood sugar levels are elevated, the body releases insulin to help bring blood glucose levels back down. Because of this, high GI foods may perk you up for a short period, but soon after, you will feel very sluggish and hungry. A GI over 60 is generally considered to be high. Foods with a high GI include sugars, syrups, sodas, white bread, cookies, cakes, potatoes, rice cereal, corn flakes, pineapple, pretzels and ice cream. Low GI Foods Foods with a low GI are used more slowly by the body. These foods are broken down into glucose, and the glucose is used by the body over a longer period. This results Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Foods That Have Little Impact On Blood Sugar

5 Surprising Foods That Have Little Impact On Blood Sugar

What is the most important information I should know about TREMFYA®? TREMFYA® may cause serious side effects, including infections. TREMFYA® is a prescription medicine that may lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections and may increase your risk of infections. Your healthcare provider should check you for infections and tuberculosis (TB) before starting treatment with TREMFYA® and may treat you for TB before you begin treatment with TREMFYA® if you have a history of TB or have active TB. Your healthcare provider should watch you closely for signs and symptoms of TB during and after treatment with TREMFYA®. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have an infection or have symptoms of an infection, including: warm, red, or painful skin or sores on your body different from your psoriasis diarrhea or stomach pain shortness of breath have any of the conditions or symptoms listed in the section “What is the most important information I should know about TREMFYA®?” have recently received or are scheduled to receive an immunization (vaccine). You should avoid receiving live vaccines during treatment with TREMFYA®. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. What are the possible side effects of TREMFYA®? TREMFYA® may cause serious side effects. See “What is the most important information I should know about TREMFYA®?” The most common side effects of TREMFYA® include: upper respiratory infections, headache, injection site reactions, joint pain (arthralgia), diarrhea, stomach flu (gastroenteritis), fungal skin infections, and herpes simplex infections. These are not all the possible side effects of TREMFYA®. Call your doctor f Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Foods That Don’t Raise Blood Sugar

Foods That Don’t Raise Blood Sugar

When you know about all the right foods that don’t raise your blood sugar—it can actually become very easy to keep your blood sugars in check. Certain foods will make your blood sugar go up quite rapidly. Also known as high-glycemic foods, these foods include sweets like candy, cakes, muffins, cupcakes, doughnuts, crackers, chips, French fries, pizza dough, wraps, white bread, white pasta, croissants, white rice, sugar, fruit juices like orange juice and apple juice, sweets, cookies, syrup, hamburger buns, rolls, bagels, oatmeal, corn, quinoa, couscous, macaroni and cheese, fettuccini, spaghetti, soda, and honey. You'll want to steer clear of those foods, so that your blood sugar levels stay nice and balanced. Once you add in more foods that don't raise your blood sugar, you won't miss those foods. Here is a list of foods that don't raise blood sugar. This is a list of diabetic-safe foods that are both healthy and delicious. Vegetables Artichoke hearts, Asparagus, Bamboo Shoots, Bean sprouts, Beets, Brussel sprouts, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Cucumber, Eggplant, Greens (collard, kale, mustard, turnip), Hearts of palm, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Mushrooms, Okra (not fried), Onions, Peppers (red, orange, yellow, green), Radishes, Rutabaga, Salad greens, Squash (summer, crookneck, spaghetti, zucchini), Sugar snap peas, Swiss chard, Turnips, and Water chestnuts. Proteins Greek yogurt, Cottage cheese, Eggs, Beef (steak, ground), Pork (chops, loin, ham), Chicken (breast, thigh), Turkey (breast, thigh), Fish (Tuna, halibut, Salmon, tilapia), Shrimp, Canadian bacon, Nuts (peanuts, almonds, cashews), Edamame (soybean), Tofu, and Low-carb protein powders. Fats Avocado, Almonds, Chia seeds, Vegetable Oil, Olive Oil, Flax seeds, Peanut butter (no sugar added), Cocon Continue reading >>

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