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Can A Diabetic Have Fruit?

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions among adults and children worldwide (1). Uncontrolled diabetes has many serious consequences, including heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and other complications. Prediabetes has also been linked to these conditions (2). Importantly, eating the wrong foods can raise your blood sugar and insulin levels and promote inflammation, which may increase your risk of disease. This article lists 11 foods that people with diabetes or prediabetes should avoid. Carbs, protein and fat are the macronutrients that provide your body with energy. Of thesen three, carbs have the greatest effect on your blood sugar by far. This is because they are broken down into sugar, or glucose, and absorbed into your bloodstream. Carbs include starches, sugar and fiber. However, fiber isn't digested and absorbed by your body in the same way other carbs are, so it doesn't raise your blood sugar. Subtracting fiber from the total carbs in a food will give you its digestible or "net" carb content. For instance, if a cup of mixed vegetables contains 10 grams of carbs and 4 grams of fiber, its net carb count is 6 grams. When people with diabetes consume too many carbs at a time, their blood sugar levels can rise to dangerously high levels. Over time, high levels can damage your body's nerves and blood vessels, which may set the stage for heart disease, kidney disease and other serious health conditions. Maintaining a low carb intake can help prevent blood sugar spikes and greatly reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Therefore, it's important to avoid the foods listed below. Sugary beverages are the worst drink choice for someone with diabetes. To begin with, they are very high in carbs, with a 12-ounce (354-ml) can of soda prov Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Fruits To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best And Worst Fruits To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Good news for fruit lovers everywhere: eating fresh fruit is associated with a lower risk of diabetes and a lower risk of complications if you already have the disease, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. Featured recipe: Fresh Fruit Salad If you've been steering clear of fruit because of the sugar content, there's no reason to do so, according to this study. Over a seven-year time period, researchers analyzed the diet and health outcomes of more than 500,000 Chinese adults. The researchers found that higher fruit consumption was not associated with higher blood sugar, even for people with diabetes. Adults who consumed fruit more frequently actually had a lower risk of developing diabetes. The study only analyzed fresh fruit consumption, not dried fruit or fruit juice, so we turned to a few registered dietitians and certified diabetes educators to clarify the best and worst fruits, appropriate serving sizes, and how many carbohydrates you should get from fruit each day. First it's important to note that "diabetes care is individualized," says Staci Freeworth, RD, CDE, and professor of nutrition at Bowling Green State University. This is why it is important for people with diabetes to see a certified diabetes educator (CDE). These specialists can break down how many carbohydrates you should be eating each day based on your individual needs and health history. Best Fruits to Eat Recipe to Try: Purple Fruit Salad Whether you have diabetes or not, the consensus from dietitians is the same regarding which fruits are best to eat. "The best fruits for everyone to eat are the ones that create the least influence on blood sugar, often termed 'low glycemic load,'—even if you don't have diabetes," says Daphne Olivier, RD, CDE, founder of My Food Coach. "These in Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

What Fruit Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes?

What Fruit Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes?

What Fruit Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? What Fruit Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? 4 Tips for Incorporating Fruit Into Your Meal Plan You may have heard at some point that you cannot eat fruit if you have diabetes. Perhaps someone even told you that watermelon and bananas are off limits because they are too sweet. Neither of these is entirely true. You can enjoy fruit, you simply need to make smart decisions about which fruits and how much you eat. Fruits have many health benefitsthey contain vitamins, minerals, filling fiber and antioxidants. Fruit can be beneficial to a diabetes meal plan if eaten in moderation. The key to eating fruit is to make sure you eat the right kindsinthe appropriateportions. The fiber found in fruit can help to prevent blood sugar spikes, may aid in pullilng cholesterol away from your heart, and increase feelings of fullness, resulting in less food intake. Fruit is also an excellent source ofvitamins andminerals, such aspotassium, which can help reduce your blood pressure . On the flip side, fruit is a carbohydrate and itcontains a natural sugarcalled fructose. Carbohydrates, whether from bread, milk, yogurt, potatoes,or fruit,get broken down and turn into sugar or glucose. For this reason, it's recommended that people who have diabetes monitorhow many carbohydrates they eat, including fruit servings. When choosing fruit you'll want to take a few tips into consideration. Dried fruit, especially if it is sweetened,ishigher in carbohydrates per serving than natural whole fruit. It also contains more sugar because sugars are added to flavor it and can be lower in fiberif the skin has been removed.Just two tablespoons of raisins (1 ounce)will cost you: 100 calories, 23 grams carbohydrate, and 18 grams sugar. This yields almost 5 teaspoons Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

Diabetes mellitus (DM) commonly referred to as Diabetes, is a chronic disorder. It occurs when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or when the cells of the body become resistant to insulin. In either case, the blood sugar cannot get into the cells for storage, which then leads to serious complications. Diabetes, perhaps more than any other disease, is strongly associated with the western diet, as it was uncommon in cultures consuming a 'primitive diet'. However as cultures switch from their native diets, to the foods of commerce; their rate of diabetes increases eventually reaching the proportions seen in the western societies. However, what's alarming is the fact that India Is home to 62 million diabetics and the number is estimated to be 100 million by 2030. Obesity is seen as one of the major contributing factors to the development of insulin resistance in approximately 90% of the individuals with type-2 diabetes. In most cases, achieving ideal body weight is associated with the restoration of normal blood sugar levels. Hence dietary modifications and treatment are fundamental to the successful treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. There are some specific foods that have been shown to produce positive effects on blood sugar control. These foods have a low glycemic index and glycemic load and are high in fiber. When it comes to diabetics eating fruits, there is a lot of confusion and information is very misleading. Just remember that moderation is the key here. TIPS TO ENJOY FRUITS IF YOU ARE DIABETIC: - Always eat fruits that are fresh, local and in season. - Eat fruits that have a low glycemic index. - Fruits should not be eaten with your main meals, its best to have fruits in between meals and as a snack. - Fruits with high glycemic index should be Continue reading >>

How Much Fruit Should Be Eaten By Diabetics?

How Much Fruit Should Be Eaten By Diabetics?

An October 2011 study published in the “Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics” found that diabetics who ate adequate amounts of fruit were able to reduce two medical risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease. If you have diabetes, eating fruit daily provides your body with essential nutrients, helps control your blood sugar and reduces your risk for other illnesses such as cardiovascular disease. Ask your health care provider or registered dietitian how to include fruits in your meal plan. Video of the Day 2 to 4 Servings Daily The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse suggests that people with diabetes consume two to four servings of fruit a day, depending on their calorie needs. If you require between 1,200 and 1,600 calories, aim for two fruits daily. Three fruits should be your goal if you need between 1,600 and 2,000 calories daily. People requiring 2,000 to 2,400 calories should consume four fruits daily. A serving is equivalent to a small piece of fruit roughly the size of a tennis ball, 1/2 cup of juice or canned fruit, 2 tablespoons of dried fruit or 3/4 cup to 1 cup of fresh berries or melon. Avoiding the Blood Sugar Roller Coaster Because fruits contain natural sugars, they will raise your blood sugar. Balancing them throughout your day will help prevent peaks and valleys in your blood sugar levels. The American Diabetes Association suggests that the best fruits to choose include fresh, frozen or canned without added sugar. Canned fruits in juice or light syrup, dried fruits and juices contain more sugar, and you should limit these. Melons and pineapple have a higher glycemic index and so may raise your blood sugar more than other fruits, but they can still be included in your diet. An important component of fruit for diabetics Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

By:Lori Brookhart-Schervish | Diabetic Living Magazine These top food offenders contain high amounts of fat, sodium, carbs, and calories that may increase your risk of high cholesterol, high blood pressure, heart disease, uncontrolled blood sugar, and weight gain. The good news is you can indulge in your favorite foods and still eat healthfully with our satisfying and delicious alternatives. At Diabetic Living, we believe that eating with diabetes doesn't have to mean deprivation, starvation, or bland and boring foods. However, some foods really are best left on the table or in the store. Everyone -- with diabetes or without -- would be wise to avoid or limit the foods on this list because they are high in saturated fat, sodium, calories, or carbs, or might contain trans fats. High amounts of sodium and saturated fat can lead to heart disease, while excess sugars, high carb counts, and added calories can cause unwanted weight gain and blood sugar spikes. If you see some of your favorite foods on this list, don't despair: We've picked healthier options for you to choose from that taste great. So you can have your fries and eat them, too -- provided they're baked rather than deep-fat fried. *Nutrition information cited was gathered from company websites or food packaging. You walk into a restaurant and you're feeling starved. A quick scan of the menu and there they are: nachos, one of your favorites. You order them as an appetizer and also order a meal. Unfortunately, most restaurant nacho orders equate to and often exceed an entire meal's worth of calories, carbs, and fat. For example, a regular order of Chili's Classic Nachos has 830 calories, 59 grams of fat, and 39 grams of carb. You don't need to give up nachos to eat healthfully. Make a few changes to the basic rec Continue reading >>

4 Sweet Science-backed Reasons That Diabetics Can Eat Fruit Worry-free

4 Sweet Science-backed Reasons That Diabetics Can Eat Fruit Worry-free

Extremely low-carb diets aren’t as healthy for you because they skimp on fruit and claim that fruit contains natural sugars that just turn to sugar in the body. It’s true that all carbohydrates from food eventually end up as blood glucose—including the carbs in fruit. That said, fruit has a much lower impact on blood sugar levels than other truly harmful foods like candy bars and soda. That’s because, like vegetables, fruit is mostly water. What isn’t water is fiber, and that fiber slows the progression of fruit sugars into the bloodstream, causing a slow, steady rise in blood sugar rather than a huge spike. Here’s more: Fruit isn’t just not bad for your diabetes. It’s good for it, and for your waistline too. 1. Fruit fights inflammation. Peaches, plums, and nectarines contain special nutrients called phenolic compounds that have anti-inflammatory properties. (These nutrient-rich foods also fight off inflammation.) These compounds travel through the bloodstream and then to your fat cells, where they affect different genes and proteins for the better, finds research done at Texas A&M University. 2. Fruit prevents diabetes. Flavonoids are nutrients found in plant foods, and especially in many types of fruit. Research shows that these compounds can lower the risk for developing type 2 diabetes, probably because these nutrients improve insulin sensitivity. Harvard’s long-running Nurses’ Health Study found that women who consumed more anthocyanins (the pigment that makes blueberries blue and strawberries red) were much less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than women who consumer fewer of these health-promoting compounds. Science says these are the 15 best foods for diabetics. 3. Fruit slims you down. New research suggests fruits may actually be more imp Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Myth: I Can't Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes

Myth: I Can't Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes

Save for later Although we know fruits and vegetables are good for us people with diabetes are often told they can’t eat fruit because they are too sweet or contain sugar. All fruits contain natural sugar, but also contain a good mix of vitamins, minerals and fibre. Why are fruit and vegetables so good for us? Eating fruits and vegetables lowers the risk of developing many health conditions including high blood pressure, heart diseases, strokes, obesity and certain cancers. It’s even more important for people with diabetes to eat more fruits and vegetables as most of these conditions are more likely to affect them. Fruits and vegetables have a good mix of soluble and insoluble fibre which is good for your bowels and general health – so it makes sense to eat more of them Should people with diabetes cut back on fruit because of sugar content? Managing diabetes has to do with managing your blood glucose, blood fats, blood pressure and your weight, and fruits and vegetables can play a positive role in all these. The concern has been that because fruits contain sugar, it makes your blood glucose go up. In fact, most fruits have low to medium glycaemic index, so they do not lead to a sharp rise in your blood glucose levels compared to other carbohydrate containing foods like white or wholemeal bread. Portion size is very important when considering the biggest effects on your blood glucose levels so let’s look at this in more detail. A portion of fruit contains about 15-20g carbohydrate on average, which is similar to a slice of bread. To put things in perspective, just a can of cola contains 35g carb and a medium slice of chocolate cake contains 35g of carbs as well. So, if you are looking to reduce your carb intake, with the aim to manage blood glucose levels, the ad Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

Fruits are the perfect snack. They are loaded with nutrients and fiber, relatively low in calories, and easy to bring to work. However, they do contain naturally occurring sugars, sometimes in large amounts. This can be a concern for those who struggle to manage their blood sugars. This article takes a science-based look at the most suitable fruits for diabetics. 1. Blueberries Blueberries are quite low in sugar, with 10 grams per 100 grams of fruit (1). But that sugar is also accompanied by 2 grams of fiber. This is important because when sugar and fiber are eaten together, blood sugar levels don’t spike as quickly (2, 3). It’s the reason 10 grams of sugar from fresh fruits will not have the same effect on blood sugar levels as 10 grams of sugar from a candy bar. In addition, blueberries provide loads of other beneficial nutrients and antioxidants that protect our cells from damage. Interestingly, a study on over 187,000 people tracked over two decades found those who ate the most blueberries had more than a 25% lower risk of getting diabetes than those who ate the fewest (4). Blueberries are great for a snack, and you can even enjoy them in salads. Although they can be particularly expensive, know that frozen blueberries are still nutritious and often much more affordable. 2. Strawberries Strawberries contain even less sugar than blueberries, with only 5 grams per 100 grams of fruit (5). This makes them a great choice for diabetics. They also provide fiber, manganese, folate, and a lot of vitamin C. In fact, 100 grams of strawberries (5-6 large strawberries) provides 98% of our daily vitamin C requirements. Strawberries are a great addition to breakfast foods like oats or yogurt, but they are also delicious on their own. 3. Blackberries Blackberries stand out as n Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps. “This super fruit literally has it all,” says Lynn A. Maarouf, RD, nutrition educator at the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “It supplies enough beta-carotene and vitamin C to meet your daily requirements and is an excellent source of potassium (an antioxidant which can help lower blood pressure).” Portion Size: 1/3 of a melon Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs One serving of strawberries gives you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin C. “Also, these sweet berries contain potassium, which help keep blood pressure down, and fiber, which makes you feel full longer while keeping blood sugar levels in check,” Maarouf says. In a recent study, people who ate strawberries along with white bread needed less insulin to steady their blood sugar, compared to people who ate just the white bread. “The research suggests it’s the polyphenols in strawberries that may slow down the digestion of simple carbohydrates, thereby requiring less insulin to normalize blood glucose,” Lenchewski says. Portion Size: 1 cup Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs These tiny tangerine hybrids are high in both vitamin C and folate, which has been shown to improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. “They fit nicely into a backpack or briefcase, and they have a peeling that slides Continue reading >>

25 Best Fruits For Diabetics

25 Best Fruits For Diabetics

25 Best Fruits For Diabetics Maanasi Radhakrishnan Are you a diabetic? Are you worried about foods with a high glycemic index? Dont worry. We are here to give you the best fruits that you can relish without worrying about your blood sugar levels. Would you like to know more? Keep reading! Diabetics do not have to eliminate all sugary foods from their regular meals. Sugar or glucose is a vital requirement for the human body. It fuels us with energy so that we can stay active all day. But when you have to deal with diabetes, it is necessary to take care of your sweet cravings in an appropriate manner. Hence, portion control is essential for every diabetic. So, what would be the best practical way to ensure diabetics get their required intake of sugar? Most would prefer a healthier and natural way, and what better way is there to go with than fruits! A quick light snack, an after meal desert, or simply blended and squeezed into a refreshing drink, fruits can be consumed in many ways. Fruits also provide us with roughage, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. Well, in addition to the various nutrients fruits give, the simple sugars or carbs in them are a whole lot easier for the body to process. Also, these are the healthier kind of sugars the body needs. Diabetes may cause weight loss, resulting in severe health adversities. Including fruits in their diet regimen can contribute towards reducing the excessive weight of many diabetics. One of the effects of diabetes is that it makes people hungry all the time, and the intake of certain fruits can create the feeling of fullness. Again, too much of anything can prove to be bad for you. Thus, when consuming fruits, a diabetic must be cautious and careful while picking the fruits to eat. Certain fruits are remarkably high in sug Continue reading >>

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