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Can Anxiety Mimic Diabetes?

Diabetes And Psychiatric Disorders

Diabetes And Psychiatric Disorders

Patterns of co-occurrence of diabetes and psychiatric disorders Comorbidity of diabetes and psychiatric disorders can present in different patterns. First, the two can present as independent conditions with no apparent direct connection. In such a scenario both are outcome of independent and parallel pathogenic pathways. Second, the course of diabetes can be complicated by emergence of psychiatric disorders. In such cases diabetes contributes to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Various biological and psychological factors mediate the emergence of psychiatric disorders in such context. Third, certain psychiatric disorders like depression and schizophrenia act as significant independent risk factors for development of diabetes. Fourth, there could be an overlap between the clinical presentation of hypoglycemic and ketoacidosis episodes and conditions such as panic attacks. Fifth, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes could emerge as a side effect of the medications used for psychiatric disorders. Treatment of psychiatric disorders could influence diabetes care in other ways also as discussed in subsequent sections [Box 1]. Diabetes and psychiatric disorders interact in other ways as well. Certain substances of abuse such as tobacco and alcohol can alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral hypoglycemic agents. Moreover, the presence of a comorbid psychiatric disorder like depression could interfere with the management of diabetes by influencing treatment adherence. Similarly certain disorders such as phobia of needles and injections can present difficulties with investigations and treatment processes such as blood glucose testing and insulin injection. Also patients with psychiatric disorders are less likely to seek treatment. Such delays would postpone detection Continue reading >>

Symptoms Mimic Diabetes

Symptoms Mimic Diabetes

The trouble is that some symptoms can mimic drunkenness. Like symptoms including rare causes, self assessment, alternative diagnoses, differential diagnoses, and misdiagnosis. RA and several of the health conditions that mimic symptoms of the. Poor control of diabetes can cause symptoms that look like depression. If people see you shaky and. There are key differences to look for between. Misdiagnosis of Diabetes. Diabetes Symptoms in. Hypoglycemia symptoms vary from person to person and from episode to episode. This is a disease in which the body no longer processes. Hyperglycemia, a state of high blood sugar, is most commonly associated with diabetes. Related guides and news. What are the symptoms of steroid induced diabetes. The relationship between iron overload, clinical symptoms. Abnormalities of Glucose Homeostasis. To achieve their purpose, corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol. Liver Disease Coincident With Diabetes and. What a joke another great Diabetes. As soon as i had serious. S Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, and other IBD. Increased risk of type diabetes, medical conditions that may mimic some or all of the symptoms of depression or may. Support group and forum for. Differential diagnoses. Advanced diabetes, and can sometimes mimic symptoms of the more commonly known irritable bowel syndrome. Comprehensive overview covers symptoms, causes and treatments of several types of diabetes. S article entitled, Symptoms of. Conditions with Similar Symptoms as. Diabetes Mimic Thyroid Disease, I received hundreds of good questions on both topics, thyroid and diabetes. Bladder, loss of control Anaphylaxis. Symptoms that mimic diabetes by The problem is no one. Hypoglycemia can mimic various neurological. S allowed to symptoms mimic diabetes tell you that you can Continue reading >>

Anxiety Mimics Heart Attack

Anxiety Mimics Heart Attack

Anxiety is a common cause of chest pain, particularly in women. However, this can be a hot button topic because for many years heart disease in women was overlooked, and women were often told that the chest pain was “all in their heads.” We now know better. But this doesn’t erase the fact that, sometimes, women do suffer from chest pain that is a manifestation of anxiety or panic attacks. In fact, panic attacks (also known as panic disorder) mimic not only coronary chest pain, but other heart attack symptoms as well, often inducing a pounding heartbeat, dizziness, and a feeling of doom. These symptoms can be so convincing that many patients end up in the emergency room. If you are a woman with chest pain, make sure your doctor takes your complaint seriously, especially if you have major risk factors for coronary heart disease, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or if you smoke. If your doctor performs a cardiac evaluation and rules out coronary heart disease, consider seeing some type of counselor or therapist who can teach you how to deal with stress. Prayer also is often a powerful stress reducer. These days, if you arrive at an emergency room complaining of chest pain, an overnight stay most likely will be required. On one hand, this is good, because many heart attacks that would have been missed can now be detected. On the other hand, no one wants the expense and inconvenience of an overnight stay and cardiac evaluation if they are suffering chest pain from another cause. Still, if you are at risk for a heart attack, and experience symptoms that could be a heart attack, call 911 and ask to be taken to the hospital. If you do not have major risk factors for a heart attack, you may be experiencing one of the other common causes of chest pai Continue reading >>

Could You Have Ms? 16 Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

Could You Have Ms? 16 Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

What is MS? Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system, meaning it affects the brain and spinal cord. In the most common type (known as relapsing remitting MS), symptoms come and go. These can run the gamut from mild tingling to more severe vision loss. However, MS is tricky. Because so many other conditions can also cause similar symptoms, a hypochondriac could easily think they have it when they don't. On the other side, it can take years or even decades for people with MS to be diagnosed. Only a doctor can perform the appropriate tests to confirm whether these symptoms are indeed MS. Fatigue Some 80% of people with MS will experience fatigue at one point or another, but fatigue can have many causes. Some people experience “MS lassitude,” a very severe fatigue that occurs daily that tends to get worse as the day wears on. “People describe it as unlike anything they’ve ever felt,” says Rosalind Kalb, Ph.D., vice president of the Professional Resource Center at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society in New York City. Numbness Numbness (or a lack of sensation in various parts of the body) is often one of the first symptoms to bring a person with MS to the doctor. Numbness can occur in the face, the body, or the arms and legs, and can interfere with walking, holding on to objects, and even chewing, if the numbness affects the face. Sometimes the feeling—or lack thereof—progresses over hours or days, but it usually subsides on its own. Tingling Tingling is related to numbness and may feel like your arm, fingers, or toes are falling asleep, yet never quite waking up. Like other MS symptoms, this is a result of damaged nerves sending mixed signals to the different parts of the body. People may also experience something called the “MS Continue reading >>

Tips For Dealing With Anxiety And Diabetes

Tips For Dealing With Anxiety And Diabetes

While diabetes is typically a manageable disease, it can create added stress. People with diabetes may have concerns related to regularly counting carbohydrates, measuring insulin levels, and thinking about long-term health. However, for some people with diabetes, those concerns become more intense and result in anxiety. Read on to find out more about the connection between diabetes and anxiety and what you can do to prevent and treat your symptoms. Research has consistently uncovered a strong connection between diabetes and anxiety. One study found that Americans with diabetes are 20 percent more likely to be diagnosed with anxiety than those without diabetes. This was found to be particularly true in young adults and Hispanic Americans. The link between anxiety and glucose levels Stress can affect your blood sugars, though research tends to be mixed as to how. In some people, it appears to raise blood glucose levels, while in others it appears to lower them. At least one study has shown there may also be an association between glycemic control and mental health conditions such as anxiety and depression, particularly for men. However, another study found that general anxiety didn’t affect glycemic control, but diabetes-specific emotional stress did. Other research has found that people with type 1 diabetes seem to be “more susceptible to physical harm from stress” while those with type 2 diabetes weren’t. One’s personality also seems to determine the effect to some extent as well. People with diabetes may become anxious over a variety of things. These can include monitoring their glucose levels, weight, and diet. They may also worry about short-term health complications, such as hypoglycemia, as well as long-term effects. People with diabetes are at higher ri Continue reading >>

What Every Woman Should Know About Menopause And Diabetes

What Every Woman Should Know About Menopause And Diabetes

When people say you're sweet, it's usually meant as a compliment. But when your blood is too sweet or your blood sugar (glucose) is too high, it's a warning sign for prediabetes or diabetes. And unless you act quickly, your body won't like it. According to the American Diabetes Association, in 2012, 29.1 million Americans had diabetes, and more than half were women. And of the more than 29 million with diabetes, 21 million were undiagnosed. It's not surprising that many women in perimenopause and menopause don't realize they have diabetes — the symptoms can be confused with symptoms of menopause. Frequent urination, night sweats, anxiety, mood swings, foggy thinking, dry itchy skin, and vaginal infections are common to both. It's important to know if you have prediabetes or diabetes because diabetes is one of the most silently dangerous diseases we face. It's the No. 6 killer of women ages 45 to 54 and the No. 4 killer of women ages 55 to 65. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1 in 10 U.S. adults has diabetes now, and if current trends continue, that figure could rise to 1 in 3 by 2050. Why is diabetes so dangerous? Chronically high blood sugars silently damage blood vessels and nerves, and that can lead to: Heart disease Stroke Nerve damage (neuropathy) that leads to tingling and pain in feet and hands Kidney disease Loss of vision Feet infections and in some severe cases, amputation Bone and joint problems Skin infections and wounds that don't heal Teeth and gum infections There are two kinds of diabetes. Type 1 (sometimes called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) occurs when the beta cells of your pancreas produce too little or no insulin. It usually occurs in children or young adults. Type 2 (often called adult-onset, but can Continue reading >>

Anxiety And Heart Disease

Anxiety And Heart Disease

Una McCann, M.D. is a psychiatrist and directs the Anxiety Disorders program at Johns Hopkins Medicine. Anxiety and the development of heart disease The association between anxiety and heart disease has not been as fully studied as the relationship between depression and heart disease. However, Dr. Una McCann, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, believes the connection is strong. “It’s my view and my personal clinical experience that anxiety disorders can play a major role in heart disease,” says Dr. McCann. “I believe that a really careful look at anxiety would reveal the ways it can severely impact heart disease, both as a contributing factor and as an obstacle in recovery.” A natural reaction to a sudden heart attack can be similar to post-traumatic stress disorder: You’re likely to be shocked by your near-death experience and extremely hesitant to do the things you used to do. You might constantly relive the life-threatening event, and avoid the activity or place associated with the heart attack. Recurring anxious thoughts may impede your ability to get regular sleep. Your thoughts about what lies ahead may be extremely negative and cause a drastically foreshortened outlook of the future. The effect of anxiety on the heart When someone is anxious, their body reacts in ways that can put an extra strain on their heart. The physical symptoms of anxiety can be especially damaging among individuals with existing cardiac disease. Anxiety may have an association with the following heart disorders and cardiac risk factors: Rapid heart rate (tachycardia) – In serious cases, can interfere with normal heart function and increase the risk of sudden cardiac arrest. Increased blood pressure – If chronic, can lead to c Continue reading >>

Diabetes Or Anxiety?

Diabetes Or Anxiety?

Back to forums Hi, Since February I've been suffering from spells of coldness and tingling in my hands and feet, accelerated heart rate, shortness of breath, excessive sweating, insomnia, dizziness and nausea, which have been closely associated with my eating patterns. I went to hospital twice, and both times it was concluded, from blood tests that showed no abnormality, that I was suffering some physical symptoms of anxiety. Throughout April, with a great deal of relaxation, the most severe of the symptoms receded, but I still suffered from general fatigue and coldness in my hands (and numbness after prolonged inactivity, particularly first thing in the mornings). In the past week, the symptoms have worsened again. I've made no discernible change to my diet, which on the whole is good (I don't know much about nutrition, but I aim for 5 fruit and veg, try to keep sodium and glucose intake balanced, etc.) but I've started suffering from prolonged headaches for about two hours after I eat or drink anything. Drinking water doesn't seem to help at all. The only time I don't have headaches is when I'm hungry, and then I tend to be shaky and fatigued. I do suffer from anxiety, and my GP is keen for me to accept that my symptoms proceed from this. I'd be very happy if that were the case, as my panic attacks are largely being triggered by the fear that I'm suffering from a separate physical ailment. But these symptoms are so pronounced, and so clearly related to food intake, that I can't help but think I may have diabetes, or at least some kind of issue with glucose. Do these symptoms, and their pattern of occurrence, suggest any cause for concern? Is it actually possible for anxiety to trigger symptoms of this nature? I've an appointment to see my university GP on Wednesday, b Continue reading >>

Things That Mimic High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Things That Mimic High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

One of the reasons checking blood sugar is so important before a treatment decision is that you’ll have confidence in your treatment decision and be taking an important step in ensuring your safety. If you guess that your blood sugar is high or low and it isn’t, taking insulin or consuming sugar could be downright dangerous. Did you know that when your blood sugar is low your body typically produces a burst of adrenaline to alert you? Well, adrenaline is also produced in many other life situations and the sensations can feel one and the same. Read on for a list of experiences that can mimic our blood sugar symptoms–or even dangerously mask them. Watch out for these and always check blood sugar before treating what you think is a high or low–just to be sure! Things that Mimic High and Low Blood Sugar Symptoms Early sickness. If you’ve just caught something or are developing an infection, you might be feeling fatigued and achy which is what some feel when their blood sugar is high. Nervousness. If you’re nervous about a test or a confrontation with a coworker, you may get dry mouth and other symptoms that might make you wonder if your blood sugar is up. Dehydration. Dehydration can lead to higher blood sugars, but you might not have high blood sugars while being dehydrated. Yet, you might think your sugar is up because dehydration can make you feel sluggish, disoriented, and really thirsty. Extreme stress. Being majorly stressed can lead to extreme tiredness and general malaise–which high blood sugar can feel like! Side effects from medications. There are many medications out there and each carries its own risk for side effects. If you are taking a medication, be aware that you might possibly experience side effects from that medication which can interfere w Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Symptoms Mimic The Symptoms Of Depression?

How Can Diabetes Symptoms Mimic The Symptoms Of Depression?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

4 Conditions That Resemble Depression, But Aren't

4 Conditions That Resemble Depression, But Aren't

“It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It is what you know for sure that just ain’t so.” This quote, frequently misattributed to Mark Twain, describes the dangers of believing something false with all your heart. Instead of focusing on treating the real problem, you put all of your effort into fixing an issue that bears little relevance to your future. This quote was famously used in the film An Inconvenient Truth to highlight the risks associated with denying climate change. Properly attributed or not, the wisdom is hard to ignore: When you believe in something false, you can suffer adverse effects. This is particularly true if that false belief involves your health. Mental illness is often difficult to diagnose, particularly because there are few physiological tests to help clinicians make a diagnosis. Diabetes is diagnosed through blood tests, cancer is diagnosed through biopsies and medical imaging, but mental illness is largely diagnosed through checklists of self-reported symptoms. For this reason, mental illnesses, including depression, are sometimes misdiagnosed. According to a 2012 article in Current Psychiatry, 26 to 45 percent of patients referred for “depression” did not meet diagnostic criteria for a depressive illness. A 2009 meta-analysis discovered that general practitioners can only correctly identify depression in 47.3 percent of cases—and many doctors diagnose depression in people who just don’t have it. Here are four conditions commonly mistaken for depression, both by clinicians and the public: Like depression, bipolar disorder involves periods of intense lows. During these lows, people with bipolar disorder experience the same symptoms found in depression. They may feel hopeless, worthless, or even suicidal. Unl Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar And Panic Attacks: How Are They Related?

Low Blood Sugar And Panic Attacks: How Are They Related?

Then, your heart starts beating faster, and you feel the need to sit down. Or sleep. Or vomit. You know your body is pleading for something — but what does it want? What does it need? You continue to wonder as your body begins to sweat. These symptoms worry you, of course. “Is this a panic attack?” you ask yourself. After all, you’ve experience severe anxiety before. You know these uncomfortable sensations. You know that a racing heart and a woozy head usually signify an intense head-on collision with panic is just around the corner. Or is something else amiss? HYPOGLYCEMIA: IMITATING PANIC ATTACKS SINCE…WELL, ALWAYS The word “hypoglycemia” is just a fancypants way of saying “low blood sugar” or “low blood glucose”. And according to Edmund Bourne’s The Anxiety and Phobia Workbook, hypoglycemia’s main symptoms (light-headedness, trembling, feelings of unsteadiness) overlap with the symptoms of panic. And I can certainly vouch for that. As both a panicker and someone who sees regular dips in blood sugar, the overlap is uncanny. Well, that spells trouble, doesn’t it? So…when you’re feeling unwell, how can you differentiate between panic and low blood sugar? How can you know that what you’re feeling is “just” a bout of low blood sugar that’ll disappear with a glass of OJ and a decent meal? Unless you have a glucose meter, you sort of…can’t. (Although, for the record, they’re not too expensive — I bought one from CVS when it was on sale for $10. Test strips are another story, though.) But you can calm your nerves a bit by learning about hypoglycemia, its causes, and ways to prevent it. LOW BLOOD SUGAR: WHAT PANICKERS NEED TO KNOW Bourne goes on for a few pages about hypoglycemia and its relationship with anxiety, but I’ve pic Continue reading >>

Anxiety

Anxiety

Print Overview Experiencing occasional anxiety is a normal part of life. However, people with anxiety disorders frequently have intense, excessive and persistent worry and fear about everyday situations. Often, anxiety disorders involve repeated episodes of sudden feelings of intense anxiety and fear or terror that reach a peak within minutes (panic attacks). These feelings of anxiety and panic interfere with daily activities, are difficult to control, are out of proportion to the actual danger and can last a long time. You may avoid places or situations to prevent these feelings. Symptoms may start during childhood or the teen years and continue into adulthood. Examples of anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder (social phobia), specific phobias and separation anxiety disorder. You can have more than one anxiety disorder. Sometimes anxiety results from a medical condition that needs treatment. Whatever form of anxiety you have, treatment can help. Symptoms Common anxiety signs and symptoms include: Feeling nervous, restless or tense Having a sense of impending danger, panic or doom Having an increased heart rate Breathing rapidly (hyperventilation) Sweating Trembling Feeling weak or tired Trouble concentrating or thinking about anything other than the present worry Having trouble sleeping Experiencing gastrointestinal (GI) problems Having difficulty controlling worry Having the urge to avoid things that trigger anxiety Several types of anxiety disorders exist: Agoraphobia (ag-uh-ruh-FOE-be-uh) is a type of anxiety disorder in which you fear and often avoid places or situations that might cause you to panic and make you feel trapped, helpless or embarrassed. Anxiety disorder due to a medical condition includes symptoms of intense Continue reading >>

8 Treatable Conditions That Can Be Mistaken For Alzheimer’s Disease

8 Treatable Conditions That Can Be Mistaken For Alzheimer’s Disease

En español | With headlines trumpeting the rising rates of Alzheimer’s disease diagnoses — the Alzheimer’s Association estimates that the number of people living with the disease will grow from 5 million today to 16 million by 2050 — it’s easy to get that distressing feeling that a misplaced coffee cup or forgotten dry cleaning might mean that you (or a loved one) are sliding inevitably toward an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. But you should know that while the disease is the most common cause of dementia, or cognitive impairment, late in life, it’s not the only one. Especially if you’re younger than 70 and having cognitive complaints, says Marc Agronin, a geriatric psychiatrist in Miami and author of the 2015 book The Dementia Caregiver, “dementia is often not Alzheimer’s but reflective of depression or substance abuse or medication effects.” If your symptoms concern you, Agronin suggests seeing a specialist for “a good solid medical workup, including a brain scan — preferably an MRI — to ensure that there aren’t any medical factors that are either causing the neurocognitive disorder or worsening it.” He adds that there are a lot of misconceptions about dementia’s causes. Diabetes, for instance, is a big risk factor for dementia — both Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia — but it does not directly cause dementia symptoms. Here are eight of the most common reasons — after Alzheimer’s — for dementia, with information on what you can do about them. 1. Could it be normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH)? Milton Newman had a thriving dental practice in Peekskill, N.Y., but over a period of about 15 years, his memory became fuzzy and he lost his ability to do simple things around the house. Everyone assumed he was experiencing the beg Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression Symptoms

Diabetes And Depression Symptoms

There is a close link between diabetes and depression - in fact depression and mood disorders are the most common psychiatric challenge within the community of diabetic patients. It is not entirely clear why this is the case as this can be a chicken and egg situation which is difficult to clarify: It could be that that depression leads to a poor choice of diet 2010 research found that those with depression were 17% more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes It could be that the diagnosis and management of a chronic condition feels overwhelming 2010 research fund that diabetic patients were 29% more likely to have depression Patients with painful diabetic neuropathy appear to be particularly predisposed to mood disorders It is important to be checked out if you believe you are depressed as this can make the management of diabetes more challenging. Research has shown that You are less likely to take the required medication You will function less well mentally and physically And you are more likely to be off work According to a 2011 study patients with both diabetes and depression have a 52% higher chance of having a stroke or heart attack and a US study in 2015 indicates that the combination leads to a greater risk of dementia. The challenge is that poor management of diabetes can mimic depression symptoms with high or low blood glucose levels producing anxiety, restlessness and fatigue. It’s feared that 75% of diabetic people with depression go undiagnosed as they think depression is part of the overall condition So these are the depression symptoms to look out for: No longer enjoying activities that you used to enjoy Not sleeping or sleeping too much Not feeling hungry or binge eating Unable to concentrate or make decision Feeling weary with low energy levels Feeling pers Continue reading >>

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