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Can A Puppy Get Diabetes?

All About Dog Diabetes

All About Dog Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that impacts lots of mammals including humans and dogs. It occurs when the body’s ability to produce or respond to the hormone insulin is impaired. Canine diabetes is incurable, but it’s a manageable disorder. With proper treatment, diabetic dogs can lead long, healthy, happy lives. How does canine diabetes work? The most common form of diabetes in dogs is diabetes mellitus, or “sugar diabetes.” As its name implies, sugar diabetes is a condition that affects your dog’s blood sugar level. A small organ near the stomach, the pancreas, is responsible for regulating blood sugar by producing insulin. Here’s how it works: when your dog eats, her food is broken down into tiny components including carbohydrates. Carbs are then converted into simple sugars, including glucose. The pancreas releases insulin go help turn glucose to fuel inside your dog’s cells. ADVERTISEMENT If there’s not enough insulin available, glucose can’t get into cells. This can lead to a dangerously high glucose concentration in your dog’s bloodstream. Two forms of dog diabetes In a healthy dog, the pancreas produces insulin to moderate the sugar in their system. In a diabetic dog, the pancreas either can’t produce enough insulin, or the dog’s body can’t effectively use the insulin it does produce. These are the two forms of diabetes: Insulin-deficiency diabetes: the most common type of canine diabetes. Occurs when the dog’s body doesn’t produce enough insulin. Dogs with insulin-deficiency diabetes need daily insulin shots to replace what their body can’t produce. Insulin-resistance diabetes: when the pancreas produces some insulin, but the dog’s body doesn’t use the insulin as it should, causing high blood sugar levels. This type of diabete Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Puppies

Low Blood Sugar In Puppies

Low blood sugar can affect puppies much more often than adult dogs, even when your puppy is healthy, so it's important to learn about low blood sugar symptoms and what to do. The technical term is hypoglycemia and happens most often with adult pets that suffer from diabetes. Sugar moves into the cells with the help of insulin, and too much insulin can cause hypoglycemia. Puppies almost never have diabetes, but can develop low blood sugar due to intestinal parasites that compromise digestion. Very small puppies, especially Toy breeds like the Chihuahua or Pomeranian, are so tiny, they have very few fat stores. Fat is body fuel, and when there’s not enough, the blood sugar levels fall. Adult pets can make up this difference when their liver churns out the necessary sugar. But immature livers can’t manufacture enough necessary sugar and as a result, these tiny pups develop hypoglycemia. What Are Low Blood Sugar Symptoms? The signs of low blood sugar can be vague. It’s important to watch out for them especially if your puppy is a tiny breed that’s most susceptible. Without enough sugar, the puppy’s heartbeat rate and breathing slow down and that triggers a cascade effect of other symptoms. Be alert for any one or combination of the following signs. The puppy acts weak. The puppy becomes sleepy. The puppy seems disoriented. He develops a wobbly “drunk” gait. His eyes look ‘glassy’ and unfocused. The puppy starts to twitch, shake or tremble/shiver. His head tilts to one side. He develops seizures. The puppy falls unconscious and can’t be awakened. Without prompt attention and first aid, your puppy could die. But fortunately, when you recognize the signs early in the process, low blood sugar is easy to treat and reverse at home. In almost all cases, the pup Continue reading >>

Top Ten Signs Your Pet Has Diabetes

Top Ten Signs Your Pet Has Diabetes

Recognize the Pet Diabetes Epidemic November is nationally recognized as American Diabetes Month, a month focused on raising awareness about diabetes in people. Not as commonly known is that November is also recognized as Pet Diabetes Awareness Month. A growing epidemic amongst our pets, recognizing and spreading awareness about diabetes in dogs and cats is vital to helping pet owners spot and treat the disorder early. Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes is a chronic disease that can affect dogs and cats and other animals (including apes, pigs, and horses) as well as humans. Although diabetes cant be cured, it can be managed very successfully. Diabetes mellitus , or sugar diabetes, is the type of diabetes seen most often in dogs. It is a metabolism disorder. Metabolism refers to how the body converts food to energy. To understand what diabetes is, it helps to understand some of this process. The conversion of food nutrients into energy to power the bodys cells involves an ongoing interplay of two things: Glucose: essential fuel for the bodys cells. When food is digested, the body breaks down some of the nutrients into glucose, a type of sugar that is a vital source of energy for certain body cells and organs. The glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood, which then transports the glucose throughout the body. Insulin: in charge of fuel delivery. Meanwhile, an important organ next to the stomach called the pancreas releases the hormone insulin into the body. Insulin acts as a gatekeeper that tells cells to grab glucose and other nutrients out of the bloodstream and use them as fuel. With diabetes, the glucose-insulin connection isnt working as it should. Diabetes occurs in dogs in two forms: Insulin-deficiency diabetesThis is when the dogs body isnt producing enough insulin. This happens when the pancreas is damaged or otherwise not functioning properly. Dogs with this type of diabetes need daily shots to replace the missing insulin. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. Insulin-resistance diabetesThis is when the pancreas is producing some insulin, but the dogs body isnt utilizing the insulin as it should. The cells arent responding to the insulins message, so glucose isnt being pulled Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pets

Diabetes And Pets

Tweet Pets such as cats and dogs can also develop diabetes. All pet owners worry about their animals so knowing whether or not your dog or cat is showing symptoms of diabetes can help save their life. What are the causes of diabetes in animals? Just like in humans, pets with diabetes may not be able to produce enough insulin, or possibly their bodies do not allow them to use insulin properly. Insulin is produced by the pancreas, and allows glucose in the blood to enter cells, allowing the body to properly function. Just like people, pets can suffer from both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. What are the symptoms of diabetes in animals? Diabetes symptoms and the complications of the disease are also similar to humans. The following symptoms could indicate that your animal has diabetes. Diabetes symptoms in pets Symptoms in pets can include: Weight loss, often despite an increased appetite Excessive thirst and urination Breakdown of body fat and development of ketacidosis Lower appetite Pungent breath with a chemical smell Complications associated with diabetes My animal looks very sick, could this be pet diabetes? Your pet may be in the throes of hypoglycaemia or low blood sugar. Hypoglycaemia can occur in animals due to insulin overdose. The symptoms of hypoglycaemia include the following: Seizure Wobbliness Weakness Dullness Sleepiness Restlessness Coma When pets are hypoglycaemic they should never be left alone overnight. The complications of untreated diabetes can be awful. These include cataract formation and loss of sight in dogs, and both nerve damage and hind-end weakness in cats. Diabetes treatment for pets Insulin is generally regarded as the benchmark treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Your vet can prescribe special insulin. Owners of diabetic pets shou Continue reading >>

How Can I Limit My Dog’s Chances Of Getting Diabetes?

How Can I Limit My Dog’s Chances Of Getting Diabetes?

Dog Diabetes What causes diabetes in dogs? What should you do if your dog has diabetes? Understanding this complex disease will help you get a head start on limiting your dog’s chances of getting it. Understanding Dog Diabetes Diabetes is caused by a lack of insulin, the hormone that regulates how sugar is absorbed and used by cells and tissues in the body. It most often afflicts dogs between the ages of 5 and 7, and female dogs are more susceptible to it than males. Know the Symptoms of Diabetes Every dog is unique, and no one knows your dog better than you do. Keep an eye out for irregularities in your dog’s behavior if you suspect he may be at risk for diabetes. Watch for: Sudden extreme thirst. A frequent and urgent need to urinate. Notable exhaustion and lower than normal activity. Obesity. Consult Your Veterinarian Have your veterinarian give your dog a thorough examination to determine whether or not he has diabetes, prediabetic symptoms, or a disposition for diabetes. Your vet can help you form a diet and exercise plan to maintain and improve your dog’s health, as well. While there is no sure cure for diabetes, hopefully some of the information in this article can help you better understand it. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

There are two forms of diabetes in dogs: diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes insipidus is sometimes called "drinking diabetes" and diabetes mellitus is also known as "sugar diabetes". Diabetes insipidus is a very rare disorder that results in failure to regulate body water content. Diabetes mellitus is more common in dogs, and is frequently diagnosed in dogs five years of age or older. This is also known as adult-onset diabetes. There is a congenital form that occurs in puppies called juvenile diabetes, but this is rare in dogs. Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas. This is a small but vital organ located near the stomach. It has two significant populations of cells. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion. The other group, called beta-cells, produce the hormone insulin. Simply put, diabetes mellitus is a failure of the pancreatic beta cells to regulate blood sugar. Some people with diabetes take insulin shots, and others take oral medication. Is this true for dogs? In humans, two types of diabetes mellitus have been discovered. Both types are similar in that there is a failure to regulate blood sugar, but the basic mechanisms of disease differ somewhat between the two groups. Most dogs with diabetes mellitus will require daily insulin injections to regulate their blood glucose. Type I or Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus results from total or near-complete destruction of the beta-cells. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilise blood glucose levels. Type II or Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus is different because some insulin-producing cells remain. However, the amount produced is insufficient, there is a Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Everything You Need To Know To Keep Them Healthy

Diabetes In Dogs: Everything You Need To Know To Keep Them Healthy

Emotional Support Animal Letters Blog Diabetes in Dogs: Everything You Need to Know to Keep Them Healthy Diabetes in Dogs: Everything You Need to Know to Keep Them Healthy The key to managing diabetes in dogs is early detection, proper care, and a better understanding of this illness and how it works. While no pet owner ever wants their pet to get sick, unfortunately, dogs and cats do get ill from time-to-time. One of the many illnesses that impact dogs today is diabetes. Much like diabetes in humans, the earlier you can catch this condition, the better, and while it may change lives it is possible for your canine companion to live comfortably with this disease, under proper management. With the Correct Monitoring and Management, Your Doggo Can Live a Long and Happy Life! If your dog gets diagnosed with diabetes, chances are you will have a number of questions swirling around in your head. The most important thing to understand first is exactly whatdiabetes is and what it means in dogs. Diabetes is actually a rather complex disease that is caused by either a lack of insulin (which is an important hormone) or the bodies inability to respond properly to insulin in the body. Type 1 Diabetes-Means a lack of insulin production. This is the most common form of diabetes in dogs and cats. Type II Diabetes-Means an inability to respond to the insulin production. Insulin production is also impaired in dogs with this condition. When insulin isnt doing its job in the body, a dogs blood sugar will level which results in hyperglycemia, and if left unattended, a number of other serious health complications, especially with the pancreas. Here is a List of the Symptoms of Diabetes in Dogs: Spotting diabetes in dogs early is essential for your doggos quality of life and overall well-bei Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus (water Diabetes) In Cats And Dogs

Diabetes Insipidus (water Diabetes) In Cats And Dogs

Overview of diabetes insipidus Most everyone is familiar with the term “diabetes;” it is a common human disease. But our four-legged friends can get diabetes, too. There are different types of diabetes, one being diabetes insipidus—an uncommon disorder that affects our pet’s ability to conserve water. Because of this disease, your dog or cat urinates and drinks water excessively in an attempt to keep up with the loss of water through the urine. There are two types of diabetes insipidus. One is due to the insufficient production of a hormone called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) that regulates the body’s ability to absorb water from the kidneys. The other form of diabetes insipidus is caused by the kidneys’ inability to respond to ADH. The kidneys are responsible for regulating the water in your pet’s body. So, without this hormone or the kidney’s response to it, your dog or cat can’t conserve water. Access to water is critical for pets with diabetes insipidus—without it, a dog or cat can become dehydrated in as little as 4–6 hours. Generally, diabetes insipidus is considered idiopathic, which means the ultimate cause is unknown. Possible causes include congenital issues, trauma, metabolic conditions, kidney disease, adverse reactions to certain medications, or tumors of the pituitary gland. Despite the underlying cause of diabetes insipidus, the symptoms are the same. They include: Diagnosis of diabetes insipidus Your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical exam and take a detailed history of your pet’s health. The symptoms of diabetes insipidus are very similar to other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus (“sugar diabetes”), Cushing’s syndrome, liver or kidney disease, Addison’s disease, and hypo-/hyperthyroidism. Your veterinarian may Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes in dogs is a complex disease caused by either a lack of the hormone insulin or an inadequate response to insulin. After a dog eats, his digestive system breaks food into various components, including glucose-which is carried into his cells by insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas. When a dog does not produce insulin or cannot utilize it normally, his blood sugar levels elevate. The result is hyperglycemia, which, if left untreated, can cause many complicated health problems for a dog. It is important to understand, however, that diabetes is considered a manageable disorder-and many diabetic dogs can lead happy, healthy lives. Diabetes can be classified as either Type 1 (lack of insulin production) or Type II (impaired insulin production along with an inadequate response to the hormone.) The most common form of the disease in dogs is Type 1, insulin-dependent diabetes, which occurs when the pancreas is incapable of producing or secreting adequate levels of insulin. Dogs who have Type I require insulin therapy to survive. Type II diabetes is found in cats and is a lack of normal response to insulin. The following symptoms should be investigated as they could be indicators that your dog has diabetes: Change in appetite Excessive thirst/increase in water consumption Weight loss Increased urination Unusually sweet-smelling or fruity breath Lethargy Dehydration Urinary tract infections Vomiting Cataract formation, blindness The exact cause of diabetes is unknown. However, autoimmune disease, genetics, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, certain medications and abnormal protein deposits in the pancreas can play a major role in the development of the disease. It is thought that obese dogs and female dogs may run a greater risk of developing diabetes later in life (6-9 Continue reading >>

Diagnosis And Detection

Diagnosis And Detection

Diabetes is one of many conditions that can affect your dog and cause visible changes in behavior and other signs. That’s why it is important that your dog be thoroughly examined by a veterinarian at least once a year or more frequently, if your veterinarian advises. Knowing the signs of diabetes is the first step in protecting your dog’s health. If any of these statements describes your pet, speak with your veterinarian about the possibility of diabetes: Drinks more water than usual (polydipsia) Urinates more frequently, produces more urine per day, or has “accidents” in the house (polyuria) Always acts hungry (polyphagia), but maintains or loses weight Has cloudy eyes When evaluating your dog for diabetes, your veterinarian may ask about these signs and will check your dog’s general health to rule out the possibility of other conditions or infections. In addition, your veterinarian will test your dog’s urine for the presence of glucose and ketones and, if indicated, will then measure your dog’s blood glucose concentration. A diagnosis of diabetes only becomes definite when glucose is found in the urine and at a persistently high concentration in the blood. Drinking large quantities of water, urinating frequently, and eating more than usual (or begging more often for food) all suggest the possibility of diabetes. Continue reading >>

What Is Canine Diabetes? > How Common Is It?

What Is Canine Diabetes? > How Common Is It?

Diabetes in Dogs Canine diabetes is quite common—anywhere between 1 in 100 to 1 in 500 dogs develops diabetes,1 and those numbers are expected to increase. Any dog could develop diabetes, but certain breeds are more likely to develop the condition. These breeds appear to be at greater risk for developing canine diabetes: Cocker Spaniels Dachshunds Doberman Pinschers German Shepherds Golden Retrievers Labrador Retrievers Pomeranians Terriers Toy Poodles Diabetes typically occurs when dogs are between 4 to 14 years old. Unspayed (intact) female dogs are twice as likely as male dogs to suffer from diabetes. Reference: 1. Panciera DL, Thomas CB, Eicker SW, Atkins CE. Epizootiologic patterns of diabetes mellitus in cats: 333 cases (1980–1986). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1990;197(11):1504–1508. Continue reading >>

5 Reasons To Test Your Dog For Diabetes

5 Reasons To Test Your Dog For Diabetes

Did you know that some authorities feel that 1 out of every 100 dogs that reaches 12 years of age develops diabetes mellitus1? Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a hormonal problem where the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin, the hormone that helps push sugar (“glucose”) into the body’s cells. Without the insulin, the body’s cells are starving for sugar; unfortunately, this then stimulates the body to produce more and more sugar (in an attempt to feed the cells). That’s why your dog’s blood sugar is so high (what we call a “hyperglycemia”) with diabetes mellitus. Without insulin, the sugar can’t get into the cells; hence, why you need to give insulin to your dog with a tiny syringe twice a day. In dogs, this is a disease that can be costly to treat and requires twice-a-day insulin along with frequent veterinary visits for the rest of your dog’s life. So how do you know if your dog has diabetes? Clinical signs of diabetes mellitus in dogs include: Dilute urine Muscle wasting Ravenous appetite Frequent urinary tract infections Weakness Unkempt or poor hair coat Blindness secondary to cataracts Neuropathies (nerve problems) As your dog gets older, it’s worth talking to your veterinarian about doing routine blood work to make sure your dog is healthy. This blood work will help rule out kidney and liver problems, anemia, infections, electrolyte problems and diabetes mellitus. The sooner you recognize the clinical signs, the sooner your dog can be treated with insulin and the less complications we see as a result. So, if you notice any of the signs above, get to a veterinarian right away. Now, continue on for 5 important reasons to test your dog for diabetes: Diabetes mellitus can shorten the lifespan of your dog, as secondary complications and infections Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Diabetes In Dogs

What You Need To Know About Diabetes In Dogs

What You Need to Know About Diabetes in Dogs Here are five key insights that can help you avoid diabetes or manage the disease in your dog. Diabetes in dogs (and cats) is certainly not uncommon. In fact, current research estimates that roughly one in every 500 canines will develop diabetes in their lifetime. Certain inherited breed tendencies and risk factors may predispose your pet to the condition; but nonetheless, incidence of this disorder is growing at an unprecedented rate. Basically, diabetes mellitus represents a problem with the way your pups body processes sugar. Cells in a dogs body run on sugar known as glucose, which is made available when dietary carbohydrates are processed during digestion. Cells extract glucose from the blood using a pancreatic hormone called insulin. When the body begins to under-produce or misuse insulin, cells dont take in enough glucose, amino acids, or electrolytes. Simultaneously, sugar begins to build up in the bloodstream. This causes cells to become under-nourished; while various organs become bathed in sugar and may suffer eventual damage. At present, diabetes isnt curable. It is, fortunately, treatable though treatment can involve regular glucose monitoring, ongoing dietary modifications, administration of targeted drugs, recurrent vet visits, and a constant watchful eye. If youre like me, you would undertake all this in a heartbeat to help your furry friend live a longer, healthier life. But its certainly a time-consuming process, and often expensive. With that in mind, here are five key insights that can help you understand diabetes more clearly and remove unnecessary hurdles that may lead to the ailment and/or disrupt your pets ongoing quality of life. I used to think canines were susceptible to Type 1 diabetes. But there Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Common In Puppies?

Is Diabetes Common In Puppies?

Is it common for puppies to get diabetes? If so, can it go into remission so that she doesn’t need shots for the rest of her life? Laura Concord, NH Diabetes is very uncommon in puppies. Diabetes mellitus (known simply as diabetes) is a common disease of cats and dogs. It occurs when the body is unable to regulate blood sugar levels. Diabetic animals have chronically high levels of sugar in their blood. The most common symptoms of diabetes are increased thirst, increased appetite, and weight loss. Diabetes is a life-threatening syndrome that must be treated. In my experience, diabetes is most common in middle aged animals. I have never diagnosed diabetes in a puppy or kitten. I have, however, seen high blood sugar levels in puppies and kittens. Very young animals may develop temporarily high levels of sugar in their blood after meals or after treatment with IV fluids that contain sugar. They are also prone to episodes of low blood sugar when they haven’t eaten for long periods. I am therefore wondering about the circumstances of your puppy’s diagnosis with diabetes. Have multiple blood sugar tests yielded high results? Is there sugar in her urine? Has her blood sugar been tested after she has been fasted for several hours? If your veterinarian has performed rigorous testing and concluded that your puppy is diabetic, then you will have to administer insulin. Some animals do experience remission from diabetes and do not require injections for their entire lives. If your vet hasn’t performed the sort of testing listed above, I’d recommend it. There may be a chance that your puppy isn’t diabetic after all. For more information on canine diabetes, visit my website: And there also is information on feline diabetes: Photo: Tina was diabetic, but not when she was a Continue reading >>

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