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Can A Diabetics Drink 100 Percent Fruit Juice?

One Hundred Percent Fruit Juice Does Not Alter Blood Sugar Levels

One Hundred Percent Fruit Juice Does Not Alter Blood Sugar Levels

Testing for alpha fetoprotein may improve early liver cancer detection, finds study The study involved comprehensive data analysis that quantitatively evaluated the correlation between consumption of 100% juice and blood glucose control. The systematic review involved a meta-analysis of 18 randomized controlled trials (RCT) and assessed the effect that 100% juice from fruits like apple, citrus, berry, pomegranate, and grape, has on fasting blood insulin and blood glucose levels. This was used as a biomarker for diabetes risk. According to The American Diabetes Association, more than 90% of the 29 million cases in adults and children in the United States fall in the category of type 2 diabetesa metabolic disorder where the body is incapable of responding to insulin. Following a healthy lifestyle is the first line of defense for preventing and treating type 2 diabetes. A healthy diet, regular physical exercise, and maintaining a healthy weight are also encouraged. The US Dietary Guidelines state that a healthy eating pattern should include vegetables, fruits, low-fat or fat-free dairy, grains, and a variety of protein foods. A 4-oz. glass of 100% fruit juice could replace one serving (1/2 cup) of fruit, and can supplement whole fruit to help people add more nutrition to their diets. Continue reading >>

Is This Juice Study Potentially Misleading?

Is This Juice Study Potentially Misleading?

Is This Juice Study Potentially Misleading? When reading information about new studies, its not only wise to pay close attention to the way a study was conducted but also to who funded the study or on whose behalf it has been conducted. Heres an example of a study that might cause you to do a double-take as a person with diabetes: The Journal of Nutritional Science has just published a study which concludes that drinking 100 percent fruit juice doesnt have a major effect on fasting blood glucose, insulin resistance, or on fasting blood insulin levels. This issue is the way the study is being reported all around the world with headlines like, Drinking 100 Percent Fruit Juice Doesnt Raise Blood Sugar . The study is legitimate but the way it is being reported may be potentially misleading and youcan imagine what some with pre-diabetes and diabetes might think if they dont look further into it. In fact, in India, some outlets are unethically reporting that this study shows people with type 2 diabetes can safely drink juice! The study does not say that. The researchers claim there is no major effect on fasting blood glucose or on fasting blood insulin levels from juice. For blood glucose lab tests, fasting glucose is typically taken in the morning after about 8 hours without food or drink with the exception of water. This study shows the subjects were healthy so theyshould show normal blood sugar after fastingbut perhaps they were looking for a lingering effect after the juice intake and found that it didnt even cause slightly elevated fasting blood glucose, fasting blood insulin, or insulin resistance. Looking at fasting blood glucose and fasting blood insulin levels and insulin resistance are ways of checking for markers of future type 2 diabetes risk and in healthy subje Continue reading >>

Can Drinking 100 Percent Fruit Juice Not Raise Diabetes Risk?

Can Drinking 100 Percent Fruit Juice Not Raise Diabetes Risk?

Can drinking 100 percent fruit juice not raise diabetes risk? New York Drinking 100 per cent fruit juice of apple, berry, citrus, grape and pomegranate does not significantly raise the risk of diabetes, a study has said. According to the study, published in the Journal of Nutritional Science, drinking 100 per cent fruit juice does not have a significant effect on fasting blood glucose, fasting blood insulin or insulin resistance markers of diabetes. For the study, the US-based Juice Products Association an industry trade group conducted systematic review and meta-analysis, which included 18 randomized controlled trials to evaluate the impact of 100 per cent juice from fruits on fasting blood glucose and fasting blood insulin levels. The findings are consistent with previous research indicating that 100 per cent fruit juice is not associated with an increased risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes, the researchers noted. However, a survey led by the British government earlier this year warned that fruit juice should be limited to a glass a day because of its high sugar content. According to the National Diet and Nutrition Survey young people aged 11 to 19 are consuming, on an average, 47 per cent too much sugar from fruit juices, soft drinks, cereal bars, biscuits and cakes. Fruit juice should only be drunk once a day and with a meal because it can be high in sugar, said Alison Tedstone, chief nutritionist at Public Health England, the government agency that released the survey. Another study, led by researchers from the Harvard University, showed that kids who drink fruit juices early in childhood are more likely to be diagnosed with asthma by age eight. The study, published in the journal Annals of the American Thoracic Society, also showed that women who drank more sugar Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Juices That Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics

Juices That Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics

Living with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) involves limiting foods that could raise blood sugar to high levels. Juice can be a part of an overall healthy diet in limited amounts. Keeping serving sizes to 4 ounces or less -- about 1/2 cup -- limits the carbohydrate load. Fruit juice is sometimes helpful to treat low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, due to the fast absorption of the sugar. The nutrient quality of juices varies, so it's helpful to know which juices are healthier choices. There are also alternatives to drinking plain juice that can help limit your carbohydrate intake. Video of the Day Vegetable juice is a lower-carbohydrate alternative to fruit juice. For example, a 4-ounce glass of a tomato-based vegetable juice contains 5.5 g of carbohydrate. However, a 4-ounce serving of a similar vegetable-fruit juice blend typically has 13.7 g of carbohydrate. Low-level inflammation is a contributing factor to insulin resistance and T2DM, particularly in people who are overweight. The authors of a June 2013 "British Journal of Nutrition" study report found that overweight and obese women experienced reduced inflammation after drinking about 1.5 cups of tomato juice daily for 3 weeks. These findings suggest that tomato-based vegetable juice and tomato juice can be good, low-carbohydrate juice options -- and might assist in reducing inflammation. When choosing a fruit juice, the American Diabetes Association recommends 100 percent fruit juice with no added sugar. Pomegranate, cranberry and grape juice all contain a high concentration of antioxidants, according to research published in January 2010 in "Nutrition Journal." Foods rich in antioxidants might help prevent or limit damage caused by an overabundance of free radicals, chemicals that can injure cells. Excess accumulation of Continue reading >>

Should I Drink Fruit Juice?

Should I Drink Fruit Juice?

If my blood glucose goes low, drinking orange juice can help raise it. But how about drinking orange juice when my blood sugar level is normal? I’m concerned that it will raise my sugar too much. So I’ve been staying away from fruit juices and just eat the fruit itself. Continue reading >>

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

Tweet Fruit juice has, until recently, been considered a great way to get your five a day. people with diabetes need to moderate their fruit juice intake as larger glasses of juice can substantially raise blood sugar levels. The key is to In addition, more recently, regular consumption of fruit juice has been linked with an increase in type 2 diabetes risk. What's in fruit juice? Aside from vitamin C and calcium, fruit juice contains: Calories - 250ml glass of unsweetened orange juice typically contains around 100 calories, compared to the 60 calories in an actual orange Fructose (a form of sugar) - half a pint of fruit juice contains more sugar than the World Health Organisation recommends ideally having in a day (30g of sugar for men, 24g for women) A lack of fibre - juice always contains less fibre than whole fruit and highly processed juices may not contain any fibre How does this affect my diabetes? Badly, is the short answer. Sugar levels in fruit juice can cause a significant spike in blood sugar levels, increasing the risk of hyperglycemia. The glycemic index, which is used to reflect the impact on blood sugar levels of individual foods, places orange juice between 66 and 76 on a scale of 100. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice doesn't offer much fibre. (it's stripped away in the juicing process). Fibre is a kind of carbohydrate that, because the body doesn't break it down, is calorie-free, so it doesn't affect your blood sugar, making it important for people with diabetes. Soluble fibre can help lower your cholesterol levels and improve blood glucose control if eaten in large amounts. Apples, oranges, and pears all contain soluble fibre, but not when juiced. Is fruit juice all bad for people with diabetes? Fruit juice has some benefits for people wi Continue reading >>

Yes, It Is Healthy! Drinking 100 Per Cent Fruit Juice Does Not Raise Blood Sugar Levels

Yes, It Is Healthy! Drinking 100 Per Cent Fruit Juice Does Not Raise Blood Sugar Levels

Yes, it is healthy! Drinking 100 per cent fruit juice does not raise blood sugar levels Do you drink fruit juice for breakfast? Here's why you need to stop right now WASHINGTON D.C. (USA): Drinking 100 per cent fruit juice does not raise blood sugar levels, according to a study. The findings are consistent with previous research indicating that 100% fruit juice is not associated with an increased risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes and support a growing body of evidence that 100% fruit juice has no significant effect on glycemic control. A comprehensive data analysis quantitatively assessed the relationship between drinking 100% juice and blood glucose control. Using fasting blood glucose and fasting blood insulin levels as biomarkers for diabetes risk, the systematic review and meta-analysis included 18 randomized controlled trials (RCT) to evaluate the impact of 100% juice from fruits, such as apple , berry, citrus, grape, and pomegranate. Type 2 Diabetes is a metabolic disorder where the body is unable to respond to insulin. The first line of defense for preventing and treating Type 2 Diabetes is following a healthy lifestyle. Eating right, exercising regularly and staying at a healthy weight are encouraged. A 120 ml (approx.) glass of 100 percent juice counts as one serving (1/2 cup) of fruit, and can complement whole fruit to help individuals add more produce to their diets. The findings have been published in the Journal of Nutritional Science. Continue reading >>

New Research Finds Drinking 100 Percent Fruit Juice Does Not Affect Blood Sugar Levels

New Research Finds Drinking 100 Percent Fruit Juice Does Not Affect Blood Sugar Levels

New research finds drinking 100 percent fruit juice does not affect blood sugar levels Juice found to have no association with major diabetes risk factors WASHINGTON, DC (Jan. 18, 2018) - One hundred percent juice does not have a significant effect on fasting blood glucose, fasting blood insulin, or insulin resistance according to a new study published in the Journal of Nutritional Science. The findings are consistent with previous research indicating that 100% fruit juice is not associated with an increased risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes and support a growing body of evidence that 100% fruit juice has no significant effect on glycemic control. A comprehensive data analysis quantitatively assessed the relationship between drinking 100% juice and blood glucose control. Using fasting blood glucose and fasting blood insulin levels as biomarkers for diabetes risk, the systematic review and meta-analysis included 18 randomized controlled trials (RCT) to evaluate the impact of 100% juice from fruits, such as apple, berry, citrus, grape, and pomegranate. According to The American Diabetes Association, about 90% of the 29 million cases of diabetes in adults and children in the United States are considered Type 2. Type 2 Diabetes is a metabolic disorder where the body is unable to respond to insulin. The first line of defense for preventing and treating Type 2 Diabetes is following a healthy lifestyle. Eating right, exercising regularly and staying at a healthy weight are encouraged. US Dietary Guidelines recommend consumption of a healthy eating pattern which includes fruits, vegetables, grains, low-fat or fat-free dairy and a variety of protein foods. A 4-oz. glass of 100 percent juice counts as one serving (1/2 cup) of fruit, and can complement whole fruit to help indivi Continue reading >>

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

Along with a diabetes-healthy diet, diabetics may consume certain fruit juices, but in moderation. Whole fruits, however, are a better and healthier choice than juices. Juice and Diabetes Juices, such as grapefruit juice, pineapple juice and orange juice, if taken in moderation, are considered appropriate for diabetics. All types of citrus fruit juices are superfood for diabetics as they are nutrient-rich, says American Diabetes Association (ADA). Apart from citrus juices, diabetics may also drink apple juice for it is rich in fibre, lemon juice as it is low on carbs, tomato juice as it is low on sugar content and carrot juice as it is juiced raw. All fruit juices, however, also contain significant amount of sugar, which can cause blood sugar levels to spike. Therefore, moderate consumption of fruit juices is advised. Carbs from juices also adds to your total intake of carbohydrates for the day. Having juice along with the meal can surely reduce the effects of sugar content of the juice. While citrus juices are low on Glycemic Index table, pineapple and orange juice is rated 46 and grapefruit juice is rated 48. Factors Diabetics should Consider Consumption of carbs present in the juices results in increased blood sugar levels, though the impact varies from individual to individual. Here are a few points that diabetics should consider if they wish to consume juices or other beverages. The recommended amount of a fruit or any other drink is 4 oz. per day. Drinking juices separately can lead to quicker spike in blood glucose level. Added sugar in the juices is a major concern for the diabetic’s well-being. Fruit and vegetable juice prepared with the original pulp is a good choice for diabetics. Two of the best juices for diabetics include apple and carrot juice. Recommen Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Fruit Juice While whole fruits are a healthy, fiber-rich carbohydrate option for diabetics, the same can’t be said for fruit juice. They may offer more nutritional benefit than soda and other sugary drinks, but fruit juices — even 100 percent fruit juices — are chock full of fruit sugar, and therefore cause a sharp spike in blood sugar. Skipping the glass of juice and opting for the fiber-packed whole fruit counterpart will help you maintain healthy blood sugar levels and fill you up on fewer calories, aiding in weight loss. For a refreshing and healthy drink alternative, choose zero-calorie plain or naturally-flavored seltzer and jazz it up with a wedge of lemon or lime. Continue reading >>

Beverage Dos And Don'ts For Diabetes

Beverage Dos And Don'ts For Diabetes

To successfully manage type 2 diabetes, plan your beverages as carefully as you plan your food choices. That typically means taking sugary drinks — such as soda, sweet tea, and even juice — off the table. You might be surprised at how much a single drink can affect you when you have type 2 diabetes. Drinking just one soda a day is associated with developing type 2 diabetes, according to 2013 research in the journal PLoS One. When you are faced with so many new constraints on sugar and other carbs after a diabetes diagnosis, you may be left asking, “What can I still drink?” Fortunately, there’s a variety of refreshing, flavorful beverages you can enjoy, says Katherine Basbaum, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. Before you take your next sip, here are the top drinking dos and don’ts for those with diabetes. Do Drink: Water Water is one of the few beverages you can drink without worry throughout the day and a great way to stay hydrated. If you often forget to drink as much water as you should, Basbaum has a suggestion for increasing your intake: Drink one 8-ounce glass of water for every other beverage you drink that contains sugar substitutes or caffeine. Shake things up with sparkling water or by squeezing lemon or lime juice into your glass. Do Drink: Skim Milk “Skim or low-fat milk is also a good beverage option, but it must be counted toward your carb total for a particular meal or snack,” Basbaum says. Cow’s milk also provides protein and calcium. Be aware that non-dairy options, such as almond milk, may have added sweeteners and flavorings. Don’t Drink: Sugar-Sweetened Soda or Tea “Sugar-sweetened drinks are absorbed into your bloodstr Continue reading >>

Study Finds 100 Percent Fruit Juice Does Not Increase Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Study Finds 100 Percent Fruit Juice Does Not Increase Type 2 Diabetes Risk

You are here: Home / Get Healthy, Stay Healthy - Well Being Tips / Study Finds 100 Percent Fruit Juice Does Not Increase Type 2 Diabetes Risk Study Finds 100 Percent Fruit Juice Does Not Increase Type 2 Diabetes Risk Juice Does Not Increase Blood Sugar Levels Good news for juice lovers and those with type 2 diabetes the consumption of pure fruit juice does not increase blood sugar levels, and it does not contribute to insulin resistance. Type 2 Diabetes And The Health Benefits Of Juicing For a long time there has been debate regarding the consumption of juice, especially in regard to people who suffer from type 2 diabetics or those with pre-diabetes. To juice or not to juice this was a tough call to make. The incredible and significant benefits of juicing cannot be overstated. Juice consumption provides an incredible amount of immediate and lasting energy, and the juice of both fruit and vegetables are loaded with disease-fighting antioxidants, chlorophyll, and phytonutrients all of which you cannot get from any other food source in such a highly concentrated form. On the other side of the argument was the potential spike in a diabetics blood sugar, which was a very real and dangerous threat to consider. Because of this life-threatening reality, I always recommended a smoothie rather thanjuice for those with type 2 diabetes. Now, if youre scratching your head (as I once did) wondering what the heck the difference is between a juice and a smoothie, you can check out my blog post, The Difference Between A Juice And A Smoothie . There is a very BIG difference between the two. Study Reveals That Juice Does Not Increase The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes But now, juicers can rejoice because a recent meta-analysi sshowed that the consumption of 100 percent fruit juice does not have Continue reading >>

What To Drink With Diabetes?

What To Drink With Diabetes?

Is there anything good for diabetes you can buy in a bottle and drink? If not, what can you drink that’s healthy? Beverages to avoid First off, do not drink bottled fruit juice. Health author Joy Bauer rated fruit juice the number one worst food for diabetes. Most bottled juice is not 100% juice and has additional sugar added. But according to Bauer, “Fruit juices, even 100% fruit juices, are chock-full of fruit sugar and cause a sharp spike in blood sugar.” Juice has a very high glycemic index, which means the sugar gets into your blood very fast. According to diabetes.co.uk, unsweetened orange juice has a glycemic index between 66 and 76, higher than most chocolate cake. People with diabetes do not have enough insulin to keep up with such a fast surge of sugar. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) agrees. “Avoid sugary drinks like regular soda, fruit punch, fruit drinks, energy drinks, sports drinks, or sweet tea. They can provide several hundred calories in just one serving. ADA advises tea, coffee, water, or milk instead. They do say that less than 4 ounces of juice at a meal might be manageable for some people with diabetes. There are other problems with juice besides the sugar. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice has almost no fiber. Bottled juice is usually stored in massive oxygen-depleted holding tanks for up to a year before it is packaged. Then lost flavor iss restored with “flavor packs.” Recent studies, however, have shown that juice does have some benefits. It helps prevent cancer and heart disease as well as whole fruits. It has more nutritional benefits than sodas, even if the sugar spike is just as bad. Dietitian Amy Campbell says vegetable juices such as V8 are healthier can be drunk in larger amounts than the sweeter juices. Continue reading >>

The Best Fruit Drinks For Diabetics

The Best Fruit Drinks For Diabetics

One hundred percent fruit juice has a medium effect on blood sugar levels. Marcelo Ferrate has been writing professionally since 2010. He has worked in the field of health care as a dietetic technician, and he writes about health, fitness, food and diet for LIVESTRONG.COM. Ferrate holds a Bachelor of Science in nutrition and dietetics from Florida International University. For diabetics, management of blood sugar can be achieved through diet by understanding the glycemic index. The glycemic index represents the effect in blood sugar rise stimulated by a specific food (less than 10 is considered a low effect, and more than 20 is considered a high effect). Because 100 percent fruit juice stimulates a medium effect in blood sugar and represents an excellent source of B vitamins, vitamin C, potassium, phosphorous and magnesium, it is preferable to smoothies or artificially flavored drinks. Orange juice has a glycemic index of about 10. Orange juice is a nutritious way for a diabetic to start his day. According to NutritionData, orange juice is packed with vitamin C (anti-inflammatory), vitamin A, vitamin B1 (co-enzyme necessary for energy production), folic acid (essential for red blood cells) and potassium (essential in muscle contraction). Orange juice has a medium glycemic response because of its high content of sucrose (about 20 g per 8 fl oz. cup). The USDA Food Guide Pyramid recommends that adults consume an average of 2 cups of fresh fruit (including juice) per day. Therefore, diabetics should limit the amount of orange juice to less than 1 cup per day to avoid hyperglycemic loads. Mix your apple juice with unsweetened applesauce to help lower glycemic load. Apple juice is another healthy alternative when it comes to choosing fresh 100 percent fruit juice. Although Continue reading >>

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