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Can A Type 2 Diabetic Get A Tattoo?

Diabetes And Tattoos: Case Study And Guidance

Diabetes And Tattoos: Case Study And Guidance

A 29-year-old woman with insulin-dependent diabetes noted a painful erosion at the site of the tattoo which she had gotten 7 days before. A culture isolated staphylococcus aureus confirming the clinical impression of staph. This diagnosis was not entirely unexpected, since patients with diabetes mellitus are predisposed to staphylococcal infection. An oral cephalosporin cleared the cellulitis, leaving the tattoo a little distorted. The tattoo artist blamed the cellulitis on the patient’s failure to take proper care of the wound site. However, the lack of recurrent infections in the patient’s history indicates that she probably was not a carrier, and the infection grew from a new source. Tattoos are very popular, especially with teens. But the tattoo application process and aftercare, which can be long, painful and stressful, can create some problems for our diabetes patients. Blood pressure and blood sugar levels can both rise while a tattoo is being applied, and high blood sugar levels can also complicate the healing process, increasing the risk of infection. Other things to consider before getting a tattoo include…. Tattooist quality The tattoo studio should be licensed and/or accredited. The patients can also research the company’s reputation, and hygiene and safety practices. Safety and awareness The tattooist should be informed of the patient’s diabetes so they can tailor both the procedure and aftercare information. Placement Certain areas should be avoided including those with poor circulation, such as: Buttocks Shins Ankles Feet Common insulin injection sites such as arms, abdomen and thighs. Tattoos in these places usually take longer to heal, which can lead to complications (e.g. infection). Other Risks Allergic reactions – reaction to the substanc Continue reading >>

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Get Tattooed?

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Get Tattooed?

Posted On 15 Nov 2011 | Updated On 15 Nov 2011 Is it Safe for Diabetics to Get Tattooed? Image courtesy: Thinkstockphotos/ Getty images Tattooing is an increasingly popular form of permanent body art that uses needles to inject ink under the skin. However, if you are diabetic and wish to get tattooed, think again because unless and until you have a good control over the disease before you go under the needle there could be complications in the healing process. Dr Apratim Goel, dermatologist, Goel Cutis Skin Clinic says, If a diabetic wishes to get tattooed, there is nothing wrong in that. But theyve got to be fastidious about their disease management and have good control over their blood glucose levels. Otherwise, a tattoo could be downright dangerous. So, what determines whether or not a diabetic has control? A simple blood test called haemoglobin A1C levels can be monitored. The result is the best indicator of how well that person is managing their diabetes. If a diabetic wants a tattoo and their last A1C tests was under 8%, and they dont have neurological problems, heart disease, or kidney damage, getting a tattoo should be safe. They just need to keep it clean and continue to keep their blood glucose levels in range In case of high sugar levels, the tattoo cant heal quickly, it can get infected, which can lead to gangrene and even heart disease, she adds. If proper precautions are not taken, there is a risk of infection and complications. According to Dr Goel, these include allergic reactions, skin infections, other skin problems (like keloids) and diseases. Diabetics specifically risk problems with wound healing and infection. So your blood sugar level is under control and you have decided to get tattooed, but to avoid complications, you must carefully select the Continue reading >>

Tattoos & T1d

Tattoos & T1d

People with Type 1 diabetes often wonder whether or not getting a tattoo is a safe option for them. We have good news – you can safely get “inked,” but just like anyone else, there is certain protocol and things to keep in mind to ensure that you have the best tattoo experience possible. Standard Safety Precautions Find a licensed/accredited tattoo parlor with experienced artists. Be certain that the needle being used is brand new and sterile. Make sure the artist autoclaves their machine between customers. Ink pots should be disposable. Ask your tattoo artist to put a temporary sticker/rendering of your tattoo on your body before committing to the permanent ink, to be sure that it is exactly what you want! T1D-Specific Risks Healing time According to many tattoo artists and doctors, the only hesitation with regards to a person with diabetes getting a tattoo has to do with the overall healing time. If your diabetes it not well managed, the body will take much longer to heal. It is important to make sure that your A1C is within a healthy range before considering getting your tattoo. Infection In addition to healing time, poorly managed diabetes can put your tattoo site at a much higher risk for infection. Regardless of your A1C, it is important to keep an eye on the tattoo as it heals, and follow the after-care instructions given to you by your tattoo artist. Tattoo locations Certain areas on the body can be trickier than others for tattoo placement if you have poor blood circulation, which makes them more susceptible to infection. Some examples are: feet, shins, ankles, and buttocks. Check your blood sugar! Depending on the size and detail of your tattoo, your appointment could last quite a while. Be sure to bring your blood sugar meter, CGM, insulin, snacks, quic Continue reading >>

6 Tattooing Tips For People With Type 1

6 Tattooing Tips For People With Type 1

A tattoo aficionado with Type 1 shares his experience on getting some ink done. I wanted to get a tattoo, but people discouraged me from doing it because of my Type 1 diabetes. The naysayers told me that we didn’t heal well enough, that we got infections too easily, that there was just too much risk. But then I began noticing people with diabetes-related tattoos. Some people were getting them on their wrists in place of MedicAlert bracelets. Others were getting more elaborate tattoos on other parts of their bodies. I learned about Darren Brass, a Miami tattoo artist with Type 1 diabetes. I read in Diabetes Mine about a columnist’s tattoo. Apparently we could get inked. sponsor Of course, as with everything in life, people with diabetes have some additional things to think about when it comes to tattoos. There are risks involved, as a tattoo is an open wound. Some people with diabetes heal slower than others, making the open wound more prone for infection. Many of us also deal with poor circulation, making tattoos on areas furthest from the heart a little more risky. After doing my research, I decided to get a diabetes-related tattoo of my own. At first I thought it would be a great idea to get a MedicAlert tattoo. But as I thought about it more, I decided a more elaborate diabetes-related tattoo would be a way to own my diabetes. No hiding, no ignoring, no running away, it would be a constant reminder to me. This is what I did to make sure my first tattoo went smoothly: -Made sure my A1C score was less than 7.0. -Made sure my 14-day blood sugar average was below 140 mg/dL. -Got my doctor’s approval before going under the pen. -Made sure I picked the right artist, one who had a good reputation and a clean parlor. -Brought a snack and checked my blood sugar at least Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes & Tattoos

Type 2 Diabetes & Tattoos

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I have both. Here's my story and then a quick question at the end. I am a tattoo artist apprentice. I have been tattooing for a year & a half now. In this time period I have been tattooed 19 times in 15 months. ALL of my tattoos have healed within 8-14 days. I was diagnosed in September of this year with type 2 diabetes. Looking back.... I have shown symptoms of diabetes for about 3 years. Drinking TONS of water, going to the bathroom alot, getting up in the middle of the night, exhaustion, tired all the time. I just put the symptoms in a category of "I work ALOT." Two & three jobs at a time. I am currently taking 1500mg Metformin ER and also I have Osteoarthritis and take 4 Tylenol Arthritis a day. Since I have been taking the drugs.... my tattoos don't heal right. I was tattooed twice since DX'ed. The first tattoo was the same day that I was DX'ed. Line work & black shading. It healed within 8 days. Three weeks later I was tattooed in the same spot with all of the color. It has been a month and it is still not completely healed. I also got a scratch on my hand three weeks ago.... it's still not completely healed. This has never happened to me before. Diabetes just doesn't start the day you get diagnosed, Right? I brought this up to my Dr & he said it's cause I don't have my sugar under control. He said he would look into it when I go back for my 3 month check up, but that's not until January. I am friends with a Dialasys Nurse & she said it may be because of the drug making my blood too thin and if it's not taken care of, I could be put on dialasys. Did my first and second tattoos this year Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Tattoos: The Only 2 Things You Need To Know

Diabetes & Tattoos: The Only 2 Things You Need To Know

Diabetes & Tattoos: The ONLY 2 Things You Need to Know Diabetics cant or shouldnt get tattoos would likely be uttered from the same person who would say people with diabetes cant or shouldnt eat carbs. Not only is it an ignorant, projected opinion filled with misinformation, but it is simply incorrect. For some odd reason, people with diabetes get treated like we have leprosy and get told we cant do anything and that gets pretty frustrating at times especially because it is the furthest thing from the truth! Getting a tattoo is a personal choice and if you decide to get a tattoo, diabetes or no diabetes, you need to make sure of the following: The tattoo shop is accredited, licensed, up-to-date legally, and clean The tattoo artist has good reviews not only of the quality of his or her work (no one wants a bad tat, right?) but the healing process You are willing to 100% adhere to the healing procedure as directed by your artist There are many in-home, or street tattoo artists that might be cheaper but never risk your health to save a buck. After all, cheaper doesnt mean better and, in most cases, means worse in terms of quality. By simply following the advice above, getting a tattoo shouldnt be a problem for the average non diabetic but as a diabetic, there are 2 huge areas of caution you need to be aware of: your A1C and your healing time. A1C Requirements for Diabetics Getting Tattoos As much as we sometimes HATE checking and living by our A1C, it is a relatively good tool that lets us know how are blood sugar has been. If you really want to get some fresh ink, whether its a small tattoo or a sick sleeve, you need to be sure your A1C is in check. Having a high A1C going into a tattoo session can provide a plethora of problems. Elevatedblood sugar levels mean decreased Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Person Get Tattoos? Diabetes Self Caring

Can Diabetics Person Get Tattoos? Diabetes Self Caring

Diabetes and Tattoos: Is it Safe for Diabetics to Get Tattooed? Diabetes and Tattoos: Is it Safe for Diabetics to Get Tattooed? Its often a great interest for many to get inked on their body. Tattoos, as people term it, is quite an art in itself and getting a dose of that art close up to the body, how could anybody not be interested in? No doubt, why the popularity soared such high for tattoos. But hold on, is everything as sunny and bright as it seems. Not that it is. Tattoos are worth getting inked for but only when you have control over your body and in a good steady condition. Getting inked while suffering from diabetes or any other medical complications would cause enough harm for you. We here would deal with the relation between tattoo and diabetes in our todays column. Wed further seek answers as to whether getting a tattoo is safe for diabetic patients. So off we go for Diabetes and Tattoos: Is it Safe for Diabetics to get Tattooed? Is it safe for diabetics to get tattooed? How does tattoo affect a diabetic patient? Getting a tattoo isnt wrong on its own. Its more about the after effects and the healing process that affects a diabetic patient while getting a tattoo. A diabetic patient should be known to the disease management issue and should possess a sound control over the blood sugar and glucose levels. If a diabetic patient without having proper control over their condition seeks to have a tattoo, the healing process and more can cause dangerous consequences for the person. There are quite a few risks to be fair with getting inked for diabetic patients. On a general note, the infection and complications are what affects a diabetic patient after undergoing through the needle. Going up, more cases like an allergic reaction, skin relation infections like keloi Continue reading >>

3 Tips For Getting A Tattoo With Diabetes

3 Tips For Getting A Tattoo With Diabetes

Some tattoo artists, upon hearing that you have diabetes, are immediately wary—and some may go so far as to refuse to tattoo you. This is due in large part to misinformation or simple ignorance: many tattoo artists are unfamiliar with diabetes, and it is easier to bow out than it is to conduct research regarding diabetes and the potential side effects. What Is Tattooing? Tattooing is the process during which ink is deposited beneath the surface of your skin. Tattoos have come a long way. While they were once created by using a single needle and stick-and-poke techniques, tattoo machines do wonders in both minimizing bleeding and achieving smooth, clean lines. Tattooing and Diabetes Although there are some higher risk factors involved, the good news is that most diabetes patients are not at a drastically higher risk for complications during the healing process. Although a diabetic’s body is different from a typical body, its healing mechanisms work the same and will work to heal a tattoo similarly. Diabetes and tattoos have even been coming into contact more frequently with the advent of medical alert tattoos, which allow emergency responders to attend to your diverse needs more efficiently. If you are a person with diabetes, and you’re thinking of getting a tattoo, go for it; tattoos are safe for individuals with a diabetes diagnosis, provided that the parlor you are visiting is clean, the artist is properly certified, and the materials being used are sterile. To make sure your tattoo experience is a good one, there are a few rules you must follow. #1. Get Your Blood Sugar Under Control Failing to have your blood sugar levels under good control could result in a much slower healing process, which is dangerous because it increases the risk of infection but can also Continue reading >>

Is It Safe For A Diabetic To Get A Tattoo?

Is It Safe For A Diabetic To Get A Tattoo?

While I can’t comment on the effects of every health condition in connection with getting tattoos, as the mother of a Type 1 diabetic I am (sadly) intimately acquainted with this disease. And since diabetes affects all ages and all walks of life, and there are over 24 million people just in the United States suffering from one form of the illness or another, it’s understandable that a large number of diabetics will eventually find themselves contemplating a tattoo. But is that a good idea? Is it safe for a diabetic to be tattooed? Type 1 vs. Type 2 Diabetes First, it’s good to understand the distinction between the two major forms of diabetes— Type 1, which is often referred to as Juvenile Diabetes, and Type 2, which used to be called “Adult Onset” Diabetes. The terms Type 1 and Type 2 are more accurate because sometimes adults can get Type 1, and sometimes kids can get Type 2. And while both forms of the disease have similar symptoms, they are actually very different. Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease, which basically means that the immune system gets confused and accidentally starts attacking good cells instead of bad ones. In the case of Type 1 diabetes, the body attacks the islet cells of the pancreas, which are responsible for producing insulin. Without insulin, none of us can survive; insulin serves as a key to unlock the sugar in our body and turn it into energy. Without that key, the sugar builds up in the body and becomes toxic. Currently there is no way to prevent Type 1 diabetes, no way to stop it once it has started attacking the pancreas, and no cure. Type 1 diabetics depend on an outside source of insulin to stay alive – many of them take up to eight injections of insulin a day or, as in the case of my daughter, wear a pump that deliv Continue reading >>

Tattoos, Pedi's, And Other Diabetes No-no's

Tattoos, Pedi's, And Other Diabetes No-no's

As PWDs (people with diabetes), we face a huge laundry list of things we're supposed to do, and an equally long list of things we're not supposed to do, including having pedicures, getting waxed, or making any kind of permanent change to our bodies, namely getting pierced or tattooed. But where did these rules come from? And are they really worth listening to in this day and age? Today, Allison and I take a look a few of these "diabetes no-no's" to see what you can really get away with. Pedicures Amy: I didn't realize what a diabetes rebel I was until I read Kerri's recent post about the taboo on pedicures with diabetes. What the ... ? She was told as a youngster never to set foot in a nail salon, and has been afraid to do so ever since. I, on the other hand, who was diagnosed at age 37, happen to live for salon pedicures. I have for a number of years now. I've even been to several mani-pedi birthday parties for friends here in the San Francisco Bay Area. My girlfriends and I just love the love salon experience. Nothing is quite as relaxing as sitting in that automatic-massage chair and having your feet luxuriously cleaned and pampered by a professional. You pick out youir colors and then plunge your feet into that little foot-sized hot tub to soak in fragrance water before they even get started... mmmm... Could I cut my toenails at home and paint them myself? Certainly I could. I just don't want to. I know that there are many myths / rumors / warnings out there about salons that carry bacteria, but I, fortunately, have never had a negative experience, even after dozens (hundreds?) of salon pedicures. Salons have to be licensed by each state, and I always look for licensing information, usually displayed on the walls. I also look for general cleanliness clues, like wher Continue reading >>

Tattoos

Tattoos

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and so November of 2006 seemed the appropriate time to have a diabetes awareness tattoo created. My son, Liam was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at the ripe old age of two. Every day I strive to keep him as healthy as possible. Every day I work to ensure that his life is as normal as possible. Diabetes does not make that easy. That is one of the reasons that I created the online community called Diabetes Advocacy (www.diabetesadvocacy.com ). Each year Diabetes Advocacy has done its bit to increase awareness of diabetes and diabetes related issues in this country. We have sent out calendars filled with people living with diabetes and have created booklets filled with their stories. In November of 2006, we took diabetes awareness to a level. Across North America—from Newfoundland to California, people came together through Diabetes Advocacy with one common goal. They have decided to have a tattoo done to raise awareness of Type 1 Diabetes. I did as well. No one in my immediate family had a clue that I was even considering this. My oldest son was shocked. My youngest told me I took after him and was tough! Despite the initial shock, the reaction has been the same—Wow! I would like to thank Bernard at Peek-a-Boo Tattoos in Stephenville for creating a true work of art and a picture of love. The tattoo you see below was created by him from a very rough concept I brought to him. He created two hearts for my two children—equal in my love. He added a touch of color that reflected their birthstones. He kept hues soft and loving. The ribbons are grey and in Liam’s case, end in the Diabetes Awareness ribbon. His heart also shows the drop of blood that he must part with every time he eats and plays so that we can ensure his blood glucose Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Get Tattoos And Piercings? What To Know Before You Go

Can People With Diabetes Get Tattoos And Piercings? What To Know Before You Go

So you’ve been admiring a friend’s tattoo for a while and want to get some ink of your own. Or maybe you’ve finally mustered the courage to get your upper ear pierced or think a stud in your nose is the perfect way to polish off your look. But you have type 2 diabetes. Does that mean body art is off the table? Happily, no. “Someone with diabetes should be able to live just like everyone else,” says Joanne Rinker, RD, CDE, the director of practice and content development for the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), who is based in Asheville, North Carolina. “Your lifestyle shouldn’t be impeded, but you may have to take an extra step or two to be safe about it,” she says. About 30 percent of Americans have at least one tattoo, according to a 2016 Harris Poll. And you can probably be one of them. Go ahead and get the tattoo or piercing of your dreams, but first, there are a few precautions to keep in mind. Diabetes and Infections: Why Tattoos and Piercings May Affect Your Risk While the American Diabetes Association (ADA) hasn’t issued a position on body art, diabetes experts pull from smart recommendations based on clinical knowledge of how someone with diabetes may heal and the complications they may face. “The skin is your body’s largest organ and protects you from the outside world. When there’s an opening in the skin, which is what happens during a tattoo or piercing, there’s always the opportunity for an infection,” explains Suzanne Ghiloni, RN, CDE, a nurse educator at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. The risk of infection is why you’re encouraged to perform good foot care and avoid, as best you can, getting cuts on your feet. And it's not just a theoretical problem; a study published in October 2012 in JAMA reported on a Continue reading >>

Creating Diabetes Tattoos That Sense Changes In Blood Sugar

Creating Diabetes Tattoos That Sense Changes In Blood Sugar

It’s not often that the words “cool” and “diabetes” get used in the same sentence, but researchers at MIT and Harvard have joined the two concepts with an idea for creating tattoos that change color based on the blood sugar level of the person wearing them. The project has the oddly dystopian name of the Dermal Abyss (or, as they call it d-abyss) and is a collaboration between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab and Harvard Medical School, according to Katia Vega, a post doctoral associate at MIT and a member of the team. “The Dermal Abyss is a proof-of-concept that illustrates the potential of culturally and medically integrated biosensors,” Vega says. “They are biosensor tattoos that visibly react to changes in the metabolism. The purpose of the work is to light the imagination of biotechnologists and stimulate public support for such efforts.” The tattoos they designed will not be showing up in a pharmacy or tattoo shop any time soon. “The purpose of the work is to highlight a novel possibility for biosensors rather than bring a medical device to market,” Vega says. “As such, there are currently no plans to develop the Dermal Abyss as a product or to pursue clinical trials.” Like a hot concept car, there is real technology in the tattoos that were produced for the project. Various iterations of the tattoos sense changes not only in glucose but in pH, which can indicate dehydration and changes in sodium ion, which can give indications of hypertension. For glucose, the colors change from a light blue at a reading of five, and go through five shade changes until it’s dark brown at a reading of 110. The team at d-abyss inserted biosensors in place of traditionally used tattoo ink into skin from a pig at a depth of 10 millimeter Continue reading >>

Tattoos And Body Piercings: A Guide For People With Diabetes

Tattoos And Body Piercings: A Guide For People With Diabetes

The best way to know if it’s safe for you to get a tattoo with diabetes is to see your doctor or healthcare provider. They can review your numbers, draw your A1C, and determine if your diabetes is controlled. If your diabetes is not well controlled, or if your blood pressure is elevated, you should take measures to get both within range prior to getting a tattoo. After you are evaluated by the healthcare provider and they confirm that your diabetes is under control,you will be given clearance to get a tattoo or a piercing. It will also be a good idea to have the doctor write a note, or even a prescription, in attention of the tattoo parlor or piercing clinic that will be performing the procedure. Normally, a tattoo or piercing establishment will take the word of the client, and the forms that you fill out there should have a question about diabetes, and whether it’s controlled. Your response should be honest on the form, and if your diabetes is not well-controlled, lying about it could be to your peril. The question is on the form for your own safety, Understand that it is imperative that your diabetes must be controlled, along with your blood pressure, prior to obtaining a piercing or tattoo with diabetes. Considerations for getting a tattoo or piercing with diabetes There are many things that your doctor or healthcare provider should consider prior to giving you the ok for the procedure, even with your blood sugar and A1C in your target ranges. If it’s a tattoo, your doctor may want to know its location on your body. Areas farther away from the heart, and areas with poor blood flow are harder to heal, and people with diabetes may have existing compromised circulation in these areas. If it’s a body piercing, where will it be placed is important to consider. Wil Continue reading >>

The Safe Way To Get Ink When You Have Diabetes

The Safe Way To Get Ink When You Have Diabetes

There was a time when tattoos were something only sailors, bikers, and other hard-livin’ rebels inked into their skin. Now 1 in 5 people have at least one—tattoos aren’t taboo anymore. But can someone with diabetes get one? Of course! And if you’re thinking about getting a medical alert tattoo, you’re taking a great step to ensure proper care in case of emergency. What are the Risks? Suzanne Ghiloni, B.S.N, R.N., C.D.E., a nurse educator at Joslin Diabetes Center, says tattoo precautions for patients with diabetes aren’t all that different from anyone else getting a tattoo. “Make sure the parlor you choose is licensed, state inspected, and clean,” she says. When choosing a tattoo parlor, ask about how they manage their equipment. The shop you choose should: Have a licensed/accredited tattoo artist (preferably someone with artistic talent) Use a brand new needle just for you Autoclave their tattoo machines between customers Use disposable ink pots “The only time I’d be hesitant is if the person has uncontrolled diabetes,” says Ghiloni. Her advice to anyone with diabetes, “get your HBA1C in a good range before you go to the tattoo parlor.” The reason: if your levels are out of control, you put yourself at risk for slower healing, nasty infections and, in severe cases, amputation. “A person with diabetes need to be hyper-vigilant about preventing infection,” says Ghiloni. “Follow all the aftercare precautions.” Stephan Lanphear, an award winning tattoo artist who helped legalize tattoo parlors in Massachusetts, is also a Joslin patient living with type 1 diabetes. During the legalization process, Lanphear helped the board of health write guidelines and regulations for the tattoo industry. “Health releases in tattoo studios have a questio Continue reading >>

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