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Can A Dog Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Managing Diabetes In Dogs

Dogs can have diabetes just like humans - both Type 1 and Type 2. Diabetic dogs are increasingly common, but the disease is entirely manageable unless left untreated. MY DOG HAS DIABETES: OVERVIEW 1. If your dog shows symptoms of diabetes (described below), seek veterinary care at once. 2. Work with your vet to determine the right type of insulin and the right dose for your individual dog. 3. Take your dog for frequent veterinary checkups. 4. Learn how to give insulin injections and reward your dog for accepting them. 5. Consistently feed your diabetic dog the same type of food at the same time of day. 6. Report any unusual symptoms or reactions to your vet. For years public health officials have reported a diabetes epidemic among America’s children and adults. At the same time, the rate of canine diabetes in America has more than tripled since 1970, so that today it affects about 1 in every 160 dogs. But while many human cases are caused and can be treated by diet, for dogs, diabetes is a lifelong condition that requires careful blood sugar monitoring and daily insulin injections. The medical term for the illness is diabetes mellitus (mellitus is a Latin term that means “honey sweet,” reflecting the elevated sugar levels the condition produces in urine and blood). Diabetes occurs when the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin to metabolize food for energy, or when the body’s cells fail to utilize insulin properly. The pancreas’s inability to produce insulin is known in humans as type 1 (formerly called juvenile or insulin-dependent) diabetes. This is analogous to the type that affects virtually all dogs. Dogs can also develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Type 2 (formerly adult onset) diabetes, which is the result of insulin resistance often l Continue reading >>

Preventing And Treating Canine Diabetes

Preventing And Treating Canine Diabetes

The growing diabetes epidemic is not limited to people—diabetes mellitus is increasing among dogs as well. Researchers estimate that one in 200 dogs will develop the disease. Fortunately, treatment has made huge strides in recent years, and as a result, dogs with diabetes are living longer, healthier lives. The mechanism of diabetes is relatively simple to describe. Just as cars use gas for fuel, body cells run on a sugar called glucose. The body obtains glucose by breaking down carbohydrates in the diet. Cells then extract glucose from the blood with the help of insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas in specialized cells called beta cells. (The pancreas, an organ situated behind the stomach, produces several hormones.) In diabetes mellitus, cells don’t take in enough glucose, which then builds up in the blood. As a result, cells starve and organs bathed in sugary blood are damaged. Diabetes is not curable, but it is treatable; a dog with diabetes may live many happy years after diagnosis. Kinds of Diabetes Humans are subject to essentially three kinds of diabetes. By far the most common is Type 2, followed by Type 1 and gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes has typically been a disease of middle and old age (though it is being seen increasingly in young people), and has two causes: The beta cells don’t make enough insulin, or muscle cells resist insulin’s help and don’t take in enough glucose (or both). As a result, blood glucose levels climb. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs when the immune system attacks and destroys the beta cells, cutting off insulin production; the reason for this attack is thought to be a combination of genetic predisposition plus exposure to a trigger (research into possible triggers is ongoing). Glucose then stays in the blood and, aga Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs | Sugar Diabetes | Type 1 & Type 2

Diabetes In Dogs | Sugar Diabetes | Type 1 & Type 2

Diabetes Mellitus, also referred to as Sugar Diabetes, DM, or simply Diabetes, is the most common type of diabetes diagnosed in dogs today. There are two forms of this type of diabetes in dogs; Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 Diabetes is an insulin-dependent form of diabetes, and is similar to juvenile-onset diabetes in people. It is fairly common in dogs and probably is hereditary. Dogs with Type 1 diabetes do not produce enough insulin, which is necessary for metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins and fats and regulation of blood glucose levels. Type 2 Diabetes is a non-insulin-dependent form of diabetes and is similar to adult-onset diabetes in people and is rare in dogs. Dogs with Type 2 Diabetes have normal amounts of insulin, but their cells still cant process food or regulate blood sugar levels normally. Dogs with either form of Diabetes Mellitus end up with too much sugar in their blood. They get extremely thirsty and pass large amounts of urine. Their body enters starvation mode, breaking down stored fat for energy, which causes harmful byproducts to build up in circulation. If left untreated, diabetes in dogs can result in stroke, coma, and even death. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Devastating But Preventable Disease That Threatens Your Pet

Diabetes: The Devastating But Preventable Disease That Threatens Your Pet

As of this writing, I haven’t yet seen a copy of The Diabetes Report, but from what I gather from the linked article and others I’ve read, it approaches the subject from the viewpoint of managing the disease, not preventing it. And yet, the report makes the following points: Diabetes is tied to obesity. Did the authors point out that obesity in dogs and cats is clearly preventable? Diabetes is more common in older animals. Does the report then make the point that since diabetes occurs primarily in older animals -- but isn’t a disease of aging -- it is therefore a disease brought on by lifestyle obstacles? Pet owners can prevent unhealthy lifestyles for their pets. According to vetlearn.com, The Diabetes Report references a study done in 2006, which showed that “… insulin was stopped in twice as many cats that were on a high protein-low carb diet than cats on a high fiber-low carb diet." Common sense seems to dictate, if a high-protein, low-carb diet can eliminate the need for insulin in cats with diabetes, it seems logical the same diet might prevent kitties -- and their canine counterparts -- from developing the disease in the first place. I suspect one of the reasons more cats than dogs get diabetes is because so many cats eat kibble-only diets. Not only do kitties require very few carbs and fiber, which most kibbles (dry food) are loaded with, but more cats are fed dry food because if their owners need to be away from home, they can stay alone for a few days with a litter box, water, and a supply of dry food that won’t spoil at room temperature. In many ways, kitties are lower maintenance than dogs, so people who are gone from home frequently are more likely to have cats as pets and feed them a diet that is convenient. Add to that the finicky appetite of Continue reading >>

The Difference: Type 1 Vs Type 2 Diabetes In Canines.

The Difference: Type 1 Vs Type 2 Diabetes In Canines.

I’ve come across several people in my comments on this blog, other places on the interwebs, and in real life that have a misconception about diabetes in dogs/canines. These are the two most common type of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, commonly known as juvenile diabetes is when the pancreas becomes permanently damaged in some fashion or another and can no longer produce insulin for the body or can’t produce it as well. This type of diabetes usually starts early in life. Insulin must be added to the body in some form, commonly through an injection. Type 2 diabetes usually happens later in life and is commonly caused by poor diet and inactive life style. With Type 2 the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or the body becomes resistant to the insulin. A major change in diet and exercise usually help curb or reverse the on set. Insulin shots usually aren’t require. The misconception For humans, there are several types of diabetes, the most common are Type 1 and Type 2. Then when you throw cats into the mix, it becomes even more confusing since cats usually have Type 2. So when most people think about diabetes in dogs, some might think in the same terms, type 1 and type 2. Which is where the misconception comes in. As of right now, research shows dogs can only get type 1. Diabetes mellitus is a disease in which the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas either stop producing insulin or can no longer produce it in enough quantity for the body’s needs. The condition is commonly divided into two types, depending on the origin of the condition: Type 1 diabetes, sometimes called “juvenile diabetes”, is caused by destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas. The condition is also referred to as Insulin-Dependent diabetes, meaning exogenous insulin injections must rep Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Illustration of a dog's pancreas. Cell-islet in the illustration refers to a pancreatic cell in the Islets of Langerhans, which contain insulin-producing beta cells and other endocrine related cells. Permanent damage to these beta cells results in Type 1, or insulin-dependent diabetes, for which exogenous insulin replacement therapy is the only answer. Diabetes mellitus is a disease in which the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas either stop producing insulin or can no longer produce it in enough quantity for the body's needs. The condition is commonly divided into two types, depending on the origin of the condition: Type 1 diabetes, sometimes called "juvenile diabetes", is caused by destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas. The condition is also referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes, meaning exogenous insulin injections must replace the insulin the pancreas is no longer capable of producing for the body's needs. Dogs can have insulin-dependent, or Type 1, diabetes; research finds no Type 2 diabetes in dogs.[1][2][3] Because of this, there is no possibility the permanently damaged pancreatic beta cells could re-activate to engender a remission as may be possible with some feline diabetes cases, where the primary type of diabetes is Type 2.[2][4][5] There is another less common form of diabetes, diabetes insipidus, which is a condition of insufficient antidiuretic hormone or resistance to it.[6][7] This most common form of diabetes affects approximately 0.34% of dogs.[8] The condition is treatable and need not shorten the animal's life span or interfere with quality of life.[9] If left untreated, the condition can lead to cataracts, increasing weakness in the legs (neuropathy), malnutrition, ketoacidosis, dehydration, and death.[10] Diabetes mainly affects mid Continue reading >>

Could A Dog Save Your Life?

Could A Dog Save Your Life?

The 36-year-old California comic book author and video game writer had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was 15, and like many people with insulin-dependent diabetes, she suffered wild swings in her blood glucose. Over time, she'd also developed hypoglycemia unawareness, the inability to recognize symptoms of severe glucose lows. "One night I woke up and my blood sugar was 17," she recalls. "It's amazing I woke up at all and didn't die in my sleep." By the summer of 2005, Grayson was restricting her activities because of her fear of hypoglycemic episodes. She gave up many of her favorite pursuits, like hiking in the redwoods north of San Francisco, and became reluctant to go out alone. She even moved into a house with friends because she worried that her diabetes made it dangerous to live alone any longer. And still she felt trapped. "There's a real psychic burden attached to diabetes," she says. "You never get a break. Every meal, every day, you have to monitor. It's lonely. There are days when you would do anything just to have a weekend off." Then Grayson met Cody, and everything changed. It was an Internet hook-up, of sorts: Online, Grayson had discovered Dogs for Diabetics, a Concord, Calif.,based organization that trains dogs to respond to serious blood glucose drops in humans. She registered for classes in the summer of 2005, and in six months she was teamed up with Cody, a male Golden Retriever. Not only has Cody saved Grayson's life, he's given her a life to enjoy, she says: "For the first time since I was diagnosed, I feel this enormous burden has been lifted. I'm not alone with it anymore." Assistance dogs, such as guide dogs for blind people, dogs that "hear" for the hearing impaired, or dogs that retrieve items for the wheelchair-bound, have bee Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs - Canine Diabetes

Diabetes In Dogs - Canine Diabetes

Up to 70% of dogs with diabetes are female Diabetes is one of the most common hormonal diseases in dogs . Diabetes in dogs can occur as young as 18 months of age. Most dogs are between seven and ten when canine diabetes diagnosis is made. Approximately 70% of dogs with diabetes are female. Any breed can be affected, but dachshunds, poodles, miniature schnauzers, cairn terriers, and springer spaniels are at increased risk. Interestingly, diabetes is seen very infrequently in Cocker Spaniels, shepherds, collies, and boxers. What signs might your dog be exhibiting if he/she is diabetic? Diabetic patients usually show a marked increase in their water intake, along with an accompanying increase in urination. They frequently have excellent appetites, yet are losing weight. Finally, the sudden appearance of cataracts in the eyes suggests the possibility of underlying diabetes. As with most conditions, it is important to diagnose diabetes early in the disease. If you observe any of the above signs in your dog, don't hesitate to get her to your family veterinarian. Left undiagnosed and untreated, diabetic dogs can develop life-threatening secondary complications due to the metabolic derangements in their body. The diagnosis of diabetes is generally fairly simple. The presence of a high blood sugar level ( hyperglycemia ) and sugar in the urine (glucosuria) along with the appropriate clinical signs confirms the diagnosis. In dogs, normal blood sugar levels are 80 to 120, I have seen diabetic patients with values as high as 600. Although diagnosing diabetes is not demanding, treating it certainly is. That said, it is a treatable disease in dogs and most diabetic dogs can lead very high-quality lives. Virtually all dogs with diabetes require insulin therapy. Just as in humans, the Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs - Overview

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs - Overview

This handout provides general information about diabetes mellitus in dogs. For information about its treatment, see the fact sheets "Diabetes Mellitus - Principles of Treatment" and "Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment". What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas, a small but vital organ located near the stomach. The pancreas has two significant types of cells. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion. The other group, called beta cells, produces the hormone insulin. Insulin regulates the level of glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream and controls the delivery of glucose to the tissues of the body. In simple terms, diabetes mellitus is caused by the failure of the pancreas to regulate blood sugar. The clinical signs of diabetes mellitus are related to elevated concentrations of blood glucose and the inability of the body to use glucose as an energy source. What are the clinical signs of diabetes and why do they occur? The four main symptoms of uncomplicated diabetes mellitus are increased thirst, increased urination, weight loss, and increased appetite. Glucose is a vital substance that provides much of the energy needed by cells, but it must first be absorbed by the cells. Insulin attaches to receptors on the surface of cells and opens "pores" in the cell wall that allow glucose molecules to leave the bloodstream and enter the cell's interior. Without an adequate amount of insulin to "open the door," glucose is unable to get into the cells, so it accumulates in the blood, setting in motion a series of events that result in diabetes mellitus. "When there isn't enough insulin, the cells of the body become starved for their promary source of energy - glucose." When there isn't enough insulin, the cells of the bod Continue reading >>

Recognizing And Managing Diabetes In Dogs For Better Canine Health

Recognizing And Managing Diabetes In Dogs For Better Canine Health

Our furry dog and cat pals can, unfortunately, get many of the same disease and ailments that humans can. Dogs and cats alike are susceptible to animal forms of diabetes. Diabetes in dogs isn’t common, but it happens. If wacky blood sugar levels go untreated, your dog can potentially suffer from further health issues, including problems with their kidneys, increased risk of urinary tract infection, and cataracts. Fortunately, diabetes can be manageable. If you adhere to your veterinarian’s advice about managing your diabetes in your pet through weight loss, insulin therapy, or another treatment, you’ll likely keep your four-legged friend in good dog health. What is Canine Diabetes? Canine diabetes does similar things to the dog body as it does to the human body. The technical term for the disease, diabetes mellitus, refers to the most common type of diabetes. With diabetes mellitus, the body, specifically the pancreas, has an impaired ability to make enough insulin or to process it correctly in the body. When cats or dogs don’t get enough insulin, their bodies can’t break down blood glucose properly. This results in an elevated blood sugar level in your pet, which could affect everything from the way your pet eats to the energy it has throughout the day. Diabetes mellitus can potentially affect other organs in your dog’s body due to excess blood glucose concentration. It may also be a risk factor for cancer of the pancreas, heart disease, and more. What Causes Diabetes in Dogs? Numerous things can cause your pet to develop this disease, and your veterinarian can likely help pinpoint a cause. Some dogs, for example, have insulin resistance, which makes some of their cells unable to respond to insulin properly. Insulin resistance can, therefore, cause dog bloo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs

There are two forms of diabetes in dogs: diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes insipidus is sometimes called "drinking diabetes" and diabetes mellitus is also known as "sugar diabetes". Diabetes insipidus is a very rare disorder that results in failure to regulate body water content. Diabetes mellitus is more common in dogs, and is frequently diagnosed in dogs five years of age or older. This is also known as adult-onset diabetes. There is a congenital form that occurs in puppies called juvenile diabetes, but this is rare in dogs. Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas. This is a small but vital organ located near the stomach. It has two significant populations of cells. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion. The other group, called beta-cells, produce the hormone insulin. Simply put, diabetes mellitus is a failure of the pancreatic beta cells to regulate blood sugar. Some people with diabetes take insulin shots, and others take oral medication. Is this true for dogs? In humans, two types of diabetes mellitus have been discovered. Both types are similar in that there is a failure to regulate blood sugar, but the basic mechanisms of disease differ somewhat between the two groups. Most dogs with diabetes mellitus will require daily insulin injections to regulate their blood glucose. Type I or Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus results from total or near-complete destruction of the beta-cells. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilise blood glucose levels. Type II or Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus is different because some insulin-producing cells remain. However, the amount produced is insufficient, there is a Continue reading >>

What Causes Diabetes In Dogs? The Signs, Symptoms And What To Do About It

What Causes Diabetes In Dogs? The Signs, Symptoms And What To Do About It

Did you know one out of every 300 dogs is diagnosed with diabetes? Especially in senior and middle aged dogs, diabetes is becoming frighteningly common in dogs today. Once your dog gets diabetes, he will most likely need insulin for the rest of his life. So its really important to do everything you can to prevent your dog from becoming diabetic. There are many things that can contribute to the risk of your dog getting diabetes but the good news is, there are also lots of things you can do to help prevent it and minimize the risk. So we called on an expert to tell us how to do that. At Raw Roundup 2017, Dr Jean Hofve gave a talk on canine diabetes and its connection to diet and environmental factors and the best ways to prevent it. But first, what is diabetes and whats the difference between the two types of the disease? Diabetes is all about glucose and how the body handles it.All cells use glucose as their primary source of energy. The pancreas produces the hormones that control glucose primarily insulin and glucagon. The pancreas is mostly made up of tissue that secretes digestive enzymes but about 5% of the pancreas is made up of beta cells that produce insulin.The bodys cells need glucose for energy its their primary fuel. But glucose cant get into those cells without the help of insulin. Dr Hofve explains insulin as the key to a lock the cells need the key (insulin) to let the glucose in. When glucose cant get into the cells without insulin, it builds up in the blood. This causes hyperglycemia, meaning too much sugar in the blood (hyper = too much, glyc = sugar and emia = in the blood) This is why the pancreas and its creation of insulin is so important. And when its not working right, your dog can become diabetic. There are two types of diabetes and were starting Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes in dogs is a complex disease caused by either a lack of the hormone insulin or an inadequate response to insulin. After a dog eats, his digestive system breaks food into various components, including glucose-which is carried into his cells by insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas. When a dog does not produce insulin or cannot utilize it normally, his blood sugar levels elevate. The result is hyperglycemia, which, if left untreated, can cause many complicated health problems for a dog. It is important to understand, however, that diabetes is considered a manageable disorder-and many diabetic dogs can lead happy, healthy lives. Diabetes can be classified as either Type 1 (lack of insulin production) or Type II (impaired insulin production along with an inadequate response to the hormone.) The most common form of the disease in dogs is Type 1, insulin-dependent diabetes, which occurs when the pancreas is incapable of producing or secreting adequate levels of insulin. Dogs who have Type I require insulin therapy to survive. Type II diabetes is found in cats and is a lack of normal response to insulin. The following symptoms should be investigated as they could be indicators that your dog has diabetes: Change in appetite Excessive thirst/increase in water consumption Weight loss Increased urination Unusually sweet-smelling or fruity breath Lethargy Dehydration Urinary tract infections Vomiting Cataract formation, blindness The exact cause of diabetes is unknown. However, autoimmune disease, genetics, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, certain medications and abnormal protein deposits in the pancreas can play a major role in the development of the disease. It is thought that obese dogs and female dogs may run a greater risk of developing diabetes later in life (6-9 Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes is a chronic disease that can affect dogs and cats and other animals (including apes, pigs, and horses) as well as humans. Although diabetes cant be cured, it can be managed very successfully. Diabetes mellitus , or sugar diabetes, is the type of diabetes seen most often in dogs. It is a metabolism disorder. Metabolism refers to how the body converts food to energy. To understand what diabetes is, it helps to understand some of this process. The conversion of food nutrients into energy to power the bodys cells involves an ongoing interplay of two things: Glucose: essential fuel for the bodys cells. When food is digested, the body breaks down some of the nutrients into glucose, a type of sugar that is a vital source of energy for certain body cells and organs. The glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood, which then transports the glucose throughout the body. Insulin: in charge of fuel delivery. Meanwhile, an important organ next to the stomach called the pancreas releases the hormone insulin into the body. Insulin acts as a gatekeeper that tells cells to grab glucose and other nutrients out of the bloodstream and use them as fuel. With diabetes, the glucose-insulin connection isnt working as it should. Diabetes occurs in dogs in two forms: Insulin-deficiency diabetesThis is when the dogs body isnt producing enough insulin. This happens when the pancreas is damaged or otherwise not functioning properly. Dogs with this type of diabetes need daily shots to replace the missing insulin. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. Insulin-resistance diabetesThis is when the pancreas is producing some insulin, but the dogs body isnt utilizing the insulin as it should. The cells arent responding to the insulins message, so glucose isnt being pulled Continue reading >>

Service Dogs That Can Monitor Their Owners’ Diabetes

Service Dogs That Can Monitor Their Owners’ Diabetes

Hypoglycemia unawareness is a common — and dangerous — condition that can develop in those with type 1 diabetes. This condition means you don’t experience the symptoms most people do when their blood sugar gets too low. Normal symptoms of low blood sugar include sweating, shaking, or confusion. At very low levels, you may experience seizures, or go into a coma if your blood sugar is too low for too long. One of the solutions for this condition is man’s best friend: a diabetes service dog. Dogs have a naturally heightened sense of smell that makes them excellent hunters. Professional trainers have learned to harness these skills by training dogs to recognize certain smells. These could include the fruity smelling ketones a person’s body produces when they are experiencing a hyperglycemic episode when blood sugar is too high, or the unique scent a person gives off during a hypoglycemic episode when blood sugar is too low. A diabetes service dog isn’t a replacement for checking blood sugar levels. However, it is a safeguard for those who experience episodes low or high blood sugar, especially if they do not have warning symptoms. There are several service dog-training programs across the country. Examples include the National Institute for Diabetic Alert Dogs (NIDAD) and Diabetic Alert Dog University. These organizations train a dog to recognize the difference between certain scents. This includes the scent a person releases when their blood sugar is high or low. According to Dogs 4 Diabetics, there are two different levels of service dogs for people with diabetes. Medical response dogs for diabetes are trained to respond to signs that an owner may be experiencing low blood sugar levels, once they have become symptomatic. A diabetic alert dog, on the other hand Continue reading >>

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