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Can Apple Cider Vinegar Be Used Treat Diabetes?

How To Use Apple Cider Vinegar For Diabetes

How To Use Apple Cider Vinegar For Diabetes

How to Use Apple Cider Vinegar for Diabetes By Jenny Hills, Medical Writer and Researcher   Food & Nutrition , Health With an estimated 86 million Americans diagnosed with pre-diabetes, and a further 29.1 million having being diagnosed with diabetes,1 it is time to take a serious look at the nutrients that can help regulate or reduce the factors that are responsible for diabetes. Lets have a look at how you can use apple cider vinegar (ACV) for diabetes (type I and type II). Diabetes is classified into type I and type II diabetes. In type II diabetes, two of the biggest factors responsible for the condition are blood sugar and insulin levels. Type II diabetes occurs when you lose the ability to regulate blood sugar levels, either as a result of insulin resistance or because of a lack of insulin. Nutrients that facilitate the ability to regulate blood sugar levels are therefore highly beneficial for helping individuals reduce or treat type II diabetes. ACV has gained a reputation as one of these nutrients. I have already mentioned the amazing health benefits of ACV and about the 11 ways you can use it to revolutionize your health.  Here are a number of studies that show you how to use ACV for regulating blood sugar and how much you need to consume. ACV can have Similar Effect to Diabetes Medication Certain diabetes medications are designed to block the digestion of sugars and starches. By blocking the digestion of these compounds, these medications can effectively prevent blood sugar spikes, and they can therefore help to regulate healthy blood sugar levels. According to Carol Johnston, Professor and Associate Director of the Nutrition Program of Arizona State University, ACV can also help to block your body’s ability to digest sugar and starch, which means that ACV Continue reading >>

9 Simple Ways To Use Apple Cider Vinegar For Treating Diabetes

9 Simple Ways To Use Apple Cider Vinegar For Treating Diabetes

From the shelves of supermarkets, apple cider vinegar (ACV) is making its way into the households as an effective remedy for various diseases. Not only is ACV used for cooking but is also used as a remedy for diabetes, which is backed by scientific research and testimonials. How to use apple cider vinegar for diabetes? Before delving into it, let’s check out the wonderful benefits it is blessed with. Science supports the benefits of apple cider vinegar, and that is sufficient enough to include it in your diabetic diet! Benefits Of Apple Cider Vinegar For Diabetes This form of vinegar is enriched with bacteria-fighting properties. It also has high mineral content, such as magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, sulfur, calcium, iron, fluorine, and copper. With such nutrients, it can help to control severe diabetic conditions. Even in cases of pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes, you can rely upon it. Enhances Sensitivity Of Insulin According to recent studies, apple cider vinegar reduces the insulin resistance power of the body. It also lowers blood sugar levels, if taken before going to bed. It improves insulin sensitivity by 19% to 34% for people who are suffering from diabetes and prediabetes conditions, respectively. This can happen even after having a high carb dinner. [ Read: Yoga Poses For Diabetes ] Lowers Blood Glucose Level Apple cider vinegar lowers the blood glucose level in the body by regulating the Glycemic Index (GI). High GI raises blood sugar level and vice versa. Apple cider vinegar stabilizes the metabolic process in the body by lowering the GI. It is a rare feat achieved by acetic acid that constitutes apple cider vinegar. Apple cider vinegar slows down the process of conversion of carbohydrates into glucose by soaking up the bicarbonates in the digestive s Continue reading >>

Uses Of Apple Cider Vinegar For Diabetics

Uses Of Apple Cider Vinegar For Diabetics

Proponents of natural healing celebrate apple cider vinegar as a healthy supplement, and as a natural treatment for weight loss, gastrointestinal issues and healthy skin. If you have diabetes, you may be particularly interested in recent research published by E. Östman et al. in the 'European Journal of Clinical Nutrition" in 2005. The article states that apple cider vinegar is able to lower glucose and insulin responses to carbohydrate-rich meals. Check with your physician before using apple cider vinegar if you have diabetes, as there may be harmful side effects or drug interactions. Video of the Day Apple cider vinegar is a result of fermenting apples. The first step is fermenting to alcohol and then into acetic acid. Fermentation is made quicker using aeration. Pasteurizing processes remove bacteria. Vinegar is a folk remedy in use for centuries, with reports of Hippocrates using the remedy in the treatment of wounds. Vinegar is comprised of acetic acid, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, polyphenolic compounds and nonvolatile organic acids, such as citric and malic acid. Lowering Blood Glucose Several studies have now shown that acetic acid in vinegar lowers blood glucose levels. Carol S. Johnston, Ph.D., R.D. and Cindy A. Gaas, B.S. indicate in their 2006 article published in "Medscape General Medicine" that the antiglycemic properties of vinegar extend to individuals with marked insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes, making this a natural option in support of diabetic symptom management. Lowering Body Fat and Triglycerides A study completed by Tomoo Kondo, et al., published in the "Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry Journal," reports positive results regarding apple cider vinegar in the suppression of body fat accumulation in obese people in Japan. The st Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Your Health

Apple Cider Vinegar And Your Health

Apple cider vinegar has a long history as a home remedy, used to treat everything from a sore throat to varicose veins. But there’s not much science to support the claims. Still, in recent years, some researchers have been taking a closer look at apple cider vinegar and its possible benefits. It’s mostly apple juice, but adding yeast turns the fruit sugar into alcohol -- this is fermentation. Bacteria turn the alcohol into acetic acid. That’s what gives vinegar its sour taste and strong smell. Vinegar’s used in cooking, baking, salad dressings, and as a preservative. There’s a lot of acid in it, so drinking vinegar straight isn’t recommended. And it can cause serious problems if you have a lot of it. If you’re looking to take some for health reasons, most people recommend adding one to two tablespoons to water or tea. Vinegar has been used as a remedy since the days of Hippocrates. The ancient Greek doctor treated wounds with it. In recent years, people have explored apple cider vinegar as a way to lose weight, improve heart health, and even treat dandruff. Many of these claims aren’t supported by modern research. But some studies have found that acetic acid -- which gives vinegar its distinctive taste and smell -- may help with a variety of conditions: Japanese scientists found that drinking vinegar might help reduce obesity. One small study found that vinegar improved blood sugar and insulin levels in a group of people with type 2 diabetes. Vinegar also has chemicals known as polyphenols. They’re antioxidants that can curb cell damage that can lead to other diseases, such as cancer. But studies on whether vinegar actually lowers your chances of having cancer are mixed. Did we mention it’s highly acidic? Drinking a lot of apple cider vinegar can dam Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Could A Spoonful Of This Every Day Condiment Cure You?

Type 2 Diabetes - Could A Spoonful Of This Every Day Condiment Cure You?

Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas which allows your body to use sugar from carbohydrates for immediate energy or to store for later - a process type 2 diabetes sufferers struggle to do. In this condition, the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the body’s cells don’t react to insulin. Which means blood sugar levels can get too high for too long a period. This can cause hyperglycaemia, which in turn can trigger heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. The weight loss benefits of drinking it are known, but it could also help you manage your diabetes too. But there might be a simple solution in the form of apple cider vinegar. The weight loss benefits of drinking it are known, but it could also help you manage your diabetes too. Research has found it improved type 2 diabetes patients’ insulin sensitivity - that’s insulin’s ability to bring sugar out of the bloodstream and into the body’s cells. The 2004 study also discovered it lessened the rise of blood sugar and insulin when patients were given insulin- and glucose-spiking foods, such as a bagel and orange juice. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Further research supports these findings. A Swedish study saw healthy males given bread with and without white vinegar - the former group showed a lowering of blood sugar and insulin - while in a 2008 study on rats it reduced blood sugar levels. Researchers have found that less than one ounce of apple cider vinegar is needed to significantly reduce blood sugar levels after a meal, while a study published in the journal Diabetes Care discovered two tablespoons with a cheese snack w Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar Helps Control Diabetes

Apple Cider Vinegar Helps Control Diabetes

Apple cider vinegar is a natural product that has been used in many therapeutic purposes for centuries. Although its utility in the kitchen is probably the best known, many cultures prize this product for its high content of essential nutrients and active compounds. The benefits it can have for your health are another reason why it’s so popular, many of which have been proven by scientific research. Most of these benefits are thanks to the high content of trace elements and acids that regulate the body’s natural pH and improve your digestive health. One of the most studied aspects of apple cider vinegar has to do with its ability to moderate blood sugar levels in patients with diabetes. There have been some significant findings on this subject so far, with experts saying it could be key to controlling this disease. Apple cider vinegar could be as effective as medication for diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common way that people suffer from this disease. Insulin and blood sugar levels are responsible for this condition. Diabetes develops when your body loses its ability to regulate the glucose found in the bloodstream, either because it becomes resistant to insulin or insulin production slows. Because of this, it’s been found that the nutrients contained in apple cider vinegar actually reduce and treat diabetes by optimizing insulin function and controlling blood sugar levels. The medical community has developed drugs that block the digestion of sugars and starches. This decreases your risk of having sugar spikes, thereby controlling diabetes. Recently, however, scientists have discovered that apple cider vinegar contains substances that generate this same type of blockage, meaning it has a similar effect to the drugs in action. This is attributed to its high Continue reading >>

Vinegar Ingestion At Bedtime Moderates Waking Glucose Concentrations In Adults With Well-controlled Type 2 Diabetes

Vinegar Ingestion At Bedtime Moderates Waking Glucose Concentrations In Adults With Well-controlled Type 2 Diabetes

Given the importance of maintaining acceptable blood glucose concentrations, there is much interest in identifying foods and diet patterns that will help individuals with diabetes manage their condition. Based on previous data indicating that vinegar ingestion at mealtime reduces postprandial glycemia (1–4), the aim of this pilot study was to examine whether vinegar ingestion at bedtime reduces the next-morning fasting glucose concentration in individuals with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— Four men and seven women (aged 40–72 years) diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (by a physician) who were not taking insulin completed the study. Participants provided a clinically determined A1C reading from a recent (<2 months) blood analysis. All participants gave written informed consent, and the study was approved by the institutional review board at Arizona State University. Participants maintained 24-h diet records for 3 days and measured fasting glucose at 0700 h for 3 consecutive days with a calibrated glucometer before the start of the study. Participants were instructed to continue usual prescription medication use during the study. Utilizing a randomized crossover design with a 3- to 5-day washout period between treatments, participants followed a standardized meal plan for 2 days, consuming either 2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar or water at bedtime with 1 oz cheese (8 g protein, 1 g carbohydrate, and 1.5 g fat). The standardized meal plan was designed to reflect the individual's typical diet. Participants were instructed to record all foods and beverages ingested during each 2-day treatment period. Fasting glucose was recorded with a calibrated glucometer by each participant during the trial: at baseline (day 0) and day 2 at 0700 h. These results were download Continue reading >>

How To Use Apple Cider Vinegar To Keep Your Blood Sugar Level Low

How To Use Apple Cider Vinegar To Keep Your Blood Sugar Level Low

Apple cider vinegar has a number of health benefits, some of which still need further research. One the benefits that’s becoming more certain has to do with diabetes management. Research involved in finding out whether apple cider vinegar can help diabetics is growing, and the findings show a lot of promise. Can apple cider vinegar actually curb diabetes risk and keep your blood sugar within normal levels? Current studies show it can. It’s a type of vinegar fermented using apples. Basically, crushed apples are placed in storage containers and allowed to ferment. After some time, the juices in crushed apples turn acidic. Most people don’t realize the tremendous health benefits of apple cider vinegar. It merely sits in most kitchen cabinets to be used as a common ingredient in many recipes. When buying apple cider vinegar, you will notice that many brands on the shelves are refined and crystal clear. You don’t want those ones. Raw organic apple cider vinegar has sediments that turn the bottle murky when it is shaken. These sediments are known as the “mother”—a result of fermentation, and they are alive with enzymes and beneficial bacteria. Bragg’s Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar is one that I trust and use in my home. How Does Apple Cider Vinegar Prevent Diabetes? Most people do not know that this vinegar is rich in probiotics or good bacteria that play a major role in digestion. Your gastrointestinal tract needs to have a good amount of beneficial bacteria for proper functioning, prevention of digestive problems and gastrointestinal diseases. Studies show that lack of beneficial bacteria in your intestines may raise your risk of type 2 diabetes. Thus, including apple cider vinegar and other sources of probiotics in your diet is a good way to prevent and he Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Diabetes?

Can Drinking Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Diabetes?

Part 1 of 4 Overview Type 2 diabetes is a preventable and chronic disease that affects how your body controls sugar (glucose) in your blood. Medications, diet, and exercise are the standard treatments. But recent studies vouch for something you can find in most kitchen cabinets too: apple cider vinegar. Over 9 percent of Americans have type 2 diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). If apple cider vinegar has potential as a natural treatment, that would be good news indeed. Part 2 of 4 While a number of studies have looked at the link between apple cider vinegar and blood sugar management, they are usually small, with varying results. “There have been several small studies evaluating the effects of apple cider vinegar, and the results are mixed,” said Dr. Maria Pena, an endocrinologist in New York. “For example, there was one small study done in rats showing that apple cider vinegar helped lower LDL and A1C levels. But the limitation to this study is that it was only done in rats, not humans.” One study from researchers at Arizona State University found that taking 20 grams of apple cider vinegar diluted in 40 grams of water, with 1 teaspoon of saccharine, could lower blood sugar after meals. Another study found that taking apple cider vinegar before bed helped moderate blood sugar upon waking up. But both studies were small, looking only at 19 and 11 participants, respectively. Another study that looked at apple cider vinegar’s impact on type 1 diabetes found that it could actually worsen glycemic control, according to Pena. “The take-home message is that until a large, randomized control trial is done, it is difficult to ascertain the true benefits of taking apple cider vinegar,” she said. Part 3 of 4 Dilute apple cide Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar - Does The Sour Taste Hide Some Sweet Benefits?

Apple Cider Vinegar - Does The Sour Taste Hide Some Sweet Benefits?

You’ve got diabetes, you know you’ve got to watch what you eat. You’ve been told to lose weight too. Then you turn to the internet to get more information. Somehow google and facebook seem to be a step ahead and you start having lots of crazy offers coming up for diabetes. Lots of promises and hype and talk of superfoods - are they all a hoax or are there really foods out there that can help? My next 3 articles are going to uncover the evidence and look at 3 cheap foods that I really do classify as ‘superfoods’ when it comes to diabetes. Apple Cider Vinegar - Drops sugars and weight It sounds too easy and too good to be true, something as simple as vinegar dropping your sugars. Vinegar has been used throughout the centuries but it is only been recently that research benefits of vinegar has become clear. There is also preliminary evidence to show that vinegar improves cholesterol and lowers blood pressure. 1. Apple Cider Vinegar and Blood Sugar: This is pretty cut and dried. Multiple studies show the effect that vinegar has on dropping blood sugars. Here’s an excerpt from a paper published by the American Diabetes Assoc. in 2007: “Given the importance of maintaining acceptable blood glucose concentrations, there is much interest in identifying foods and diet patterns that will help individuals with diabetes manage their condition. Based on previous data indicating that vinegar ingestion at mealtime reduces postprandial glycemia” The study showed that vinegar dropped sugars overnight. It is well established that vinegar before meals drop sugars after meals. The studies showed this effect was even larger in pre-diabetics. Type 2 diabetics had a 19% increase in insulin sensitivity. Prediabetics had a 34% increase in insulin sensitivity. What does that mean? Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: Does It Help? How Is It Taken?

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: Does It Help? How Is It Taken?

For many years, apple cider vinegar has been linked with an array of health benefits. These have ranged from aiding weight loss to relieving cold symptoms. But does taking it help people with diabetes? The majority of the health claims around apple cider vinegar have yet to be supported by clinical research. However, evidence has been emerging to suggest that apple cider vinegar may have certain benefits for the management of type 2 diabetes. This article will discuss the research behind this claim and how apple cider vinegar should be taken, if at all. What is apple cider vinegar? Vinegar can be made from nearly any carbohydrate. Apple cider vinegar is derived from cider or freshly pressed apple juice. Like most vinegars, apple cider vinegar is produced after a slow process spanning several weeks or months in which sugars are broken down. Mother of vinegar is a cobweb-like substance made from yeast and bacteria that builds up during this period. Mother of vinegar gives the vinegar a cloudy appearance and it is only present in unfiltered apple cider vinegar. It is thought to boost the vinegar's nutritional value. However, most vinegar is pasteurized. This heating process kills bacteria but prevents mother of vinegar from forming. Apple cider vinegar and diabetes In 1980, there were around 108 million people with diabetes worldwide. Its prevalence has increased greatly over the past few decades to an estimated 422 million. Diabetes is a chronic condition marked by an inability to manage blood sugar levels appropriately. The hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels is called insulin. People with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce this hormone. People with type 2 diabetes are unable to produce enough insulin or respond appropriately to the hormone. People c Continue reading >>

Awesome Reasons Why Acv Is Good For Diabetes

Awesome Reasons Why Acv Is Good For Diabetes

Apple cider vinegar has long been a favorite natural remedy for an extraordinary number of ailments. It has been used to treat bacterial and fungal infections, hyperacidity, warts, fatigue, cancer, to clear acne, cure hiccups, lower blood pressure, get rid of dandruff, on sunburns and to treat leg cramps, to name just a few. Apple cider vinegar has been used for centuries and is made from fermented apple mash. It contains acetic acid, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, polyphenols and other types of acids. The “mother” fluid is a product of a long fermentation process and will often look cloudy because of the non-infectious and non-toxic bacteria (the probiotics) that it contains. Other, “non-mother” products are filtered to remove the cloudiness and may be less beneficial. Evidence is beginning to pile up for at least some uses of apple cider vinegar—commonly known as ACV. Many professionals will recommend, however, that you only use the “mother” ACV and not any filtered ACV products. Some of the Evidence-based Medical Uses of Apple Cider Vinegar Many of the uses for ACV is to fight infections, particularly skin infections—since ACV is high in acetic acid, it is very likely that ACV can kill off bacterial, fungal and viral infections because the acid in ACV is absorbed and directly kills off any infectious agent. This is likely to explain the traditional use of ACV on skin infections. [1] Using ACV on wounds may also be useful in preventing infections because of its acidity. ACV is also used to treat hyperacidity (heartburn). To use ACV for heartburn, the recommendation is to add about 1 tablespoon of ACV to 6 ounces of water and drink it about 20 minutes before a meal—this actually stimulates a normal amount of acid in the stomach.[2] ACV has been test Continue reading >>

How To Lower Blood Sugar Using Just Apple Cider Vinegar

How To Lower Blood Sugar Using Just Apple Cider Vinegar

By pH health care professionals Vinegar comes from the French word vinaigre meaning sour wine. It can be made from almost any fermented carbohydrate - wine, molasses, dates, pears, berries and apples have all been used to make vinegar, with apple cider vinegar being one of the most popular kinds. The benefits to apple cider vinegar are abundant. Proponents use it for everything from curing hiccups to alleviating cold symptoms, and claim it can help them fight diabetes, cancer, heart problems, high cholesterol and weight issues. Studies are beginning to affirm some of the benefits, and no doubt apple cider vinegar will be the subject of numerous studies in the future. There is evidence that fermented foods such as apple cider vinegar containing lactic acid or acetic acid can lower blood sugar (glucose) by helping store excess glucose in the liver. This reduces the body’s rate of glucose production and absorption. A 2004 study that appeared in Diabetes Care measured the effects of vinegar on blood glucose after a meal. Blood glucose levels were taken one to two hours after a meal. The participants were insulin sensitive (normal response), insulin resistant (pre-diabetic), or Type 2 diabetics. They were required to either drink apple cider vinegar or water with a sugar substitute before eating a buttered bagel and drinking orange juice. The insulin-resistant group that drank the vinegar before their meal had increased insulin sensitivity for an hour after eating. The Type 2 diabetes group also saw a slight improvement, but the biggest effect was seen in people whose insulin response was normal and those who were insulin resistant. This study demonstrated that vinegar does seem to significantly improve post-meal insulin sensitivity in people who are insulin resistant, whi Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes

OK, y’all. I wrote about this several years ago, but now I’m serious. If you want to control any type of diabetes better, consume vinegar before meals and at bedtime. Start today! It lowers post-meal and fasting glucose levels. In a study from Arizona State University, subjects took a drink of 20 grams of apple cider vinegar, 40 grams of water, and 1 teaspoon of saccharin with each meal. (I think stevia might be better than saccharin.) Those with insulin resistance who drank the vinegar had 34% lower postprandial (after-meal) glucose compared to controls. These postprandial benefits had been found before. It was thought that vinegar might slow the absorption of carbohydrate into the blood, or slow the breakdown of starches into sugars. This effect would mimic the effect of drugs like acarbose (brand name Precose). But the 2004 study cited above reported that vinegar reduced postprandial glucose more in subjects who were highly insulin resistant. The authors say this result shows that vinegar increases insulin sensitivity, perhaps acting similarly to metformin. Now studies have found that vinegar at bedtime reduces fasting blood glucose in the morning, indicating that vinegar might promote insulin production, like nateglinide (Starlix). Pretty amazing that a simple chemical like vinegar (acetic acid) could have the benefits of three different classes of diabetes drugs, and all for a few cents a dose! It’s likely good for both Type 2 and Type 1, especially for lowering postprandial glucose. And postprandial glucose levels account for 30% to 70% of A1C values. Vinegar has got to be the most cost-effective medicine in history, but most people with diabetes still aren’t taking it. And doctors aren’t prescribing it. Why not? Is it because there are no “vinegar rep Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: A Cure Or An Aid?

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: A Cure Or An Aid?

If you’ve been searching for various remedies to help manage blood glucose levels, you’ve probably come across the suggestion to add apple cider vinegar into your meal plan. But does this so-called natural remedy really work? It turns out that using vinegar as a treatment for health aliments, such as infections and stomachaches, has been practiced for centuries in cultures throughout the world. But it was a Japanese study that suggested apple cider vinegar may promote weight loss that thrust it into the spotlight for people looking to slim down or better manage their diabetes. Since then, other researchers have studied this vinegar’s impact on appetite and blood glucose management. “There is some emerging evidence that suggests apple cider vinegar may have certain potential benefits for people with diabetes,” says Susan Weiner, RDN, CDE, author of Diabetes 365: Tips for Living Well. But she adds, “all of the studies in this area are small and have varying results.” Mona Morstein, ND, author of Master Your Diabetes: A Comprehensive Integrative Approach for Both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes, also shared concern regarding the research so far. “Studies done with small groups is always something to be wary of when expanding findings to millions of others,” says Morstein, noting that, at the same time, the results in the studies conducted to date have all been positive. Apple Cider Vinegar for Diabetes: What Studies Say Controlling blood sugar is important for people with diabetes, and some research suggests apple cider vinegar may help do the job. According to a study published in the journal Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, consuming vinegar with complex carbohydrates may reduce post-meal blood glucose levels by as much as 20 percent. Additional research Continue reading >>

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