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Can Blood Sugar Levels Affect Body Temperature?

Can Hot Weather Affect Blood Sugar?

Can Hot Weather Affect Blood Sugar?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was just curios if weather had an affect on diabetics blood sugar Also is insulin as efficient when it's really hot as it is right now. Can't complain though I suppose! Shout out to all my fellow diabetic today, keep smiling Heya, yes the weather certainly does affect your blood glucose levels. I find I need less insulin as my body burns it up a lot quicker, whereas in the colder weather I need more. Take care with your insulin storage too, keep it somewhere cool Ahh very interesting, thanks for the information Heya, yes he weather certainly does affect your blood glucose levels. I find I need less insulin as my body burns it up a lot quicker, whereas in the colder weather I need more. Take care with your insulin storage too, keep it somewhere cool Definitely. I keep dropping low and my daughter has had a hypo nearly everyday this week due to warm weather. It's wonderful! We've gone the other way! Higher bloods and only 1 hypo in nearly 3 weeks. Hotter weather or end of the honey moon period, I'm not sure but things are looking up at the min Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app We've gone the other way! Higher bloods and only 1 hypo in nearly 3 weeks. Hotter weather or end of the honey moon period, I'm not sure but things are looking up at the min Sent from my iPhone using DCUK Forum mobile app Its a real Dilemma, i struggle to keep control of my blood sugars as it is! Perhaps closer monitoring of my BS will ensure the best possible outcome. On my last two fishing trips in hot conditions I noticed that my BS level went from 6.1(at 9.30am two hours after breakfast) to 8.2 at 12.30 before lunch and with no snacking between times. Yes my bgs Continue reading >>

Having A Hard Time With Blood Sugar Control?

Having A Hard Time With Blood Sugar Control?

Are you having a hard time with blood sugar control? Check your body temperature. Research shows that people with type 2 diabetes are more likely than normal to also have thyroid problems. People with low temperatures have a harder time controlling their blood sugar level, and are more likely to sustain collateral organ damage such as kidney failure. In fact, “Failure to recognize the presence of abnormal thyroid hormone levels may be a primary cause of poor management of diabetes mellitus type 2,” state one group of researchers. Even if your test results show normal thyroid hormone blood levels, you can still have problems with low thyroid hormone activity (Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome). WTS can be due to thyroid hormone “resistance.” Just like insulin resistance, this is a problem with faulty receptor sites on the membranes of cells. Your thyroid is secreting enough T4, the inactive form of the hormone, but it is not getting into cells, where it is needed. Or, T4 may be getting inside cells, but once, there, not being converted to T3, the active form of thyroid hormone. In either case, your blood tests may show normal levels of T4 and TSH, but you may still have problems related to low intracellular T3. An easy way to find out if you have adequate T3 in your cells is by taking your body temperature. A consistently low body temperature, typically below 97.8, strongly suggests you have slow metabolism, which could be due to low T3. (For more on how to take your temperature accurately, see “How Are Body Temperatures Measured“.) Slow metabolism and resulting low body temperature interfere with many biochemical reactions in the body, including proper glucose metabolism. You can be tired, hungry and have high blood sugar all at the same time! People with low Continue reading >>

Stupid Question (sugar Control + Body Temperature)

Stupid Question (sugar Control + Body Temperature)

Stupid Question (sugar control + body temperature) Stupid Question (sugar control + body temperature) I got a stupid question, recently my sugar control has been pretty good. I also noticed that I actually feel cold now, in the past I usually don't feel cold or need a jacket until the weather reaches mid 40s or lower. The weathers in the low 60s and I start shivering. It's not a hypoglycemic reaction, as I have been checkinig my sugars. Is there any corrolation? Same here. I used to be able to bring the garbage out in 30 degree weather wearing a short sleeved shirt and not feel the cold. Now, I have to wear a jacket when it's in the 50s and my hands feel cold from time to time. I used to joke that my thermostat was set 10 degrees higher than everybody else's. My wife called me her furnace. Since I've brought my BG under tight control, I've become......normal (somewhat Diabetes causes peripheral neuropathies, some of which are reversible. I'm just guessing, but I think that bringing BG under control into normal range causes peripheral nerves that sense cold to wake up again. When it's cold, capillaries should constrict and restrict blood flow to the skin surface and extremities. I think that response is impaired in poorly controlled diabetics. Since bringing my BG under control, i think that my peripheral nerves and capillaries are now working the way they should when it's cold outside, resulting in a more physiologically normal response to cooler temperatures. BTW, my pedal pulses are strong - I would suggest seeing a podiatrist or your PCP to get them checked once a year if you have diabetes, well controlled or not. Dx: Type 2 in 04/2016; Diet induced oxalate kidney stones in 12/2016 A1c: 6.9 in 2/2018; 6.1 in 7/2017; 6.0 in 2/2017; 6.1 in 11/2016; 6.2 in 08/2016; 11. Continue reading >>

Body Temperature Regulation In Diabetes

Body Temperature Regulation In Diabetes

Go to: Introduction Diabetes mellitus, commonly known as diabetes, refers to a group of metabolic disorders which are associated with an impaired ability to regulate glycemia. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are the most prevalent forms of the disease representing ~10 and ~90% of cases, respectively.1 Type 1 diabetes was formerly known as juvenile diabetes due to its common presentation in children and adolescents, and is characterized by the endocrine pancreas ceasing to produce insulin following the immune-mediated destruction of β-islet cells.2 Therefore, management of type 1 diabetes always requires exogenous delivery of insulin. Although the causes of type 1 diabetes remain to be elucidated, it is probably caused by a combination of genetic predisposition (with >40 loci known to affect susceptibility)3 and various environmental factors including stress and viruses.4 On the other hand, type 2 diabetes is most often diagnosed in adults and typically involves a combination of insulin resistance and relative (rather than absolute) deficiency of insulin.5 While the causes of type 2 diabetes are also incompletely understood, a plethora of studies have found associations with excessive abdominal adiposity,6 sedentary lifestyle, and poor dietary habits7 along with genetic factors. In contrast to type 1, type 2 diabetes may be treated in several ways including non-insulin pharmaceuticals, lifestyle modifications as well as exogenous insulin administration. Diabetes is becoming a worldwide public health issue, with the global prevalence in 2014 estimated at 9% among adults.8 By 2035, the International Diabetes Federation has projected a prevalence of 592 million cases with an additional ~175 million going undiagnosed.9 In North America alone, ~7% (2.5 million) of Canadian adults Continue reading >>

Change In Temperature Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Change In Temperature Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Back to Living Better Many diabetics are aware stress and illness can cause blood sugar fluctuations, but did you know changes in temperatures can affect blood sugar levels and lead to false readings? Sabrina Rene, M.D., an endocrinologist at Piedmont, explains how temperature can produce blood sugar highs and lows, and how they can affect diabetes testing supplies. Effects of warm weather on diabetics During warmer months, it is especially important for diabetics to stay properly hydrated. Dehydration can cause blood sugar to rise as the glucose in your blood becomes more concentrated. High temperatures can also cause blood vessels to dilate, which can enhance insulin absorption, potentially leading to low blood sugar. It is best for diabetics to stay indoors during the hottest part of the day and monitor blood sugar closely for changes when temperatures start to rise. Ideal storage temperature for diabetic testing supplies Extreme heat and cold can affect insulin, test strips and glucose monitors. Never leave these supplies in a car, no matter what time of year. The meter should also be stored and used in a room that remains between 50 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Dr. Rene says it is important to store test strips in a dry, cool place. “You never want to store test strips in your bathroom. The warm, humid atmosphere can damage the strips, causing them to produce false readings,” she says. Vascular problems and temperature changes Patients with vascular problems often do not have proper blood flow, especially to their extremities, and cold weather may exacerbate slow blood flow. Diabetes test strips need a certain level of oxygen and blood flow to accurately calculate the glucose level. The lower these are, the less accurate the reading, says Dr. Rene. Raynaud’s p Continue reading >>

Body Heat Processed Sugar Dangers

Body Heat Processed Sugar Dangers

When your body wont do what you want it to, and you dont do it cause you know youre through. Whats that? Body heat! It was some 36 years ago when the late Godfather of Soul James Brown released his Bodyheat album with those lyrics. The lyrics cover a large range of emotions and one is how do you handle your bodys heat? It has been said with a great deal of truth that you are what you eat, so beware that excess processed sugar increases body heat. There is a significant amount of information to know in preventing real internal body heat since carbohydrates become blood sugar in the body, but one thing for sure is that consuming a lot of processed sugar will cause an unnaturally high blood sugar spike. Typically, the foods that cause heightened perspiration are stimulants that speed up many of the bodys natural functions. Often, eating sugary foods can raise body temperature and stimulate sweating, although these effects do not last very long. Consequently, without thinking you find yourself doing it again eating more sugary filled products to reverse the sugar crash with a sugar high, which can lead to excessive sweating among countless other long term health complications. Under some circumstances for some people who eat too much processed sugar it will increase their heart rate. Processed sugar is an inflammatory that is a high glycemic substance that raises insulin levels and high insulin levels activate enzymes that raise levels of arachidonic acid in the blood. Even though our body requires fuel in order to operate high glycemic index foods, processed sugar is converted into blood glucose within a few minutes. As well as the stress response raising the heart beat, processed sugar works negatively to narrow blood vessels which causes the heart beat to increase. Eati Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heat Intolerance

Diabetes And Heat Intolerance

I have mentioned this subject quite some time ago now, and have read a bit about it. Apparently 60-70% of diabetic Americans suffer with some form of nerve damage (neuropathy), and this is a cause of heat intolerance in diabetics as the sweat glands are involved. Inefficient sweat glands cause the body to fail to cool down. Symptoms are mainly lack of perspiration, but the opposite can also be a symptom (too much sweat). My search that uncovered this was on the body's inability to regulate body temperature. Definitely neuropathy seems to be behind it, but when I mention it to my doctors, even the endo, they just want to know about my feet. Neuropathy affects any nerves in the body, including major organs, glands, and skin. Not just feet! My question is, does anyone have any medical experience with this subject, and medical support, back-up, anything useful at all? Do others experience heat intolerance (and/or cold intolerance), the feeling that your body can't seem to regulate body temperature? Any remarks, information, links, etc. will be much appreciated. In order to become what you are to be, you must learn, first, to be what you are. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Good point try a google on autonomic neuropathy it affects many things regualted normally by the body. In the last 2 yrs my heart no longer knows I am not exercising and goes to 160 plus on my pulse rate its autonomic neuropathy. Thank you. I will google it and see what I can find. It is frustrating, knowing something, but not being able to generate even a discussion with a doctor about it. My feet do suffer. I cannot wear a closed in shoe as they overheat and burn to the point of being unable to walk. But I am overall intolerant to heat, not just my feet. My head even burns, skin itches so ba Continue reading >>

The Link Between Diabetes And Body Temperature

The Link Between Diabetes And Body Temperature

Diabetes and Body Temperature: Managing Cold, Numb or Tingly Feelings When you live with diabetes, it’s not uncommon to feel cold or numb, especially in your extremities. Your core body temperature is closely tied to your metabolism, and since diabetes wreaks havoc on your metabolic processes, you’re bound to sweat, shiver and shake more than the average person. Part of the problem comes down to your diabetes management, but that’s not the only force at play. Circulation, insulin levels, nerve problems, and other lifestyle factors could be interfering with your natural heat regulation. Find out what’s behind your cold, numbness or painful tingling, and take steps to kick-start your internal heating system. How Peripheral Neuropathy Leaves You Cold When diabetes goes uncontrolled for a long time, the nerves in your hands and feet could sustain permanent damage. This sort of nerve damage in the extremities is known as peripheral neuropathy, and it can interfere with all sorts of regular sensations. For many people, nerve damage leads to pain, numbness or tingling. You may feel a “pins and needles” sensation in your fingers that lingers for a long time, or you could lose sensitivity, making it more difficult to pick things up or feel different textures. In some cases, the opposite is true — heightened sensitivity makes any contact agonizing. Since the nerves in your limbs also monitor temperature and send those signals to your brain, it’s not uncommon for hands and feet to feel abnormally cold, too. Coldness or numbness that stems from peripheral neuropathy often brings along some other common symptoms, like: Sharp pains Cramps A burning sensation Loss of reflexes Loss of balance If you haven’t noticed any strange symptoms in your extremities other than t Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Insulin, And Core Body Temperature

Diabetes, Insulin, And Core Body Temperature

Diabetes can be seen in part as the body’s responses to a chronic low metabolic temperature condition. An article from November, 2009, in Science Daily online, called, Insulin Linked to Core Body Temperature, describes the research of a team of scientists led by the Scripps Research Institute who discovered, “a direct link between insulin … and core body temperature.” Insulin in the Brain and Core Body Temperature The scientists were investigating ‘warm-sensitive neurons’ in an area of the brain “known to regulate core body temperature.” They had learned that these neurons have an insulin receptor, and they found that when injecting this area of the brain in rodents with insulin, “core body temperature rose, metabolism increased, and brown adipose (fat) tissue was activated to release heat.” So the insulin was causing a rise in body temperature. Insulin, as it turns out, is part of the body’s thermostat. With regard to metabolism the body increases insulin levels as part of its effort to trigger a rise in core body temperature when that temperature is too low. The article explains that the body needs to maintain its temperature hot enough that, “key enzymatic reactions can occur.” Insulin Body Temperature and Fat The scientists inferred from their study that, “differences in core temperature may play a role in obesity and may represent a therapeutic area,” to help manage fatty tissues. They are not alone in this inference. Proponents of thermal therapy would say that abdominal weight gain can be caused by the body’s effort to insulate itself with white fat cells when core body temperature is chronically too low. Rather than turning to drugs, however, a thermal therapy proposes to heat the abdomen by external means (usually using far infra Continue reading >>

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Hot And Cold Weather Affects Your Blood Sugar

Find a weather-proof location to exercise all year round. Working out in your living room or local gym, or even just walking your local mall are all good options. When temperatures start to get out of control, so can your blood sugar. Both hot and cold weather extremes can affect your testing equipment and your medications, and have a negative impact on your body’s ability to produce and use insulin. Research shows that when it’s hot out, more people with diabetes end up in the ER and are hospitalized because of heat illness. The number of deaths in diabetes patients due to heat illness also increases in summer. Low temperatures can be an issue for people with diabetes as well. But you don’t have to let the environment have the upper hand. Taking a few smart precautions can help you outsmart Mother Nature. Here are the adjustments to make depending on where you live and the weather forecast. 6 Tips to Survive the Summer Heat Take these steps to keep your diabetes under control when the temperature soars: Stay hydrated. Lori Roust, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, explains, “The problem is that in the heat, people tend to get dehydrated easily. When you’re dehydrated, you have higher concentrations of blood sugar because less blood flows through your kidneys. With less blood, your kidneys don’t work as efficiently to clear out any excess glucose (blood sugar) from your urine.” When it’s hot, be sure to drink plenty of water or sugar-free drinks. Don’t wait until you are thirsty to replenish fluids. Store your medications properly. High summer temps can affect your diabetes medications, glucose meter, and diabetes test strips. “When it’s hot out, it’s easy for insulin and other drugs to become degraded,” Dr. Roust says. Be su Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia means high (hyper) glucose (gly) in the blood (emia). Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Hyperglycemia is a defining characteristic of diabetes—when the blood glucose level is too high because the body isn't properly using or doesn't make the hormone insulin. You get glucose from the foods you eat. Carbohydrates, such as fruit, milk, potatoes, bread, and rice, are the biggest source of glucose in a typical diet. Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, and then transports the glucose to the cells via the bloodstream. Body Needs Insulin However, in order to use the glucose, your body needs insulin. This is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps transport glucose into the cells, particularly the muscle cells. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin to help their bodies use glucose, so they have to take insulin, which is injected under the skin. People with type 2 diabetes may have enough insulin, but their body doesn't use it well; they're insulin resistant. Some people with type 2 diabetes may not produce enough insulin. People with diabetes may become hyperglycemic if they don't keep their blood glucose level under control (by using insulin, medications, and appropriate meal planning). For example, if someone with type 1 diabetes doesn't take enough insulin before eating, the glucose their body makes from that food can build up in their blood and lead to hyperglycemia. Your endocrinologist will tell you what your target blood glucose levels are. Your levels may be different from what is usually considered as normal because of age, pregnancy, and/or other factors. Fasting hyperglycemia is defined as when you don't eat for at least eight hours. Recommended range without diabet Continue reading >>

Low Body Temperature & Metabolic Syndrome

Low Body Temperature & Metabolic Syndrome

Cardiovascular problems and other medical conditions that affect your blood flow, such as diabetes and hypothyroidism, can provoke metabolic syndrome and low body temperature. Both are very serious medical conditions that can be life-threatening. If you experience confusion, dizziness, lack of coordination, nausea or vomiting, get medical help immediately. Video of the Day Medical professionals use the term metabolic syndrome to describe a group of conditions that affect your metabolism. If you have three or more of the following conditions, you might have metabolic syndrome: high blood pressure; elevated blood fat levels; insulin resistance; obesity in your abdominal region; abnormally high levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 or fibrinogen in your blood; or unusually high levels of C-reactive protein. These combined factors put you at greater risk of diabetes, stroke and heart disease. Doctors disagree, however, on the precise definition of metabolic syndrome and whether it is a distinct medical condition. Alternate names for the condition are insulin resistance syndrome and syndrome x. Low Body Temperature The normal human body temperature is 98.6 degrees F. When your body temperature dips below 95 degrees, you experience low body temperature, or hypothermia. Although there is no direct link between low body temperature and metabolic syndrome, there is an indirect relationship. Any condition that restricts blood flow might lead to low body temperature. For example, the plaque buildup that results from high blood fat and high blood pressure -- two metabolic syndrome components -- can make it difficult for your body to regulate your temperature. Similarly, diabetes and stroke, which are possible consequences of metabolic syndrome, impact your body's temperature Continue reading >>

The Claim: Diabetes Makes You Sensitive To Heat

The Claim: Diabetes Makes You Sensitive To Heat

THE FACTS Summer can be uncomfortable for anyone. But for people with diabetes, the heat and humidity can be particularly hazardous. One of the complications of diabetes, both Type 1 and Type 2, is an impaired ability to adjust to rises in temperature, which can cause dangerous increases in body temperature during the summer. The underlying problem, nerve damage, occurs in 60 to 70 percent of Americans with diabetes; it can affect nearly every organ in the body, including sweat glands. When nerve damage keeps the sweat glands from working properly, the body fails to cool down as the mercury rises. In one small study, scientists compared diabetic patients and a group of healthy control subjects as they were exposed to increasing temperatures. The subjects were hooked up to devices that measured skin temperature, core temperature and sweat rates. As temperatures rose, the control subjects’ perspiration rates increased proportionately; their core temperatures stayed constant. “For subjects with diabetes, sweat seemed to plateau irrespective of an alarming rise in core temperature,” the scientists wrote. “The diabetic subjects’ generalized inability to sweat across the body had a profound effect on core temperature.” Research by the Mayo Clinic in Arizona shows that diabetic patients have higher rates of adverse events — like hospitalizations, dehydration and death — in the heat. Yet a survey by the clinic found that many were unaware of the greater risk and the need for special precautions. THE BOTTOM LINE People with diabetes are particularly vulnerable to hot weather. ANAHAD O’CONNOR [email protected] Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Affect Body Temperature?

Does Diabetes Affect Body Temperature?

Diabetes is a complex disease, affecting virtually every part of the body. The damage it does, to nerve endings, blood vessels, organs and the brain, is the subject of many, many scientific research studies. Several such studies have investigated the relationship between pancreatic secretions and core temperature changes. Findings from one study, conducted by the Scripps Research Institute and published in the January 2010 issue of the journal Diabetes, show that increases in pancreatic secretions cause a corresponding rise in core body temperatures. Core Body Temperatures Core body temperatures are those maintained within the trunk of the body and the head, which encompass all vital organs. Temperatures within the core generally remain fairly steady, with only slight variations, facilitating various enzymatic reactions. When core body temperatures go outside this narrow range for extended periods or to extreme levels, either becoming too low (hypothermia) or too high (fever), damage to the body occurs. Limited changes in core body temperature are common, related, among other things, to female hormonal cycles, the 24 hour wake-sleep cycle and the effects of severe calorie restriction. Brown Fat When insulin is either secreted by the pancreas or injected, changes occur in so-called ‘brown fat’ cells, resulting in an increase in core temperature and a corresponding acceleration in the rate of metabolism. Brown fat cells are adipose tissue that burns calories, rather than storing them, as white fat does. The pathway of insulin to these brown fat deposits is through the brain. Scientists experimented on rats, which have large masses of brown fat on their backs. They injected the preoptic area of the brain with insulin and then electronically scanned the brown fat. The r Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

Diabetes In Hot Weather — 12 Things To Know

To date, 2016 has been the hottest year ever, and it’s getting hotter. From now on, coping with heat will be an important part of managing diabetes. Some knowledge that might help you: 1. High body temperatures can lower blood sugar. Mayo Clinic writers Nancy Klobassa Davidson, RN, and Peggy Moreland, RN, CDE, say you should check your sugars more often in the hot weather. 2. Sunburn can raise blood sugar. The Mayo Clinic advises wearing a good sunscreen, sunglasses, and a hat while out in the sun. 3. Warm skin absorbs insulin faster, while dehydrated skin absorbs insulin more slowly. The closer you can keep your injection site to normal temperature and hydration, the better. 4. Dehydration from sweating can raise blood sugar and can lead to heat exhaustion. According to the Cleveland Clinic, people with diabetes are more likely than others to be admitted to hospitals for dehydration and heat exhaustion, and to die from it. High glucose levels lead to urinating more, which increases risk for dehydration. This may be especially true if you’re on an SGLT-2 inhibitor drug. Keep drinking water with a bit of salt if you are blessed to live in an area where water is available. Have a bottle with you and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Learn to check yourself for dehydration by pinching up some skin on your arm and letting it go. It should snap right back into place. If it goes more slowly, you are getting dehydrated. Don’t drink alcohol or caffeine in super-hot weather, as they are dehydrating. 5. Heat can damage insulin, other medications, and test strips. The Joslin Clinic advises people to keep their insulin cool, but not on ice. If you take medicines with you while you’re away from home, get a cooler bag to keep your medicines and test strips in. Ext Continue reading >>

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