diabetestalk.net

Can Blood Transfusion Affect Blood Sugar

Can I Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

Donating blood is a selfless way to help others. Blood donations help people who need transfusions for many types of medical conditions, and you may decide to donate blood for a variety of reasons. A pint of donated blood may help up to three people. Although you’re allowed donate blood if you have diabetes, there are a few requirements that you’ll need to meet. If you have diabetes and want to donate blood, it’s generally safe for you to do so. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are eligible to give blood donations. You should have your condition under control and be in otherwise good health before you donate blood. Having your diabetes under control means that you maintain healthy blood sugar levels. This requires you to be vigilant about your diabetes on a daily basis. You need to be aware of your blood sugar levels throughout each day and make sure you eat a proper diet and exercise sufficiently. Living a healthy lifestyle will contribute to keeping your blood sugar levels in a healthy range. Your doctor may also prescribe certain medications to help manage your diabetes. These medications shouldn’t impact your ability to donate blood. If you want to donate blood but are concerned about your diabetes, talk to your doctor before your donation. They can answer any questions you may have and help you determine whether this is the best option for you. Health screening Blood donation centers have a screening process that requires you to disclose any preexisting health conditions. It’s also a time where a certified Red Cross professional will evaluate you and measure your basic vital statistics, such as your temperature, pulse, and blood pressure. They will take a small blood sample (likely from a finger prick) to determine your hemoglobin levels as well. If Continue reading >>

Effects Of Packed Red Cell Transfusion On Blood Glucose Concentrations In Beta Thalassemia Major (btm) Ashort Presentations Of Personal Experience

Effects Of Packed Red Cell Transfusion On Blood Glucose Concentrations In Beta Thalassemia Major (btm) Ashort Presentations Of Personal Experience

The most accurate method with which to evaluate altered glucose metabolism in patients with TM is still controversial. Even if the annual oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) by the age of 10 years is the recommended method, a diagnosis of 'normal' glucose tolerance during OGTT does not exclude abnormal postprandial glucose levels at home . There is now evidence that the OGTT method, evaluating fasting and 2-h post load glucose, may miss episodes of hyperglycaemia . Furthermore, the credibility of Hb A1c has been questioned because the hemoglobin composition of patients' erythrocytes are considerably modified, due to regular and frequent transfusions. The results may be falsely increased or decreased depending on the proximity to transfusion, shortened erythrocyte lifespan and the assay used . It has been demonstrated recently that the continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) is a useful and valid tool in defining glucose metabolism in children and adults affected by TM with early glucose derangements . Indeed, the CGMS allows monitoring of glycaemic profiles throughout a period of 72 h for a total of 288 glycaemic registrations per day. It identifies glycaemic excursions and constitutes a valid device to understand the 24-h glycaemic trend and profiles. Rimondiet al. investigated the value of using CGMS in six TM patients with abnormal glucose homeostasis after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) . Two-hour OGTT glucose values and CGMS fluctuations were classified as normal if < 7.8 mmol/l, impaired if 7.8 to 11.1 mmol/l, diabetic if > 11.1 mmol/l. The TM patients spent from 1 to 23% of the time with a blood glucose level from 7.8 to 11.1 mmol/l. we evaluate three patients with Beta Thalassemai major using CGMS Patient 1 A 15 year old male with TM presented with noc Continue reading >>

What Is A Blood Transfusion? Risks, Procedure & Side Effects

What Is A Blood Transfusion? Risks, Procedure & Side Effects

A blood transfusion is the transfer of blood or blood products from one person (donor) into another person's bloodstream (recipient). This is usually done as a lifesaving maneuver to replace blood cells or blood products lost through severe bleeding, during surgery when blood loss occurs or to increase the blood count in an anemic patient. The following material is provided to all patients and/or their family members regarding blood transfusions and the use of blood products. Although in most situations the likelihood of a blood transfusion associated with surgery is uncommon, at times patients may require blood products. You are encouraged to discuss your particular need for transfusion as well as the risks of transfusion with your doctor. Your options may be limited by time and health factors, so it is important to begin carrying out your decision as soon as possible. For example, if friends or family members are donating blood for a patient (directed donors), their blood should be drawn several days prior to the anticipated need to allow adequate time for testing and labeling. The exact protocols are hospital and donor site specific. The safest blood product is your own, so if a transfusion is likely, this is your lowest risk choice. Unfortunately this option is usually only practical when preparing for elective surgery. In most other instances the patient cannot donate their own blood due to the acute nature of the need for blood. Although you have the right to refuse a blood transfusion, this decision may have life-threatening consequences. If you are a parent deciding for your child, you as the parent or guardian must understand that in a life-threatening situation your doctors will act in your child's best interest to insure your child's health and wellbeing in Continue reading >>

Blood Transfusion-risks Of Blood Transfusion

Blood Transfusion-risks Of Blood Transfusion

Blood Transfusion - Risks of Blood Transfusion The risks of blood transfusions include transfusion reactions (immune-related reactions), nonimmune reactions, and infections. Immune-related reactions occur when your immune system attacks components of the blood being transfused or when the blood causes an allergic reaction . This is called a transfusion reaction. Most transfusion reactions occur because of errors made in matching the recipient's blood to the blood transfused. These errors are very rare, and much effort is made to prevent them. Even receiving the correct blood type sometimes results in a transfusion reaction. These reactions may be mild or severe. Most mild reactions are not life-threatening when treated quickly. Even mild reactions, though, can be frightening. Mild allergic reactions may involve itching , hives , wheezing , and fever. Severe reactions may cause anaphylactic shock . Doctors will stop a blood transfusion if they think you are having a reaction. A reaction may turn out to be mild. But at the beginning, it is hard for doctors to know whether it will be severe. There are several immune-related transfusion reactions. Nonhemolytic fever reactions cause fever and chills without destruction (hemolysis) of the red blood cells . This is the most common transfusion reaction. It can occur even when the blood has been correctly matched and administered. The more transfusions you receive, the greater your risk for this type of reaction. People who have had several transfusions are more likely to have nonhemolytic fever reactions or other types of immune system reactions. These problems occur because the body mistakes the new blood as harmful and makes specific antibodies to destroy it. Careful screening helps reduce the risk for these problems. Hemoly Continue reading >>

Can Diabetic People Donate Blood?

Can Diabetic People Donate Blood?

In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration does not have any regulatory restrictions against diabetics donating blood other than if the individual has received bovine source insulin since 1980. The concern here is not the diabetes but rather the bovine spongiform encephalopathy. As bovine source insulins were not widely available in the US, the diabetic would have had to specifically import it from Europe. (Of note, the FDA regulations require that is the donor answers that they are not certain whether they received bovine source insulin, they are deferred. Many donors answer "I do not know" and are therefore deferred when in reality they have not been exposed as it was not available in the US.) Donors may mistake this deferral as being due to their having diabetes. Here is the FDA guidance (Each blood collection center in the US can have criteria more stringent that either the FDA and AABB so there is some variability among blood centers. At the collection center where I work, we allow donors with diabetes, whether controlled with diet, oral hypoglycemics, or insulin, to donate. The only instance where I can think where diabetes would have a negative affect on blood product and therefore an adverse effect on the patient would be in the rare instances where we collect granulocytes. If the donor had poor glucose control, this could impair neutrophil function. Since granulocyte donors are usually stimulated with corticosteroids, which would worsen glucose control, diabetics are deferred from granulocyte donation at my institution so this is not an issue. Continue reading >>

5 Diabetes Myths

5 Diabetes Myths

I've had diabetes for over 16 years now and there were times I would hear things about diabetes that were just completely false. I'm sure this is the case for a lot of diabetics as well. Below are some of the myths that seem to come up quite often. Myth #1: Diabetics can't eat sweets The first thing that comes to people's minds when they first meet a diabetic is probably how it sucks to not be able to eat chocolate or ice cream. While sugar does seem to be the enemy, it's completely ok for diabetics to eat sweets as long as they're watching their blood glucose levels. For diabetics like me who take insulin, for example, we can make adjustments to the amount of insulin we take to account for the extra glucose. They key thing is being able to control our blood sugar levels and we can pretty much eat anything non-diabetics can eat without the risk of any complications. Myth #2: Diabetes is contagious Diabetes occurs when a person's pancreas is not producing enough insulin, not producing any insulin at all, or the body is just not responding properly to the insulin produced. You can't catch it from making contact with people with diabetes or even through blood transfusion. Myth #3: Only old people can get diabetes I actually thought this was the case as well when I was younger, until I developed the disease myself when I was 13. It's true that a lot of people who are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes tend to be older, usually over 40, but you can develop diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2) at any age. There was a point that Type 1 diabetes (usually insulin dependent) was referred to as 'juvenile diabetes' as it was pretty rare and only seemed to occur in children and young adults. But it is now known that you can get either type at any age. Myth #4: Eating too much sugar causes diabet Continue reading >>

Blood Transfusion | Diabetic Connect

Blood Transfusion | Diabetic Connect

I was wondering if a blood transfucion could cure a body of diabetes? Even with a pancreatic transplant, you are really only trading your diabetes medications for anti rejection drugs. Still chronic. Still a lifelong thing to deal with. I would rather keep my broken pancreas and wear my pump than subject my already broken self to a transplant and all that would entail. Being diabetic is difficult enough with my own pancreas why take a chance on someone else's ;-) I was joking with my dr and mentioned I could just get a new pancreas, and he said no because that would only last for a couple of years and then I would be worse off then before the transplant. He went on to explain why, too long to go through explaination here. Sure did burst my bubble:( There is no cure for diabetes and the only thing that would help is a pancreas transplant. That still isn't a guarantee that you won't develop diabetes. Other than a pancreatic transplant, there isn't a cure for diabetes. I sure wish it was as easy as a blood transfusion :) Nope it don't work like that ,if only it did I had one friend who was a type 1 diabetic for 35 yearsa brittle diabetic She had a pancreatic transplant, it worked successfully, and she had to go through the medication to stablize the new organbut her body still had the effects of years of diabetesbut to have a transplant like that you have to be in a position of dire straits Hey Scarlett I got an email that you responded to my response to you but I don't see it here or on my profile page. This keeps happening, I get the email and no one has responded. This is weirdlol Scarlett, someone here in MD got a transplant earlier this year and the organ was from a person with AIDS. The recipient is now HIV Positive. The hospital is being sued. These days you have t Continue reading >>

Red Cell Transfusion Decreases Hemoglobin A1c In Patients With Diabetes

Red Cell Transfusion Decreases Hemoglobin A1c In Patients With Diabetes

Hemoglobin A1c (Hb A1c)1 is a mainstay of diabetes diagnosis and management that allows clinicians to estimate the recent mean blood glucose concentration of a patient. Glycation of hemoglobin is an irreversible, nonenzymatic process that depends on the glucose concentration in red blood cells (RBCs), and Hb A1c represents the integrated glucose concentration in RBCs over their life span. RBC transfusion can complicate the interpretation of Hb A1c values in diabetic patients because it introduces hemoglobin molecules exposed to glucose concentrations that may have been different from the glucose concentrations in the diabetic transfusion recipient. The potential effect of transfusion on Hb A1c has been recognized for some time, but opinions on the direction of the effect are contradictory. Data from the older literature (1–3) suggest that the high concentration of glucose in RBC storage medium promotes glycation and causes Hb A1c values to increase over time, which would predict that Hb A1c might increase in transfused patients. This concept has been stated in a recent review article (4) and on consumer Web sites, such as Lab Tests Online (however, a recent case in which a pathology resident was contacted to explain a patient's Hb A1c value decreasing from 7.4% to 5.4% in 3 days after the patient received 3 units of RBCs suggested that transfusion may lower Hb A1c values in diabetic patients. Indeed, the majority of blood donors are not diabetic, and donor RBCs would dilute the increased Hb A1c value (>6.5%) in a diabetic patient. To our knowledge, no study has used contemporary Hb A1c methods to examine the effect of RBC storage conditions on Hb A1c or the overall effect of RBC transfusion on Hb A1c in patients. To investigate these questions, we used an immunoassay Continue reading >>

Excess Glucose Limits Blood Transfusion Success

Excess Glucose Limits Blood Transfusion Success

Excess glucose limits blood transfusion success Cell-to-cell communications in blood donations are disrupted if storage solutions contain too much glucose Reducing the level of glucose in solutions used to process blood donations could benefit patients receiving blood transfusions , new research shows. The storage of blood donations is a great challenge as the longer blood is stored, the more it deteriorates. Red blood cells (RBCs) are often collected in solutions containing glucose to preserve and extend their shelf-life, but these solutions may also be adversely affecting the blood as well as patients receiving it. In the same way that untreated high blood sugar in diabetics can lead to serious medical conditions, complications associated with blood transfusions might be due to the high levels of glucose currently used to store RBCs after donation often almost 10 times the bloodstream glucose level in a healthy person. This rationale was the motivation behind the research of Dana Spence and his team at Michigan State University in East Lansing, US, who used a microfluidic system to maintain a constant, low level of glucose in blood storage solutions, and then assessed the impact this had on the RBCs. By reducing the glucose levels, we saw that the red blood cells were able to release increased amounts of ATP [adenosine triphosphate] which, in turn, can stimulate nitric oxide in other cell types, says Spence. He goes on to explain that nitric oxide is essential for maintaining blood flow and low nitric oxide bioavailability is a recognised problem associated with transfusion. Christopher Silliman , an expert in blood banking and transfusions at the Bonfils Blood Center in Denver, Colorado, US, says the results are compelling and may lead to improved storage techniques Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Anemia

Diabetes And Anemia

If you have diabetes, you’ll need to have your blood checked regularly for anemia. It’s common for people with diabetes to also end up with this blood condition. It happens when your body’s red blood cells can’t deliver as much oxygen as your body needs. If you spot anemia early on, you can better manage the issues causing it. Usually, it happens because you don’t have enough red blood cells. That can make you more likely to get certain diabetes complications, like eye and nerve damage. And it can worsen kidney, heart, and artery disease, which are more common in people with diabetes. Diabetes often leads to kidney damage, and failing kidneys can cause anemia. Healthy kidneys know when your body needs new red blood cells. They release a hormone called erythropoietin (EPO), which signals your bone marrow to make more. Damaged kidneys don’t send out enough EPO to keep up with your needs. Often, people don’t realize they have kidney disease until it’s very far along. But if you test positive for anemia, it can be an early sign of a problem with your kidneys. People with diabetes are more likely to have inflamed blood vessels. This can keep bone marrow from getting the signal they need to make more red blood cells. And some medications used to treat diabetes can drop your levels of the protein hemoglobin, which you need to carry oxygen through your blood. These drugs include ACE inhibitors, fibrates, metformin, and thiazolidinediones. If you take one of these, talk to your doctor about your risk for anemia. If you have kidney dialysis, you may have blood loss, and that can also cause anemia. When your brain and other organs don’t get enough oxygen, you feel tired and weak. Other signs you may have anemia include: Shortness of breath Dizziness Headache Pale Continue reading >>

Type 2 - Can Blood Transfusion Correct Blood Sugars | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 - Can Blood Transfusion Correct Blood Sugars | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 2 Can blood transfusion correct blood sugars I had a hip replacement in December 2016 and needed to have 2 blood transfusions.. By the third day I noticed that hypos were occurring at least twice a day. When I got home 9 days later I noticed that my sugar levels where between 5 and 6; night time readings where no higher than 7 before bed. I decided to find out if this was a fluke so i took 1.2 Victoza in the morning. I happily dug into cake and custard and had as couple of chocolate bars (delicious) in the afternoon. I did not take novorapid after. I did not test myself until 10pm prior to having my nighttime insulin Lanctus @40 units. To my surprise my blood sugar reading was 9.1 instead of 7, so it didn't really go too high. Prior to my operation my hba1c was 55, this week its come back at 43.. Can anyone explain what happened or have you experienced this. So far I have stopped novorapid as the hypos where happening everyday. I had a hip replacement in December 2016 and needed to have 2 blood transfusions.. By the third day I noticed that hypos were occurring at least twice a day. When I got home 9 days later I noticed that my sugar levels where between 5 and 6; night time readings where no higher than 7 before bed. I decided to find out if this was a fluke so i took 1.2 Victoza in the morning. I happily dug into cake and custard and had as couple of chocolate bars (delicious) in the afternoon. I did not take novorapid after. I did not test myself until 10pm prior to having my nighttime insulin Lanctus @40 units. To my surprise my blood sugar reading was 9.1 instead of 7, so it didn't really go too high. Prior to my operation my hba1c was 55, t Continue reading >>

Dextrose In The Banked Blood Products Does Not Seem To Affect The Blood Glucose Levels In Patients Undergoing Liver Transplantation.

Dextrose In The Banked Blood Products Does Not Seem To Affect The Blood Glucose Levels In Patients Undergoing Liver Transplantation.

World J Gastroenterol. 2005 May 14;11(18):2789-91. Dextrose in the banked blood products does not seem to affect the blood glucose levels in patients undergoing liver transplantation. Department of Anesthesiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Ta-Pei Road 123, Niao Shung Hsiang, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, China. Hyperglycemia commonly seen in liver transplantation (LT) has often been attributed to the dextrose in the storage solution of blood transfusion products. The purpose of the study is to compare the changes of the blood glucose levels in transfused and non-transfused patients during LT. A retrospective study on 60 biliary pediatric patients and 16 adult patients undergoing LT was carried out. Transfused pediatric patients were included in Group I (GI), those not transfused in Group II (GII). Twelve adult patients were not given transfusion and assigned to Group III (GIII); whereas, four adult patients who received massive transfusion were assigned to Group IV (GIV). The blood glucose levels, volume of blood transfused, and the volume of crystalloid infused were recorded, compared and analyzed. Results showed that the changes in blood glucose levels during LT for both non-transfused and minimally transfused pediatric groups and non-transfused and massively-transfused adult groups were almost the same. We conclude that blood transfusion does not cause significant changes in the blood glucose levels in this study. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Anemia:

Diabetes And Anemia:

There are lots of articles about diabetes, as well as all kinds of information about anemia. But what if you have both? About 25 percent of people with diabetes have some level of anemia. This article explains how the two conditions interact. What Is Anemia, and Why Is It Linked to Diabetes? In anemia, there are fewer red blood cells than normal, resulting in less oxygen being carried to the body’s cells. People with anemia often feel tired or weak and may have difficulty getting through activities of daily living. Other symptoms include paleness, poor appetite, dizziness, lightheadedness, rapid heartbeat, and shortness of breath. Because these symptoms can also be associated with diabetes, they are sometimes not recognized as evidence of anemia. Anemia may occur with diabetes because the hormone that regulates red blood cell production, erythropoietin (EPO), is produced by the kidneys. Kidney damage at several levels is a complication of diabetes, and one problem often leads to the other. Changes in the kidneys that occur with diabetes range from diabetic nephropathy all the way to chronic kidney disease. Early detection and treatment is essential to prevent or delay disease progression. Information in greater detail can be found at www.kidney.niddk.nih.gov. Other causes of anemia are low levels of iron or other vitamins, as well as prolonged illness. Diagnosing Anemia A simple blood test done during a doctor visit, called a complete blood count or CBC, is used to check for anemia. The two elements of the test that reveal anemia are hemoglobin and hematocrit. Hemoglobin is the part of red blood cells that carries oxygen to the cells. Hematocrit indicates the percentage of red blood cells in the blood. How Does Anemia Affect Your Diabetes Care? If you have anemia, you Continue reading >>

Donating Blood With Type 1 Diabetes

Donating Blood With Type 1 Diabetes

According to the American Red Cross, every two seconds someone needs blood. We all know that donating blood is a worthy thing to do. But the donation of blood assumes a cooperative body and a donation system that will accept the blood running through your veins. So what does that mean for those with T1D? Many are under the assumption that a diagnosis means they can’t donate. Wrong. For the most part, giving blood is an option, but it does depend on the following: Where you live Your blood sugar levels What type of insulin you are taking Consider your own safety T1D should not put you at any greater risk of feeling feint or nauseous while donating. Some T1D patients report their BGLs run slightly higher for 3-5 days after donating. Your immediate levels shouldn’t be influenced either way — you won’t suddenly spike or bottom out. Doctors do say your A1c or HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin, which measures one’s 3-month blood sugar level) may be falsely lowered, a temporary effect thought to be caused by blood loss and accelerated red blood cell turnover. If you want to donate, but are concerned about the health consequences, talk to your doctor first. After donating it’s crucial to closely monitor your blood sugar levels and re-nourish your body. Increase your fluid intake and consider eating more iron-rich foods for a few days. Be smart. Use common sense. Take care of yourself the same way you always would. US donor requirements to be in good overall health (the day they plan to donate) have a weight of 110 pounds or more be at least 17 years old (in most states) When you arrive to donate, a donation professional will take you through a screening process requiring you to disclose any health conditions, including T1D. You should be ready to provide additional informa Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Be Transferred Through Blood Transfusion?

Can Diabetes Be Transferred Through Blood Transfusion?

As we’re not entirely sure what causes type I diabetes, this question is far from easy to answer. There are some that maintain that this is primarily an autoimmune disease and there are those that believe that some pathogen, probably a virus is involved. There is always a risk of transmitting diseases with a blood transfusion and for this reason we don’t give transfusions unless it’s absolutely necessary. We also generally exclude individuals with diabetes, cancer, hepatitis, HIV and other chronic diseases and infections from being blood donors as we know that there is a risk that some of these conditions can or could potentially be spread with a blood transfusion. Type II diabetes on the other hand is a metabolic disorder that is primarily connected to lifestyle and genetic susceptibility and those can't be transferred through a blood transfusion. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes