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Can Cancer Cause Diabetes?

Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic Cancer

Tweet Pancreatic cancer, or cancer of the pancreas, is one of the more dangerous forms of cancer. Diabetes is listed as a risk factor and also a potential consequence of pancreatic cancer. Famous people that have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer include Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Inc. What is pancreatic cancer? The pancreas is an organ that sits close behind the stomach and plays an important part in digestion as well as in keeping our blood sugar levels at safe levels. Pancreatic cancer is when cells start being produced in the pancreas in an uncontrolled fashion by the body. This can lead to a number of health risks which can include diabetes in some cases. How common is pancreatic cancer? Cancer research reports that pancreatic cancer accounts for about 3% of all cancer cases. In 2010, around 8,500 people in the UK were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Survival rates from pancreatic cancer are low. In 2005-2009, only 4% of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer survived for 5 years or more. Pancreatic cancer is relatively rare in younger people. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer Type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer have been shown to be linked but researchers have found it difficult to work out which may have the biggest influence on the other. Higher than normal levels of circulating insulin and increased pressure on the pancreas to produce insulin have been suggested as possible reasons for diabetes leading to a higher risk of pancreatic cancer. Looking at the other side of the coin, pancreatic cancer may lead to insulin resistance by increasing the amount of insulin produced by the pancreas and pancreatic cancer can also lead to a loss of insulin producing capacity. Both of these situations can therefore lead to increased risk of diabetes. If the pancrea Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer And Diabetes – A Cellular Case Of Chicken And Egg

Pancreatic Cancer And Diabetes – A Cellular Case Of Chicken And Egg

We’ve all heard the age-old question about the chicken and the egg. Well scientists studying the link between diabetes (a condition where the amount of glucose in your blood is too high because the body cannot use it properly) and pancreatic cancer are facing a similar conundrum. It seems there’s a link between the two conditions, but it’s not clear which one comes first. While the majority of people with diabetes will never develop pancreatic cancer, the question of whether diabetes could be a cause or a consequence of pancreatic cancer is an important one. Answering this could help scientists better understand the biology of these two conditions, and might help spot people at higher risk of pancreatic cancer. So, as it’s pancreatic cancer awareness month, we’ve dug into the evidence to see what is known about these links, and which questions remain unanswered. We know there’s a link Doctors first started exploring the possibility of a link between diabetes and pancreatic cancer in the 1940s and 1950s. Several reports had come out saying that patients with pancreatic cancer were more likely to also have diabetes than other people. This has been shown for type 2 diabetes as well as type 1 and young onset diabetes. Since then, many studies have shown a link between the two conditions. Overall, it seems that people with diabetes are around twice as likely to be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer than the general population. And this makes sense, given that diabetes and pancreatic cancer are diseases that both affect the pancreas. The next big question is: how does this work? Does diabetes increase a person’s risk of pancreatic cancer or is it the cancer that causes diabetes? Or is there something else increasing the risk of both conditions? How pancreatic canc Continue reading >>

Overcoming Treatment-induced Diabetes

Overcoming Treatment-induced Diabetes

Good nutrition is key Betty Overfelt's oncologist back home in Missouri informed her that she had stage IV small-cell lung cancer. His prognosis was grim — "I think I can get you three months if you'll take treatment," he said. Jerry, her husband of 45 years, decided immediately to seek a second opinion, which led them to Cancer Treatment Centers of America© (CTCA). There, Jerry remembered, doctors told Betty that they couldn't promise a cure but thought they might be able to control the cancer. Subsequent blood tests at CTCA delivered unexpected news — Betty had developed treatment-induced diabetes, in a big way. "We had just visited the pulmonologist and were waiting at the scheduler's desk when my cell phone rang," Jerry recalled. It was Sue, [the pulmonologist's nurse], who said, "Don't move; stay right there." Sue came to their location and told them Betty needed an immediate infusion of insulin. Her initial lab screening indicated a blood sugar of 863. Normal range is from 80 to 110, with above 500 signaling a critical situation. The diagnosis for diabetes was confusing because Betty never had diabetes, nor did it run in her family. The Overfelts were not alone — 8 to 18 percent of all cancer patients also have diabetes, according to CTCA. Type 1 diabetes is linked to cervical cancer and stomach cancer, and type 2 diabetes is linked to breast, endometrial, pancreatic, liver, kidney and colon cancers. Treatmentinduced diabetes can be triggered by chemotherapy and steroid use. "It is very overwhelming to a patient to be diagnosed with cancer, and then be told that they have diabetes as well," said Andrea Reser, RD, LD, nutrition supervisor/diabetes program coordinator at CTCA. "People need to know how to regulate their blood sugar while on a cancer-fighting d Continue reading >>

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What is the relationship between breast cancer and diabetes? Survivors of breast cancer, who are post-menopausal, have a higher chance of developing diabetes. Scientists are becoming increasingly aware of an association between diabetes and cancer. In this article, we discuss the link. A study, published in Diabetologia, is the largest to observe the link between surviving breast cancer and eventually developing diabetes; it also showed that whether the patient went on to develop diabetes was closely associated with having undergone chemotherapy . The opposite interaction has also been observed: females with diabetes have a 20 percent chance of developing postmenopausal breast cancer. A study from last year demonstrated that people with diabetes over the age of 60 are more likely to develop breast cancer, compared with their counterparts without diabetes. Fast facts on breast cancer and diabetes: It has been observed that having diabetes increases the likelihood of breast cancer, and that having breast cancer increases the likelihood of developing diabetes. Lifestyle changes can help reduce risk long-term. How has the connection between breast cancer and diabetes been established? There has been increased study into the correlation of breast cancer and diabetes. The connection has been made as a result of improvements in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. As more women survive breast cancer, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the long-term outcomes for survivors as they grow older. However, few studies have tried to determine what the risk of developing diabetes is for a breast cancer survivor. The study in Diabetalogia is an example of the new research that has established the connection between breast cancer and diabetes more firmly. The team, Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Exocrine Pancreatic Cancer

Signs And Symptoms Of Exocrine Pancreatic Cancer

The symptoms of exocrine pancreatic cancers and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are often different, so they are described separately. Having one or more of the symptoms below does not mean you have pancreatic cancer. In fact, many of these symptoms are more likely to be caused by other conditions. Still, if you have any of these symptoms, it’s important to have them checked by a doctor so that the cause can be found and treated, if needed. Early pancreatic cancers often do not cause any signs or symptoms. By the time they do cause symptoms, they have often already spread outside the pancreas. Jaundice and related symptoms Jaundice is yellowing of the eyes and skin. Most people with pancreatic cancer (and nearly all people with ampullary cancer) will have jaundice as one of their first symptoms. Jaundice is caused by the buildup of bilirubin, a dark yellow-brown substance made in the liver. Normally, the liver excretes bilirubin as part of a liquid called bile. Bile goes through the common bile duct into the intestines, where it helps break down fats. It eventually leaves the body in the stool. When the common bile duct becomes blocked, bile can’t reach the intestines, and the level of bilirubin in the body builds up. Cancers that start in the head of the pancreas are near the common bile duct. These cancers can press on the duct and cause jaundice while they are still fairly small, which can sometimes lead to these tumors being found at an early stage. But cancers that start in the body or tail of the pancreas don’t press on the duct until they have spread through the pancreas. By this time, the cancer has often spread beyond the pancreas as well. When pancreatic cancer spreads, it often goes to the liver. This can also lead to jaundice. Dark urine: Somet Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Pancreatic Cancer

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Pancreatic Cancer

Go to: Review The early symptoms of pancreatic cancer, such as abdominal pain, weight loss, fatigue, jaundice, and nausea, are nonspecific and may occur late in the course of the disease [1,2]. As a result, pancreatic cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage, frequently after the tumor has already metastasized. Pancreatic cancer is insensitive to pharmacological and radiological intervention and often recurs after apparently curative surgery. All these factors contribute to the dismal prognosis of the disease [3]. About 80% of pancreatic cancer patients have glucose intolerance or frank diabetes [4,5]. This observation has led to the following two hypotheses: i. pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and ii. diabetes is a risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer. Numerous studies have been performed in order to elucidate the relationship between these two diseases. Evidence suggesting that pancreatic cancer causes diabetes The majority of diabetes associated with pancreatic cancer is diagnosed either concomitantly with the cancer or during the two years before the cancer is found [6]; 71% of the glucose intolerance found in pancreatic cancer patients is unknown before the cancer is diagnosed [5]. These suggest that recently-developed glucose intolerance or diabetes may be a consequence of pancreatic cancer and that recent onset of glucose intolerance or diabetes may be an early sign of pancreatic cancer. Several studies have demonstrated that diabetes in pancreatic cancer patients is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance [4,5,7]. Insulin resistance is also found in non-diabetic or glucose intolerant pancreatic cancer patients, though to a lesser degree [7]. Insulin sensitivity and overall diabetic state in pancreatic cancer patients who undergo t Continue reading >>

Diabetes May Be Warning Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Diabetes May Be Warning Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

A presentation to the European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam reports that 50% of people in two sample groups who had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the previous year and been given their first medication to control it. Fewer than 5 out of 100 people can expect to be alive 5 years after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Survival rates are poor because the cancer doesn't usually cause any symptoms until late in the disease. The American Cancer Society estimates more than 53,000 people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2017. "Although it has been known for some time that there is an association between type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer, the relationship between the two conditions is complex," Alice Koechlin, from the International Prevention Research Institute in Lyon, France, told the conference. The pancreas contains cells that make insulin. Type 2 diabetes happens when these cells are unable to make enough insulin or the insulin doesn't work properly. The study involved 368,377 people with type 2 diabetes in Belgium and 456,311 in Italy. Among these patients over a 5-year period, there were 885 and 1,872 cases of pancreatic cancer diagnosed respectively. The researchers found that patients had a 3.5 times higher risk of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer compared to those on other non-insulin, non-incretin diabetes treatments in the first 3 months after their first prescription for a class of diabetes medications known as incretins. The risks decreased with time. These are hormones that stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin. Among patients who already had type 2 diabetes, the need to switch to injecting insulin because their condition got worse was associated with a seven-times-higher risk Continue reading >>

Chasing Diabetes' Connection To Pancreatic Cancer

Chasing Diabetes' Connection To Pancreatic Cancer

Chasing Diabetes' Connection to Pancreatic Cancer Diabetes and pancreatic cancer affect the same organ, but they have more in common than just their location. People who have one of these conditions are also more likely to have the other one. About 30 million Americans have diabetes. Pancreatic cancer is diagnosed in nearly 54,000 people each year, and it's the third-leading cause of cancer-related death. Most people aren't diagnosed until their cancer has already spread and is harder to treat. Researchers have been looking at the link between diabetes and pancreatic cancer for many years. Now they're trying to use this connection to diagnose pancreatic cancer earlier, when treatment is more likely to improve survival. Diabetes is both a risk for, and a warning sign of, pancreatic cancer. "The relationship goes both ways," says Lynn Matrisian, PhD, chief science officer of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. Researchers don't know exactly why, but people who have had diabetes for several years are slightly more likely to get pancreatic cancer than those without diabetes. Pancreatic cancer can also cause diabetes. About half of people with pancreatic cancer have high blood sugar. When the cancer is surgically removed, blood sugar levels often go back to normal. "In longstanding diabetes, the diabetes came first. In new-onset diabetes that's followed by pancreatic cancer after a year or two, diabetes may be a symptom of the pancreatic cancer. Which is why there's an opportunity to intervene," says Richard Frank, MD, a medical oncologist and director of cancer research at Western Connecticut Health Network. Frank and other researchers are looking for ways to spot pancreatic cancer early in people with newly diagnosed diabetes. How to Screen for Pancreatic Cancer in Peop Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cancer: What's The Connection?

Diabetes And Cancer: What's The Connection?

When Michelle Hall was diagnosed with breast cancer two years ago, she was shocked. "The standing joke in the family was that I came from a long line of stocky French women who lived forever," says Hall, 62, of Salem, N.H. "We had no breast cancer in the family." Hall had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2001, so she would have special challenges while facing down cancer. As diseases, cancer and diabetes seem a world away from each other. Yet, numerous studies suggest the conditions are linked. People with diabetes are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer than those without diabetes, but why remains unclear. Scientists are still trying to answer even the most basic questions: Does diabetes cause cancer? If so, what kinds of cancer and how? As the interplay between diabetes and cancer becomes clearer, researchers hope to gain an edge against both diseases. The link between diabetes and cancer may be partially explained by risk factors that underlie and raise the risk of both diseases. Sex: Overall, men are more likely to develop both cancer and type 2 diabetes than women. Weight: Overweight and obese people are more likely to develop cancer than lean people. The association between type 2 diabetes and weight is also well established. While it's clear that losing weight reduces the risk for type 2 diabetes, less is known about whether weight loss combats cancer. Diet: Eating patterns that are thought to help prevent and treat type 2 diabeteslimited red and processed meats and abundant vegetables, fruits, and whole grainsare also associated with a lower risk for many types of cancer. Exercise: Studies show that regular physical activity lowers the risk of developing several types of cancer. Likewise, 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per day can reduce th Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cancer

Diabetes And Cancer

Diabetes and cancer are common diseases with tremendous impact on health worldwide. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that people with diabetes are at significantly higher risk for many forms of cancer. Type 2 diabetes and cancer share many risk factors, but potential biologic links between the two diseases are incompletely understood. Moreover, evidence from observational studies suggests that some medications used to treat hyperglycemia are associated with either increased or reduced risk of cancer. Against this backdrop, the American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society convened a consensus development conference in December 2009. Following a series of scientific presentations by experts in the field, the writing group independently developed this consensus report to address the following questions: Is there a meaningful association between diabetes and cancer incidence or prognosis? What risk factors are common to both diabetes and cancer? What are possible biologic links between diabetes and cancer risk? Do diabetes treatments influence risk of cancer or cancer prognosis? For each area, the authors were asked to address the current gaps in evidence and potential research and epidemiologic strategies for developing more definitive evidence in the future. Table 1 includes a summary of findings and recommendations. Recommendations in this report are solely the opinions of the authors and do not represent official position of the American Diabetes Association or the American Cancer Society. Go to: 1. Is there a meaningful association between diabetes and cancer incidence or prognosis? Both diabetes and cancer are prevalent diseases whose incidence is increasing globally. Worldwide, the prevalence of cancer has been difficult to establish because many area Continue reading >>

Two Hidden Cancer Causes: Diabetes And Obesity

Two Hidden Cancer Causes: Diabetes And Obesity

Does a widening waistline put you at risk for cancer? Apparently so. According to a new study, nearly 6 percent of cancers are attributable at least in part to obesity and diabetes. Researchers compared incidence data for 12 cancers in 175 countries in 2012 with body mass index and diabetes prevalence figures from 2002, on the assumption that it takes at least ten years for cancer to develop. They found that in 2012, diabetes and a B.M.I. above 25 were independent risk factors for 792,600 new cases of cancer, about 5.6 percent of the 14,067,894 cases reported to a worldwide cancer registry. Among the cancers associated with diabetes and high B.M.I. were tumors of the colon, gallbladder, liver and pancreas. Obesity and diabetes weren’t the only causes of these cancers, but the conditions played a role. “We know a lot about what causes obesity and diabetes, but what it is about being obese or diabetic that causes cancer is less clear,” said the lead author, Jonathan Pearson-Stuttard, a clinical fellow at Imperial College London. “It may be that exposure to high insulin levels or insulin resistance may also be a cause of cancer.” The study, in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, found considerable differences in the proportions of cancer cases attributable to B.M.I. on the one hand and to diabetes on the other. For example, high B.M.I. was associated with about twice as many cases of colorectal cancer as diabetes, and nearly three times as many cases of breast and endometrial cancers. Diabetes was not associated with kidney cancer at all, but high B.M.I. was linked to about a fifth of kidney cancer cases. High B.M.I. and diabetes combined accounted for 38.4 percent of endometrial cancers but only 8.9 percent of breast cancers. In men, the two conditions combin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Could Be A Warning Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Diabetes Could Be A Warning Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

"Experts have revealed the onset of diabetes, or existing diabetes getting much worse could be a sign of hidden pancreatic cancer," reports The Daily Express. The media reports follow a press release of a study presented at the European Cancer Congress (ECCO) yesterday. The research analysed nearly a million people with type 2 diabetes in Belgium and Italy, some of whom went on to be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. The recent onset of diabetes appeared to be a possible warning sign of pancreatic cancer, with 25% of cases in Belgium and 18% in Italy being diagnosed within three months of a diabetes diagnosis. Faster progression of diabetes (where patients needed insulin or other more intensive treatments sooner) was also associated with a greater chance of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer is rare and often has a poor outcome, partly because it is difficult to detect at an early stage. However, it's important to put these findings in context. Diabetes has previously been linked with pancreatic cancer, though it is unclear why. It could be that diabetes increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. What is probably more likely is that rapid onset or progression of diabetes could be a symptom of the cancer itself. Diabetes is fairly common in the UK, with around 4 million cases, while pancreatic cancer remains very rare. Just because you have diabetes does not mean you will go on to get pancreatic cancer. However, if you are concerned that you may have diabetes or that your diabetes is poorly controlled, you should talk to your GP. There are also steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing diabetes. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the International Prevention Research Institute in Lyon, France. The Continue reading >>

Rapid Diabetes Deterioration -- Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer?

Rapid Diabetes Deterioration -- Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer?

Rapid Diabetes Deterioration -- Sign of Pancreatic Cancer? AMSTERDAM Patients with type 2 diabetes whose condition deteriorates rapidly soon after diagnosis may have asymptomatic pancreatic cancer, say European investigators. In a study of more than 550,000 diabetes patients, researchers found that patients who received glucagonlike peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, or incretin mimetics, were at significantly increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. However, the researchers observed that the increased risk diminished rapidly after diagnosis. Given that they also found that the risk for pancreatic cancer was markedly increased after starting insulin therapy, they suggested that "reverse causation" may be in play, with asymptomatic pancreatic cancer initially causing diabetes before progressing to a symptomatic stage. The new findings were presented here at the inaugural meeting of the European CanCer Organisation (ECCO) Congress 2017. Alice Koechlin, from the International Prevention Research Institute (IPRI) in Lyon, France, said in a statement: "Doctors and their diabetic patients should be aware that the onset of diabetes or rapidly deteriorating diabetes could be the first sign of hidden pancreatic cancer, and steps should be taken to investigate it." She cautioned that investigating the possibility of undiagnosed pancreatic cancer is "difficult," as there is currently no good, noninvasive method for detecting asymptomatic pancreatic cancer. "We hope that our results will encourage the search for blood markers indicating the presence of pancreatic cancer, which could guide decisions to perform a confirmation examination like endoscopy," she said. Peter Naredi, MD, PhD, chair of the Congress, president of ECCO, and professor of surgery at the Sahlgrenska Ac Continue reading >>

Cancer And Diabetes: Managing A Dual Diagnosis

Cancer And Diabetes: Managing A Dual Diagnosis

Benefits of good nutrition Nutritional support at CTCA Preventing malnutrition Cancer and diabetes Managing side effects with nutrition What to eat Nutrition tips If you are managing cancer and diabetes, you understand how difficult it can be to eat right and stay strong. Each of these diseases can be frustrating enough to deal with on their own. When battling them at the same time, it can take your stress to new levels. Regardless of which disease came first, know you are not the only one dealing with this situation. Cancer and diabetes often co-exist. And, while managing both diseases simultaneously can be difficult, it can be done. The first step is understanding. Understanding diabetes Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas (the large gland behind the stomach). Insulin is needed to convert sugar, starches and other carbohydrates into energy needed for daily life. Much of the food you eat is broken down into glucose (sugar), which is the main source of fuel for the body. After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream and, with the help of insulin, it moves into the body’s cells where it provides fuel for metabolic processes. If the pancreas produces little or no insulin, or if the body’s cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced, glucose accumulates in the blood. Thus, the body’s cells lose their main source of fuel. Also, when there is too much sugar in the blood for long periods of time, other cells become damaged. While an estimated 14.6 million Americans (about 7 percent of the U.S. population) have been diagnosed with diabetes, about 6.2 million people have the disease and don’t even realize it. Types of diabetes There are two main type Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer Symptoms: Diabetes Could Be A Warning Sign For Deadly Disease

Pancreatic Cancer Symptoms: Diabetes Could Be A Warning Sign For Deadly Disease

Pancreatic cancer is hard to diagnose in its early stages as the tumour doesn't usually cause any symptoms. The disease affects around 8,800 people every year in the UK. Diabetic have an increased risk of pancreatic cancer - however now experts have suggested cancer can cause some cases of diabetes. Experts have revealed the onset of diabetes, or existing diabetes getting much worse could be a sign of hidden pancreatic cancer. Medical records and the type of diabetic medicines they are prescribed could be a tool in identifying those at risk, scientists from the International Prevention Research Institute in Lyon said. An analysis of nearly a million patients with type 2 diabetes in Italy and Belgium with pancreatic cancer found half were diagnosed within one year of being found to have type 2 diabetes and being given their first prescription to control it. Experts said they had a 3.5 times greater risk of being diagnosed with the disease in the first three months after their first prescription for incretins, hormones which stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin to lower blood sugar levels. Injecting insulin was associated with a seven-fold increased risk of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Professor Philippe Autier said: "Although it has been known for some time that there is an association between type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer, the relationship between the two conditions is complex. "Incretin therapies reduce diabetic hyperglycemia through stimulating the release of insulin by the pancreas. "These drugs are typically prescribed when the oral anti-diabetic drugs can no longer control blood glucose levels. "Because of their stimulating effects on the pancreas, it has long been thought that the incretin therapies could promote the occurrence of panc Continue reading >>

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