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Can Almonds Reduce Blood Sugar?

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Last year everyone was talking about how good nuts are for diabetes. This year they’re just as good, and new research shows it. If you aren’t eating lots of nuts yet, I’m going to try to get you started. Nuts are great because they are seeds and fruit combined. They are literally full of life. According to Wikipedia, while fruit seeds are separate from the fruit itself, in nuts (according to the botanical definition of the term), the seeds and fruit (which the seed will use to grow if planted) are bound up together, making them among the most nutritious foods on the planet. New research from Louisiana State University found that people who regularly eat tree nuts — including almonds, macadamias, pistachios, walnuts, and cashews — have lower risks for Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Their C-reactive protein (a major marker of inflammation) levels were lower. Their HDL (“good cholesterol”) levels were higher. According to The Huffington Post, the study was funded by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research & Education Foundation. Study results often show what the funders wanted them to show, but I tend to believe this one. It appeared in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition and was based on analyzing data from NHANES, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the gold standard for this kind of study in the US. This research confirms dozens of other studies. As Web Editor Diane Fennell wrote in 2011, “Nuts are well known for their nutritional benefits, including their high levels of heart-healthy fats, protein, antioxidants…, plant sterols (natural substances found in plants that can help lower cholesterol), fiber, and minerals.” Nutritionist Amy Campbell explained in this article that nuts are good because they h Continue reading >>

Almonds Can Improve Diabetes Control

Almonds Can Improve Diabetes Control

Two new studies into the potential health benefits of eating almonds have supported evidence that they can help people with type 2 diabetes to maintain their blood glucose and cholesterol levels.… One of the studies, published in the journal, Metabolism, showed that consuming an ounce of almonds straight before eating a high-starch meal brought a 30 per cent reduction in post-meal glucose levels for patients with type 2 diabetes, compared with a 7 per cent reduction for non-diabetics. In addition, after overnight fasting, patients with type 2 diabetes whose meal contained almonds had a lowering of blood sugar levels after their meal. The effect of regular almond consumption on blood glucose levels for people with type 2 diabetes was also investigated, with the daily consumption of one ounce of almonds over a 12-week period being associated with a 4 per cent reduction in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and the same reduction in body mass index (BMI). The second study, which was published in Diabetes Care, revealed that nuts such as almonds could help to maintain healthy levels of blood glucose and cholesterol for both men and post-menopausal women who suffer from type 2 diabetes. Karen Lapsley, chief science officer for the Almond Board of California, commented “Those with diabetes are faced with many challenges with their disease management, which is why we are always energized when new research is published that supports our understanding of almonds’ role in helping alleviate some of the difficulties.” Diabetes UK, Diabetes Care, Oct. 2011 Continue reading >>

More Proof Of The Benefits Of Almonds For Diabetes Control

More Proof Of The Benefits Of Almonds For Diabetes Control

Two new studies into the potential health benefits of eating almonds have supported evidence that they can help people with type 2 diabetes to maintain their blood glucose and cholesterol levels. One of the studies, published in the journal Metabolism, showed that consuming an ounce of almonds straight before eating a high-starch meal brought a 30 per cent reduction in post-meal glucose levels for patients with type 2 diabetes, compared with a 7 per cent reduction for non-diabetics. In addition, after overnight fasting, patients with type 2 diabetes whose meal contained almonds had a lowering of blood sugar levels after their meal. The effect of regular almond consumption on blood glucose levels for people with type 2 diabetes was also investigated, with the daily consumption of one ounce of almonds over a 12-week period being associated with a 4 per cent reduction in haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and the same reduction in body mass index (BMI). The second study, which was published in Diabetes Care, revealed that nuts such as almonds could help to maintain healthy levels of blood glucose and cholesterol for both men and post-menopausal women who suffer from type 2 diabetes. Karen Lapsley, chief science officer for the Almond Board of California, commented "Those with diabetes are faced with many challenges with their disease management, which is why we are always energized when new research is published that supports our understanding of almonds' role in helping alleviate some of the difficulties." Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Prevent dangerous blood sugar spikes with the help of these foods. Almonds Almonds provide a healthy, low-carb mix of monounsaturated fats plus magnesium, which is believed to be instrumental in carbohydrate metabolism. A large study out of Harvard University found that high daily magnesium intake reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 33 percent. Therefore, including more magnesium-rich foods like almonds, pumpkin seeds, spinach, and Swiss chard in your diet is a smart move. Continue reading >>

5 Foods That Lower Your Blood Sugar Quickly

5 Foods That Lower Your Blood Sugar Quickly

Eating a whole foods, plant-based diet is one of the simplest ways to manage your blood sugar and elevate your health to a whole new level. Your blood sugar controls several different hormonal responses in the body, all of which contribute to your energy, your mood, and even your hunger levels. Healthy blood sugars are also vital to prevent or manage Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hypoglycemia. Eating a diet that supports your blood sugar can also help prevent obesity. Plant-based foods are jam-packed with fiber, which is the main reason they’re so supportive of blood sugar levels. Fiber slows down the release of sugar within the bloodstream, which helps steady insulin levels. This prevents those blood sugar “ups and downs” that foods high in refined sugars, animal foods, and highly- processed foods can cause. To take care of your blood sugar, all you have to do is prioritize higher fiber sources of whole foods versus foods lower in fiber, such as foods with refined or added sugars, animal products (which dramatically raise insulin), and most processed foods. To keep things easy and simple, focus on eating foods that do support your blood sugar instead of focusing on those that don’t. As you’ll see, there are some pretty delicious plant-based foods and meals you can make with them that support your blood sugar. These foods will keep you energized, satisfied, provide your body with vitamins, minerals, fiber, healthy fats, and even some protein too! 1. Magnesium-Rich Leafy Greens All leafy greens such as: kale, spinach, romaine, arugula, collards, turnip greens, all lettuces, Swiss chard, dandelion greens, and any other green you can think of, are absolutely wonderful for your blood sugar. However, a few are especially rich in magnesium, which is acts like a Continue reading >>

Almonds Help To Control Blood Sugar

Almonds Help To Control Blood Sugar

Almonds may improve the control of blood sugar levels and eliminate sugar spikes after eating, says new research that may have implications for diabetes and heart health. Almonds may improve the control of blood sugar levels and eliminate sugar spikes after eating, says new research from Canada that may have implications for diabetes and heart health. "We found that eating almonds can have a significant impact in blunting the glycaemic and insulin responses of the body when fed with a carbohydrate meal," said study co-author Cyril Kendall from the University of Toronto. "Almonds have already been found to reduce LDL cholesterol levels and contain a variety of important nutrients," he said. "This new research shows that incorporating almonds in the diet may help in the management of blood glucose levels and the onset of such illnesses as diabetes, while promoting a healthy heart." The study, published in the current issue of the Journal of Nutrition, looked at the effects of five meals, eaten on five different occasions, on the blood glucose, insulin and antioxidant levels of 15 healthy volunteers (eight women). The meals were: two control test meals with white bread, test meal with white bread plus 60 grams of almonds, test meal with parboiled rice, and test meal with instant mashed potatoes. All meals were balanced for carbohydrate, fat, and protein, using butter and cheese. Lead researcher David Jenkins reported that glycaemic indices for the rice and almond meals were significantly less than for the potato meal (38 and 55 vs. 94, respectively). Serum protein thiol concentrations were measured to gauge the level of oxidative protein damage increased levels associated with less damage. Jenkins and his co-workers report that, following the almond meal, thiol concentrat Continue reading >>

Can Nuts Affect Blood Sugar?

Can Nuts Affect Blood Sugar?

If you worry about your blood sugar, carbohydrate-rich foods usually are the main culprit. Carbohydrates, once digested, become sugar, or glucose, and increase your blood sugar levels. Breads, pasta, breakfast cereals, rice, potatoes, cookies, muffins, sugar and soft drinks. Nuts generally have a low carbohydrate content, but could affect your blood sugar depending on how they are prepared or how many you have in a serving. Video of the Day A serving of 1 ounce of almonds contain 6.1 grams of carbohydrates, of which 3.5 grams are fiber, which means that only 2.6 grams of carbohydrates are available to raise your blood sugar levels. Fiber does not raise your blood sugar levels, but they are part of the total carbohydrate content. Subtracting fiber from the total carbohydrates gives you a better idea of the amount of carbohydrates that can truly affect your blood sugar. In this case, 1 ounce of almonds contains the equivalent of available carbohydrates found in 1/2 teaspoons of sugar, which is not likely to significantly affect your blood sugar levels. If you have a large serving, or about 1 cup of almonds, you will be getting 31 grams of total carbohydrates and 17.4 grams of fiber, which corresponds to 13.6 grams of available carbohydrates. This amount of carbohydrates correspond to the equivalent of almost a slice of bread and could raise your blood sugar levels to the same extent. Other raw and roasted nuts have similar nutritional value. Sugar-Coated Nuts Some nuts are coated with sugar, honey or other high-carb coating, which can significantly influence how these nuts will affect your blood sugar levels. For example, 1 ounce of honey roasted almonds has 7.9 grams of carbohydrates and 3.9 grams of fiber, or 4 grams of available carbohydrates. In other words, honey roa Continue reading >>

10 Foods And Drinks To Help Manage Blood Sugar

10 Foods And Drinks To Help Manage Blood Sugar

Delicious and surprising diabetes friendly food options are as close as your kitchen. When you have prediabetes or diabetes, a healthy diabetes meal plan is key to managing your blood sugar. Sometimes it can be tricky to know which foods and drinks are the best choices, but these 10 picks can help keep your numbers in check. 1. Beans (Of Any Kind!) Whether they're lentils, kidney, pinto, black or garbanzo, beans are a low glycemic index food. That means their carbohydrates are gradually released so they're less likely to cause blood sugar spikes. They're so beneficial that one recent study found that eating a daily cup of beans for three months as part of a low-glycemic index diet lowered HbA1c by half a percentage point. Try it: Swap in beans for half the meat in tacos or your favorite chili recipe. 2. Apples You might think that there's no room in a diabetic meal plan for fruit, but apples are also low glycemic. Aiming for foods that are low or medium on the glycemic index is one way to manage blood sugar levels. And eating an apple a day has its benefits – they are high in fiber, vitamin C as well as fat-free! Not to mention a portable and easy snack option. Try it: Toss an apple in your lunch bag or grab one between meals. Bake them and add cinnamon for warm treat. 3. Almonds These crunchy nuts are rich in magnesium, a mineral that may help your body use its own insulin more effectively. Try working more almonds into your diet — one ounce (about 23 whole nuts) supplies nearly 20 percent of your daily dose of this blood sugar-balancing mineral. Plus, nuts like almonds are high in monounsaturated fatty acids, protein, and fiber, which makes them a great way to help manage blood glucose levels. Try it: For healthy snacking on-the-go, pack one-ounce portions of almo Continue reading >>

Eat Nuts To Control Blood Sugar & Fat

Eat Nuts To Control Blood Sugar & Fat

Nuts contain unsaturated fats, protein and a range of vitamins and minerals that lower cholesterol, inflammation and insulin resistance. A recent study suggests that you should include at least 50 grams of almonds, cashews, chestnuts, walnuts or pistachios in your diet to control blood fats (triglycerides) and sugars - two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome. The study was published in the journal BMJ Open. Tree nuts tend to healthier than others. Family of tree nuts includes almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, hazelnuts, hickory nuts, macadamia nuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, and walnuts amongst others. A person develops metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors - low levels of "good" cholesterol, high triglycerides, high blood pressure, high blood sugar and extra weight around the waist. By including at least 50 grams of almonds, cashews, chestnuts, walnuts or pistachios in your diet, blood fats (triglycerides) and sugars can be controlled effectively. "Eating tree nuts is good for lowering risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes," said John Sievenpiper, a physician at St Michael's Hospital in Toronto. However, the greatest benefit can be reaped only if they are consumed daily. The study found a "modest decrease" in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet. To reach this conclusion, Sievenpiper screened 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals and found 49 randomised control trials with 2,000 participants. Sievenpiper says that the largest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He also a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Almonds: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Almonds: What You Need To Know

Almonds may be bite-sized, but these nuts pack a big nutritional punch. They’re an excellent source of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin E and manganese. They’re also a good source of: In fact, “almonds are actually one of the highest protein sources among tree nuts,” said Peggy O’Shea-Kochenbach, MBA, RDN, LDN, a dietitian and consultant in Boston. Almonds, while nutritionally beneficial for most people, are especially good for people with diabetes. “Research has shown that almonds may reduce the rise in glucose (blood sugar) and insulin levels after meals,” said O’Shea-Kochenbach. In a 2011 study, researchers found that the consumption of 2 ounces of almonds was associated with lower levels of fasting insulin and fasting glucose. This amount consists of about 45 almonds. The key in this study is that the participants reduced their caloric intake by enough to accommodate the addition of the almonds so that no extra calories were consumed. A 2010 study found that eating almonds may help increase insulin sensitivity in people with prediabetes. Almonds and magnesium Almonds are high in magnesium. Experimental studies have suggested that dietary magnesium intake may reduce a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In a 2012 study, researchers found that long-term high blood sugar levels may cause a loss of magnesium via urine. Because of this, people with diabetes may be at a greater risk for magnesium deficiency. Learn more about mineral deficiencies. Almonds and your heart Almonds may reduce your risk of heart disease. This is important for people with diabetes. According to the World Heart Federation, people with diabetes are at a higher risk of heart disease. “Almonds are high in monounsaturated fat,” said O’Shea-Kochenbach, Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Snacking On Almonds Could Reduce Severity Of Type 2 Symptoms | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes Diet: Snacking On Almonds Could Reduce Severity Of Type 2 Symptoms | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes diet: Almonds could help ward off symptoms such as fatigue and blurry vision Type 2 diabetes sufferers with raised cholesterol levels experienced benefits to heart health when they ate more almonds A study published this year in the Journal of Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders discovered that a group of type 2 diabetes sufferers with raised cholesterol levels experienced benefits to heart health when they ate more almonds. Researchers found that when the sufferers substituted whole, raw almonds for 20 per cent of their calorie intake their heart health improved. Heart health can be at risk in diabetes sufferers, with heart disease a complication of the condition. Managing blood sugar levels effectively can help protect the heart. Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. People should be aware signs and symptoms of diabetes are not always obvious and the condition is often diagnosed during GP check ups. Diabetes diet: Sufferers are at an increased risk of heart disease Additionally, another study, also published this year, in the journal Nutrition and Metabolism looked at the effect of adding 60g of almonds into the diet of a group of type 2 diabetes sufferers. They discovered that the nut lowered fasting serum glucose levels - which measures blood sugar levels after fasting - by six per cent. It also reduced haemoglobin A1c - which measures average blood sugar levels over a two to three month period - by three per cent. The findings suggested that consuming almonds as part of a healthy balanced diet could help improve long-term blood sugar levels. Diabetes diet: Almonds can help manage long-term blood sugar level Continue reading >>

The Best Nuts For Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, And More

The Best Nuts For Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, And More

When you’re looking for a satisfying diabetes-friendly snack, it’s hard to beat nuts. “Nuts are a super snack food for people with diabetes because they’re the total package — low in carbs and high in protein, fiber, and healthy fat — and they create a feeling of fullness,” says Cheryl Mussatto, RD, founder of Eat Well to Be Well in Osage City, Kansas. Nuts: A Good Choice for Diabetes and Your Heart The healthy fat in nuts protects your ticker, says Melissa Joy Dobbins, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. That’s important because people with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to die of heart disease than those without it, according to the American Heart Association. Heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats found in nuts can lower your LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, Mussatto says. “At the same time, nuts also raise levels of ‘good,’ or HDL, cholesterol,” she says. “This cholesterol acts sort of like a sanitation worker, removing cholesterol from the tissues for disposal, which prevents plaque buildup in the arteries.” What’s more, nuts help regulate blood sugar, which makes them a better option to reach for than, say, pretzels, when afternoon hunger strikes, Mussatto says. Many kinds of nuts have this effect: Almonds have been shown to slow down the blood sugar response when eaten with carbohydrate-rich foods, according to a small study published in the journal Metabolism that focused on healthy people without the disease. A study published in March 2011 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found similar results for pistachios when eaten by healthy volunteers. For those people already diagnosed with diabetes, regularly eating tree nuts can also improve blood sugar management, Continue reading >>

6 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

6 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

A healthy lifestyle of exercise with a well-balanced diet should go a long way towards keeping blood sugar levels even. For example, for maintaining good blood sugar levels, my doctor recommends a diet rich in healthy protein and fats, lower in carbohydrates, and plenty of low-carb produce. But beyond the general principles, there are some wonderful foods that specifically help keep blood sugar levels in a healthy place. Here are six of them. Tea: Animal studies have shown that black, green, white and oolong teas all help with blood sugar control. One study found that after drinking six cups of tea a day for eight weeks, patient’s blood sugar levels were 15-20 percent lower than before! Drinking tea is a beautiful and traditional practice that could also have a positive role in healthy blood sugar levels. Dark chocolate: One important aspect of good blood sugar control is how your body handles insulin. Dark chocolate was found to reduce insulin resistance, a vital part of keeping healthy blood sugar levels. This is good news for chocolate lovers — just make sure that it is a truly dark chocolate. Vinegar: In a surprising study at Arizona State University, vinegar was shown to have the same effect as a leading diabetes medication! In the study, patients were given a vinegar drink to consume before a meal rich in carbohydrates. Starting a meal with a salad with a vinegar dressing could be a good choice instead. Nuts: When diabetic patients swapped carbohydrate-rich snacks with nuts instead, they were able to lower their general blood sugar levels over time. Nuts are a healthy source of protein, as well as many nutrients (such as vitamin E and selenium), so they are a smart addition to a healthy lifestyle. Chia seeds: This tiny seed is native to Southern Mexico and Cen Continue reading >>

Antioxidant-rich Almonds May Help In Blood Sugar Control

Antioxidant-rich Almonds May Help In Blood Sugar Control

Antioxidant-rich almonds may help in blood sugar control Almonds may improve the control of blood sugar levels and eliminate 'sugar spikes' after eating, says new research from Canada that may have implications for diabetes and heart health. "We found that eating almonds can have a significant impact in blunting the glycemic and insulin responses of the body when fed with a carbohydrate meal," said study co-author Cyril Kendall from the University of Toronto. "Almonds have already been found to reduce LDL cholesterol levels and contain a variety of important nutrients," he said. "This new research shows that incorporating almonds in the diet may help in the management of blood glucose levels and the onset of such illnesses as diabetes, while promoting a healthy heart." Cardiovascular disease (CVD) causes almost 50 per cent of deaths in Europe, and is reported to cost the EU economy an estimated 169bn ($202bn) per year. The study, published in the current issue of the Journal of Nutrition, looked at the effects of five meals, eaten on five different occasions, on the blood glucose, insulin and antioxidant levels of 15 healthy volunteers (eight women). The meals were: two control test meals with white bread, test meal with white bread plus 60 grams of almonds, test meal with parboiled rice, and test meal with instant mashed potatoes. All meals were balanced for carbohydrate, fat, and protein, using butter and cheese. Lead researcher David Jenkins reported that glycaemic indices for the rice and almond meals were significantly less than for the potato meal (38 and 55 versus 94, respectively). Serum protein thiol concentrations were measured to gauge the level of oxidative protein damage - increased levels associated with less damage. Jenkins and his co-workers report that Continue reading >>

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