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Can Cancer Treatments Cause Diabetes?

Does Chemotherapy Cause Diabetes? Or, Does Certain Chemicals... | Bc Advisor

Does Chemotherapy Cause Diabetes? Or, Does Certain Chemicals... | Bc Advisor

Does Chemotherapy cause diabetes? Or, does certain chemicals... Does Chemotherapy cause diabetes? Or, does certain chemicals... does Chemotherapy cause diabetes? Or, does certain chemicals in Chemotherapy cause diabetes? I want to Thank You for this question. I learned something. YES, cancer therapy can lead to developing diabetes. This means that Survivors need to have their blood sugar tested regularly. Here is what I found out: "......... 8 to 18 percent of all cancer patients also have diabetes, according to CTCA. Type 1 diabetes is linked to cervical cancer and stomach cancer, and type 2 diabetes is linked to breast, endometrial, pancreatic, liver, kidney and colon cancers. Treatment induced diabetes can be triggered by chemotherapy and steroid use. "It is very overwhelming to a patient to be diagnosed with cancer, and then be told that they have diabetes as well," said Andrea Reser, RD, LD, nutrition supervisor/diabetes program coordinator at CTCA. "People need to know how to regulate their blood sugar while on a cancer-fighting diet, and we try to inform them in a way that does not overwhelm them." Thank you so much Starwish, for all that info. Do you have any other notes I can use. Basically, I ask because I had cancer while I was active duty (US Army Infantry) and, like it said in your notes about Andrea Reser, I just didn't pay it any attention when the VA (after I got out of the military) advised that I was diabetic and I had a lot of lifestyle changes I had to implement, if I wanted to grow old. Of course, I am following those changes, but it only hits me now that I was really young (25) when I was diagnosed a diabetic and that if you do become a diabetic, it is over a period of time. Not just within a month. So, I am taking my case to Veteran's Affairs (VA Continue reading >>

My Life With Cancer & Diabetes

My Life With Cancer & Diabetes

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. This upcoming Sunday is National Cancer Survivors Day , a worldwide observance the first Sunday in June, dedicated to "showing the world that life after a cancer diagnosis can be meaningful and productive." We almost hate to mention it, but there is some question about a possible link between cancer and diabetes and there are many people out there dealing with both. There's no real proof that one causes the other, yet there are a lot of studies linking the two . Results suggest that anywhere from 8 to 18% of people with cancer also have diabetes. One recent study published in Diabetes Care showed that 16 out of every 100 men with diabetes and 17 out of every 100 women with diabetes said they had cancer, compared to just 7 out of 100 men and 10 out of 100 women without diabetes. So maybe there is some connection...? We're not pointing this out to scare anybody, but rather to pay homage to the folks who are dealing with both illnesses. Despite the stats cited, there's hardly any available literature on treating this combination. One of the few things we found was a 2006 Diabetes Spectrum article by Helen Psarakis, a diabetes nurse practitioner at Yale New Haven Hospital. She states that cancer patients who are on glucocorticoids a steroid used in short term, high-dose chemo treatments often suffer with high blood sugar. In fact, patients at risk for diabetes who begin taking glucocorticoids during cancer treatment are often quickly diagnosed with diabetes too. Insulin is recommended to treat steroid-induced blood sugar, as patients "may require two to three times their usual dose(s) of insulin." Woah. Helen points out a f Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cancer | Diabetes Uk

Diabetes And Cancer | Diabetes Uk

Sometimes diabetes isnt your only health concern. If you have diabetes, you can be more at risk of developing certain types of cancer. Its estimated that 20 per cent of cancer patients have diabetes. Cancer develops when the normal workings of a cell goes wrong and the cells become abnormal. The abnormal cell keeps dividing making more and more abnormal cells. These eventually form a tumour. Not all tumours are cancerous. A tumour that is not cancerous (benign) may grow but cannot spread to anywhere else in the body. A tumour that is cancerous (malignant) can grow into nearby tissue. Sometimes, cancer cells spread from where the cancer first started to other parts of the body. Some cancer treatments can affect your diabetes and make it harder to control your blood glucose (blood sugar). In partnership with Macmillan , weve produced an information booklet for anyone who has been diagnosed with cancer whos living with diabetes. With tips to help you cope with side effects of cancer treatment, its designed to help you deal with some of the questions or feelings you might have after your diagnosis and throughout your treatment. Sometimes, the treatment given for cancer, especially high dose steroids, can cause a person to develop diabetes. The management will vary depending on many factors such as age, weight etc. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cancer: What's The Connection?

Diabetes And Cancer: What's The Connection?

When Michelle Hall was diagnosed with breast cancer two years ago, she was shocked. "The standing joke in the family was that I came from a long line of stocky French women who lived forever," says Hall, 62, of Salem, N.H. "We had no breast cancer in the family." Hall had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2001, so she would have special challenges while facing down cancer. As diseases, cancer and diabetes seem a world away from each other. Yet, numerous studies suggest the conditions are linked. People with diabetes are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer than those without diabetes, but why remains unclear. Scientists are still trying to answer even the most basic questions: Does diabetes cause cancer? If so, what kinds of cancer and how? As the interplay between diabetes and cancer becomes clearer, researchers hope to gain an edge against both diseases. The link between diabetes and cancer may be partially explained by risk factors that underlie and raise the risk of both diseases. Sex: Overall, men are more likely to develop both cancer and type 2 diabetes than women. Weight: Overweight and obese people are more likely to develop cancer than lean people. The association between type 2 diabetes and weight is also well established. While it's clear that losing weight reduces the risk for type 2 diabetes, less is known about whether weight loss combats cancer. Diet: Eating patterns that are thought to help prevent and treat type 2 diabeteslimited red and processed meats and abundant vegetables, fruits, and whole grainsare also associated with a lower risk for many types of cancer. Exercise: Studies show that regular physical activity lowers the risk of developing several types of cancer. Likewise, 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per day can reduce th Continue reading >>

The Little-known Connection Between Diabetes And Breast Cancer

The Little-known Connection Between Diabetes And Breast Cancer

The Little-Known Connection between Diabetes and Breast Cancer In a hurry? Click here to read the Article Summary... Diabetes, especially lifestyle and diet-related Type 2 Diabetes, has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. And sadly not just for adults, but for children and teens as well. This is not breaking news. Still, the statistics can be scary. Close to 10% of the U.S population have been diagnosed with the disease and an estimated additional8.1 million Americans went undiagnosed in 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control. This includes close to 4,000 new cases of Childhood Type 2 Diabetes each year (something that was unheard of just 15 years ago). And these statistics do not even include the 40% of Americans who, according to the CDC, may be deemed pre-diabetic. The Connection Between Diabetes and Cancer Is Real A study of close to one million people registered with the national Diabetes Service Scheme (NDSS) in Australia who were diagnosed between the years 1997 to 2008 discovered that there were high correlations was between Type 2 Diabetes and cancer. Specifically, these include pancreatic, liver, endometrium, kidney, thyroid and gallbladder cancer as well as certain kinds of leukemia. A 2014 report by the World Journal of Diabetes found that high correlationalso existed between Type 2 Diabetes and breast cancer as well. Increasing rates of both diabetes and cancer over the last decade has led scientists to try to determine the specific chemical and biological connections between the two diseases. For years, conventional wisdom stated that obesity was the common cause. Now more evidence points to factors related to insulin instead. There are a few connections between insulin levels and cancer. First of all, studies have shown that tu Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Chemotherapy

Diabetes And Chemotherapy

If you have diabetes, your blood sugar may need closer monitoring while you are having treatment. Chemotherapy can make you feel sick or be sick. You might not want to eat and this can be a problem. If you can't eat, your blood sugar could drop too low causing: faintness sweating coma This is called a hypoglycaemic attack. You and your doctor might need to plan chemotherapy a bit more carefully than would be necessary if you weren’t diabetic. Some chemotherapy combinations include steroids and these might upset your sugar balance. It might be a good idea for you and your cancer doctor to talk to your diabetes specialist. Types of diabetes There are 2 different types of diabetes. How you manage it depends on the type you have: type 1 – you need to have regular insulin injections or an insulin pump type 2 – you may be able to control it with either diet or with a combination of diet and tablets. There are some people with type 2 diabetes who also need to have insulin injections Type 1 diabetes If you are dependent on insulin, your doctor may suggest that you have the first course of chemotherapy in hospital so that the nurses can keep an eye on you. Then, if you need sugar quickly, you can have it through a drip rather than by mouth. It's possible for you to have insulin and a sugar solution (dextrose) given together through a drip in hospital. The insulin dose is based on hourly or 2 hourly blood sugar tests. But most people don't need this. If you are unable to eat your normal diet when you are at home, you may find you need to check your blood sugar a bit more often than you usually would. Type 2 diabetes If you control your diabetes with diet or tablets it should be possible to manage it during chemotherapy without too many problems. Discuss the options with you Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management In Cancer Patients

Diabetes Management In Cancer Patients

Hyperglycemia is a common challenge during cancer treatment and palliation. In addition, many patients with pre-existing type 1 or type 2 diabetes undergoing cancer treatment develop iatrogenic hyperglycemia with unique features. The most common example is steroid-induced hyperglycemia,[1] but several other scenarios are common and clinically important (Table 1). Special considerations are often necessary regarding standard lifestyle recommendations, optimal choice of antidiabetic drug (Table 2), and goals of therapy.[2] In patients with active cancer, the focus of hyperglycemia management shifts from preventing long-term complications toward avoiding acute and subacute outcomes, such as dehydration from polyuria, infection, catabolic weight loss, hyperosmolar nonketotic states (HNK), and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA; Table 3).[3,4] It should be noted that the truly emergent conditions HNK and DKA are rare. The more common scenario of an asymptomatic severe elevation in blood glucose level (> 400 mg/dL, for example), although requiring a treatment plan with good hydration and close follow-up, does not typically require an emergency room visit or admission. Two representative clinical cases are presented here. Clinical Vignette #1 Corticosteroid-induced hyperglycemia A 53-year-old woman with a history of pre-diabetes and peripheral blood stem cell transplant for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) presented with asymptomatic elevated random blood glucose levels. After transplant she developed graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) with liver injury, which was treated with 60 mg of prednisone daily, tapered gradually to 20 mg daily at the time of presentation 2 months later. Random serum glucose level was 396 mg/dL. Previously, all serum glucose levels had been less than 160 mg/dL u Continue reading >>

Overcoming Treatment-induced Diabetes

Overcoming Treatment-induced Diabetes

Good nutrition is key Betty Overfelt's oncologist back home in Missouri informed her that she had stage IV small-cell lung cancer. His prognosis was grim — "I think I can get you three months if you'll take treatment," he said. Jerry, her husband of 45 years, decided immediately to seek a second opinion, which led them to Cancer Treatment Centers of America© (CTCA). There, Jerry remembered, doctors told Betty that they couldn't promise a cure but thought they might be able to control the cancer. Subsequent blood tests at CTCA delivered unexpected news — Betty had developed treatment-induced diabetes, in a big way. "We had just visited the pulmonologist and were waiting at the scheduler's desk when my cell phone rang," Jerry recalled. It was Sue, [the pulmonologist's nurse], who said, "Don't move; stay right there." Sue came to their location and told them Betty needed an immediate infusion of insulin. Her initial lab screening indicated a blood sugar of 863. Normal range is from 80 to 110, with above 500 signaling a critical situation. The diagnosis for diabetes was confusing because Betty never had diabetes, nor did it run in her family. The Overfelts were not alone — 8 to 18 percent of all cancer patients also have diabetes, according to CTCA. Type 1 diabetes is linked to cervical cancer and stomach cancer, and type 2 diabetes is linked to breast, endometrial, pancreatic, liver, kidney and colon cancers. Treatmentinduced diabetes can be triggered by chemotherapy and steroid use. "It is very overwhelming to a patient to be diagnosed with cancer, and then be told that they have diabetes as well," said Andrea Reser, RD, LD, nutrition supervisor/diabetes program coordinator at CTCA. "People need to know how to regulate their blood sugar while on a cancer-fighting d Continue reading >>

How To Balance Diabetes And Cancer Treatment

How To Balance Diabetes And Cancer Treatment

How to Balance Diabetes and Cancer Treatment Managing your type 2 diabetes during cancer treatment can be challenging but it can be done. Being treated for cancer when you have type 2 diabetes requires working with a multidisciplinary team of caregivers. Type 2 diabetes can raise your risk for several types of cancer, and it can also affect your cancer treatment if you are diagnosed with cancer. The critical issue is to treat the cancer with whatever works best for the patient and not to avoid any treatment just because of the diabetes, says Derek LeRoith, MD , director of research in the division of endocrinology, diabetes and bone disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. It is vital, though, to take the diabetes into consideration as part of the treatment, says Marilou Terpenning, MD , a physician at Santa Monica Hematology-Oncology Consultants in Santa Monica, California. And that means assembling a multidisciplinary team of caregivers that may include an endocrinologist , internist, surgeon, medical oncologist , and radiation therapist, and a dietitian for nutritional education and counseling,Dr. Terpenning says. Treatment for cancer can affect glucose metabolism and affect the need for monitoring blood sugar and adjustment of medications, she says. The cancer treatment team needs to prepare the joint cancer treatment plan and work with the endocrinologist or internist overseeing diabetes management. The good news is that experts can generally predict how certain treatments such as surgery and chemotherapy will affect diabetes management and advise accordingly, Terpenning says. Many people with diabetes have a form of nerve damage known as diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy can cause tingling, burning, pain, or num Continue reading >>

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What is the relationship between breast cancer and diabetes? Survivors of breast cancer, who are post-menopausal, have a higher chance of developing diabetes. Scientists are becoming increasingly aware of an association between diabetes and cancer. In this article, we discuss the link. A study, published in Diabetologia, is the largest to observe the link between surviving breast cancer and eventually developing diabetes; it also showed that whether the patient went on to develop diabetes was closely associated with having undergone chemotherapy . The opposite interaction has also been observed: females with diabetes have a 20 percent chance of developing postmenopausal breast cancer. A study from last year demonstrated that people with diabetes over the age of 60 are more likely to develop breast cancer, compared with their counterparts without diabetes. Fast facts on breast cancer and diabetes: It has been observed that having diabetes increases the likelihood of breast cancer, and that having breast cancer increases the likelihood of developing diabetes. Lifestyle changes can help reduce risk long-term. How has the connection between breast cancer and diabetes been established? There has been increased study into the correlation of breast cancer and diabetes. The connection has been made as a result of improvements in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. As more women survive breast cancer, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the long-term outcomes for survivors as they grow older. However, few studies have tried to determine what the risk of developing diabetes is for a breast cancer survivor. The study in Diabetalogia is an example of the new research that has established the connection between breast cancer and diabetes more firmly. The team, Continue reading >>

Cancer And Diabetes: Managing A Dual Diagnosis

Cancer And Diabetes: Managing A Dual Diagnosis

Benefits of good nutrition Nutritional support at CTCA Preventing malnutrition Cancer and diabetes Managing side effects with nutrition What to eat Nutrition tips If you are managing cancer and diabetes, you understand how difficult it can be to eat right and stay strong. Each of these diseases can be frustrating enough to deal with on their own. When battling them at the same time, it can take your stress to new levels. Regardless of which disease came first, know you are not the only one dealing with this situation. Cancer and diabetes often co-exist. And, while managing both diseases simultaneously can be difficult, it can be done. The first step is understanding. Understanding diabetes Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas (the large gland behind the stomach). Insulin is needed to convert sugar, starches and other carbohydrates into energy needed for daily life. Much of the food you eat is broken down into glucose (sugar), which is the main source of fuel for the body. After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream and, with the help of insulin, it moves into the body’s cells where it provides fuel for metabolic processes. If the pancreas produces little or no insulin, or if the body’s cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced, glucose accumulates in the blood. Thus, the body’s cells lose their main source of fuel. Also, when there is too much sugar in the blood for long periods of time, other cells become damaged. While an estimated 14.6 million Americans (about 7 percent of the U.S. population) have been diagnosed with diabetes, about 6.2 million people have the disease and don’t even realize it. Types of diabetes There are two main type Continue reading >>

Survivors Of Breast Cancer More Likely To Develop Diabetes, And Should Be Screened More Closely, Study Shows

Survivors Of Breast Cancer More Likely To Develop Diabetes, And Should Be Screened More Closely, Study Shows

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Survivors of breast cancer more likely to develop diabetes, and should be screened more closely, study shows A major new study shows that post-menopausal survivors of breast cancer are more likely to develop diabetes than controls without breast cancer. A major new study shows that post-menopausal survivors of breast cancer are more likely to develop diabetes than controls without breast cancer. Furthermore, the relationship between breast cancer and diabetes varies depending on whether a breast cancer survivor has undergone chemotherapy. The study is the largest to explore this relationship so far, and is published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). An association between diabetes and cancer is becoming increasingly recognised. For instance, women with diabetes have an estimated 20% higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. As breast cancer survival rates continue to improve, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the long-term health consequences for survivors as they age. However, to date little research has been carried out on the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer survivors developing diabetes. In this population-based study, Dr Lorraine Lipscombe (Women's College Hospital, Women's College Research Institute, Toronto, ON, Canada) and colleagues used population-based data from Ontario, Canada to compare the incidence of diabetes among women aged 55 years or older with breast cancer, from 1996 to 2008, with that of age-matched women without breast cancer. They further explored this relationship based on whether the patient had undergone chemotherapy. They found that, of 24,976 breast cancer survivors and 124,880 con Continue reading >>

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

More than 25 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among people 65 and older, nearly 27 percent have diabetes. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is associated largely with older age and being overweight as well as family history. Older age and obesity also are risk factors for developing cancer, which means that people with type 2 diabetes are diagnosed with cancer more often than those in the general population. Having diabetes can complicate cancer treatment due to a number of factors. At the same time, some treatments for cancer, including certain newer targeted therapy drugs, can spur the development of diabetes, especially in patients who already had a propensity toward developing the disease, although this effect is usually reversible. Azeez Farooki is a Memorial Sloan Kettering endocrinologist who specializes in treating cancer patients who also have diabetes. We spoke with Dr. Farooki about what special considerations are taken into account when treating this group of patients. A Disease of Blood Sugar “Diabetes is a disease in which a person has increased levels of glucose, or sugar, in the blood,” Dr. Farooki explains. “It can occur because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin — the hormone that allows glucose to be absorbed — or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. Cells should normally take in sugar from the blood; if they don’t, then high blood sugar or ‘hyperglycemia’ results.” The majority of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, which often causes the body to become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type 2 disease may be treated with insulin injections, other hormonal inject Continue reading >>

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated With Anti-cancer Medication

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated With Anti-cancer Medication

Acute Hyperglycemia Associated with Anti-Cancer Medication Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Thyroid Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea. Corresponding author: Eun Kyung Lee. Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Thyroid Cancer, National Cancer Center, 323 Ilsan-ro, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang 10408, Korea. Tel: +82-31-920-1743, Fax: +82-31-920-2798, [email protected] Received 2017 Jan 16; Revised 2017 Feb 1; Accepted 2017 Feb 16. Copyright 2017 Korean Endocrine Society This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( ) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Hyperglycemia during chemotherapy occurs in approximately 10% to 30% of patients. Glucocorticoids and L-asparaginase are well known to cause acute hyperglycemia during chemotherapy. Long-term hyperglycemia is also frequently observed, especially in patients with hematologic malignancies treated with L-asparaginase-based regimens and total body irradiation. Glucocorticoid-induced hyperglycemia often develops because of increased insulin resistance, diminished insulin secretion, and exaggerated hepatic glucose output. Screening strategies for this condition include random glucose testing, hemoglobin A1c testing, oral glucose loading, and fasting plasma glucose screens. The management of hyperglycemia starts with insulin or sulfonylurea, depending on the type, dose, and delivery of the glucocorticoid formulation. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are associated with a high incidence of hyperglycemia, ranging from 13% to 50%. Immunotherapy, such as anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1) antibody treatment, induces hyperglycem Continue reading >>

How Radiotherapy Can Affect Your Diabetes

How Radiotherapy Can Affect Your Diabetes

If you're struggling to find what you need, call our Support line on 0808 808 0000 (Monday to Friday, 9am-8pm) How radiotherapy can affect your diabetes How radiotherapy can affect your diabetes Need to talk? Call us free* 0808 808 00 00 Monday to Friday, 9am-8pm Radiotherapy uses high-energy rays, usually x-rays and similar rays (such as electrons), to treat disease. It destroys cancer cells in the area that is treated. Normal cells can also be damaged by radiotherapy. They can usually repair themselves, but cancer cells cant. Radiotherapy is carefully planned so that it avoids as much healthy tissue as possible. However, there will always be some healthy tissue that is affected by the treatment and this will cause side effects . Radiotherapy is used to treat many different types of cancer. How we write our information and the sources we use How radiotherapy can affect your diabetes During and immediately after radiotherapy, your blood sugar level may rise. This happens because the body releases extra sugar to help you cope with the treatment. Depending on your diabetes treatment, your blood sugar may sometimes drop after the radiotherapy. During your course of radiotherapy treatment, it is important to test your blood sugar more often than usual. Your diabetes team will be able to give you advice on how to manage your blood sugars. You may need to change your medicines or insulin. If you inject insulin, avoid giving your injections in the area of your skin where you are having radiotherapy. The booklet explains how some cancer treatments can affect your diabetes and make it difficult to control your blood sugar. It also has some tips to help you cope with side effects of cancer treatment if you have diabetes. The type of treatment you might be offered depends on the Continue reading >>

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