diabetestalk.net

Can Being Sick Affect Glucose Tolerance Test

Factors That Can Affect The Glucose Tolerance Test

Factors That Can Affect The Glucose Tolerance Test

Factors that Can Affect the Glucose Tolerance Test I have failed the glucose tolerance test in half of my pregnancies. In the first and fourth, I failed the one hour test and had to go for the three hour. As anyone who has gone though this can attest, it is not an enjoyable experience. The test takes three hours and you cant eat after midnight on the night before the test. So if the lab opens at nine in the morning, you wont eat until lunchtime. Most pregnant women dont fare well when they skip eating for the morning. I know I didnt. What I never realized is the factors that affect the test and what can be done to improve the odds of passing. Certain medications can affect the test, causing you to fail. Talk to your health care provider about any prescription medications you may be taking before scheduling the test. Some fairly common medications can have a negative effect. Some of these wont be a problem right now, such as birth control pills. A few of the other drugs that can affect the test include certain blood pressure medications, anti inflammatory drugs known as NSAIDS and seizure medications. You can prepare for the test by eating a healthy diet in the days leading up to the glucose test. A healthy diet that includes complex carbohydrates is the best choice. Include foods such as fruits, vegetables, rice, grains, bread, cereal and crackers for three days before the test. Carbs are important because people who follow low carb diets tend to do poorly on the glucose test. If you are not feeling well on the day of the test, you may want to reschedule. In some cases, an illness can affect the glucose tolerance test. Fever, vomiting or infection are some of the symptoms that may warrant postponing the test. Should you decide to wait, dont wait to long to reschedule t Continue reading >>

Pcos: Preparing For Your Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

Pcos: Preparing For Your Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

If you have PCOS and you’re getting ready to have an oral glucose tolerance test, you may be wondering how to prepare for the test and what the results may mean. The test can help your health care provider figure out whether you have a high risk of developing diabetes and whether lifestyle changes and medications such as Metformin might be helpful in treating your PCOS. What is Glucose? Glucose is a type of sugar and the main source of energy used by your body. The glucose that your body uses for energy comes from many kinds of foods called carbohydrates, such as cereal, bread, rice, pasta, and other grains, not just sugary foods. Dairy products, fruits, and vegetables all contain carbohydrates as well. Your body uses the glucose it needs and then stores the rest as “glycogen” in your liver and muscles. What is an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT)? An OGTT is a way to measure your body’s ability to use glucose. Your pancreas (a gland located behind the stomach) makes a hormone called insulin, which helps your body use the glucose in your blood. If your pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin or if your body is unable to use the insulin it makes, you may have a high blood glucose level. The OGTT involves fasting overnight and then having your blood checked early in the morning. You will then drink a special glucose drink and have your blood tested again after 2 hours. Sometimes blood sugar levels are also checked at other times such as 1 hour, 3 hours, or 4 hours after the glucose drink. What if my blood glucose level is high? If the OGTT shows that your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, your health care provider may tell you that you have “impaired glucose tolerance”. This often means that you are at risk for developing diabetes. Rarely, diabetes Continue reading >>

Do I Need An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test?

Do I Need An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test?

Your blood sugar level can give your doctor important clues about your health, and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) shows how well your body handles sugar from foods. It can tell whether you are at risk for diabetes or if you already have it. A shorter version of an OGTT checks for diabetes during pregnancy. Normally when you eat, your blood sugar rises. Your pancreas, a long gland deep in the belly, releases a hormone called insulin. It helps move sugar from your blood into your cells for energy and storage. Then your blood sugar goes back down to normal. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body uses insulin poorly. Glucose builds up in your blood. This excess sugar can damage blood vessels around your body. Diabetes can lead to heart disease, nerve damage, eye disease, and kidney damage. You might need an oral glucose tolerance test if you: Have a close family member with diabetes Have high triglycerides (a type of fat in your blood) Have polycystic ovarian syndrome (which causes menstrual problems) Delivered a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds A shorter version of this test is done between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy to see whether you have gestational diabetes. It's called the oral glucose challenge test. To get an accurate result on the OGTT, eat about 150 grams of carbohydrates each day for 3 days before the test. Don't eat or drink anything except water after about 10 o’clock the night before. You don't need to do any special prep before the pregnancy glucose challenge test. You can eat in the morning. Just avoid foods with a lot of sugar, such as doughnuts or orange juice. You'll get the OGTT at your doctor's office, a clinic, hospital, or lab. Here’s what happens: A nurse or doctor will take a blood sample from a vein in your arm to test your s Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

QUOTE (ozbilby @ 12/04/2011, 10:52 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}> The antibiotics should not be a problem but being sick can cause blood sugar levels to jump around a bit. QUOTE (kyuden @ 12/04/2011, 10:58 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}> The antibiotics will not cause an issue but being sick may cause your BSL to be higher or lower than normal. That said the GTT does not just look at BSL but some other markers that give guidelines to BSL levels in the past and the difference is what they are interested in. See that's what I was also thinking. I'm actually recovering from pneumonia and still have quite a productive cough (which includes getting all that gunk out Thanks for the advice, I will give the pathology place a call. I'm already at 'risk' because I have thyroid problems and PCOS, so I've been advised to expect an abnormal result already. Ugh, why can't anything be bloody easy! LOL. (I know I'm really getting off lightly compared to others, just having a whinge). I dont thinkk you can do it.My ob said if your sick that it can skew the results....best double check My bsl is always higher when I am sick even if I haven't been able to eat at all. I would wait until you are a bit better, not coughing so much and your temperature has settled down to pretty much normal. What everyone else has said, plus if you're having that drink when you already feel sick, it will make you feel so much worse. I did the test with a cold and couldn't keep the drink down, so I had to go back and do it another time anyway. Just wait until you feel better! Continue reading >>

All You Need To Know About The Glucose Tolerance Test

All You Need To Know About The Glucose Tolerance Test

Most of the food people eat is turned directly into glucose when digested, and the body uses it as energy. The pancreas is responsible for making the hormone insulin which helps to get glucose into the cells of the body. Diabetes is a long-term disease that occurs due to the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the body being unable to use the insulin it produces effectively. The body is unable to process food properly to use for energy. Glucose builds up in the blood, which can lead to severe health problems. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults and is also known as juvenile diabetes. With type 1 diabetes the body does not produce insulin. According to The American Diabetes Association, only 5 percent of people with diabetes have type 1. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. In people with type 2 diabetes, their body does not use insulin properly, which is known as insulin resistance. The pancreas responds by making more insulin to cover the deficiency but is not able to keep blood glucose at normal levels. As glucose builds up in the blood, the body's cells do not receive the energy they need. Over time, high blood glucose levels can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and heart. Glucose tolerance test: Testing for diabetes A simple blood test can often detect diabetes. If the test produces borderline results, a glucose tolerance test may help with the final diagnosis. In a healthy person, glucose levels will rise after eating a meal and return to normal once the glucose is used or stored by the body. A glucose tolerance test can help to work out the difference between normal glucose levels and the levels seen in diabetes and prediabetes. The glucose tolerance test is used to measure t Continue reading >>

My 2010 Glucose Tolerance Test Have I Goofed?

My 2010 Glucose Tolerance Test Have I Goofed?

July 2012 Glucose Tolerance Test Passed! I may have goofed today, getting a two-hour glucose tolerance test after a weekend bout of flu. Theres a chance that fighting off bugs over the weekend will mean that icky, super sweet sugar drink will boost my blood sugars artificially high, when my hope had been to have those blood sugars be as low and just as passing the grade as they were last year when I did this test. Passing a glucose tolerance test last year, after five years ago failing two in a row . . . that got the attention of my endocrinologist. Hes intrigued, because that kind of success is almost unheard of. Especially for someone who doesnt have much insulin in her pancreas. It was motivating to see my endocrinologist be surprised by the unexpected IMPROVEMENT of my supposedly incurable condition. It was affirming to me that hes a pretty good human being, and that in addition to being surprised by my success, he also seemed delighted about it. So youd think Id go out of my way to be sure my lab tests this year would be just as good. And then that darned flu-ey kind of thing hit. On the week where my annual physical had been scheduled months ago, and for months, Id had in mind to do the labs right after my annual physical. And besides, my sugars while sick had been pretty good. In the 70s mainly. But then, I wasnt eating much at all. Just resting more than usual throughout the weekend and drinking broth and water. It didnt occur to me that a sugar test a day after a fever might throw my body for a major loop. Now that Im worried about my results, there are dozens of warning bells that should have sounded off. Here are some of the obvious ones: 1) Stress can lead the body to make more sugar on its own, out of our little stores of body sugar, plus if the body deems Continue reading >>

Colds And Illness

Colds And Illness

When you are poorly with colds and illness or vomiting, you may notice a rise in blood sugar levels as your body fights to get better. The body releases extra glucose and having gestational diabetes means that you cannot create or use enough insulin to help normalise your blood sugar levels. Dehydration With higher blood sugar levels your body will cause more frequent urination to help flush out the excess glucose, this in turn can lead to dehydration. Make sure you increase fluid intake if you are poorly. How to make yourself feel better Drink plenty Try to eat little and often to maintain blood sugar levels Frequently test blood sugar levels so that you can see what's happening Take paracetamol to bring down temperatures and give pain relief Try sugar free throat lozenges for sore throats such as Halls sugar free throat sweets Try applying Vicks Vaporub on your neck for sore throats, or on the soles of your feet with colds Try drinking hot water, lemon and ginger for colds Have a warm, steamy shower or bath to clear airways For help with advice when vomiting, take a look at our hyperemesis page here. Consult a medical professional if you are concerned or symptoms persist. If you cannot keep food down then you should contact your hospital Diabetes and infections Bacteria feed from increased glucose levels and the reduced function of neutrophils (white blood cells that attack infection) in the body mean that diabetics are more susceptible to infection. Gestational diabetes also increases the susceptibility to various types of infections. The most common infections are urinary tract, yeast infections such as thrush and skin infections. If you suspect you may be suffering with any type of infection then please seek medical advice. In many cases, medication may be required Continue reading >>

How To Pass Your 3-hour Glucose Test: Expectations, Planning & More

How To Pass Your 3-hour Glucose Test: Expectations, Planning & More

Written by Sarah Vickers on June 14, 2018 So you failed your one-hour glucose test, and now you have to do the dreaded three-hour test? Yeah, me, too. I have had to do the three-hour test with two of my pregnancies, and it stinks! Oh man, I have asked myself this so many times, but the truth is, there is no way to really make it so that you pass, unless you really don't have gestational diabetes. Sure, you will find tips around the Internet about what you could do that might help, but in all honesty, trying to do something to get a false passing reading on this test is dangerous to your health and the health of your little baby, too! It is important for the test results to be accurate so that if there really is a medical issue, your doctor will know what to do and can treat you properly and watch for the safety of both of you. Do exactly what your doctor tells you to do before this test; some of them want you to load up on carbs for a few days before the test, others want you to avoid sugar, and almost all of them will want you to be fasting from midnight until the time of the test in order to make sure that your body is clear of everything. At the very least, you should expect to get to your doctor's office with your tummy growling, only to be given another bottle of that yummy glucose syrup (seriously, it's sugar can't they make it taste better?), which you will drink right after you have your first blood draw. You guzzle down the bottle of glucose and wait a whole hour without any food or drink, get another blood draw, and repeat that same process for three full hours. Some offices have a room for you to go into and sit. It is important that you not overexert yourself between blood draws because it can change the way that your body processes the glucose. If your doc Continue reading >>

3 Hour Glucose Tolerance Testing

3 Hour Glucose Tolerance Testing

I just completed my three-hour glucose tolerance testing. Things are not looking promising, I have to say. The official bloods are being whisked to the lab at this moment, with results pending, but my husband Will recommended I start checking my blood sugars as soon as I failed the one hour test, and immediately provided me with a glucometer for that fun task. The values have been pretty ok the past week...sometimes a point or two over the ideal, but nothing too alarming. But today. Today. Yikes. According to my finger sticks, my fasting blood level today was between 95 and 102, the highest it has been all week (I tested twice - right when I got out of bed, and at the doctor's office. Weirdly, the higher level was at the doctor's office...I would have thought your glucose would continue to decline the longer you were fasting, but what do I know). My one hour blood level after drinking the 100g of glucola (yuck!!) was 233. Seriously out of bounds, even if this meter isn't perfect. My two hour blood level was 225. And my three hour blood level was 176. I decided to wash my hands and do it again...resulting in an even more abysmal 184. Here are the cutoffs to reach a diagnosis of GD...and my worrisome levels: TIME OF SAMPLE COLLECTION CURRENT American Congress of Obstetricians and gynecologists (ACOG) TARGET LEVEL Mo’s Levels according to her glucometer Glucose load: Samples drawn after 100-gram glucose drink Fasting (prior to glucose load) < 95 mg/dL (5.3 mmol/L) 95-102 mg/dL 1 hour after glucose load < 180 mg/dL (10.0 mmol/L) 233 mg/dL 2 hours after glucose load < 155 mg/dL (8.6 mmol/L) 225 mg/dL 3 hours after glucose load < 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L) 176-184 mg/dL Results interpretation If TWO or more values meet or exceed the target level, gestational diabetes is diagnos Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes is a major health problem in America today. Normally, sugars and starches (carbohydrates) are metabolized for use by the body by the chemical insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas. If the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, the carbohydrates cannot be used and the level increases in the blood. The carbohydrate that is tested and found in the blood is glucose. Excess glucose in the blood leads to the diagnosis of diabetes. If diabetes is not adequately controlled by diet or insulin injections, complications can occur, such as increases in infections and damage to blood vessels. GESTATIONAL DIABETES When a woman is pregnant, she must share her carbohydrates with the growing baby. The pregnancy hormones can interfere with the ability of the mother's insulin to regulate carbohydrates. In a small percentage of pregnant women (3-12%), the insulin response is very reduced and the blood glucose levels become abnormally high, causing gestational diabetes (diabetes in pregnancy). For the mother, this can mean increased risk of infections or increased chance of a Cesarean section delivery. Following delivery of the baby, the mother's system returns to normal. In addition to problems for the mother, her baby may also suffer from diabetes. Depending upon the blood levels of glucose during the pregnancy, the baby may grow excessively large, causing difficulties at delivery. Additionally, the baby may have temporary difficulty controlling its glucose and calcium at birth. If the mother's blood sugar remains elevated throughout her pregnancy, the baby has increased risk of stillbirth. DETECTING GESTATIONAL DIABETES Gestational diabetes is most often encountered in late pregnancy. In the past, screening for this disease was based on clues such as a family history o Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Testing

Gestational Diabetes Testing

Diabetes is a condition in which the body is unable to properly use sugar (glucose) as a source of fuel. As a result, the levels of sugar in the blood become abnormally high. When this condition occurs during pregnancy, it is called gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Impact Gestational diabetes affects about 2–10 percent of all pregnancies. It usually begins in the fifth or sixth month of pregnancy and goes away after the baby is born. Risk factors for gestational diabetes include gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, obesity, high blood pressure, increasing age and a close relative with diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Ramifications Gestational diabetes can result in complications for mother and baby. Women with gestational diabetes are more likely to get high blood pressure or pre-eclampsia. They have an increased chance of needing a Cesarean delivery. Babies of women who have gestational diabetes are more likely to develop jaundice. They also may grow too large, leading to an increased risk of birth trauma. Complications can be avoided by controlling gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can usually be well controlled through a combination of close monitoring, diet, exercise and occasionally the administration of medication. You will be instructed to go to the lab at your convenience or call to schedule time. The lab will provide the glucose solutions to drink and you will need to remain in the clinic for the duration of the test (about one hour). Gestational Diabetes Screening Test Testing for gestational diabetes is usually done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. If you have risk factors for gestational diabetes, you may be tested earlier. For accurate results, it is very important that you follow these instructions exactly. You do not need Continue reading >>

Sick For Glucose Test Question

Sick For Glucose Test Question

Does anyone know if being sick can cause glucose test to be higher? I took the test Thursday with an awful cold and just got a call this afternoon saying my results were slightly elevated... I'm assuming that means I barely failed. Now I'm wondering if it has something to do with being sick! Anyone know? When you're sick your body will definitely run higher in sugar levels :) It's just a way for your body to fight off what ever you have. If they didn't say you failed then I wouldn't worry about it :) 1 or 3 hour? Illness may cause your metabolism to slow down a tad and not process as efficiently, but it's not likely to cause you to fail a glucose tolerance test. I have never in my life passed a 1 hour glucose test, sick or not, pregnant or not. Well she said I was slightly elevated so I have to go next Tuesday for the 3 hour test... I'm so mad! If it's all because of that stupid cold!!! If I had known I would have rescheduled! You could have been borderline high, and at that point they'd want to do the 3 hour. My doctor told me that the 3 hour test will give you much more accurate results any ways :) I work at a lab and we do those tests maybe 20 times a day. If it is slightly elevated they are just wanting to make sure you don't have it, for instance something you may of ate later the night before. Juice in the morning anything. So repeating it is just making sure if it's slightly elevated that you don't have GD. Actually walking around while waiting to get your blood drawn is the worst thing you can do! Having a cold shouldn't effect, as you have a certain time frame to do the test and youu may be sick for a couple weeks! Should be all good, hope it works out! :) I see. I'll do anything for a healthy baby! I just wanted to make sure it wasn't from being sick! So drea Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Diabetes

Diagnosing Diabetes

In diagnosing diabetes, physicians primarily depend upon the results of specific glucose tests. However, test results are just part of the information that goes into the diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Doctors also take into account your physical exam, presence or absence of symptoms, and medical history. Some people who are significantly ill will have transient problems with elevated blood sugars, which will then return to normal after the illness has resolved. Also, some medications may alter your blood glucose levels (most commonly steroids and certain diuretics, such as water pills). The 2 main tests used to measure the presence of blood sugar problems are the direct measurement of glucose levels in the blood during an overnight fast and measurement of the body's ability to appropriately handle the excess sugar presented after drinking a high glucose drink. Fasting Blood Glucose (Blood Sugar) Level A value above 126 mg/dL on at least 2 occasions typically means a person has diabetes. The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is one that can be performed in a doctor's office or a lab. The person being tested starts the test in a fasting state (having no food or drink except water for at least 10 hours but not greater than 16 hours). An initial blood sugar is drawn and then the person is given a "glucola" bottle with a high amount of sugar in it (75 grams of glucose or 100 grams for pregnant women). The person then has their blood tested again 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 3 hours after drinking the high glucose drink. For the test to give reliable results, you must be in good health (not have any other illnesses, not even a cold). Also, you should be normally active (for example, not lying down or confined to a bed like a patient in a Continue reading >>

Can Stress Affect The Glucose Test?

Can Stress Affect The Glucose Test?

First, I'm so sorry for your loss. I know it can be a hard time and my t&p go out to your family. Secondly, I'm a type 1 diabetic which is a bit different than GD but I've had to test my sugar for pretty much my entire life so I know how it works lol. Generally speaking, at least with me, if I'm under a GREAT deal of stress and worry, it can sometimes put my numbers high but that's usually only the case if I've ate a very carbohydrate filled meal in which case my body just lets itself go basically. It's not often and I've never seen a trend relating my stress to my numbers but during finals time, I can see an increase in my waking (fasting) number. I usually only notice an increase in my numbers when I'm sick and down with the flu or something like that. Being sick definitely raises my numbers. If it makes you feel any better, like the PP said, if you don't pass the 3hr glucose test they order a test called an A1C test. This test measures your blood sugar over the past three months and puts it into a percentage number. Anything between a 5-6% is usually what doctors consider to be normal, and even some low 6's can sometimes be passing but generally anything over 6.5 usually end up having to be diet controlled or insulin controlled if the diet doesn't work. FWIW, my A1C is currently at 6.5 as a diagnosed diabetic and my ob couldn't be happier. Some practices are different and have different standards but I hope my bit of education helped! Continue reading >>

My 3 Hour Glucose Test Disaster

My 3 Hour Glucose Test Disaster

If you’re here, you likely searched for something like: failed glucose test failed 3-hour glucose test what happens when you fail your glucose test what to expect at my glucose screenings sugar shock glucose test throwing up after glucose test And so I say: welcome! (Although I hope that what happened to me doesn’t happen to you!) Since I originally shared this experience, I have gone on to have two healthy, beautiful baby girls (read their birth stories here and here). Despite the dramatic moments I had at the glucose test, please be assured that it’s very uncommon and I recovered after a little rest and relaxation! A quick update on my story. During my first pregnancy, I failed my 1-hour glucose test, which meant I was ordered to undergo a second and more extended test. These glucose screenings are designed to diagnose high blood sugar during pregnancy (gestational diabetes). The first test involves drinking a liquid that contains glucose and after an hour, having your blood drawn to test the sugars. If you fail the first test, you have to do a tolerance test, which involves fasting and then another round of glucose screening with multiple blood draws. So, that brings us back to my experience! I showed up to my 3-hour test armed with my laptop and free wifi to pass the time, so I wasn’t too worried. I fasted and showed up at 8:15am. At 8:30am I was taken back and had my fasting blood sugar level drawn. I was handed the glucola, which was twice as sweet as the previous one, meaning it had 100g of sugar in it. Again, it didn’t taste bad, just syrup-y sweet. This time, I had 10 minutes to drink it and I chatted with the nurse while I sipped away. She told me some interesting facts: How you eat doesn’t necessarily affect your outcome. She has had large women c Continue reading >>

More in diabetes