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Can A Diabetic Have Peanut Butter?

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

The Benefits And Risks Of Peanuts For People With Diabetes

The Benefits And Risks Of Peanuts For People With Diabetes

Peanuts are packed with a variety of nutritious properties that may benefit people with type 2 diabetes. Eating peanuts and peanut products may help: promote weight loss lower the risk of cardiovascular disease control blood sugar prevent people from developing diabetes in the first place However, peanuts also carry some potential risks. If you have type 2 diabetes, read on to learn more about the risks and benefits of eating peanuts. Adding peanuts and peanut butter to your diet may be beneficial, especially if you have type 2 diabetes. While not technically nuts, peanuts provide many of the same health benefits as tree nuts, such as walnuts, almonds, and pecans. Peanuts are also less expensive than most other nuts, which is great if you’re looking to save money but still want the nutritional rewards. Peanuts help control blood sugar If you have diabetes, you need to consider the glycemic content of the foods you eat. Glycemic content is based on how quickly your body converts carbohydrates into glucose, or blood sugar. The glycemic index (GI) is a 100-point scale that rates foods on how rapidly they cause blood sugar to rise. Foods that cause a rapid rise in blood sugar are given a higher value. Water, which has no effect on blood sugar, has a GI value of 0. Peanuts have a GI value of 13, which makes them a low GI food. According to an article in the British Journal of Nutrition, eating peanuts or peanut butter in the morning may help control your blood sugar throughout the day. Peanuts may also help lessen the insulin spike of higher GI foods when paired together. One reason that peanuts may help control blood sugar is because they contain a large amount of magnesium. A single serving of peanuts (about 28 peanuts) contains 12 percent of the daily recommended amount Continue reading >>

Going Nuts For Peanuts

Going Nuts For Peanuts

Good nut news! A new study showed that eating peanuts or peanut butter with breakfast limited the rise in blood glucose after both breakfast and lunch. This “second-meal” effect was completely unexpected and exciting. This study, “Acute and second-meal effects of peanuts on glycemic response and appetite in obese women with high type 2 diabetes risk: a randomized cross-over clinical trial,” was conducted jointly by Purdue University and the Federal University of Vicosa in Brazil. Such a long-distance collaboration couldn’t have happened just a few years ago. It was published in the June 2013 edition of the British Journal of Nutrition. The study not only showed reduced blood glucose levels, but also reduced appetite and food consumption for most of the day in people who ate peanuts or peanut butter. This was based on levels of satiety (fullness) hormones as well as self-reports by the subjects and actual food logs. Not only glucose levels, but nonessential fatty acid levels were lower in the people that ate peanuts or peanut butter. The level of the hormone GLP-1, was higher in the peanut butter group, which is very good news. GLP-1 is the hormone that drugs like exenatide (brand name Byetta) try to mimic. It stimulates insulin production, lowers insulin resistance, and decreases appetite. I knew nuts were good for diabetes, but not this good! On the down side, the subjects did not have diabetes. They were “obese women at high risk for Type 2 diabetes.” So we don’t know yet how much benefit peanuts will give people who already have Type 2. Also, the study was quite small, with only 15 subjects. I’m hoping there will be larger studies, but I’m not holding my breath. There’s not a ton of money in boosting peanuts. The American Peanut Council has some Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Peanuts

Diabetes And Peanuts

Individuals with diabetes need foods that can help manage blood sugar and weight. Peanuts and peanut butter can be a powerful ally to reaching success. Peanuts and peanut butter have a low glycemic index, which mean they don’t cause blood sugar to rise sharply. For great ideas for including peanuts and peanut butter in meals, visit our recipe pages. Successfully Managing Diabetes More than 25 million people in the U.S. have diabetes (NIDDK, 2011). Successfully managing diabetes requires nutritious eating and maintaining a healthy weight, as well as monitoring blood sugar and taking medications as prescribed. When it comes to diet, peanuts and peanut butter are like a secret weapon because they taste great, but don’t cause blood glucose to spike. They have a glycemic index of just 14. Glycemic index is a measure of how quickly the blood sugar rises after eating a specific amount of a food, as compared to a control food – the lower the glycemic index number, the lower the impact on blood glucose (The University of Sydney, 2001). As part of a carbohydrate controlled diet, peanuts can add flavor, variety, and substance to meals. Heart Health and Healthy Weight The number one killer for people with diabetes is cardiovascular disease. In order to maintain good health, people with diabetes need to also reduce the risk for other disease. Incorporating foods that help promote heart health, including peanuts, is an important part of nutritious eating. In fact, scientific evidence suggests but does not prove that eating 1.5 oz. per day of nuts, including peanuts, as a part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease. As part of reducing cardiovascular risk and managing diabetes, maintaining a healthy weight is paramount. Peanuts can be Continue reading >>

The Trouble With Peanuts In Managing Diabetes

The Trouble With Peanuts In Managing Diabetes

If you have diabetes, beware of peanuts, peanut butter, and peanut oil. Some people think that because most tree nuts, like almonds, are so healthy, that peanuts should also be good for us. But peanuts aren’t nuts at all. They are a legume, and unlike most nuts we can’t eat them raw because they are sometimes covered with a dangerous fungus. Actually, we can’t eat them at all if we want to avoid some of the side effects that we can get from them. Some of these side effects can be quite serious. I can think of only nine reasons why we have to avoid peanuts or anything made from them. Maybe you can think of more, but these eight might be enough to give anyone pause: 1. Peanuts have a lot of carbohydrates, which raise our blood sugar level. Take a look at the US Department of Agriculture’s [National Nutrient Database](which is the gold standard of nutrient facts. "One tablespoon of natural, unsweetened peanut butter contains 3 grams of carbohydrate and will raise my blood sugar 15 mg/dl," writes Dr. Richard K. Bernstein in the 2011 edition of his book Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. "Imagine the effect on blood sugar of downing 10 tablespoons!" 2. Peanuts are the source of one of the most common food allergies. "They have the potential to provoke acute allergic reactions (e.g., hives or anaphylaxis) that can be dangerous in the susceptible, even fatal in rare instances," writes Dr. William Davis in his 2011 book, Wheat Belly. Many schools will no longer let children bring peanut butter products to school. 3. Peanuts "contain lectins and other anti-nutrients that can adversely affect your health, particularly if you are suffering from an autoimmune disorder," writes Loren Cordain in his 2002 book, The Paleo Diet. These lectins "are known to increase intestinal Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Have Peanut Butter? (buy, Blood, Eat, Sugar) - Diabetes -symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention, Treatment - City-data Forum

Can Diabetics Have Peanut Butter? (buy, Blood, Eat, Sugar) - Diabetes -symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention, Treatment - City-data Forum

Can Diabetics Have Peanut Butter? (buy, blood, eat, sugar) Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account , you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads. View detailed profile ( Advanced ) or search Can anybody tell me whether the diabetics could eat peanut butter or not? And some tips for the diabetics. Peanut Butter is OK. But you have to be careful. A lot of the popular brands are loaded with sugar. JIF, and Peter Pan, for example, are very high in sugar. My first reaction was, "Of course!" But my entire life I have bought / eaten nothing but natural peanut butter...nothing but peanuts and salt. As the previous poster said, diabetics should avoid the kind with added sugar...as everyone should. If you have a Giant Food store near you, try their Organic Nature's Promise peanut butter with "no salt added". It has a great taste, low in carbs and very very low in salt. This peanut butter is one of the very few items I can eat that is low in carbs and salt and still high in calories which I need to keep from losing any more weight. Can anybody tell me whether the diabetics could eat peanut butter or not? And some tips for the diabetics. Peanuts are a legume and cause some people's bg to sky rocket. I avoid them although I really like them! Peanuts are a legume and cause some people's bg to sky rocket. I avoid them although I really like them! Interesting, given the low GI of peanuts. Of course, it's hard to eat just a few peanuts. But with a natural (No sugar added) peanut butter it is easier to maintain portion control. Diabetics can eat anything, as long as they stick to a reasonable amount Continue reading >>

We're Nuts About Nuts, Seeds, Peanut Butter & Nut Butters!

We're Nuts About Nuts, Seeds, Peanut Butter & Nut Butters!

Nuts, seeds, peanut butter and nut butters are a great source of protein and natural fats. This means that they make for a great 'GD food pairing tool' to eat with carbohydrates to slow down the absorption of glucose into the bloodstream. But with so many different products available to buy, which ones should you choose and are any better than others? Here we share with you all our hints and tips for choosing the best nuts, seeds, peanut butter and nut butters... Nuts Nuts are a great source of protein and natural fat but they do still contain carbohydrates, meaning that some nuts are better than others. The best choice for nuts are nuts which are not salted or flavoured. Looking at this chart we can see that cashew nuts and pistachio nuts contain the highest amounts of carbohydrates, making them the nuts which aren't so good for pairing if eaten in larger amounts. Another nut that is high in carbohydrates, which isn't listed on this chart is the chestnut, so be wary of these carby nuts at Christmas! Highest in protein are the peanut and almonds. With macademia, walnuts and pecans being the highest in fats. That makes these nuts better for food pairing. Flavoured or coated nuts Salted, dry roasted, sweet chilli, BBQ, salt & vinegar, yoghurt coated, crispy shells, chocolate coated, you name it they seem make nuts covered or coated in so many different things. Savoury nuts included salted, dry roasted and flavoured contain high amounts of salt, so bear this in mind when eating them. Choosing nuts which are yoghurt or chocolate coated means that you are significantly increasing the carb amount, making these type of nuts possibly suitable for a treat, but would not be advisable as such good 'food pairing tools'. What about snickers, peanut M&Ms & Reese's peanut butter cups? Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Peanut Butter?

Can Diabetics Eat Peanut Butter?

Are you diabetic? If you are, then there must be various restrictions for you regarding food that you take. It is really painful to follow such restricted guidelines regarding food, but due to your health condition, you have to forcefully follow the advice as given by your doctor from time to time. It may be that you may have a liking for peanut butter. But maybe due to certain restrictions you do not have the liberty to have that liked butter of yours. If you have such a condition, then this article is for you. Just continue reading, and you will know whether you can have peanut butter. Fact about peanut butter that will make you happy There are certain facts about peanut butter will make you happy. First of all, let me inform you that you can have peanut butter to manage the diabetic condition that you have. It is great news, isnt it? It is good to know how this nature of butter can help you in your condition of diabetics. How peanut butter helps in diabetic conditions Past observations show that foods that are rich in Magnesium have defensive benefits against the expansion of diabetic patients. It is good to hear that peanut butter is a rich source of magnesium. Magnesium plays a role in the effective control of metabolic syndrome, inflammation, and insulin resistance. So, you definitely can have it. Must Read: Is Almond Milk Good for Diabetics? Another feature of this food material also makes it suitable to be used by you even though you have diabetes. Peanut butter is also a low glycemic index food. It means that consumption of peanut butter will not have a bad influence on the blood sugar level that you have. Moreover having healthy oils , protein , and fiber peanut butter will have a positive effect on the blood sugar level that you have. Medical research has al Continue reading >>

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes is a serious medical condition that puts you at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is also very treatable, and if you have it, there is a good chance you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by making changes in your diet and increasing your level of physical activity. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body does not produce or use enough insulin to be able to turn glucose into energy. Glucose is the sugar and starch that comes from the food you eat, which fuels your body. Insulin is a hormone that carries glucose from your blood into your cells. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in your blood and can cause serious health problems. Pre-Diabetes Pre-diabetes is when your fasting blood glucose (blood sugar) level is above normal. To test for pre-diabetes, your doctor will take a sample of your blood after you have fasted overnight: Normal fasting glucose: 60 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) Pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose): 100 to 125 mg/dl Diabetes: 126 mg/dl or higher on 2 occasions Healthy Tips for Preventing Type 2 Diabetes If you have pre-diabetes, you should talk to your doctor about developing a lifestyle plan to reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends increased physical activity and, if you are overweight, losing 5-10 percent of your body weight. Your doctor may also want you to take medication if you have a family history of diabetes, you are obese, or have other cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, or a history of heart disease). Below are tips to help you keep pre-diabetes from progressing to Type 2 diabetes: Exercise Every Day Since muscles use glucose for energy, activities like walking, bicycling, and gardening Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Peanut Butter At Breakfast Helps Control Hunger And Blood Sugar All Day

Peanut Butter At Breakfast Helps Control Hunger And Blood Sugar All Day

Consuming peanut butter or peanuts for breakfast can control blood sugar throughout most of the day, even after eating a high carbohydrate lunch… In addition to this “Second Meal Effect,” peanuts and peanut butter caused a significant reduction in the desire to eat for up to 12 hours and a significant increase in the secretion of the hormone PYY that promotes satiety and feelings of fullness. The study, “Acute and second-meal effects of peanuts on glycemic response and appetite in obese women with type 2 diabetes risk: a randomized cross-over clinical trial,” was conducted jointly by Purdue University and the Federal University of Vicosa in Brazil. The principal investigator, Dr. Richard Mattes of Purdue University explained, “If you include peanut butter or peanuts at breakfast, you not only diminish the rise in blood sugar at breakfast but also again after lunch, helping to reduce blood sugar over a very large portion of the day.” During three phases of the study, 1.5 ounces of peanuts, 3 tablespoons of peanut butter, or no peanuts or peanut butter were consumed with a breakfast consisting of orange juice and cream of wheat followed by a lunch consisting of white bread and strawberry jam. Blood samples and appetite ratings were taken over a series of three hours following breakfast and again after lunch to assess glucose control and satiety; participants were also asked to keep a food diary for the remainder of the day after leaving the testing site. Results showed that peanut butter or peanuts included with breakfast promotes secretion of the appetite-suppressing hormone peptide YY (PYY). In addition, participants who consumed peanut butter or peanuts with breakfast reported a lower desire to eat for up to 8 to 12 hours later and maintained lower blood Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Peanut Butter?

Can Diabetics Eat Peanut Butter?

Rich in unsaturated fat and protein, all-natural peanut butter can make a nutritious addition to meals and snacks for individuals with diabetes. Peanut butter's low carbohydrate content keeps blood sugar under control, while its healthy fats satisfy the appetite for several hours. While people with diabetes should limit their portion size to avoid weight gain, peanut butter can still be a healthy addition to a diabetic diet. In its natural form with no added fats, sweeteners or sugars, peanut butter is considered a nutritional powerhouse. Two tablespoons of peanut butter contain approximately 12 grams of healthy poly- and monounsaturated fats, and nearly 8 grams of protein. Because there is no cholesterol and very little saturated fat in peanut butter, it is also appropriate for people with cardiac problems. The carbohydrate content of peanut butter is minimal, with less than 7 grams per serving. Because of its low carbohydrate and high healthy fat and protein content, peanut butter does not elevate blood sugar. Serving Size for Those With Diabetes According to the American Diabetes Association, individuals with diabetes should consume no more than 2 tablespoons of peanut butter at one snack or meal. Even though peanut butter does pack a healthy nutritional punch, it is also high in calories, and 2 tablespoons equals roughly 200 hundred calories, or 10% of the daily caloric needs for a 2,000-calorie diet. Individuals who are diabetic and who want to lose weight may consider reducing their portion size of peanut butter to 1 tablespoon at a time, simply to cut the calories but still reap some of the nutritional benefits. Healthy Snack Ideas Diabetic snacks should ideally contain carbohydrate, fat and protein, and peanut butter meets the fat and protein requirement. To mee Continue reading >>

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Disease Prevention Glycemic index is a point scale used to compare how high your blood sugar and insulin spike after eating the same amount of carbohydrates from different foods. Foods that are digested more slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. The GI content of foods is measured on a 100-point scale, with 100 being the highest GI foods. Peanuts have a GI of 14 making them a low GI food (Jenkins, 1981). Glycemic load also measures blood sugar spikes, but uses the typical serving size of each food item instead of a standard carbohydrate amount, making it an even better tool to show how different foods eaten can affect blood sugar (Salmeron, 1997). Foods with a higher GI and GL can cause blood sugar and insulin to spike soon after eating, followed by a drop in blood sugar to levels lower than before consumption. This crash in blood sugar can make a person feel tired and hungry for more food, and the rollercoaster cycle of highs and lows can contribute to the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes (Jenkins, 1981). In addition, low-GI diets can significantly improve long-term glucose control in people with diabetes, similar to the amounts achieved with medication (Ajala, 2013). Peanuts and peanut butter are both low GI and GL foods, due to their content of healthy oils, protein, and fiber that have a positive effect on blood sugar control. Research has shown that peanuts can help control blood sugar in both healthy individuals and those with type 2 diabetes (Kirkmeyer, 2000 and Jenkins, 2011). Peanuts and peanut butter have even been shown to help lessen the spike in blood sugar when paired with high carbohydrate or high GL foods (Johnston, 2005). Snacking on peanuts can help to maintain blood sugar in between meals. One study showed t Continue reading >>

Peanut Butter And Banana Breakfast Sandwich

Peanut Butter And Banana Breakfast Sandwich

Buzzworthy The Best Slow Cooker Beef Dishes Try these 3 in 1 beef meals today! Cleaning up will be a breeze when you start with Reynolds Kitchens® Slow Cooker Liners. Continue reading >>

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