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Can A Type 1 Diabetic Be A Police Officer

Barred From Joining The Police Because Of Type 1 Diabetes

Barred From Joining The Police Because Of Type 1 Diabetes

Above: Craig Roth (center) with his father, Saul (left), who also was a police officer. For much of his life, Craig Roth wanted to be a police officer. He dreamed of following in his fathers footsteps in joining the Nassau County Police Department and patrolling the Long Island community where his parents still live. Roth did become a police officer, and has served with distinction, but not for Nassau County; the countys civil service commission refused to hire him because of his Type 1 diabetes. The bitterness of the rejection has caused him to move away from the community where he thought he would spend his life. He said it would upset him too much to see the blue-and-yellow-and-red emblem of the countys police force every day and know he couldnt be a part of the force. I wouldnt want to live in a place that blatantly violates my civil rights, Roth said in an interview. Roth has worked in public safety his entire adult life, including with the New York City Police Department, but Nassau County officials determined his Type 1 diabetes would be too much of a liability. Instead of serving his community, Roth has been fighting its government, alleging, first in a civil complaint and now in a federal lawsuit, that the Nassau County Civil Service Commission was guilty of discrimination under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act and New Yorks Human Rights Law. Roths case highlights how little consensus exists in hiring guidelines for people with Type 1 diabetes in the field of public safety. Even those who have been working in the field for years may be barred from employment in a neighboring municipality. When Roth began the process to join the Nassau County police force in 2015, he was no stranger to the lengthy hiring process to become an officer. He had already w Continue reading >>

Can't Be A Cop W/diabetes???

Can't Be A Cop W/diabetes???

Hello..My husband has been disqualified from the New York Police Department due to his Type 1 diabetes. When he went for his medical examination, he volunteered that he was a diabetic, he was told not to worry and to provide them w/medical clearance from his doctor. He complied. He recieved a letter in the mail yesterday that states clearly..he is being disqualified due to diabetes. Tommorow we will contact the EEOC, this may seem like a silly question but Can they do this? I know that he can't be discriminated against in most situations, but I also know there are a few things he absolutely cannot do. Join military, fly airplane, ect. Is law enforcement one of them. Any information or case law examples would be much appreciated. Thank you. One more thing that might be of some help..my husband has spoken with an NYPD police officer who is also an insulin dependent diabetic, they hired him knowing this information. He hasn't had it as long as my husband, but I can't see how that would matter. Even if they have laws prohibiting him from doing this kind of work....would their laws be overturned by past precedence?? Thank you for your response. Wow..I was hoping to be able to ease his mind over this. I'm not arguing your response, I'm just a little confused as to why he wouldn't be covered under the American w/Disabilities Act? Is there anywhere I can look for further information? I've checked out the EEOC's website as well as the American Diabetic Association..all saying he's covered. Nothing really pertaining specifically to law enforcement though. We spent alot of money on college for him to obtain the credits needed to be eligible. This is really bothering me because he asked from day 1 of the exam if he was wasting his time & he was told no, as long as he was cleared b Continue reading >>

A 25-year-old Woman With Diabetes In Custody

A 25-year-old Woman With Diabetes In Custody

A 25-year-old woman with diabetes in custody Fiona G. Kouyoumdjian , MD PhD, Wendy Lai , MD, Aaron Orkin , MD MSc, and Barbora Pek , MD Centre for Research on Inner City Health (Kouyoumdjian), St. Michaels Hospital; Department of Emergency Medicine (Lai), Humber River Hospital; Dalla Lana School of Public Health (Orkin), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont.; Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Family Medicine (Pek), McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. Correspondence to: Fiona Kouyoumdjian, [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2016 Joule Inc. or its licensors A 25-year-old woman who is handcuffed was brought to the emergency department in the custody of police officers. She has type 1 diabetes and last took her insulin over a day ago. She is slurring her words and appears fatigued. She asks if her sugar can be checked. The officers request that she be treated and stabilized before she is taken to the local correctional facility. They expect the patient to remain in detention for several days and ask if her urine can be checked for drugs. Does the patient have to remain in handcuffs? Concerns regarding privacy, confidentiality and legal consequences may prevent a patient in custody from discussing relevant aspects of medical history in the presence of security staff. Physical restraints, such as handcuffs, may cause physical and emotional discomfort, obstruct the physical examination and undermine the patients trust and confidence in the physicians professional independence. 1 This is particularly important because there are high rates of morbidity and mortality across a variety of health status indicators in patients who experience detention and incarceration. 2 , 3 Health care encounters can be an affir Continue reading >>

Any Type 1 Diabetics With Insulin Pumps

Any Type 1 Diabetics With Insulin Pumps

I searched and just can't seem to find what I need. I'm a type 1 diabetic and I wear an insulin pump, my question is has anyone wore one through an academy? If so can you give me any tips on how to treat it and where to wear it? Thanks for any help. Originally posted by rlstearns2 View Post I searched and just can't seem to find what I need. I'm a type 1 diabetic and I wear an insulin pump, my question is has anyone wore one through an academy? If so can you give me any tips on how to treat it and where to wear it? Thanks for any help. Actually, I have a couple of questions for you. Have you been hired by a dept yet? Are you hoping to attend a self sponsor academy? I ask for a reason, as you might be putting the cart before the horse. Diabetes may or may not be a disqualifier. Much will depend on the severity of your Diabetes, the medical standards of the agency to which you apply, and state POST medical standards. I am not qualified to evaluate your situation medically. What I can do is suggest that you do some research. Check with any agencies which might interest you to determine if your condition would be a bar to employment. I'd do that prior to spending the often considerable amount of cash needed to attend a self sponsor academy. Quite often, and especially in today's still toxic economy, LE employment has become extremely competitive. There is every chance you could complete an academy, your condition notwithstanding, and still have little prospect of employment. Get started on your research before you even think about enrolling in an academy. Good luck. From all the officers I've talked to around here most departments are okay with diabetes as long as it's controlled. No I have not been hired yet. Have you checked the TCLEOSE website for medical requirements? Continue reading >>

Police With Type1 | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Police With Type1 | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Whats the deal with joining the police with T1? I hear there is quite heavy discrimination. novorapidboi26 Type 1 Well-Known Member I cant be sure but I don't think you can get in if you want to do actual street policing............ after a Google though its seems as though you may be able to join but there may be an in depth assessment of your control and I would assume there may be some duties that you may not be permitted to do......... I believe you can do normal policing work but I heard you couldn't drive or use firearms etc ... Joining the fireservice is easier and i believe that would be more risky as a diabetic lol novorapidboi26 Type 1 Well-Known Member if your keen its definitely worth inquiring.......... I would have fancied being in the force too...... Its more a backup. I'm at uni and going through a bit of a tough patch lol. Looking at various options lol novorapidboi26 Type 1 Well-Known Member uni and diabetes can be tough, never mind all the other stuff that goes on during that time of life....... Hi, I'm T1 and a serving police officer, although was already in the job when I was diagnosed in December last year. I work in the emergency response department, so fully front line, and have been allowed to keep my full response and pursuit driving accreditation providing I test every two hours and my blood sugar is 5 or above. I have been working quite closely with the welfare department, but so far have only been told two roles I cannot apply for: PSU (riot police) and Firearms. Both because there could be prolonged periods of exercise where I would be unable to monitor my blood sugar or take corrective actions. It's a shame, but common s Continue reading >>

Any Diabetic Officers? : Protectandserve

Any Diabetic Officers? : Protectandserve

This subreddit is a place where the law enforcement professionals of Reddit can communicate with each other and the general public in a controlled setting. This is a great place for those who are already in the field, people who are aspiring cops, and anyone else interested in the world of law enforcement. Everyone is welcome here. If you imply that you are a sworn law enforcement officer, verify your account by following these instructions . Refusing to do so, while implying you are a LEO, WILL result in a ban. Remember, impersonating a law enforcement officer, even online, is a crime. The security protocols that are in place do not allow the system to be accessed via a cell phone, and it works best using Chrome. Be respectful. Refrain from insults when disagreeing with another user. Practice OPSEC. Any pictures of CADs must have all information minus the specific text you're showing redacted. No personal information (i.e., addresses, phone numbers, etc.) shall be readable. Remember, this forum can be seen by anyone. No racism, antisemitism, sexism, victim blaming, etc. is allowed. Any racist or derogatory terms will result in an immediate ban. "Dindu nuffin," and its derivatives, is strictly prohibited. Do not post material that paints law enforcement in a negative light without a discussion starter (at least a paragraph) within the post or comments. Do not post links leading to BCND or /r/news. When linking to another subreddit, you must use the NP domain (explanation here ). Only post memes, image macros, reaction gifs, rage comics, etc. on Mondays. "[MEME]" at the beginning of the post's title, or it will be removed. This rule does not apply to comment sections. Only post hiring questions in the Weekly Hiring Questions Thread. Follow Reddit's User Agreement at all Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Jobs Can We Have As Type 1's?

What Kind Of Jobs Can We Have As Type 1's?

What kind of jobs can we have as Type 1's? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. What kind of jobs can we have as Type 1's? I know you cannot be a police officer, fire fighter, air controller, etc. I'm curious as to what kind of jobs you all have, or jobs you've been knocked back for? I personally wish that one day I can be a paramedic, but i'm worried that it will have restrictions as per the air force, military, police, fire, etc. I'm currently a qualified child care worker. I'm a Registered Nurse Have been nursing for 29 years now been diabetic for nearly 28 years. I have managed in all areas and have worked all shifts as well as double shifts etc. I've been in the ER twice in 24hrs and I feel for the nurses who had to tell with some increasingly "problematic" people who entered the ER @ 2am. I'm a Registered Nurse Have been nursing for 29 years now been diabetic for nearly 28 years. I have managed in all areas and have worked all shifts as well as double shifts etc. I know you cannot be a police officer, fire fighter, air controller, etc. I know we all hear about these things, I heard years ago it was fighter/commercial pilot and scuba diving that were barred, but I think we need to be really careful about assuming we are right about these things we have been told, often casually or from people who might have known a year ago but don't know now! I would take the line "innocent until proven guilty"... don't assume you are barred for any job until you get an answer in black and white from the relevant authority. Cassandra, I see nothing mentioned in the queensland ambo info about diabetes or conditions being a general problem. Continue reading >>

Getting A Job: American Diabetes Association

Getting A Job: American Diabetes Association

If you are in the market for a new job, you may be concerned that your diabetes will stand in the way of getting the job you want. A common question is whether you have to tell potential employers about your diabetesor if you do tell them, how much do you share? You are not usually required to tell employers that you have diabetes. In some professions, there are specific legal rules regarding certification and physical qualification, and you must disclose your diabetes in order to meet the job standards. But for the most part, there is no legal requirement to disclose a disability and the decision whether to tell an employer or potential employer is up to the individual. Keep in mind, however, that anti-discrimination laws only provide protection from discrimination if the employer knows about the disability. Unless your employer has notice of your diabetes, you will not be able to prove that any discriminatory action was because of your disability. Blanket banslaws, regulations or policies that restrict a person from employment simply because of a disabilityare illegal and medically inappropriate because they do not take into consideration the individual's qualifications and abilities. Thanks to advances in law and medicine, there are no longer many jobs that are off-limits to people with diabetes. Commercial drivers who treat their diabetes with insulin are now able to obtain Department of Transportation medical certification through a diabetes exemption program. Fire fighters , police officers, and other law enforcement personnel now have the benefit of guidelines developed by diabetes health care professionals that assess whether the person is able to do the job, rather than automatically disqualify the person on the basis of a diabetes diagnosis. In addition to th Continue reading >>

Www.realitycheck.org.au

Www.realitycheck.org.au

This is a secure and safe place for people to bitch, moan, argue, or rejoice (yes, really) about having Type 1 Diabetes. If something has inspired you or enraged you, here's your opportunity to let everyone know. I am currently trying to get into the police force. I have successfully completed the medical test with no probs except the obvious type 1 diabetes and have also successfully completed the beep test to a higher level than required by QLD Police Recruit. The doctor I saw to have my medical exam said that it was worth a try to send in all my information to the recruitment team and that I would also need a letter from either a GP or endo (or as many ppl as possible!) to explain that I don't have hypos and my control is good etc etc... I have typed "police" into the search bar and read many other posts about the same thing, but what I'm wondering, if anyone could please help me out with.. has anyone with type 1 D actually gotten into the police force in the last three years? (Those who already HAD type 1 before applying and did disclose it?) Just curious and wondering wether or not I should give up now and stop wasting my time? MOD Comment : Ellikus, I just changed the Subject so it made a bit more sense. It read like you were asking about Diabetic 'Food' Police :) Tony Re: any diabetic police people out there? What do you mean you dont have hypos? Never? As in NEVER had a bsl lower than 4mmol??? I made extensive enquiries with Qld Police and was told that T1Ds will never be able to join the Police. As far as I know, this is Australia wide. I also have a friend who is a trainer at Oxley (Police training area) and he said that T1Ds are not recruited, because of the risk of hypos in a high stress environment, like hostage crimes etc etc. I can see their point really Continue reading >>

Law Enforcement Officers And Diabetes Discrimination

Law Enforcement Officers And Diabetes Discrimination

Law Enforcement Officers and Diabetes Discrimination Throughout the country, men and women with diabetes like Jeff Kapche are helping to keep our communities safe by working as law enforcement officers. The American Diabetes Association worked with the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) to create a National Consensus Guideline for the Medical Evaluation of Law Enforcement Officers for individuals with diabetes who wish to work as law enforcement officers (LEOs). Diabetes should not be considered an automatic disqualifying condition, but rather, each LEO with diabetes must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. The Consensus Guideline states that current published data suggest that persons with diabetes who can safely and effectively function as LEOs can be readily identified through careful individualized assessment. Thus blanket bans of all people with diabetes, in addition to being illegal, are not consistent with current medical knowledge. The diabetes standard is located at Section 4.3 of the Consensus Guideline and includes: Appendix B Physician Evaluation form for Law Enforcement Officers with Diabetes For additional information or to speak with a Legal Advocate about employment discrimination, call 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383). Continue reading >>

Glendale Pd: Diabetes Won't Stop Us From Hiring Qualified Officers

Glendale Pd: Diabetes Won't Stop Us From Hiring Qualified Officers

Copyright 2000 - 2016 Fox Television Stations, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Glendale PD: Diabetes won't stop us from hiring qualified officers PHOENIX (KSAZ) - November is diabetes awareness month, and it can be a real challenge to get a job in law enforcement if you've been diagnosed with diabetes. Now the Glendale Police Department is putting out the word that diabetic conditions will never stop the agency from hiring qualified police officers. When he was growing up James Calderon was not sure if he could become a police officer because he had diabetes. "When I tried to join the military they were like no, you can't do this, you're a type one diabetic," said Officer James Calderon. He had trouble getting hired with the NYPD because of his diabetic status. Now Calderon works as a patrolman for the City of Glendale. "I think law enforcement, in general, is a tough job, it just adds a little more of a challenge to it," said Calderon. "At the police department they've been very supportive of that type of situation, every supervisor I've ever had has said do whatever you've gotta do to make sure you're healthy in safe," said Detective Derek Johnston. Johnston is also diabetic; the diagnosis came as a shock when he learned his condition at age 14. In time, he learned to manage the disease. "With the syringes and constant testing, I'm able to keep it under control," said Johnston. But men say they closely monitor their diabetes, to make sure they stay healthy on the job. "Things change by the minute on a daily basis, by the hour, sometimes you don't have time to eat. Maybe I need something sweet to keep my sugars up, so I have to keep stuff on me at all times," said Calderon. Johnston says being dependent on synthetic insulin never stops him from taking care of business. "You Continue reading >>

The Three Glendale Police Officers With Type 1

The Three Glendale Police Officers With Type 1

The Three Glendale Police Officers with Type 1 James Calderon, Taylor Carr, and Derek Johnston have become a prime example of the ability of people with Type 1 to protect and serve. Recently, an Arizona police department launched a campaign during Diabetes Awareness Month to let people know its hiring twenty officers, and that people with diabetes are welcome to apply. The Glendale, Arizona police department has been using its Twitter account to initiate a community outreach effort featuring three accomplished officers with Type 1 from the force. In telephone interviews in December and January, we spoke with two uniformed officers, James Calderon and Taylor Carr, and Derek Johnston, a family services detective. Combined, the trio has been serving Glendale for more than 20 years, without any hiccup in their service or their health. Calderon, a native of suburban New York City, aspired to be a pilot in the Armed Forces, but was turned away after his medical review. It was You cant do this. Youre a Type 1 diabetic, he says. The New York Police Department also declined to consider him for a post. Then a friend who had become a police officer in Virginia encouraged him to apply for a position in Roanoke. After graduating from a regional Virginia police academy and beginning his law enforcement career in that state, he learned of openings in Phoenix and Glendale. Glendale responded first to his applications, and he made the move. He has been a patrol officer for a dozen years, and now serves as an in-service training officer. Carr, an Arizona native, was given a Type 1 diagnosis at the age of 11. It was quite an adjustment for him and his family. I wound up in the hospital for two or three days, Carr says. No one in my family had ever had Type 1 or Type 2. Carr had dreamed o Continue reading >>

Career As A Police Officer?

Career As A Police Officer?

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. My 16 yr old is interested in becoming a police officer. We live in Wisconsin. I know having type 1 you are not able to join the military. Does anyone know if he may study to become a police officer? I have been looking on the internet and cant find a definite yes or no answer. Im wondering if JRDF or ADA would be able to help me? A couple of years ago they had a Miami police officer who had type 1. They also had a guy who went to join the FBI but they wouldn't let him join because he was either on shots and they said had to be on the pump or the other way around. The lawyer who handled that case. Actually the guy went through two such fights and won both. My 16 yr old is interested in becoming a police officer. We live in Wisconsin. I know having type 1 you are not able to join the military. Does anyone know if he may study to become a police officer? I have been looking on the internet and cant find a definite yes or no answer. Im wondering if JRDF or ADA would be able to help me? No concrete help here sorry. But why not call the local police department (non-emergency number) and ask to talk to someone about it directly. No concrete help here sorry. But why not call the local police department (non-emergency number) and ask to talk to someone about it directly. I know a career firefighter that is Type1 on a pump. If that helps. There's a profile on the adults with diabetes section of the CWD page of a police officer with childhood onset type 1 diabetes (I am distinguishing because the military will allow people to stay once they develop diabetes, they just won't let us join). I know that a police officer in Evanston, IL was one of the first, if not the first, p Continue reading >>

Diabetic Police Officer Who Failed To Check His Sugar Levels Before Car Crash Which Left Father-of-two Brain Damaged Avoids Jail

Diabetic Police Officer Who Failed To Check His Sugar Levels Before Car Crash Which Left Father-of-two Brain Damaged Avoids Jail

A diabetic police officer has walked free from court after leaving a father-of-two brain damaged in a horror smash which occurred after he failed to check his blood sugar levels. John Cleary, 59, suffered devastating injuries when Merseyside Police officer Paul Ford's car smashed into his vehicle in a horrific pile-up on the M57 in February 2014, and can now only communicate by giving a thumbs up or down. Diabetic Ford, 47, of Bebington, Merseyside, had not checked his blood sugar levels before getting into his vehicle that day and suffered a hypoglycaemic attack at the wheel. After pleading guilty to one count of dangerous driving at an earlier hearing, Ford was sentenced to 11 months in prison suspended for two years at Liverpool Crown Court today. Ford, who was required by the DVLA to check his blood sugar levels before driving, was also ordered to do 200 hours unpaid work, given an eight month curfew and banned from driving for four years. Sentencing, Judge Clement Goldstone QC, the Recorder of Liverpool, said: 'On this occasion you failed to check your blood levels. 'You took a massive chance that you would not suffer a hypoglaecemic attack. 'You knew full well a hypoglaecemic attack would deprive you of your mind and control of the vehicle. 'Just being aware of the potential for disaster, you should not have taken that risk - that was a criminal decision. 'All your victims were seriously affected, as were there families, and all of them are amazed that of all people a policeman should have behaved in such a cavalier way. 'You should remember how fortunate you are not to be looking at prison walls and not to be suffering like your victims. You will live with that for the rest of your life.' Liverpool Crown Court heard the smash caused Ford's Vauxhall Mervia to boun Continue reading >>

Jobs Diabetics Can Not Have

Jobs Diabetics Can Not Have

My question is, who has the right to say an insulin dependent diabetic will have poor control of their diabetes? Question is because I have recently found out my Type 1 diabetic son will not be able to join the military, become an astronaut, drive a tractor trailer, fly an airplane or become a police officer. My son may have 60 plus years of great control. He may have 60 years of poor control. But no one will know this until it happens. In every single job I listed above, you have drug addicts working in them positions. But they are disciplined when they have a positive drug test. So why can't the same be done with an insulin dependent diabetic. Who is to say they may have a low while on duty or while driving or flying? How can that be an assumption? Do these people truly believe every single insulin diabetic will have one or many lows in their diabetic lifetime while working? I can totally understand their reasoning, but who is to say they will have a low while on duty? I am not a physician, but a volunteer and a mom of a type 1 diabetic and the daughter of a type 2.I feel the same way you do, but my husband and I tell our daughter that she can be anything she wants to be.Who knows they might change the rules or better yet FIND A CURE!! You have to realize that if a person has a severe low in the military, as a pilot or in a big rig, it is not just there life at stake; they are risking the life of others.I do know that in the state I live before a diabetic teenager gets there drivers permit and license the doctor has to sign a statement that the person has been in good control for at least 6 months.I know several teens that have not been able to get there permits yet. I have also read about and, met diabetics that have had such severe lows that the local EMTs know her Continue reading >>

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