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Can Anxiety Cause Symptoms Of Diabetes?

The Shocking Diabetes Trigger That Can Strike Anyone

The Shocking Diabetes Trigger That Can Strike Anyone

It’s the opposite of what most people worry about… Everyone knows about high blood sugar and the devastating effects it can have on one’s health and longevity. But low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can be just as dangerous—and it does not get nearly the attention that it should. Simply put, hypoglycemia occurs when the body does not have enough glucose to use as fuel. It most commonly affects people with type 2 diabetes who take medication that sometimes works too well, resulting in low blood sugar. Who gets overlooked: In other people, hypoglycemia can be a precursor to diabetes that is often downplayed by doctors and/or missed by tests. Having low blood sugar might even make you think that you are far from having diabetes…when, in fact, the opposite is true. Hypoglycemia can also be an underlying cause of anxiety that gets mistakenly treated with psychiatric drugs rather than the simple steps (see below) that can stabilize blood sugar levels. That’s why anyone who seems to be suffering from an anxiety disorder needs to be seen by a doctor who takes a complete medical history and orders blood tests. When a patient comes to me complaining of anxiety, hypoglycemia is one of the first things I test for. What’s the link between hypoglycemia and anxiety? A sudden drop in blood sugar deprives the brain of oxygen. This, in turn, causes the adrenal glands to release adrenaline, the “emergency” hormone, which may lead to agitation, or anxiety, as the body’s fight-or-flight mechanism kicks in. THE DANGERS OF HYPOGLYCEMIA Hypoglycemia has sometimes been called carbohydrate intolerance, because the body’s insulin-releasing mechanism is impaired in a manner similar to what occurs in diabetics. In people without diabetes, hypoglycemia is usually the result of eati Continue reading >>

Anxiety And Depressive Symptoms As Predictors Of All-cause Mortality Among People With Insulin-naïve Type 2 Diabetes: 17-year Follow-up Of The Second Nord-trøndelag Health Survey (hunt2), Norway

Anxiety And Depressive Symptoms As Predictors Of All-cause Mortality Among People With Insulin-naïve Type 2 Diabetes: 17-year Follow-up Of The Second Nord-trøndelag Health Survey (hunt2), Norway

Abstract To examine whether elevated anxiety and/or depressive symptoms are related to all-cause mortality in people with Type 2 diabetes, not using insulin. 948 participants in the community-wide Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey conducted during 1995–97 completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale with subscales of anxiety (HADS-A) and depression (HADS-D). Elevated symptoms were defined as HADS-A or HADS-D ≥8. Participants with type 2 diabetes, not using insulin, were followed until November 21, 2012 or death. Cox regression analyses were used to estimate associations between baseline elevated anxiety symptoms, elevated depressive symptoms and mortality, adjusting for sociodemographic factors, HbA1c, cardiovascular disease and microvascular complications. At baseline, 8% (n = 77/948) reported elevated anxiety symptoms, 9% (n = 87/948) elevated depressive symptoms and 10% (n = 93/948) reported both. After a mean follow-up of 12 years (SD 5.1, range 0–17), 541 participants (57%) had died. Participants with elevated anxiety symptoms only had a decreased mortality risk (unadjusted HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.46–0.96). Adjustment for HbA1c attenuated this relation (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.50–1.07). Those with elevated depression symptoms alone had an increased mortality risk (fully adjusted model HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.05–1.84). Having both elevated anxiety and depressive symptoms was not associated with increased mortality risk (adjusted HR 1.30, 95% CI 0.96–1.74). Elevated depressive symptoms were associated with excess mortality risk in people with Type 2 diabetes not using insulin. No significant association with mortality was found among people with elevated anxiety symptoms. Having both elevated anxiety and depressive symptoms was not associated with mortality. The hypot Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

What Is It? Hypoglycemia is an abnormally low level of blood sugar (blood glucose). Because the brain depends on blood sugar as its primary source of energy, hypoglycemia interferes with the brain's ability to function properly. This can cause dizziness, headache, blurred vision, difficulty concentrating and other neurological symptoms. Hypoglycemia also triggers the release of body hormones, such as epinephrine and norepinephrine. Your brain relies on these hormones to raise blood sugar levels. The release of these hormones causes additional symptoms of tremor, sweating, rapid heartbeat, anxiety and hunger. Hypoglycemia is most common in people with diabetes. For a person with diabetes, hypoglycemia occurs because of too high a dose of diabetic medication, especially insulin, or a change in diet or exercise. Insulin and exercise both lower blood sugar and food raises it. Hypoglycemia is common in people who are taking insulin or oral medications that lower blood glucose, especially drugs in the sulfonylurea group (Glyburide and others). True hypoglycemia with laboratory reports of low blood sugar rarely occurs in people who do not have diabetes. When it does occur outside of diabetes, hypoglycemia can be caused by many different medical problems. A partial list includes: Gastrointestinal surgery, usually involving removal of some part of the stomach. Surgery that removes part of the stomach can alter the normal relationships between digestion and insulin release. "Nissen" surgeries for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux can also result in episodes of hypoglycemia. A pancreatic tumor, called an insulinoma, that secretes insulin A deficiency of growth hormone from the pituitary gland or of cortisol from the adrenal glands. Both of these hormones help to keep blood suga Continue reading >>

Could Stress Give You Diabetes? It's Not Just The Overweight Who Are At Risk, Doctors Warn

Could Stress Give You Diabetes? It's Not Just The Overweight Who Are At Risk, Doctors Warn

The popular image of a patient with type 2 diabetes is someone who's overweight, with a couch-potato lifestyle. It's a stereotype that makes salesman Dave Dowdeswell furious. The father-of-two, now 48, developed the condition at the age of 44 when he had a 32 in waist and weighed only 12 st - almost ideal for his 5 ft 9 in height. As a keen windsurfer and diver who also walked his dog every day, he was physically fit. There was no family history of type 2 diabetes, and he doesn't even have a sweet tooth. In fact, Dave ticked none of the normal risk-factor boxes, such as being overweight or having a waist of 37 in or more. So how did he become one of almost three million people in the UK with type 2? His doctors believe the trigger was stress. In the 12 months before he began to feel unwell, he had witnessed his 19-year-old daughter Gemma being knocked over by a car and breaking her neck after a family meal out; his thriving paint-spraying business had collapsed because of falling trade and teetered on the verge of bankruptcy, and his beloved bulldog died. Then, in November 2010, Dave unexpectedly lost his 70-year-old father to cirrhosis of the liver. 'That really hit me for six. He went into hospital and never came out,' says Dave, who lives in Portsmouth. 'He went downhill so quickly and I couldn't believe it when he died. We were close and it hit me so badly.' Within a week Dave started to feel ill himself. 'I was suddenly needing to get up two or three times a night to have a pee. 'I was also drinking around two pints of orange juice in one go, and I couldn't wait to finish a meal so I could have a drink of water or orange juice as I felt so thirsty. 'We were on a scuba-diving holiday in Egypt at the time, but my wife Adriana said: "As soon as we get home, I think yo Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

People with diabetes have high blood glucose levels caused by a problem with the hormone insulin. The two main types of diabetes are type 1 (insulin dependent) and type 2 (non-insulin dependent). There is no cure, but symptoms can be controlled with diet, exercise and medication. If untreated, high blood glucose levels can result in serious complications. On this page: Diabetes is a chronic condition in which the levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too high. Blood glucose levels are normally regulated by the hormone insulin, which is made by the pancreas. Diabetes occurs when there is a problem with this hormone and how it works in the body. Around 5.1 per cent of Australians aged 18 years or older have diabetes. The risk of diabetes increases with age, from 2.8 per cent in people aged 35 to 44, to 15.0 per cent in those aged 65 to 74. Aboriginal people have one of the highest rates of type 2 diabetes in the world. Glucose in the body The body uses glucose as its main source of energy. Glucose comes from foods that contain carbohydrates, such as potatoes, bread, pasta, rice, fruit and milk. After food is digested, the glucose is released and absorbed into the bloodstream. The glucose in the bloodstream needs to move into body tissues so that cells can use it for energy. Excess glucose is also stored in the liver, or converted to fat and stored in other body tissues. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, which is a gland located just below the stomach. Insulin opens the doors (the glucose channels) that let glucose move from the blood into the body cells. It also allows glucose to be stored in muscle, the liver and other tissues. This is part of a process known as glucose metabolism. In diabetes, either the pancreas can’t make insulin (type 1 diabetes), or Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia

Not to be confused with the opposite disorder, hypoglycemia. Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar (also spelled hyperglycaemia or hyperglycæmia) is a condition in which an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood plasma. This is generally a blood sugar level higher than 11.1 mmol/l (200 mg/dl), but symptoms may not start to become noticeable until even higher values such as 15–20 mmol/l (~250–300 mg/dl). A subject with a consistent range between ~5.6 and ~7 mmol/l (100–126 mg/dl) (American Diabetes Association guidelines) is considered slightly hyperglycemic, while above 7 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) is generally held to have diabetes. For diabetics, glucose levels that are considered to be too hyperglycemic can vary from person to person, mainly due to the person's renal threshold of glucose and overall glucose tolerance. On average however, chronic levels above 10–12 mmol/L (180–216 mg/dL) can produce noticeable organ damage over time. Signs and symptoms[edit] The degree of hyperglycemia can change over time depending on the metabolic cause, for example, impaired glucose tolerance or fasting glucose, and it can depend on treatment.[1] Temporary hyperglycemia is often benign and asymptomatic. Blood glucose levels can rise well above normal and cause pathological and functional changes for significant periods without producing any permanent effects or symptoms. [1] During this asymptomatic period, an abnormality in carbohydrate metabolism can occur which can be tested by measuring plasma glucose. [1] However, chronic hyperglycemia at above normal levels can produce a very wide variety of serious complications over a period of years, including kidney damage, neurological damage, cardiovascular damage, damage to the retina or damage to feet and legs. Diabetic n Continue reading >>

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (gad)

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (gad)

Generalized anxiety disorder facts Anxiety disorders are the most common category of psychiatric diagnoses. The most common anxiety disorders are specific phobias. Besides generalized anxiety disorder, other anxiety disorders include separation anxiety, selective mutism, social anxiety disorder (social phobia), panic disorder, and agoraphobia. Anxiety disorders can also be caused by some medical conditions, medications, or substances. Signs and symptoms of anxiety may be physical (racing heart, shortness of breath, sweating), emotional (panic, feeling worried, stress), behavioral (nervous habits, compulsions), and cognitive (racing thoughts, worries, obsessions). Many of these signs and symptoms are similar to the body's normal "fight-or-flight" response to danger. Children and adolescents may have symptoms of anxiety either similar to or quite different from those of adults, depending on the specific diagnosis and age of the individual. There also seem to be gender-related differences in how many men and women experience and show anxiety. While obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) used to be classified as an anxiety disorder, it is now grouped with other compulsive disorders. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been reclassified as a trauma-related disorder instead of an anxiety disorder. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is an anxiety disorder that is characterized by excessive worries that interfere with the person's life in some way. GAD is quite common, affecting millions of people. While there is no single cause of GAD, there are many factors that increase the risk of developing this disorder. If a medical or mental-health professional suspects that you have GAD, you will likely undergo an extensive medical interview and physical examination. GAD usually requ Continue reading >>

Struggles With Panic Attacks

Struggles With Panic Attacks

First, I want to address a question that Envoy posted on my blog entry from two weeks ago. Envoy asked if I thought that depression was more common in people who have diabetes. The first answer is that I have always believed it is more common, and research has also indicated that it’s twice as likely to occur in people who have diabetes. That is part of the reason I suggest a yearly mental health checkup in conjunction with your annual physical. The percentage of people with diabetes who experience depression is quite significant, in the range of 20%. Hopefully, your health-care professional asks you questions about your moods, energy level, activities, sleep, and connections with other people at appointments. An open discussion of this type can give him or her enough information to begin an assessment for depression. It makes sense that controlling diabetes would be made more difficult if depression is left untreated. However, fewer than 25% of cases of depression in people with diabetes are recognized and treated appropriately. We clearly have a lot of work to do in improving mental health care for people with diabetes. Another mental health issue that has been shown to interfere with people’s diabetes control is panic disorder. Panic disorder is characterized by unpredictable, excessive fear or terror accompanied by a number of physical symptoms. Symptoms may include pounding heart, palpitations, sweating, difficulty breathing, numbness or tingling sensations, chest pain, dizziness, nausea, trembling or shaking, and chills or hot flashes. Many of these are similar to symptoms of hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, and they could also resemble a heart attack. Therefore, a person may overreact (by visiting the emergency room, for example) or, thinking that his symp Continue reading >>

Can Hypoglycemia Cause Anxiety?

Can Hypoglycemia Cause Anxiety?

Diabetes and issues with blood sugar are all over the news. Every day there are more and more reports of the effects that foods and chemicals have on your long term health, and it's not uncommon to worry about developing these types of problems. That's why so many people with anxiety wonder if they have hypoglycemia - or low blood sugar. Hypoglycemia occurs when there is not enough glucose in the body, starving the brain. This article explores whether or not hypoglycemia may be causing your anxiety and how. You Can Manage Hypoglycemia Anxiety Even if your anxiety is related to your blood sugar levels, you can control it with the right anxiety treatments. Take my anxiety test to look at the symptoms of your anxiety and recommend an effective treatment option. Worried About Hypoglycemia? See a Doctor Your blood sugar is one of the easiest things to diagnose. You can take a simple blood test after fasting for 12 hours and have results in no time. So if you're worried about your blood sugar, talk to your doctor. You should also take my free anxiety test to find out more about your anxiety. Health Causes of Anxiety Most people that suffer from anxiety worry that it has a physical cause. In fact, one of the main problems affecting those with anxiety attacks is the constant, nagging feeling that the physical symptoms are too severe to be something as "harmless" as anxiety, and they often look for other explanations for why they may be feeling these symptoms. First, you need to remember that anxiety causes you to think this way. Anxiety alters thought processes so that "worst case scenario" thinking is more common. In addition, anxiety symptoms can be incredibly severe, and genuinely mimic the symptoms of major health disorders. As much as it may seem hard to believe, your symp Continue reading >>

Warning Signs And Symptoms Diabetes By Type

Warning Signs And Symptoms Diabetes By Type

The main symptoms of diabetes are increased urination (polyuria), thirst ( polydipsia) and tiredness. Common symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes: Excessive thirst Increased urination (sometimes as often as every hour) Unexpected weight loss Nausea, perhaps vomiting Blurred vision In women, frequent vaginal infections Yeast infections (thrush) Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching skin, especially in the groin or vaginal area. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can develop quickly, over weeks or sometimes days. Type 2 diabetes often doesn’t cause symptoms and is identified on routine screening. Acanthosis nigricans as a warning sign This is a condition that results in the darkening and thickening of certain areas of the skin, especially in the skin folds. The skin becomes light brown or brown and is sometimes slightly raised and described as velvety. Most often the condition, which typically looks like a small wart, appears on the sides or back of the neck, the armpits, under the breast, and groin. Occasionally the top of the knuckles will have a particularly unusual appearance. Acanthosis nigricans usually affects people who are very overweight. There is no cure for acanthosis nigricans, but losing weight may improve the condition. Acanthosis nigricans usually precedes diabetes. There are other conditions that are also known to cause acanthosis nigricans, including acromegaly and Cushing syndrome. Acanthosis nigricans is a skin manifestation of insulin resistance in most people. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes is a condition characterised by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that is first recognised during pregnancy. The condition occurs in approximately 14% of all pregnant women. It is usually diagnosed during routine screening before it causes any symptoms. Seek Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Issue Or Anxiety Disorder Causing Panic Attacks?

Blood Sugar Issue Or Anxiety Disorder Causing Panic Attacks?

8 years ago I wonder if you could go to a free clinic for a simple fasting blood test? You would fast for 12 hours and just get have them test your morning sugar levels to see where you are right now. Do you have a friend who is diabetic? They could use a new needle and give you a little test. Did you have a childhood where you have a parent who didn't make you feel very safe, like one who had panic attacks, traumatic stress syndrome, or lost a parent at a young age? That can also cause panic attacks. It's hard for anyone on here to diagnose you, not knowing your situation, as we are not doctors or therapists. Anxiety can also come from taking certain medications. If you take any, check for side effects. 8 years ago The mental and physical feelings a diabetic can get when the blood sugar goes up suddenly,like after a starchy meal, can sometimes mimic an anxiety attack in being slightly disoriented, unstable in walking, totally brain fried, or the opposite after an hour or so, very sleepy and lethargic. Likewise, when blood sugar drops -- usually several hours after a large meal with not much protein and having a lot of starch, a panic feeling can result. If this happens and you haven't eaten for a while, try 4 oz. of orange juice or just a teaspoon of sugar under your tongue and see if the attack goes away in 15 minutes. This will be a big clue that your "attack" may really be sugar related. Keep a record of when the attacks hit you in relation to your previous meal. Write down what you ate and how long afterwards the attack hit. Also write down any stresses you are feeling. Sometimes just stomping around the house and yellng out loud at the furniture can disapate the attack. Also breathing regularly and slowly or exhaling into a paper bag and rebreathing your exhaled c Continue reading >>

Dry Mouth At Night, Causes, Anxiety, Diabetes, While Sleeping, Constant, Home Remedies, Get Rid, Treat

Dry Mouth At Night, Causes, Anxiety, Diabetes, While Sleeping, Constant, Home Remedies, Get Rid, Treat

Dry mouth is a well-known condition that frequently occurs at night. It is caused when the salivary glands do not produce enough moisture to keep the mouth wet. Saliva is essential as it helps the mouth to naturally combat the acids and bacteria that cause tooth decay, gum disease, and bad breath. An absence of saliva during the night is not only uncomfortable, but it can also disturb sleep and negatively affect oral health. Symptoms of Dry Mouth at Night There are common symptoms of dry mouth at night which includes: Frequently waking up in the middle of night to drink water. Waking up in the morning with a dry mouth. Dry lips and throat in the morning. Thick, stringy or foamy saliva in the morning. A constant sore throat. Burning or cracked tongue. Halitosis or bad breath. Dry Mouth at Night Causes A good night’s sleep is important for good health, but that peaceful slumber can be difficult to achieve if you frequently wake up with dry mouth. The causes of xerostomia, the medical term for dry mouth, can vary, but during the night time hours. Lack of saliva is most often caused by sleeping with your mouth open or snoring. Emotional causes, such as stress, and side effects to medications can also play a factor. In fact, research has it that more than 400 medications, both over-the-counter and prescription, list dry mouth as a possible adverse side effect. Some of the causes of dry mouth at night may include the following: Medications Several medications, including many over-the-counter drugs, produce dry mouth as a side effect. Among the more likely types to cause problems are some of the drugs used to treat depression, nerve pain and anxiety, as well as some antihistamines, decongestants, muscle relaxants and pain medications. Aging The aging process doesn’t necess Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Hypoglycemia Anxiety

How To Deal With Hypoglycemia Anxiety

I have strong memories of hypoglycemia anxiety from my early days of living with Type 1 diabetes. I would wake up anxious throughout the night. I was dreaming. I had always hated math, but after weeks of constant carb counting, recording my blood glucose levels, and noting my insulin doses, I had numbers in my head all night. That made me anxious, and so did the fear of hypoglycemia. Sometimes early in the morning, my blood sugar would drop low, making me shaky and sweaty. Those are the symptoms of a panic attack, but also of low blood sugar. Every day people with diabetes (PWD) who use insulin risk hypoglycemia (a low blood sugar level). Each time they check their blood glucose, PWD have to examine the reading and decide how to proceed. We are balancing the need to maintain good blood glucose control with the fear of hypoglycemia. This fear is well founded. Hypoglycemia is not just unpleasant and embarrassing- it can be fatal. I counsel people with Type 1 diabetes, and one of the most stressful parts of diabetes for many people is the experience of being hypoglycemic. I have met a number of people who let their blood sugar levels run high in order to have a break from the lows. Many of them live with substantial guilt about this coping strategy. They often worry about the long-term effects of their elevated blood glucose levels. The fact that they choose the guilt and worry over the risk of going low shows how intensely they fear hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia anxiety can diminish their quality of life, and often results in an ongoing elevated blood glucose level that causes other health issues. However, we can treat hypoglycemia anxiety and find the courage and motivation to maintain good blood glucose control. There are effective methods to reduce and manage anxiety. Cog Continue reading >>

The Emotional Side Of Diabetes

The Emotional Side Of Diabetes

Dealing with diabetes puts a lot of attention on blood glucose monitoring and insulin and medications—and those are important, of course. But there is an emotional side to diabetes and effects on your mental health that should be addressed, too. Diabetes interrupts your workday when you have to check your blood glucose. Diabetes means you can't just grab food whenever you want—you have to plan for it. Diabetes prolongs getting ready in the morning as you wash and inspect your feet. Diabetes frustrates you when your taste buds cry out for a pastry instead of an apple. Diabetes makes you worry about your future. All of the time, effort, money, and stress interrupts your emotional stability and introduces emotional complications—and it's okay to be frustrated or overwhelmed or scared. Diabetes and "Being in Control" Let's face it: most of us like being in control, and we don't like feeling that anything is out of our control. When it comes to diabetes, you can feel simultaneously in control and out of control. Out of control: Because of how diabetes affects your body, it is possible to feel that nothing is in your control anymore. You can't eat what you want when you want. You have to take medications or give yourself injections. You can start, perhaps, to feel that your body isn't your own anymore. How to counteract that "out of control" feeling: Taking a step back and an objective look at the situation may help. You can say to yourself, "Yes, diabetes makes me do these things, but diabetes does not run my life." A mantra along those lines—repeated at moments when you're feeling particularly out of control—can help. Also, you can do a mental mind shift: all these steps you're taking to manage your diabetes are actually proactive, healthy steps. You are taking co Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

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