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Can A Tooth Infection Cause High Blood Sugar

Glucose, Diabetes & Oral/dental Care & Lower Blood Sugar Levels And Dental Treatments - Dr. Terry Simpson, Type 2 Diabetes & Colgate

Glucose, Diabetes & Oral/dental Care & Lower Blood Sugar Levels And Dental Treatments - Dr. Terry Simpson, Type 2 Diabetes & Colgate

There's good news to report for patients who have type 2 diabetes and gum disease : regular dental treatment could potentially lower blood glucose levels. Gum diseaseor periodontal diseaseis an infection of the gum and bone that hold teeth in place. Diabetes reduces the body's resistance to infection, so the gums are among the tissues likely to be affected. In the early stages of periodontal diseasecalled periodontitisthe gums can become red, swollen and bleed easily. At this stage, the disease is still reversible. The new research evaluates studies of patients age 16 and older with type 1 (juvenile onset) or type 2 (adult onset) diabetes and periodontitis. Reviewers found that treating periodontitis could have small yet beneficial implications for people with type 2 diabetes; however, the review did not show enough evidence to support beneficial implications for people with type 1 diabetes. The review by lead author Dr. Terry Simpson of the Edinburgh Dental Institute in Scotland appears in The Cochrane Library, a publication of The Cochrane Collaboration, which evaluates medical research based on the content and quality of existing medical trials. "It would be wise to advise these patients of the relationship between treating periodontal disease and the possibility of lowering their blood sugar levels," said Dr. Simpson. "Additionally, an oral health assessment should be recommended as part of their routine diabetes management." Dr. Simpson also cautioned that larger studies are necessary to further analyze periodontal treatment and outcomes. According to the American Dental Association, periodontal disease is often linked to the control of diabetes. For example, patients with inadequate blood sugar control appear to develop periodontal disease more often and more sev Continue reading >>

Tooth Infection | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Tooth Infection | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I got a nasty tooth infection , kept me up all last night and now at work with uncontrollable blood sugars. Is it normal a tooth infection can cause crazy blood sugars or could this be related to a lack of sleep ? Anyway I've got an emergency appointment this evening hopefully they'll pull the tooth or somehow put me out of my misery :-( Any infection can put up blood sugars. I'm not sure about the lack of sleep bit as I have always slept well since being diagnosed. I expect you will be given antibiotics alongside whatever else they decide to do. I have had a few tooth abscesses and they are truly horrid, worse than broken bones in my experience. I'm glad you have an appointment this evening, I hope you have a better night's sleep tonight. It's my first experience of an infection impacting blood sugar levels in almost 4 years of being a T1. I've never looked forward to a dentist visit until today It's my first experience of an infection impacting blood sugar levels in almost 4 years of being a T1. I've never looked forward to a dentist visit until today The issue about dental infections is they tend to be confined to a very tight space (often, but not exclusively, around the root tip), so as the inflammation grows (the cardinal signs of inflammation are redness, swelling and heat), the swelling causes the immense pain, due to the pressure. Antibiotics can take the edge off this quickly, then either a conservative root canal treatment or extraction of the tooth. You've done the right thing to be seen sooner rather than later. If the pain suddenly eases, it usually means the infection has found a way of venting itself, but it will still need attention. Continue reading >>

Coast Dental Blog How Diabetes Can Affect Your Teeth And Gums

Coast Dental Blog How Diabetes Can Affect Your Teeth And Gums

Diabetes affects almost 26 million Americans, which is more than 8 percent of the U.S. population. The condition often requires them to make lifestyle changes, including what they eat, how they exercise and the medications they take. It also requires them to change the way they take care of their teeth and gums. About one-third of people with diabetes have severe periodontal disease which is causing the gum tissue and bone around the teeth to break down, according to the National Institutes of Health. People with poorly-controlled diabetes had a 2.9 times increased risk of developing periodontitis than non-diabetics, according to a large study published in 2002. The same study found people with well-controlled diabetes had no significant increase in the risk of periodontitis. There are several reasons why poorly-controlled diabetes can increase your chance of getting periodontal disease, said Dr. Dale Nash, a dentist at Coast Dental Wesley Chapel. In the past decade, Dr. Nash has seen an increase in the number of patients with diabetes. "People with diabetes are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection," Dr. Nash said. "Diabetics have high blood sugar, which basically coats the immune-fighting cells and affects the blood supply to many areas of the body including the patient’s mouth." Here’s how it works: The poor circulation affects the blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the gums, called the gingiva, and the cells in your mouth that help fight off infection. If the gums can’t get the nutrients they need, then it’s harder to fight infection. Also, poor circulation means the blood can’t carry away bad bacteria effectively. Research shows the functions of immune cells in poorly-controlled diabetics are altered in other ways.(1) One kind o Continue reading >>

What Are Your Teeth Telling You About The State Of Your Body?

What Are Your Teeth Telling You About The State Of Your Body?

What are your teeth telling you about the state of your body? What are your teeth telling you about the state of your body? A VARIETY of conditions can have a harmful impact on your mouth including gastrointestinal disease, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, blood and skin problems. Your gums can offer fascinating clues to the health of your body Yet many people dont realise that the mouth itself also has an impact on general health. In fact at dental school students are taught that the mouth is a window to the body. In most cases the health of the body is linked to the level of inflammation in the mouth. Inflammation starts as a mechanism that helps us to fight cuts, scrapes and infections. However when inflammation carries on for a long time and becomes chronic it ends up doing more harm than good. One theory is that it causes a pro-inflammatory state in the body which releases a number of mediators (tiny messengers that communicate between different parts of the body) into the bloodstream which can impact our health. When the body detects inflammation a protein called C-reactive protein (CRP) is released into the blood. Doctors use CRP levels as an indication of whether youre fighting inflammation, even if youre unaware of it. For instance, gum disease has no symptoms, or perhaps just a small amount of bleeding after brushing. At dental school students are taught that the mouth is a window to the body. Yet this isnt normal and if your scalp bled when you brushed your hair it would quite rightly cause alarm. If CRP and other mediators are present for too long they can have a detrimental effect and they have been shown to lead to increased risk of conditions including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, strokes, high blood pressure and possibly even Alzheimers disea Continue reading >>

"can Toothaches Tigger High Blood Sugar Level On Type 2 Diabetics?": Diabetes Community - Support Group

I know when I'm sick or have a fever, my numbers go up a little. Maybe your tooth is a little infected. Any infection can increase blood sugar. Good luck at the dentist. That isn't my favorite place at all. steveox replied to Louise_WebMD_Staff 's response: Thanks for the support,,But i requested to be put to sleep when they pull my tooth so i dont have to see my tooth being pulled. Louise_WebMD_Staff replied to steveox 's response: Tooth pulling depending on the tooth is way easier for me than a filling or root canal. I wish I could find a dentist who sedated for that sort of thing. (no not safe but...) Unfortunately because of a digestive disorder I have-tooth damage is serious and inevitable. It means I know way more about dentists than I ever imagined. (compounded by a serious allergic reaction to local anesthetic AND a touchy feely dentist as a child-I hate going even though I haven't had a horrible experience as an adult) I've had extensive dental reconstruction (30 crowns, 1 permanent bridge, 21 root canals, 2 extractions). Although I've read that tooth infections can cause a rise in blood sugar, I haven't experienced anything substantial. You won't have to see your tooth being pulled & there should be very little or no pain during the extraction. You may have pain during recovery but you will likely use medication for it. Even with most root canals, you shouldn't experience much pain if the dentist knows what he's doing & isn't in a hurry. Correct me if im wrong.. Back in the old west days the Barber pulls your tooth and gives you a bottle of whiskey. I dont think Dentistry excisted during the 1800s Yeah, & if the barber was on vacation, the blacksmith had the proper tools for a tooth extraction....... Louise_WebMD_Staff replied to steveox 's response: I comple Continue reading >>

Diet, Diabetes And Tooth Decay

Diet, Diabetes And Tooth Decay

If you are one of the 16 million Americans with diabetes, you're probably aware that the disease can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. What you may not know is that diabetics are more susceptible to developing oral infections and gum (periodontal) disease than those who do not have diabetes. Diet and tooth decay Your teeth are covered with plaque, a sticky film of bacteria. After you have a meal, snack or beverage that contains sugars or starches, the bacteria release acids that attack tooth enamel. Repeated attacks can cause the enamel to break down and may eventually result in cavities. When diabetes is not controlled properly, high glucose levels in saliva may help bacteria and plaque thrive. Plaque that is not removed can eventually harden into tartar. When tartar collects on your teeth, it makes a thorough cleaning of your teeth more difficult. This can create conditions that lead to chronic inflammation and infection in the mouth. Diabetes lowers your resistance to infection and can slow the healing process. What you can do Reduce or eliminate sugars and starches from your diet, eat healthy foods and exercise regularly. Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and clean once a day between your teeth with floss or an interdental cleaner to remove decay-causing plaque. Keep teeth and gums strong by keeping track of blood sugar levels. Also, have your triglycerides and cholesterol levels monitored. Treat dental infections immediately. Diabetics who combine good dental care with insulin control typically have a better chance of avoiding gum disease. Provide your medical and oral health histories to both your medical and dental care providers. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

Diabetes And Teeth - American Dental Association

By Laura Martin, Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine Did you know that 29.1 million people living in the United States have diabetes ? That’s 9.3% of the population. Approximately 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year—and 8.1 million people living with diabetes don’t even know they have it. Diabetes affects your body’s ability to process sugar. All food you eat is turned to sugar and used for energy. In Type I diabetes, the body doesn’t make enough insulin, a hormone that carries sugar from your blood to the cells that need it for energy. In Type II diabetes, the body stops responding to insulin. Both cases result in high blood sugar levels, which can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body. So what does this have to do with that smile of yours — and how can you protect it? First, it’s important to understand the signs of diabetes and the roles they play in your mouth. The warning signs of diabetes affect every part of your body. After a blood test, you may be told by a doctor that you have high blood sugar. You may feel excessively thirsty or have to urinate a lot. Weight loss and fatigue are other common symptoms. Diabetes can also cause you to lose consciousness if your blood sugar falls too low. If diabetes is left untreated, it can take a toll on your mouth as well. Here's how: You may have less saliva, causing your mouth to feel dry. ( Dry mouth is also caused by certain medications.) Because saliva protects your teeth, you’re also at a higher risk of cavities. Gums may become inflamed and bleed often ( gingivitis ). You may experience delayed wound healing. You may be susceptible to infections inside of your mouth. For children with diabetes, teeth may erupt at an age earlie Continue reading >>

Dental Infections Are Trouble For Diabetes

Dental Infections Are Trouble For Diabetes

If you have a dental infection and diabetes, you can never get your blood sugar stabilized. I know this from my personal experience and from listening to Richard K. Bernstein, M.D. Any infection will wreck havoc with our blood sugar management. But dental infections may be some of the most common infections. They can also be insidious, as I know all too well. The typical dental infection is probably gum disease, which our dentists call periodontal disease. But root canal infections, known as endodontic or endodontal infections, can go undetected even by the best dentists. I know, because my dentist didn’t find mine for about a year. Since I have lost a lot of weight and have been following a very low-carb diet ever more strictly in the past few years, I have expected my A1C level to come down below 5.0. In April 2003 it was 7.0 when I weighed 296 pounds. With my height, 6’ 2.5″, that’s a body mass index of 37.5, which is well into the obese range. By June 2007, about a year and one-half after starting to take Byetta but still not consciously following a very low-carb diet, my weight had dropped to 186, a BMI of 23.6, which is in the normal range. My A1C was down to the level that Dr. Bernstein recommends, 4.6. He writes on page 57 of the fourth edition of Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution: The Complete Guide to Achieving Normal Blood Sugarst hat in his experience a truly normal A1C ranges from 4.2 percent to 4.6 percent. He himself has type 1 diabetes and for years has kept his own level within that range. Yet, this year my A1C has ranged from 5.1 to 5.7 in the tests that I take on the first of every month. I am following a very low-carb diet and my weight is just 156, a BMI of 19.8, well into the low normal weight range. So why don’t I have a normal A1C lev Continue reading >>

Tooth Ache Affect On Blood Sugars

Tooth Ache Affect On Blood Sugars

"The real secret of success is enthusiasm..." thanks, Walter P. Chrysler. I believe it. That's what I want in my life--to give my imagination a chance, to live with energy and enthusiasm! P.S. I looked up enthusiasm, and it says the root words mean God within... interesting...! Ralph Waldo Emerson said 'Life belongs to the energetic.' But you don't have to be frenetic and hyper--some energy is quiet and steady, like a heartbeat... and that works too! LOL Thank you all for the advice on this. My goodness, what a difference without that old tooth! I told the dentist I would rather go through childbirth again than to deal with a toothache, lol. (that is no small joke, since all my babies were over 10 hrs in labor!) I was achy from the tooth removal and the lack of sleep over the past few days because of the pain, so I didn't even take my evening dose of Metformin. My bs this morning was 110 with only 1 dose of meds in me! It could also be that I didn't get to eat much but soft food after the surgery, but I'll take a lower dose of medication anyday I can get it! Now that the pain is mostly gone, maybe I will see a "normalization" of my numbers. I plan to be real good over the holidays, as this is my 1st one as a diabetic, so no unlimited noshing at functions! The others are totally right. ANY KIND OF STRESS will do it. Infection is a stressor. Pain is a stressor. A visit to the dentist (even when it'll be a relief!) is a stressor. And there go the numbers! LOL You're dentist will take care of the tooth, and once that's done and healed, you'll see for yourself what experience has taught the rest of us...LOL "The real secret of success is enthusiasm..." thanks, Walter P. Chrysler. I believe it. That's what I want in my life--to give my imagination a chance, to live with ener Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Oral Health

Diabetes affects your body’s ability to utilize glucose, or blood sugar, for energy. Diabetes can cause many complications. These include nerve damage, heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and even blindness. Another common health complication is gum disease and other oral health problems. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are at higher risk for gingivitis, gum disease, and periodontitis (severe gum infection with bone destruction). Diabetes affects your ability to fight off bacteria that can cause gum infections. Gum disease can also affect the body’s blood sugar control. Diabetes is associated with increased risk for thrush, a type of fungal infection. Additionally, people with diabetes are likely to have a dry mouth. This has been associated with increased risk for mouth ulcers, soreness, cavities, and dental infections. What the research says A 2013 study published in the journal BMC Oral Health looked at 125 people with type 2 diabetes. Researchers measured factors including missing teeth, the incidence of periodontal disease, and the amount of reported dental bleeding. The study found that a combination of the longer people had diabetes, the higher their fasting blood glucose, and the higher their hemoglobin A1C (a measurement of a person’s average blood sugar over three months), the more likely they were to have periodontal disease and dental bleeding. Those who did not report careful self-management of their condition were more likely to have missing teeth than those who did work to control their blood sugar levels. Some people with diabetes are at greater risk for oral health problems than others. For example, people who don’t maintain tight control over their blood sugar levels are more likely to get gum disease. Al Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems

How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too much glucose, also called sugar, in your blood from diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your mouth. Your mouth includes your teeth your gums your jaw tissues such as your tongue, the roof and bottom of your mouth, and the inside of your cheeks Glucose is present in your saliva—the fluid in your mouth that makes it wet. When diabetes is not controlled, high glucose levels in your saliva help harmful bacteria grow. These bacteria combine with food to form a soft, sticky film called plaque. Plaque also comes from eating foods that contain sugars or starches. Some types of plaque cause tooth decay or cavities. Other types of plaque cause gum disease and bad breath. Gum disease can be more severe and take longer to heal if you have diabetes. In turn, having gum disease can make your blood glucose hard to control. What happens if I have plaque? Plaque that is not removed hardens over time into tartar and collects above your gum line. Tartar makes it more difficult to brush and clean between your teeth. Your gums become red and swollen, and bleed easily—signs of unhealthy or inflamed gums, called gingivitis. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to gum disease called periodontitis. In periodontitis, the gums pull away from the teeth and form spaces, called pockets, which slowly become infected. This infection can last a long time. Your body fights the bacteria as the plaque spreads and grows below the gum line. Both the bacteria and your body’s response to this infection start to break down the bone and the tissue that hold the teeth in place. If periodontitis is not treated, the gums, bones, and tissue that support the teeth are destroyed. Teeth may become loose and might need to be removed. If you hav Continue reading >>

Why Dental Problems Make It Hard To Control Blood Glucose

Why Dental Problems Make It Hard To Control Blood Glucose

The nearly 30 million people living with type 2 diabetes may be surprised to learn about another unintended difficulty: dental problems, namely gum disease. People with diabetes are at an increased risk for serious gum disease, or what's known as periodontitis, because they are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection, and have a decreased ability to fight bacteria that invade the gums. On the flip side, serious gum disease may have the potential to affect blood-glucose control and contribute to the progression of diabetes. Too much glucose or sugar in your blood from the diabetes can cause pain, infection, and other problems in your teeth and gums because it helps allow harmful bacteria to grow in your saliva. These bacteria combine with food to form plaque, a soft, sticky film that causes tooth decay or cavities. If you have uncontrolled blood sugar, you're more likely to develop gum disease than someone who doesn't have diabetes. Other dental complications related to uncontrolled diabetes include thrush, an oral fungus, and dry mouth, which can cause sores and ulcers. If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, the better you control your blood glucose, the lower your risk is for periodontitis. 5 Simple Ways to Prevent Diabetes-Related Gum Disease To help prevent dental problems: Brush your teeth at least twice daily. Floss once a day, pressing the floss against your teeth and not your gums. Check for areas where your gums are red or painful. See your dentist right away if you think you have a problem. If you are having dental work, be sure to remind the hygienist and dentist that you have diabetes. Many dental treatments can affect your blood sugar. Your dentist may decide to delay some procedures — including dental surgery — if your blood-glucose levels ar Continue reading >>

Tooth Absess... Affect Glucose Score?

Tooth Absess... Affect Glucose Score?

Good to see you. Ask whatever you want to. We're here to help you, if we can. You'll never know everything about Diabetes like most of us don't but with what you learn you can help other Diabetics. Especially those who don't have computers. Sorry to hear of your abscess. That's funny in a way though. I had an abscess also and didn't feel any pain. Most are in terrible pain. My Dentist told me that he worries more about Insulin dependant Diabetics because it's injected not natural. So he likes anyone on Insulin to watch their sugars. Stress is definitely a culprit when most go to the Dentist. My sugars drop when I'm stressed. I'm in the minority. Most People's sugar rises when they are stressed. Diabetics should go to the Dentist's in the morning after they have looked after their Dawn Phenomenom with medications and have had a decent breakfast. Gee, I hope that your biopsy results are Good. It would be the worry and stress of the results and the pain plus the lack of exercise that would raise your sugars. Unless you were put on a drug that raises them. Maybe you need to have your meds, altered a bit also if your sugars don't settle down soon. I do hope that everything works out for you Bruce. Well... good news. My wife's non-hodgkin's lymphoma has not progressed. Whew. Also just found out that they haven't found any cancer with my last biopsy. My scores have been averaging between 10 and 15 ever since the biopsy (also absessed tooth dx) 2 weeks ago. Tried to see my doc, couldn't get in, so went to clinic today. After two weeks of these higher scores clinic doc put me on metformin. In fact it hit 19.5 tonight so hit the treadmill and got it to 13. This is weird, before the biopsy, scores were between 4 and 9 most of the time during the day (diet and exercise was working Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Can Diabetes Affect Your Teeth And Gums?

Did you know that trouble keeping your blood sugars in control could lead to an infection? That infection could be in your gums. That’s right. People with diabetes have a higher incidence of gum disease or periodontal disease than people without diabetes. In this article, we will look at the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. We will look at what it is, what are the prevention and treatment options available, some other oral problems that are also linked to diabetes, and more. Just like high blood glucose makes it easier for you to get an infection in other places in your body, high blood glucose levels also make it easier to get a gum infection, or other infection in your mouth. Decaying teeth and poor oral habits contribute to periodontal disease, as does smoking. We will take a look at all of that here. First, let’s see why Martin contacted TheDiabetesCouncil. Martin was interested in learning more about his high blood sugars and their effects on his teeth. He had been trying to get his blood sugar levels down, but nothing he seemed to do with diet, exercise, or medications helped in aiming his target range for blood sugars or in an A1C range that he was comfortable with. He was due to pay a visit to his dentist since his last visit was over a year ago. Martin’s dentist told him that he was at the start of a periodontal disease, and in addition, he had a gum infection. He wondered if the infection in his gums may be a reason for why he was unable to keep his blood glucose in a good range. An infection anywhere in your body could be a reason for unruly blood glucose. Let’s see if we can answer Martin’s question in depth. What is periodontal disease? Periodontal disease is an infection that develops of the gum, and underlying bone, that holds the Continue reading >>

Can Infection Raise Blood Sugar Levels In Nondiabetics?

Can Infection Raise Blood Sugar Levels In Nondiabetics?

Even if you do not have diabetes, you can experience drops and spikes in blood sugar levels for many reasons. If your blood sugar level gets too high or too low, you might develop many symptoms and/or health problems. Stress, poor diet, illness and infections can all cause your blood sugar level to change, and if you notice the warning signs, it is important to talk to your physician about the best treatment approach. Video of the Day After a meal, your body breaks food down into glucose either for immediate use, or else it's stored for later use. The hormone insulin, as well as other chemicals, regulate how much glucose is in your system. If the level of glucose in your bloodstream gets too high, many complications can result. A general goal for everyone is to keep your blood sugar levels no higher than 100 mg/dL, says MedlinePlus. A blood sugar level higher than this can indicate not just diabetes, but also some forms of cancer, Cushing syndrome, an imbalance of various hormones, thyroid disorders or it might be the body's reaction to stress, trauma or an infection. Infections and Blood Glucose Levels When your body is under mental or physical stress, such as when fighting off an infection, hormones such as cortisol are released to help your body cope. The hormones that are released to fight off the infection might have the side effect of raising your blood sugar levels, so your body has the energy it needs to get better. This effect can happen to both diabetics and nondiabetics. If you have an infection and are concerned about your blood sugar levels, it is important to know the warning signs of nondiabetic hyperglycemia, which are the same symptoms that occur in diabetics: hunger, sweating, shakiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, thirst, sleepiness, confusion, diffic Continue reading >>

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