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Can A Man With Type 2 Diabetes Get A Woman Pregnant

How To Get Pregnant If My Husband Has Diabetes?

How To Get Pregnant If My Husband Has Diabetes?

Diabetes is such a common disease, it affects many people of all ages. When a woman is trying to get pregnant, she may wonder how her husband’s diabetes will affect her fertility. Diabetes is such a common disease, it affects many people of all ages. When a woman is trying to get pregnant, she may wonder how her husband’s diabetes will affect her fertility. The most important thing for couples who want to get pregnant with diabetes is going to be constant contact with their doctor or health care provider every step of the way. Claim Your 20 Free Pregnancy Tests – Click Here It is also important to remember that if you do get pregnant and your partner has diabetes, your baby will be at risk for diabetes as well. This does not mean that your baby will automatically have diabetes, just that he or she will be at a greater risk of developing the disease. When it comes to getting pregnant with diabetes, communication with your doctor is key. There are several studies that show that diabetes can affect a man’s fertility, including his sperm count and motility. Sometimes, when a man has diabetes, assisted reproductive techniques like in vitro fertilization are the best route, especially if he has issues related to sperm. Remember that getting pregnant when you have a partner with diabetes is not impossible, but it might be a little more difficult, and take a little more time or creativity to do so. ConceiveEasy® TTC Kit™ is the most complete fertility system available over the counter. Clinically proven to dramatically increase your chances of conception and help you get pregnant fast from the very first use. And now for a limited time, Try a FREE starter pack today & receive 20 FREE pregnancy tests and a FREE Digital BBT Thermometer! Male fertility Continue reading >>

Women’s Top Diabetes Concerns

Women’s Top Diabetes Concerns

Managing type 2 diabetes means being good to yourself. “Diabetes requires self-care to do it well,” says Robin Goland, MD, diabetes research director at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. “While many women are comfortable at taking care of others, it can be hard for them to take care of themselves.” Your first line of defense is a healthy diet and exercise plan, so talk to your doctor about creating one that will likely include: Getting at least 30 minutes of physical activity on most days. Anything that gets your heart rate up and causes you to sweat a little is beneficial, even if it’s gardening, walking, or cleaning your house. Eating foods that will keep your blood sugar levels in check. That means choosing high-fiber foods, swapping out white starchy foods for whole grains, putting lots of vegetables on your plate, and steering clear of sweetened beverages, including fruit juice. Ask your doctor who else can help you, like a nutritionist or a diabetes specialist. Having diabetes makes heart disease more likely. That's all the more reason to follow your doctor's guidelines about diet and exercise. Also, track your blood pressure, says OB/GYN and diabetes educator Cassandra Henderson, MD, of New York’s Lincoln Hospital and Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Keeping your cholesterol levels in check will also help protect your heart. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Male Fertility - Infertility, Retrograde Ejaculation, Sperm Quality

Diabetes And Male Fertility - Infertility, Retrograde Ejaculation, Sperm Quality

Erectile dysfunction is a common problem associated with diabetes that causes difficulty with getting or maintaining an erection. It is caused by neuropathy (nerve damage) and reduced blood circulation typically as a result of less well controlled diabetes or long standing diabetes. High levels of blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol are all associated with an increased risk of erectile difficulties. Getting these under control, as well as cutting down on alcohol and quitting smoking can help to reduce the effects of ED. A number of different treatment options are also available. Ejaculation problems can also result if nerves in the penis become damaged . Lack of nerve sensitivity is one problem which can affect the ability to ejaculation. Retarded, delayed and impaired ejaculation are all terms which describe a difficulty in achieving ejaculation. Note that retarded ejaculation can also be caused or influenced by psychological problems, age and by certain medications. If impaired ejaculation is brought on psychological problems then treatment, such as through counselling or psychosexual therapy . Ejaculation problems caused by nerve damage tend not to be treatable but it may be possible to find sex positions that result in improved nerve stimulation. Assisted reproduction technology (ART), such as IVF, can help with treating infertility if conception via intercourse is problematic or impossible. Another problem that may result from neuropathy ( autonomic neuropathy ) is retrograde ejaculation. This occurs if nerves are unable to control the muscles of the bladder from closing at the point of ejaculation, which results in semen entering the bladder rather than exiting via the penis. Retrograde ejaculation does not cause health problems but can impair conceptio Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fertility: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Fertility

Diabetes And Fertility: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Fertility

You’ve have been trying with no luck to get pregnant and have not been able to a find a reason for your infertility. You may have tried a fertility cleanse, begun eating a fertility diet, and are taking all the right supplements and herbs, but are still having trouble conceiving. It may be time to have a simple blood test to determine if your glucose levels are too high. With the rates of Type II diabetes rising every year in the U.S., more and more infertility specialists are looking toward this health issue as a main cause of some otherwise unexplained infertility cases they see. According to the American Diabetes Association, there are more than 200,000 new cases of Type II diabetes diagnosed every year, with another 2.4% of the general childbearing population suffering from the disease but not knowing it. When it comes to diabetes and infertility the answer is clear: there is a connection. No, in many cases (especially among women), diabetes alone does not keep them from getting pregnant, but it oftentimes keeps them from staying pregnant. In many cases, say fertility doctors, “a woman with higher than normal glucose levels does get pregnant month after month. Unfortunately her diabetes status prevents that embryo from implanting in the uterus, causing a miscarriage before she ever realizes she is pregnant.” In this case, the diabetes isn’t preventing conception, but is preventing an ongoing pregnancy. High glucose levels are reported to increase a woman’s chances of miscarriage by 30-60% according to statistics released by the American Diabetes Association. Even when implantation does occur, there are other risks to consider, including: An increased risk of birth defects due to damage caused to embryonic cells form the high levels of glucose in the blood Continue reading >>

Pregnancy In Women With Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes

Pregnancy In Women With Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes

Being well-prepared for pregnancy can help reduce the risk of complications, keep you healthy throughout your pregnancy, and give your baby a good start in life. Blood glucose (sugar) control is a daily challenge for people with diabetes. Hormonal changes during pregnancy make diabetes even more challenging. The majority of women who properly control their diabetes before and during pregnancy have successful pregnancies, and give birth to beautiful, healthy babies. Risks and potential complications Women with diabetes have a higher risk of miscarriage and of having a baby with birth defects (heart and kidney defects, for example). This risk significantly increases if blood glucose (sugar) control is not optimal, especially at conception and during the first 3 months of pregnancy, when the baby's organs are forming. If your blood glucose (sugar) levels are poorly controlled, you should avoid becoming pregnant until your healthcare team has helped you improve your blood sugar control. Risks for the mother: Miscarriage Rapidly worsening retinopathy (damage to the retina caused by diabetes) Rapidly worsening nephropathy (kidney damage caused by diabetes) and kidney failure A more difficult vaginal delivery (because of the baby’s weight) requiring special maneuvers by the obstetrician or the use of forceps or suction Caesarean delivery Gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia (a pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure and significant swelling) Excess amniotic fluid, which can cause premature labour Risks for the baby: Defects (especially if the diabetes is poorly controlled in the first 3 months of pregnancy) of the heart, kidneys, urogenital tract, brain, spinal cord and backbone Higher-than-average birth weight (more than 4 kg or 9 lbs.) or, convers Continue reading >>

Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes And Pregnancy

Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes And Pregnancy

Problems of Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well controlled in a pregnant woman with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes could lead to problems for the woman and the baby: Birth Defects The organs of the baby form during the first two months of pregnancy, often before a woman knows that she is pregnant. Blood sugar that is not in control can affect those organs while they are being formed and cause serious birth defects in the developing baby, such as those of the brain, spine, and heart. Download Chart[PDF – 167KB] An Extra Large Baby Diabetes that is not well controlled causes the baby’s blood sugar to be high. The baby is “overfed” and grows extra large. Besides causing discomfort to the woman during the last few months of pregnancy, an extra large baby can lead to problems during delivery for both the mother and the baby. The mother might need a C-Section to deliver the baby. The baby can be born with nerve damage due to pressure on the shoulder during delivery. C- Section (Cesarean Section) A C-section is a surgery to deliver the baby through the mother’s belly. A woman who has diabetes that is not well controlled has a higher chance of needing a C-section to deliver the baby. When the baby is delivered by a C-section, it takes longer for the woman to recover from childbirth. High Blood Pressure (Preeclampsia) When a pregnant woman has high blood pressure, protein in her urine, and often swelling in fingers and toes that doesn’t go away, she might have preeclampsia. It is a serious problem that needs to be watched closely and managed by her doctor. High blood pressure can cause harm to both the woman and her unborn baby. It might lead to the baby being born early and also could cause seizures or a stroke (a blood clot or a bleed in the brain that ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes May Affect Men's Fertility

Diabetes May Affect Men's Fertility

May 2, 2007 -- Men with type 1 diabetes may have more DNA damage in their sperm, possibly hampering fertility, a preliminary study shows. The study was small and doesn't prove that type 1 diabetes causes male infertility. But the findings deserve further research, write the researchers, who are based in Belfast, Northern Ireland. They included Ishola Agbaje, MD, of the Reproductive Medicine Research Group at Queen's University of Belfast. Agbaje and colleagues studied semen and blood samples from 27 men with type 1 diabetes. Those men weren't necessarily infertile; they were invited to participate in the study while getting routine diabetes checkups. For comparison, the researchers also studied semen and blood samples from 29 men without diabetes who were undergoing infertility tests. Both groups of men were in their early to mid-30s, on average. The men with diabetes had lower semen volume than the men without diabetes. But the diabetes patients' semen volume was still within the normal range set by the World Health Organization (WHO). Sperm count, shape, and motion (motility) were similar in both groups of men. But when the researchers analyzed the sperms' DNA, they found more DNA damage in the diabetes patients' sperm. Sperm damage may increase infertility, note the researchers. Many factors can cause DNA damage. It's not clear whether diabetes was responsible for the DNA damage seen in the study. The study didn't include any men without diabetes who weren't undergoing infertility tests. Such men might have even less DNA damage in their sperm than the study groups, the researchers note. Agbaje's team calls for further studies on DNA sperm damage -- and its possible fertility consequences -- in men with type 1 diabetes. The study appears online in the journal Human Re Continue reading >>

Pre-existing Diabetes And Pregnancy

Pre-existing Diabetes And Pregnancy

If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and are planning a family, you should plan your pregnancy as much as possible. Controlling your blood sugars before conception and throughout pregnancy gives you the best chance of having a trouble-free pregnancy and birth and a healthy baby. If you have diabetes and your pregnancy is unplanned, there’s still plenty you can do to give your baby the best start in life. The information on this page is for women who have diabetes before becoming pregnant. If you develop diabetes during pregnancy, it is called gestational diabetes. Planned pregnancy Visit your doctor or diabetes educator at least 6 months before you start trying to fall pregnant, if you can. You will be given advice and guidance on controlling your blood sugars as tightly as possible, and taking necessary supplements like folate. You may also be advised to change medications. If you are healthy and your diabetes is well controlled when you become pregnant, you have a good a chance of having a normal pregnancy and birth. Diabetes that is not well controlled during pregnancy can affect your health long-term and can also be risky for your baby. Unplanned pregnancy Not everybody can plan their pregnancy. If you have diabetes and think you might be pregnant, see your doctor as soon as you can. Your healthcare team You may be cared for by a team of health professionals including: an obstetrician who can handle high risk pregnancies a specialist experienced in diabetes care during pregnancy, who may be an endocrinologist or who may be a general physician a diabetes educator to help you manage your diabetes a dietician who can provide dietary advice at all the different stages - before conception, while pregnant and after the birth a midwife who is experienced in all aspects Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Infertility: When Blood Sugar Control Isn’t Enough

Diabetes And Infertility: When Blood Sugar Control Isn’t Enough

An excerpt from the book, Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby. Maybe your blood sugars have been great and you’ve been having ongoing sex with your partner. But if you’re still not pregnant after six to twelve months of trying, you’re considered infertile. Dealing with infertility and diabetes can feel like an energy-draining double whammy of health issues, but you’re not alone. There’s a definite group of women with diabetes who require even more maintenance and medical specialists to figure out why, once again, their bodies aren’t doing what seems to come naturally for everyone else. What’s Going On? Infertility is an inability to get pregnant. You are considered infertile after a year of actively trying to conceive (i.e., having unprotected sex around the time you ovulate) if you are younger than 35, and after six months if you’re 35 or older, or if you have a history of many miscarriages. The timeframe is key: It can take some fertile couples that long to conceive naturally, while older women are advised to seek help sooner since fertility declines rapidly with age. About 10 to 15 percent of all couples experience infertility. Of those, about 40 to 50 percent are caused by female infertility, while another 30 to 40 percent are caused by male infertility. The rest are either a combination of male and female factors, or are simply unexplained as one of life’s many mysteries. Several factors can lead to infertility, according to the national infertility association RESOLVE: age, weight, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Fallopian tube disease, endometriosis, exposure to a chemical known as Diethylstilbestrol (DES), smoking, and alcohol use. Diabetes and Infertility: Are They Related? While all the above are ge Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects Women: Symptoms, Risks, And More

How Diabetes Affects Women: Symptoms, Risks, And More

Diabetes describes a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar due to problems processing or producing insulin. Diabetes can affect anyone, regardless of age, race, gender, or lifestyle. Between 1971 and 2000, the death rate for men with diabetes fell, according to a study in Annals of Internal Medicine. This was a major coup, reflecting the many advances in diabetes treatment. However, according to the study, the death rate for women with diabetes showed no signs of improvement. Additionally, the difference in death rates between women who had diabetes and those who didn’t more than doubled. This study of diabetes in men and women presented several possible reasons for the gender differences. Reasons included: Women often receive less aggressive treatment for cardiovascular risk factors and conditions related to diabetes. The complications of diabetes in women are more difficult to diagnose. Women often have different kinds of heart disease than men. Hormones and inflammation act differently in women. The findings emphasize how diabetes affects women and men differently. Although the death rate was higher among women previously, there has been a shift in gender distribution of type two diabetes showing higher rates among men. The most current reported stats (in 2012) found that 13.4 million women and 15.5 million men have been diagnosed with diabetes in the United States alone. According to the global reports from the World Health Organization from 2014, there was an estimated 422 million adults living with diabetes. This is up from 108 million that was reported in 1980. If you’re a woman with diabetes, you’ll experience many of the same symptoms as a man. However, some symptoms are unique to women. Understanding both will help you identi Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Affect Fertility?

Does Diabetes Affect Fertility?

There was a time when women who had diabetes were strongly advised to avoid getting pregnant. Attempting to produce a biologically-related family was just too dangerous [source: Brucker]. Fortunately, diabetic women are no longer given that heartbreaking direction from caregivers. Diabetics can, and routinely do, get pregnant and give birth to healthy children. Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, however, can still be a major factor in fertility for men or women. There are challenges diabetics face in getting a partner pregnant, becoming pregnant, maintaining a pregnancy and ensuring they give birth to a healthy, full-term baby. Diabetes (Type 1 or Type 2) can harm sperm [source: Paddock]. Type 2 diabetes can make it far more difficult to become pregnant. There's an increased rate of miscarriage among diabetics in general, and women with Type 1 diabetes are somewhat more likely to have a baby with a birth defect or a child born prematurely [source: MyDr]. However, all of these challenges can largely be managed by being attentive to and responding to signals from the body. In order to understand why diabetes affects reproduction, it helps to have a general understanding of the disease in both of its forms. A healthy human body digests food and -- with the help of a hormone called insulin -- transports a form of sugar known as glucose through the bloodstream to cells for energy. Diabetics have flaws in their metabolism. A Type 1 diabetic's body doesn't make insulin. The body of a Type 2 diabetic either fails to create enough insulin, the person's cells don't react properly to the insulin or both malfunctions occur [source: Nordqvist]. Click ahead to learn the specifics of how Type 1 diabetes influences reproduction and how it can be managed. You've undoubtedly heard a pregnant wom Continue reading >>

Trying To Get (my Wife) Pregnant

Trying To Get (my Wife) Pregnant

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My name's Dan, I'm 29 years old and I live in the south-east UK, quite near to Reading. I was diagnosed as being Type I Diabetic when I was 16 and currently have to inject 4 times a day. Over the 13 years that I've been living with my Diabetes I think I've gradually developed rather a relaxed attitude to it and as a consequence I haven't always looked after my blood sugar nearly as carefully as I should have done. The reason for my post is to ask whether anyone here knows anything much about how Diabetes can affect fertility. My wife and I did manage to get pregnant back in June but we lost the baby at the beginning of August and have now started trying again. I've read several things online though, saying that there's an increased chance of miscarriage if the father suffers from Diabetes and also that sperm can be damaged by poor blood-sugar regulation. I've also read articles saying that being Diabetic has no bearing on male fertility whatsoever so this has left me a little confused. At the moment I'm feeling rather angry and frustrated at myself for potentially jeopardising our chances of falling pregnant again by my complete absence of will-power. Obviously I'm working hard to rectify this now but I would love to hear from anyone who has been in the same situation who is now a parent! I am sorry to hear of the recent miscarriage suffered by your wife. I do not know if diabetes is linked to male infertility. It sounds like doctors do not know that much on the subject either. I do know though, from personal experience, that there is a lot that the medical profession can do to assist couples with fertility problems, irrespective of what the cause of Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: The Infertility Triple Threat

Diabetes Mellitus: The Infertility Triple Threat

Based on the feedback received from doctors reading the blog, we are introducing a new feature: Case of the Month. This Case of the Month is an actual patient from The Turek Clinic. It is presented to recognize American Diabetes Association Alert Day. The Case of Male Infertility He is a 31-year old who has been trying to conceive with his 28-year old wife for 2 years. During this time, he has noticed a lower sex drive and has had trouble ejaculating. His medical history is negative except for a 6-year history of diabetes mellitus that is well controlled with insulin injections. Exacerbated, he states “I really don’t know what’s happening to me!” Upon further questioning, the sex drive issue started even before they were trying to conceive. Regarding ejaculation, the patient states that his erections are not very strong and, although he has the sensation of climax, nothing comes out of the penis with ejaculation. In fact, he is concerned that things might be “backing up” in his body with these symptoms. A Short Review of Diabetes First identified as a disease of “sweet urine” in ancient times, diabetes mellitus a metabolic disease characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels. It is one of the most common medical diseases in the U.S., affecting 26 million adults and children or about 8% of the population. Among those affected, about 15 million are people of reproductive age. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. When the blood glucose rises, say after eating food, insulin is released to decrease the glucose level. In patients with diabetes, there is low or no production of insulin and therefore blood sugar levels are elevated. The sugars spill into the urine, hence the term “sweet uri Continue reading >>

High Sugar In Men And Sperm Count

High Sugar In Men And Sperm Count

An estimated one in eight couples who want to have children experience the pain and frustration of infertility, according to the infertility website Resolve. In a third of the cases, male factors cause infertility; another 33 percent is caused by problems with the female partner and another third can be both partners or unknown causes. Diabetes -- high blood sugar -- can affect a man's fertility in several ways, including lowering sperm count in some cases. Diabetes and Infertility in Men Type 2 diabetes is more common among both men and women than type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder, MayoClinic.com explains. Lifestyle factors, such as being overweight or having high cholesterol levels, contribute to having type 2 diabetes. As the incidences of overweight and obesity have risen, so has the occurrence of type 2 diabetes. High glucose levels in the blood damages blood vessels throughout the body. In diabetic men, high glucose levels can cause impotence -- the inability to maintain an erection -- as well as damage to the sperm. In a Qatar study published in the December 2009 issue of "International Urology and Nephrology," 25 percent of the men with type 2 diabetes were infertile. Retrograde Ejaculation Men with high blood glucose levels can develop retrograde ejaculation, a condition where the semen goes back into the bladder rather than being ejaculated normally during sex. Nerve damage prevents bladder muscles from tightening and keeping sperm out of the bladder during ejaculation. The number of sperm in the semen might be normal, but because most or all of the semen doesn't exit the body during orgasm, few or no sperm reach the woman's vagina. The sperm count in the ejaculate will appear very low. Damaged Sperm Several studies have shown that men with type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Infertility & Pre-diabetes – What's The Relationship?

Infertility & Pre-diabetes – What's The Relationship?

Because of that, we will be dedicating Mondays in November to this topic and how it relates to infertility and fertility treatment. Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) has had its focus on this topic for quite a while. Carolyn Gundell, MS, one of RMACT’s Fertility Nutritionists talked about diabetes and its connection to fertility three years ago in 2012 on PathtoFertility. In case you haven’t had a chance to read her thoughtful piece, here it is again. Best thing about Carolyn’s piece? How hopeful it is. And how she explains things in a way that is manageable and accessible to a non-clinical person reading it. Pre-diabetes and diabetes are conditions that do need to be examined if you are trying to conceive. Isn’t it a relief to know that there are programs in place, led by qualified, knowledgeable and passionate professionals that can turn a situation around so that it’s safe and effective to try to become and stay pregnant? Think of this as a preview for November. You will hear more from Carolyn Gundell, MS, Dr. Spencer Richlin, (RMACT’s Surgical Director and lead physician for the Diabetes Program), Melissa Kelleher, LCSW (one of RMACT’s Fertility Counselors) and more. Do you have questions about why this is an important subject? Or how it could affect you? Please let us know. We’re happy to find the right person to answer your questions. When it comes to pre-diabetes and diabetes, we have made sure that we have the right professionals to help with these serious, but manageable problems. ~Lisa Rosenthal November is Diabetes Awareness Month. As I think about this, I recall many patients who I have counseled through ourNutrition Program for pre-diabetic and diabetic conditions. I remember their disappointment as we discussed that th Continue reading >>

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