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Can A Puppy Get Diabetes?

5 Reasons To Test Your Dog For Diabetes

5 Reasons To Test Your Dog For Diabetes

Did you know that some authorities feel that 1 out of every 100 dogs that reaches 12 years of age develops diabetes mellitus1? Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a hormonal problem where the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin, the hormone that helps push sugar (“glucose”) into the body’s cells. Without the insulin, the body’s cells are starving for sugar; unfortunately, this then stimulates the body to produce more and more sugar (in an attempt to feed the cells). That’s why your dog’s blood sugar is so high (what we call a “hyperglycemia”) with diabetes mellitus. Without insulin, the sugar can’t get into the cells; hence, why you need to give insulin to your dog with a tiny syringe twice a day. In dogs, this is a disease that can be costly to treat and requires twice-a-day insulin along with frequent veterinary visits for the rest of your dog’s life. So how do you know if your dog has diabetes? Clinical signs of diabetes mellitus in dogs include: Dilute urine Muscle wasting Ravenous appetite Frequent urinary tract infections Weakness Unkempt or poor hair coat Blindness secondary to cataracts Neuropathies (nerve problems) As your dog gets older, it’s worth talking to your veterinarian about doing routine blood work to make sure your dog is healthy. This blood work will help rule out kidney and liver problems, anemia, infections, electrolyte problems and diabetes mellitus. The sooner you recognize the clinical signs, the sooner your dog can be treated with insulin and the less complications we see as a result. So, if you notice any of the signs above, get to a veterinarian right away. Now, continue on for 5 important reasons to test your dog for diabetes: Diabetes mellitus can shorten the lifespan of your dog, as secondary complications and infections Continue reading >>

Feeding And Treating Your Diabetic Pet

Feeding And Treating Your Diabetic Pet

If your dog or cat is diagnosed with diabetes, this will mean a lifetime of treatment for your pet, starting with insulin injections. When caring for a diabetic dog or cat, pet owners also must pay closer attention to their pet’s diet. There are a lot of important things to consider when feeding your four-legged family member suffering from diabetes, even if your pet is just starting to show early signs of this disease. Symptoms of Diabetes Diabetes is a medical condition where your pet’s body doesn’t produce enough insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. There are a few telling signs your dog or cat could have diabetes. Increased Urination Increased Thirst Increased Appetite Weight Loss Caring for a Pet with Diabetes There are several areas you’ll want to keep a close eye on when feeding a canine or feline suffering from diabetes. Below are some key points to remember: Watch water intake. First, a major symptom of diabetes is when your pet drinks abnormally large amounts of water. Even after diagnosis, keep and eye on how much your pet drinks. Get in a routine. Feed your pet the exact recommended amount of food ever day. Also, find a mealtime for your pet and stick to it. Sweat with your pet. Make sure your dog or cat is getting regular exercise to help reach a healthy body weight. Then keep exercising to maintain that weight. Inquire before the injection. It’s important your pet actually eats his or her meal to keep a consistent blood sugar level. If your pet doesn’t eat, contact your vet before giving your dog or cat an insulin shot. Track treatment. Keep a very close record of your pet’s meals and insulin injections. If friends or family must care for your pet, ask they do the same. It’s important to eliminate any chance of an accidenta Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Everything You Need To Know To Keep Them Healthy

Diabetes In Dogs: Everything You Need To Know To Keep Them Healthy

Emotional Support Animal Letters Blog Diabetes in Dogs: Everything You Need to Know to Keep Them Healthy Diabetes in Dogs: Everything You Need to Know to Keep Them Healthy The key to managing diabetes in dogs is early detection, proper care, and a better understanding of this illness and how it works. While no pet owner ever wants their pet to get sick, unfortunately, dogs and cats do get ill from time-to-time. One of the many illnesses that impact dogs today is diabetes. Much like diabetes in humans, the earlier you can catch this condition, the better, and while it may change lives it is possible for your canine companion to live comfortably with this disease, under proper management. With the Correct Monitoring and Management, Your Doggo Can Live a Long and Happy Life! If your dog gets diagnosed with diabetes, chances are you will have a number of questions swirling around in your head. The most important thing to understand first is exactly whatdiabetes is and what it means in dogs. Diabetes is actually a rather complex disease that is caused by either a lack of insulin (which is an important hormone) or the bodies inability to respond properly to insulin in the body. Type 1 Diabetes-Means a lack of insulin production. This is the most common form of diabetes in dogs and cats. Type II Diabetes-Means an inability to respond to the insulin production. Insulin production is also impaired in dogs with this condition. When insulin isnt doing its job in the body, a dogs blood sugar will level which results in hyperglycemia, and if left unattended, a number of other serious health complications, especially with the pancreas. Here is a List of the Symptoms of Diabetes in Dogs: Spotting diabetes in dogs early is essential for your doggos quality of life and overall well-bei Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

There are two forms of diabetes in dogs: diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes insipidus is sometimes called "drinking diabetes" and diabetes mellitus is also known as "sugar diabetes". Diabetes insipidus is a very rare disorder that results in failure to regulate body water content. Diabetes mellitus is more common in dogs, and is frequently diagnosed in dogs five years of age or older. This is also known as adult-onset diabetes. There is a congenital form that occurs in puppies called juvenile diabetes, but this is rare in dogs. Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas. This is a small but vital organ located near the stomach. It has two significant populations of cells. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion. The other group, called beta-cells, produce the hormone insulin. Simply put, diabetes mellitus is a failure of the pancreatic beta cells to regulate blood sugar. Some people with diabetes take insulin shots, and others take oral medication. Is this true for dogs? In humans, two types of diabetes mellitus have been discovered. Both types are similar in that there is a failure to regulate blood sugar, but the basic mechanisms of disease differ somewhat between the two groups. Most dogs with diabetes mellitus will require daily insulin injections to regulate their blood glucose. Type I or Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus results from total or near-complete destruction of the beta-cells. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilise blood glucose levels. Type II or Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus is different because some insulin-producing cells remain. However, the amount produced is insufficient, there is a Continue reading >>

How To Treat Hypoglycemia In Puppies

How To Treat Hypoglycemia In Puppies

Twitching, shaking, trembling, or shivering Without prompt attention and first aid, your puppy could die. Fortunately, when you recognize the signs early in the process, low blood sugar is easy to reverse at home. In almost all cases, the puppy will respond very quickly to treatment, within five or 10 minutes. However, if treatment doesnt reverse the symptoms within this time frame, take your puppy to the veterinarian immediately as something else could have caused the signs. Even when your dog responds quickly its a good idea to have the vet check it sometime that day to be sure everything is as it should be and determine the cause in order to prevent it again in the future. When you catch the symptoms early and seek treatment immediately, most puppies are fine. Without prompt help, puppies can fall into a coma and their breathing or heartbeat may stop. When the blood sugar drops, puppies cant regulate their body temperature . Its important to keep the dog warm until the glucose level rises enough to burn for energy. Wrap your puppy in a blanket. Getting sugar into the puppy will counteract all these symptoms. Often, youll notice the wooziness when its been a while since the puppys last meal. So as soon as you notice puppy woozy behavior, offer it something to eat. Make it something smelly and yummy that you know hell eagerly snarf up, like a tablespoon or two of canned food. A highly concentrated sugar source like Karo syrup, pancake syrup or honey can work. Just be sure your puppy is still able to swallow before giving about a teaspoonful of the sugar source. If the dog is very groggy, offer a bit of water first. You can use a syringe if the dog doesn't lap up the sugar water. Check to be sure the dog swallows, and then offer the syrup. It should be able to lap it u Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pets

Diabetes In Pets

Diabetes is more common in older pets, but it can also occur in younger or pregnant pets. The disease is more manageable if it is detected early and managed with the help of your veterinarian. The good news is that with proper monitoring, treatment, and diet and exercise, diabetic pets can lead long and happy lives. Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, is a condition that occurs when the body can not use glucose (a type of sugar) normally. Glucose is the main source of energy for the body’s cells. The levels of glucose in the blood are primarily controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made by the pancreas. As food passes through the intestines during digestion, sugars are one of the nutrients absorbed from the food. The sugars are transported into the cells that line the intestines and are converted into simple sugars (including) glucose. The simple sugars are then absorbed into the bloodstream for circulation and delivery to the whole body’s tissues and cells. Insulin is required for the transfer of glucose from the bloodstream to the cells. If there is not enough insulin or the body is unable to use the insulin, glucose accumulates in high levels in the blood – a condition called hyperglycemia. When the blood glucose reaches a certain level, the glucose overflows into the urine (this is called glucosuria) and draws large volumes of water with it. This is why diabetic pets often drink more water and urinate more frequently and in larger amounts. In diabetics, regardless of the source of the sugar or the amount of sugar in the blood, there is not enough glucose transported into the body’s cells. As a result, there is not enough energy for the cells to function normally, and, the tissues become starved for energy. This state of metabolic “starvation” caus Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes In Dogs? The Signs, Symptoms And What To Do About It

What Causes Diabetes In Dogs? The Signs, Symptoms And What To Do About It

Did you know one out of every 300 dogs is diagnosed with diabetes? Especially in senior and middle aged dogs, diabetes is becoming frighteningly common in dogs today. Once your dog gets diabetes, he will most likely need insulin for the rest of his life. So it’s really important to do everything you can to prevent your dog from becoming diabetic. There are many things that can contribute to the risk of your dog getting diabetes … but the good news is, there are also lots of things you can do to help prevent it and minimize the risk. So we called on an expert to tell us how to do that. At Raw Roundup 2017, Dr Jean Hofve gave a talk on canine diabetes and its connection to diet and environmental factors and the best ways to prevent it. But first, what is diabetes and what’s the difference between the two types of the disease? What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is all about glucose and how the body handles it. All cells use glucose as their primary source of energy. The pancreas produces the hormones that control glucose … primarily insulin and glucagon. The pancreas is mostly made up of tissue that secretes digestive enzymes … but about 5% of the pancreas is made up of beta cells that produce insulin.The body’s cells need glucose for energy – it’s their primary fuel. But glucose can’t get into those cells without the help of insulin. Dr Hofve explains insulin as the key to a lock … the cells need the “key” (insulin) to let the glucose in. When glucose can’t get into the cells without insulin, it builds up in the blood. This causes hyperglycemia, meaning too much sugar in the blood (hyper = too much, glyc = sugar and emia = in the blood) This is why the pancreas and its creation of insulin is so important. And when it’s not working right, your dog can b Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes In Dogs? The Signs, Symptoms And What To Do About It

What Causes Diabetes In Dogs? The Signs, Symptoms And What To Do About It

Did you know one out of every 300 dogs is diagnosed with diabetes? Especially in senior and middle aged dogs, diabetes is becoming frighteningly common in dogs today. Once your dog gets diabetes, he will most likely need insulin for the rest of his life. So its really important to do everything you can to prevent your dog from becoming diabetic. There are many things that can contribute to the risk of your dog getting diabetes but the good news is, there are also lots of things you can do to help prevent it and minimize the risk. So we called on an expert to tell us how to do that. At Raw Roundup 2017, Dr Jean Hofve gave a talk on canine diabetes and its connection to diet and environmental factors and the best ways to prevent it. But first, what is diabetes and whats the difference between the two types of the disease? Diabetes is all about glucose and how the body handles it.All cells use glucose as their primary source of energy. The pancreas produces the hormones that control glucose primarily insulin and glucagon. The pancreas is mostly made up of tissue that secretes digestive enzymes but about 5% of the pancreas is made up of beta cells that produce insulin.The bodys cells need glucose for energy its their primary fuel. But glucose cant get into those cells without the help of insulin. Dr Hofve explains insulin as the key to a lock the cells need the key (insulin) to let the glucose in. When glucose cant get into the cells without insulin, it builds up in the blood. This causes hyperglycemia, meaning too much sugar in the blood (hyper = too much, glyc = sugar and emia = in the blood) This is why the pancreas and its creation of insulin is so important. And when its not working right, your dog can become diabetic. There are two types of diabetes and were starting Continue reading >>

5 Signs Your Pet May Have Diabetes

5 Signs Your Pet May Have Diabetes

1 / 6 Dogs and Cats Can Develop Diabetes, Too Have a beloved dog or cat? You may be surprised to learn that, like people, our pets can develop chronic health conditions such as diabetes, and their risk is also greater if they are overweight or obese. As the number of Americans with diabetes continues to grow, a similar trend is also happening among cats and dogs in the United States, according to Christopher G. Byers, DVM, a board-certified veterinary specialist at MidWest Veterinary Specialty Hospital in Omaha, Neb. Dogs develop an insulin-dependent type of diabetes that is similar to type 1 diabetes in humans, says Dr. Byers. "Cats are quite different in that they actually develop a form similar to type 2 diabetes in people." Pet parents, take note. Watch out for these five warning signs of diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pets

Diabetes And Pets

Tweet Pets such as cats and dogs can also develop diabetes. All pet owners worry about their animals so knowing whether or not your dog or cat is showing symptoms of diabetes can help save their life. What are the causes of diabetes in animals? Just like in humans, pets with diabetes may not be able to produce enough insulin, or possibly their bodies do not allow them to use insulin properly. Insulin is produced by the pancreas, and allows glucose in the blood to enter cells, allowing the body to properly function. Just like people, pets can suffer from both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. What are the symptoms of diabetes in animals? Diabetes symptoms and the complications of the disease are also similar to humans. The following symptoms could indicate that your animal has diabetes. Diabetes symptoms in pets Symptoms in pets can include: Weight loss, often despite an increased appetite Excessive thirst and urination Breakdown of body fat and development of ketacidosis Lower appetite Pungent breath with a chemical smell Complications associated with diabetes My animal looks very sick, could this be pet diabetes? Your pet may be in the throes of hypoglycaemia or low blood sugar. Hypoglycaemia can occur in animals due to insulin overdose. The symptoms of hypoglycaemia include the following: Seizure Wobbliness Weakness Dullness Sleepiness Restlessness Coma When pets are hypoglycaemic they should never be left alone overnight. The complications of untreated diabetes can be awful. These include cataract formation and loss of sight in dogs, and both nerve damage and hind-end weakness in cats. Diabetes treatment for pets Insulin is generally regarded as the benchmark treatment for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Your vet can prescribe special insulin. Owners of diabetic pets shou Continue reading >>

Diagnosis And Detection

Diagnosis And Detection

Diabetes is one of many conditions that can affect your dog and cause visible changes in behavior and other signs. That’s why it is important that your dog be thoroughly examined by a veterinarian at least once a year or more frequently, if your veterinarian advises. Knowing the signs of diabetes is the first step in protecting your dog’s health. If any of these statements describes your pet, speak with your veterinarian about the possibility of diabetes: Drinks more water than usual (polydipsia) Urinates more frequently, produces more urine per day, or has “accidents” in the house (polyuria) Always acts hungry (polyphagia), but maintains or loses weight Has cloudy eyes When evaluating your dog for diabetes, your veterinarian may ask about these signs and will check your dog’s general health to rule out the possibility of other conditions or infections. In addition, your veterinarian will test your dog’s urine for the presence of glucose and ketones and, if indicated, will then measure your dog’s blood glucose concentration. A diagnosis of diabetes only becomes definite when glucose is found in the urine and at a persistently high concentration in the blood. Drinking large quantities of water, urinating frequently, and eating more than usual (or begging more often for food) all suggest the possibility of diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus (water Diabetes) In Cats And Dogs

Diabetes Insipidus (water Diabetes) In Cats And Dogs

Overview of diabetes insipidus Most everyone is familiar with the term “diabetes;” it is a common human disease. But our four-legged friends can get diabetes, too. There are different types of diabetes, one being diabetes insipidus—an uncommon disorder that affects our pet’s ability to conserve water. Because of this disease, your dog or cat urinates and drinks water excessively in an attempt to keep up with the loss of water through the urine. There are two types of diabetes insipidus. One is due to the insufficient production of a hormone called antidiuretic hormone (ADH) that regulates the body’s ability to absorb water from the kidneys. The other form of diabetes insipidus is caused by the kidneys’ inability to respond to ADH. The kidneys are responsible for regulating the water in your pet’s body. So, without this hormone or the kidney’s response to it, your dog or cat can’t conserve water. Access to water is critical for pets with diabetes insipidus—without it, a dog or cat can become dehydrated in as little as 4–6 hours. Generally, diabetes insipidus is considered idiopathic, which means the ultimate cause is unknown. Possible causes include congenital issues, trauma, metabolic conditions, kidney disease, adverse reactions to certain medications, or tumors of the pituitary gland. Despite the underlying cause of diabetes insipidus, the symptoms are the same. They include: Diagnosis of diabetes insipidus Your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical exam and take a detailed history of your pet’s health. The symptoms of diabetes insipidus are very similar to other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus (“sugar diabetes”), Cushing’s syndrome, liver or kidney disease, Addison’s disease, and hypo-/hyperthyroidism. Your veterinarian may Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes is a chronic disease that can affect dogs and cats and other animals (including apes, pigs, and horses) as well as humans. Although diabetes cant be cured, it can be managed very successfully. Diabetes mellitus , or sugar diabetes, is the type of diabetes seen most often in dogs. It is a metabolism disorder. Metabolism refers to how the body converts food to energy. To understand what diabetes is, it helps to understand some of this process. The conversion of food nutrients into energy to power the bodys cells involves an ongoing interplay of two things: Glucose: essential fuel for the bodys cells. When food is digested, the body breaks down some of the nutrients into glucose, a type of sugar that is a vital source of energy for certain body cells and organs. The glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood, which then transports the glucose throughout the body. Insulin: in charge of fuel delivery. Meanwhile, an important organ next to the stomach called the pancreas releases the hormone insulin into the body. Insulin acts as a gatekeeper that tells cells to grab glucose and other nutrients out of the bloodstream and use them as fuel. With diabetes, the glucose-insulin connection isnt working as it should. Diabetes occurs in dogs in two forms: Insulin-deficiency diabetesThis is when the dogs body isnt producing enough insulin. This happens when the pancreas is damaged or otherwise not functioning properly. Dogs with this type of diabetes need daily shots to replace the missing insulin. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. Insulin-resistance diabetesThis is when the pancreas is producing some insulin, but the dogs body isnt utilizing the insulin as it should. The cells arent responding to the insulins message, so glucose isnt being pulled Continue reading >>

6 Signs Your Pet May Have Diabetes

6 Signs Your Pet May Have Diabetes

Diabetes is a glucose control problem that can affect both dogs and cats. A growing epidemic, raising awareness about diabetes is vital to identifying and treating the disorder early. Does My Pet Have Diabetes? Diabetes is a complex disease caused by either a lack of the hormone insulin or an inadequate response to insulin. Diabetes can develop gradually, over time, and the signs may not be apparent at first. There are a few signs to look for especially in older pets. 1. Extreme Thirst and Increased Urination The foremost clinical sign of diabetes is increased water consumption (“polydipsia”) and consequently increased urination (“polyuria”). Thirst is sometimes difficult to quantify. Is my dog drinking excessive amounts of water or just temporarily thirsty or hot? This must be evaluated over time and sometimes is vague in small dogs and cats. It’s easier to spot in large dogs, because their water bowl will empty quickly. The resulting urine will be diluted or clear, almost like water. 2. Increased Appetite and Weight Loss Dogs with diabetes will lose weight although may be still eating normally, or even appear hungrier than usual. That’s because the body can’t convert the food into energy – due to either a lack of insulin or insulin resistance. Since they are not getting energy from food, their body starts burning fat and muscle for energy, causing a reduction in overall body weight. 3. Chronic or Sudden Bouts of Fatigue Feeling fatigued or lethargic is also a sign of diabetes, and can be caused by blood sugar swings on both sides of the spectrum. When their blood sugar is high, it stops their body from getting the energy they need from food, so they are tired all the time. Blood sugar dips can cause sudden bouts of fatigue. 4. Depression and Vomiting A Continue reading >>

All About Dog Diabetes

All About Dog Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that impacts lots of mammals including humans and dogs. It occurs when the body’s ability to produce or respond to the hormone insulin is impaired. Canine diabetes is incurable, but it’s a manageable disorder. With proper treatment, diabetic dogs can lead long, healthy, happy lives. How does canine diabetes work? The most common form of diabetes in dogs is diabetes mellitus, or “sugar diabetes.” As its name implies, sugar diabetes is a condition that affects your dog’s blood sugar level. A small organ near the stomach, the pancreas, is responsible for regulating blood sugar by producing insulin. Here’s how it works: when your dog eats, her food is broken down into tiny components including carbohydrates. Carbs are then converted into simple sugars, including glucose. The pancreas releases insulin go help turn glucose to fuel inside your dog’s cells. ADVERTISEMENT If there’s not enough insulin available, glucose can’t get into cells. This can lead to a dangerously high glucose concentration in your dog’s bloodstream. Two forms of dog diabetes In a healthy dog, the pancreas produces insulin to moderate the sugar in their system. In a diabetic dog, the pancreas either can’t produce enough insulin, or the dog’s body can’t effectively use the insulin it does produce. These are the two forms of diabetes: Insulin-deficiency diabetes: the most common type of canine diabetes. Occurs when the dog’s body doesn’t produce enough insulin. Dogs with insulin-deficiency diabetes need daily insulin shots to replace what their body can’t produce. Insulin-resistance diabetes: when the pancreas produces some insulin, but the dog’s body doesn’t use the insulin as it should, causing high blood sugar levels. This type of diabete Continue reading >>

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