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Can A Tumor In The Pancreas Be Benign?

Pancreatic Cysts: Symptoms, Causes & Management

Pancreatic Cysts: Symptoms, Causes & Management

What is the treatment for pancreatic cysts? The pancreas is an organ approximately six inches long that is located in the abdomen behind the stomach and in front of the spine and aorta . The pancreas is divided into three regions: the head, the body, and the tail. The head of the pancreas is located on the right side of the abdomen adjacent to the duodenum. The tail is on the left side of the abdomen, and the body lies between the head and the tail. There are two functional parts to the pancreas, referred to as the exocrine and endocrine parts. The majority of the cells of the pancreas produce digestive juices which contain the enzymes necessary for digesting food in the intestine. The enzymes are secreted into smaller collecting ducts within the pancreas (side branches). The side branches empty into a larger duct, the main pancreatic duct, which empties into the intestine through the papilla of Vater in the duodenum. During passage through the ducts, bicarbonate is added to the digestive enzymes to make the pancreatic secretion alkaline. The cells and ducts producing the digestive juices comprise the exocrine part of the pancreas. Just before the main pancreatic duct enters the duodenum, it usually merges with the common bile duct that collects bile (a fluid that helps to digest fat) produced by the liver . The common bile duct usually joins the pancreatic duct in the head of the pancreas. The union of these two ducts forms the ampulla of Vater which drains both the bile and pancreatic fluid into the duodenum through the papilla of Vater. Buried within the tissue of the pancreas, primarily in the head, are small collections of cells, termed the Islets of Langerhans. The cells of the Islets produce several hormones, for example, insulin , glucagon, and somatostatin; th Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cysts | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Pancreatic Cysts | Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Pancreatic cysts are fluid-filled growths that develop in the pancreas. This small glandular organ is located in the abdomen between the stomach and the intestines. In addition to making digestive enzymes, the endocrine (islet) cells in the pancreas produce hormones, such as insulin, that control blood sugar levels in your body. Sometimes pancreatic cysts grow as a result of pancreatitis, an inflammation in the pancreas. But most develop for no apparent reason and are discovered by chance during a CT or MRI scan done for another purpose. In fact, advances in the quality of these and other imaging technologies have dramatically increased the number of pancreatic cysts that are now found. Most pancreatic cysts are benign (noncancerous) and unlikely to harm you or cause symptoms. But some are precancerous and have the potential to develop into pancreatic cancer . So its important to find out what type of cyst you have. There are nearly 20 types of pancreatic cysts. Common ones include: Pseudocysts are mostly made of fluid. These can start in or next to the pancreas and are a common complication of acute pancreatitis, an inflammation of the pancreas. Theyre unlikely to develop if youve never had pancreatitis or pancreas injury. Serous cystadenomas have thick, fibrous walls and contain clear fluid. Almost all SCAs are benign, but they may cause pain, jaundice, or make you uncomfortable in other ways as they grow. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms (IPMNs) Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms start in the ducts that connect the pancreas to the intestine. Theyre the most common type of precancerous cyst. They produce large amounts of proteins that form mucus (mucin) in the cyst lining and fluid. Its difficult to predict if and when an IPMN will become cancerous, alt Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Head Mass: What Can Be Done ? Diagnosis: Surgery

Pancreatic Head Mass: What Can Be Done ? Diagnosis: Surgery

Pancreatic Head Mass: What Can Be Done ? Diagnosis: Surgery Petz Aladr Teaching Hospital. Gyor, Hungary Visit for more related articles at JOP. Journal of the Pancreas Diagnosis, Differential; Pancreatic Neoplasms; Pancreatic Cyst; Pancreatic Pseudocyst; Histology; Biopsy, Needle A wide spectrum of benign and malignant diseases can produce a mass in the head of the pancreas. It can be solid (ductal adenocarcinoma, chronic pancreatitis, endocrine tumor) or a cystic lesion (cystic neoplasm, true cyst or pseudocyst). The most important question is whether or not it is a malignant or benign tumor. There is no doubt that, whenever possible, preoperative histological confirmation of the diagnosis of malignancy is advantageous [ 1 ]. The need for surgical intervention is often determined by the presence or absence of jaundice or duodenal obstruction. In a patient with obstructive symptoms secondary to a pancreatic head mass, resection may be the treatment of choice regardless of the diagnosis. In these cases, preoperative histological confirmation is not essential before surgical intervention. By contrast, the management of a relatively asymptomatic tumor of the body or tail, or the non-operative treatment of an advanced case, is dependent on an accurate diagnosis. It is also important for a frank discussion with the patient or relatives concerning the prognosis. Thus, the need for an accurate diagnosis is inversely proportional to the degree of resectability of the lesion [1-3]. Cystic lesions are easily identified by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy cannot sufficiently differentiate between malignant and benign cystic tumors, with a failure rate of about 30%. Rapid tumor enhancement and specific biochemical features may sugges Continue reading >>

What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

Cancer starts when cells in the body begin to grow out of control. Cells in nearly any part of the body can become cancer, and can spread to other areas of the body. See What Is Cancer? to learn more about how cancers start and spread. Pancreatic cancer starts when cells in the pancreas start to grow out of control. The pancreas is an organ that sits behind the stomach. It's shaped a bit like a fish with a wide head, a tapering body, and a narrow, pointed tail. In adults it's about 6 inches long but less than 2 inches wide. The head of the pancreas is on the right side of the abdomen (belly), behind where the stomach meets the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). The body of the pancreas is behind the stomach, and the tail of the pancreas is on the left side of the abdomen next to the spleen. Exocrine cells: Most of the cells in the pancreas form the exocrine glands and ducts. The exocrine glands make pancreatic enzymes that are released into the intestines to help you digest foods (especially fats). The enzymes are first released into tiny tubes called ducts. These merge to form larger ducts, which empty into the pancreatic duct. The pancreatic duct merges with the common bile duct (the duct that carries bile from the liver), and empties into the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine) at the ampulla of Vater. Endocrine cells: Endocrine cells make up a much smaller percentage of the cells in the pancreas. These cells are in small clusters called islets (or islets of Langerhans). These islets make important hormones like insulin and glucagon (which help control blood sugar levels), and release them directly into the blood. Types of pancreatic cancer The exocrine cells and endocrine cells of the pancreas form different types of tumors. It’s very i Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cysts - Symptoms And Causes - Mayo Clinic

Pancreatic Cysts - Symptoms And Causes - Mayo Clinic

Many kinds of cysts can grow on the pancreas, some cancerous and some benign. Pancreatic cysts are saclike pockets of fluid on or in your pancreas, a large organ behind the stomach that produces hormones and enzymes that help digest food. Most pancreatic cysts aren't cancerous, and many don't cause symptoms. They're typically found during imaging testing for another problem. Some are actually noncancerous (benign) pockets of fluids lined with scar or inflammatory tissue, not the type of cells found in true cysts (pseudocysts). But some pancreatic cysts can be or can become cancerous. Your doctor might take a sample of the pancreatic cyst fluid to determine if cancer cells are present. Or your doctor might recommend monitoring a cyst over time for changes that indicate cancer. You may not have symptoms from pancreatic cysts, which are often found when imaging tests of the abdomen are done for another reason. When signs or symptoms of pancreatic cysts do occur, they typically include: Persistent abdominal pain, which may radiate to your back A mass you can feel in your upper abdomen Rarely, cysts can become infected. See a doctor if you have a fever and persistent abdominal pain. A ruptured pseudocyst can be a medical emergency, but fortunately is rare. Fluid released by the pseudocyst can damage nearby blood vessels and cause massive bleeding. A ruptured pseudocyst can also cause infection of the abdominal cavity (peritonitis). Seek emergency medical treatment if you have signs or symptoms of internal bleeding and shock, including: The cause of most pancreatic cysts is unknown. Some cysts are associated with rare illnesses including von Hippel-Lindau disease, a genetic disorder that can affect the pancreas and other organs. Pseudocysts often follow a bout of a painful c Continue reading >>

Patient With Benign Pancreatic Tumor Experiences Pain Relief After Mr-guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment

Patient With Benign Pancreatic Tumor Experiences Pain Relief After Mr-guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment

Patient with Benign Pancreatic Tumor Experiences Pain Relief After MR-guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment Patient with Benign Pancreatic Tumor Experiences Pain Relief After MR-guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment "What a difference a year makes!" exclaimed Doris McArdle and her daughter, Sharon Duffy, in a recent New Years greeting. The recipients of that message David Heller, Neal Kassell, M.D. and Wladyslaw Gedroyc, M.D. made a difference that McArdle will never forget. In November 2010, the indomitable, 89-year-old McArdle boarded a trans-Atlantic flight from Chicago to London. There, she successfully underwent a noninvasive MR-guided focused ultrasound procedure to relieve acute pain and discomfort caused by a large benign tumor in her pancreas. "The pancreatic tumor had grown to the point that it obstructed the liver bile duct, and Mom had to be hospitalized for almost a week," recalls Duffy. "At that time, they put a temporary stent in her bile duct, and it looked like Mom had only two options going forward: do nothing and let the tumor mass continue to grow or undergo Whipple surgery, which we heard was horrific and offered doubtful prospects for recovery." Fortunately, McArdles internist, Robert Havey, M.D., had heard about focused ultrasound from FUS Foundation board member David Heller and had read some of the scientific literature about it. "Dr. Havey asked if focused ultrasound would work for his patient, so I brought Dr. Kassell at the FUS Foundation into the loop," Heller notes. After reviewing CT scans and other information, Kassell turned to Gedroyc, a pioneering clinician in MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation who is based at St. Marys Hospital in London. "We carried out this procedure on a one-off basis under compassionate grounds since Mrs. McArdle Continue reading >>

The Increasing Problem Of Unusual Pancreatic Tumors

The Increasing Problem Of Unusual Pancreatic Tumors

The Increasing Problem of Unusual Pancreatic Tumors Copyright 2000 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.2000 Arch Surg. 2000;135(6):644-650. doi:10.1001/archsurg.135.6.644 Hypothesis Patients presenting with a pancreatic mass often have a curable lesion rather than the more common adenocarcinoma. Greater awareness of this among nonsurgeons is necessary. Setting Tertiary care referral hospital. Patients All patients who presented with a pancreatic mass during the 8 years from 1990 to 1998 were studied. Patients with a history of chronic pancreatitis, a functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, or pancreatic adenocarcinoma were excluded. Forty patients were identified, demographic and clinical characteristics recorded, and long-term follow-up obtained. Interventions Therapy included either a Whipple procedure or distal pancreatectomy. Two patients underwent a biliary bypass. Main Outcome Measures Tumor histology, morbidity, and survival. Results Three hundred thirty-six patients with a pancreatic mass were treated during this 8-year period. Two hundred ninety-six of these had pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Forty (11.9%) of the 336 patients had other types of pancreatic tumors. Two thirds of these patients were female, with an average age of 57 years. Seventy-five percent of these tumors were either malignant or potentially malignant. In several instances, cystic tumors were diagnosed as inflammatory pseudocysts and managed accordingly. Fourteen (35%) of 40 patients had no symptoms and their tumor was found on a computed tomographic scan performed for another indication. Percutaneous biopsy was performed in 9 patients, of whom 5 were assigned an incorrect diagnosis. There were no operative deaths, alt Continue reading >>

Surprise Finding: Pancreatic Cancers Progress To Lethal Stage Slowly

Surprise Finding: Pancreatic Cancers Progress To Lethal Stage Slowly

Surprise Finding: Pancreatic Cancers Progress to Lethal Stage Slowly - 10/27/2010 Surprise Finding: Pancreatic Cancers Progress to Lethal Stage Slowly Pancreatic cancer develops and spreads much more slowly than scientists have thought, according to new research from Johns Hopkins investigators. The finding indicates that there is a potentially broad window for diagnosis and prevention of the disease. "For the first time, we have a quantifiable estimate of the development of pancreatic cancer, and when it would be best to intervene," according to Christine Iacobuzio-Donahue, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of pathology and oncology at Johns Hopkins' Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center , "so there is potentially a very broad window for screening." Right now, however, she adds, "pretty much everybody is diagnosed after that window has closed." Pancreatic cancer is notoriously difficult to detect in its early stages because there are frequently few symptoms and current imaging techniques are not specific for cancer. Bert Vogelstein, M.D., professor and director of the Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, says the results show that "many pancreatic cancer cases have a long lag time before they are detected through conventional tests. This leaves room to develop new early, diagnostic tools and intervene with potentially curative surgery." The Johns Hopkins work, published in the Oct. 28 issue of the journal Nature, suggests that it takes at least a decade for the first cancer-causing mutation that occurs in a cell in a pancreatic lesion to turn into a full-fledged cancer cell. At this point, the lesion is called "high-grade" and should be removed, m Continue reading >>

Do Pancreatic Cysts Become Cancerous?

Do Pancreatic Cysts Become Cancerous?

Pancreatic cysts are water or mucus filled structures in the pancreas, similar to cysts that appear in other parts of the body. The most common cause of benign (non-cancerous) cysts is pancreatitis, an inflammation of the pancreas. Pancreatitis can be a result of excessive alcohol use or gallstone disease. Additionally, some genetically inherited conditions can predispose a person to get cysts in the pancreas. How do you know if you have a pancreatic cyst? Most people do not have any symptoms or pain and their pancreatic cysts are discovered by pure chance. Approximately 2-3 percent of pancreatic cysts are discovered when that patient has a CT scan or MRI of the abdomen for other reasons. There may be some abdominal pain associated with large cysts. However, for small cysts, other causes of abdominal pain should be excluded before attributing the pain to the cyst. What types of pancreatic cysts are there? Cysts in the pancreas can arise as the result of several different processes. There are approximately five major types of pancreatic cysts, depending upon how they developed, where they are located and what they are made out of. Most pancreatic cysts are benign non-neoplastic(not a tumor) lesions resulting from pancreatitis. However, benign neoplastic(tumor) cysts are slightly more common in women. Sign up to receive our monthly Cancer Talk e-newsletter. Continue reading >>

What Are Pancreatic Tumors

What Are Pancreatic Tumors

There are two very important things to know about neoplasms of the pancreas. First, some, such as the "intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm," are curable precancerous lesions. Just as colon cancer arises from curable precancerous colon polyps, so to do some pancreatic cancers arise from curable precancerous lesions. Second, as we alluded to earlier, a variety of different types of neoplasms can arise in the pancreas, such as ductal adenocarcinoma and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, and these different tumor types are important to recognize because they are often treated differently, and because they are associated with different prognoses (predicted outcomes). Trained expert pathologists usually establish the diagnosis of a specific type of neoplasm. They do this either from biopsies of the tumor or by examining resected (removed) tumors. This is the form of cancer that most people are talking about when they refer to "cancer of the pancreas." These neoplasms account for >75% of all pancreas cancers. Adenocarcinomas (most common) - Just as the normal exocrine cells of the pancreas do, adenocarcinomas form microscopic glands (collections of cells surrounding an empty space). Adenocarcinomas can grow large enough to invade nerves which can cause back pain. They also frequently spread (metastasize) to the liver or lymph nodes. If this happens the tumor may be considered unresectable. Adenocarcinoma: This is a gland-forming (it makes tubes) cancer. In this example, the adenocarinoma has wrapped around a nerve (center of the image). The following rare exocrine neoplasms of the pancreas are listed alphabetically. Acinar Cell Carcinomas - These rare cancers may produce excess amounts of the digestive enzymes normally produced by the pancreas. This increase in enzymes caus Continue reading >>

Non-pancreatic Cancer Tumors In The Pancreatic Region

Non-pancreatic Cancer Tumors In The Pancreatic Region

Non-pancreatic cancer tumors in the pancreatic region Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. Correspondence to: ke Andrn-Sandberg, Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital at Huddinge, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright : North American Journal of Medical Sciences This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Most of tumors found in the pancreas are adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. A small number of tumors in the pancreas, such as islet cell tumors or neuroendocrine tumors, papillary cystic neoplasms, lymphoma, acinar cell tumors, metastatic tumors to the pancreas often, have a far better prognosis, and the majority of these tumors are non-malignant or benign. The author reviewed the recent literatures, and summarized where the tumor comes originally in the pancreas, what is the type of the tumor, and how to treat the tumor. Keywords: Pancreas, adenocarcinoma, exocrine pancreatic neoplasms, metastases, non-pancreatic cancer Limited data are available to guide the management of very rare exocrine neoplasms of the pancreas (VREP). Available evidence suggests that VREP have different risk factors and prognoses from those of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The primary objectives for one study were to determine the survival, comorbidities, and response to treatment of patients seen at Mayo Clinic with VREP. It was reviewed patients from 1975 to 2005 who had VREP and compared them to patients with adenocarcinomas that were matched for TNM, g Continue reading >>

General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (islet Cell Tumors)

General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (islet Cell Tumors)

Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors form in hormone-making cells (islet cells) of the pancreas. The pancreas is a gland about 6 inches long that is shaped like a thin pear lying on its side. The wider end of the pancreas is called the head, the middle section is called the body, and the narrow end is called the tail. The pancreas lies behind the stomach and in front of the spine. Enlarge There are two kinds of cells in the pancreas: Endocrine pancreas cells make several kinds of hormones (chemicals that control the actions of certain cells or organs in the body), such as insulin to control blood sugar. They cluster together in many small groups (islets) throughout the pancreas. Endocrine pancreas cells are also called islet cells or islets of Langerhans. Tumors that form in islet cells are called islet cell tumors, pancreatic endocrine tumors, or pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pancreatic NETs). Exocrine pancreas cells make enzymes that are released into the small intestine to help the body digest food. Most of the pancreas is made of ducts with small sacs at the end of the ducts, which are lined with exocrine cells. This summary discusses islet cell tumors of the endocrine pancreas. See the PDQ summary on Pancreatic Cancer Treatment for information on exocrine pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) may be benign (not cancer) or malignant (cancer). When pancreatic NETs are malignant, they are called pancreatic endocrine cancer or islet cell carcinoma. Pancreatic NETs are much less common than pancreatic exocrine tumors and have a better prognosis. Pancreatic NETs may or may not cause signs or symptoms. Most pancreatic NETs are functional tumors. There are different kinds of functional pancreatic NETs. Pancreatic NETs make different kinds of hormones s Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Mass - Wikipedia

Pancreatic Mass - Wikipedia

This article or section may have been copied and pasted from ( DupDet CopyVios ), possibly in violation of Wikipedia's copyright policy . Please remedy this by editing this article to remove any non-free copyrighted content and attributing free content correctly, or flagging the content for deletion. Please be sure that the supposed source of the copyright violation is not itself a Wikipedia mirror . It has been suggested that this article be merged into pancreatic tumor . ( Discuss ) The lead section of this article may need to be rewritten. Please discuss this issue on the article's talk page . Use the lead layout guide to ensure the section follows Wikipedia's norms and to be inclusive of all essential details. ( Learn how and when to remove this template message ) A pancreatic mass is any undifferentiated growth detected in the pancreas , usually on medical imaging . A number of terms used to describe abnormal masses (also known as tumors ) in the pancreas . Masses can be described based on their physical characteristics, as defined by imaging studies, as solid (consisting of solid abnormal tissue) or cystic (cavities filled with mucus or fluid). Masses can also further be described based on their aggressiveness usually based on imaging and examination of their cells under the microscope as benign (no potential for turning into cancer), premalignant (some potential to turning into cancer) and malignant (cancerous). Masses involving the pancreas are being recognized more frequently, in part because of the growing use of radiology imaging. Many lesions found on the pancreas turn out to be benign pseudocysts, but a variety of harmless (benign) and malignant (cancerous) neoplasms (abnormal growths) can involve the pancreas and a multidisciplinary approach including goo Continue reading >>

Not All Tumours Are Cancerous; Tumours Can Be Benign Or Malignant.

Not All Tumours Are Cancerous; Tumours Can Be Benign Or Malignant.

Not all tumours are cancerous; tumours can be benign or malignant. Benign tumours arent cancerous. They can often be removed and, in most cases, do not come back. Cells in benign tumours do not spread toother parts of the body. Malignant tumours are cancerous. Cells in these tumours can invade nearby tissues and spread to other parts of the body. Sometimes cells move away from the original (primary) cancer site and spread to other organs and bones where they can continue to grow and form another (secondary) tumour at a new site. This process is called metastasis. Secondary cancers keep the name of the original cancer location. For example, pancreatic cancer that has spread to the liver is still called pancreatic cancer. Cancer cells are dangerous because they will continue to grow and divide, even if they cause damage to the tissues around them. The information provided in this site, or through links to other websites, is not a substitute for medical or professional care and should not be relied upon as such. Read our disclaimer. Sources and references for this information product will be supplied on request. Please contact us quoting the Information Product number below: Information Product No. PCA0011v2 | Published: 03/01/2014 | Last Updated: 25/09/2017 | Next Review Due: 03/01/2017 Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cysts Can Be Benign, Precancerous Or Cancerous

Pancreatic Cysts Can Be Benign, Precancerous Or Cancerous

Pancreatic Cysts: Benign, Pre-Cancerous, or Cancerous About 80% of pancreatic cysts are benign. About 20% are either precancerous or cancerous. Today, a greater number pancreas cysts are diagnosed due to advanced imaging technology and many are discovered accidentally while scanning the abdomen area for other medical issues. Therefore, often, precancerous cysts are found before becoming cancerous. There are differing types of pancreatic cysts. Many are technically not cysts at all, but pockets of noncancerous fluid with inflammatory or scar tissue. Cysts found in the pancreas can fall into the following categories: Serous Cystadenoma. Rarely cancerous, but can become large enough to cause abdominal pain and a feeling of fullness. Fortunately, most discovered pancreatic cysts are of this type. Mucinous Cystadoma. Typically located in the tail or body of the pancreas. The larger the cyst is, the more likely it is cancerous. Mucinous Duct Ectasia. This type is most often found in the head of the pancreas and is most common in men. It is usually precancerous or is already cancerous when discovered. Papillary Cystic Tumor. Most common among women and typically located in the body or tail of the pancreas. They are generally cancerous. The type of cyst is based upon certain indicators such as size, location, characteristics. The doctor may want to take a sample of the cyst fluid to determine whether cancer cells are present or precancerous conditions exist . If the tumor is precancerous or malignant and has not spread beyond the pancreas, surgical removal is necessary. Precancerous cysts left unabated most likely become cancerous in the future. Read this success story titled Doctors Aim To Stop Pancreatic Cancer Before It Forms published by the Baltimore Sun. Paula Rimes, a y Continue reading >>

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