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Can A Diabetic Eat Greek Yogurt?

Eat This, Not That! 9 Best Yogurts | Eat This Not That

Eat This, Not That! 9 Best Yogurts | Eat This Not That

Manufacturers have a knack for cramming as much sugar and artificial ingredients into yogurt pots as they do candy bars, so make sure you know which are best. By Eat This, Not That! Editors February 2, 2016 Packed with protein, crammed with calcium, popping with probiotics, yogurt has all the makings of the best weight loss foods . But tread ye carefully in the aisle of the fermented milk products; manufacturers have a knack for cramming as much sugar and artificial ingredients into yogurt pots as they do candy bars as we found out doing research for Eat This, Not That!. The next time you find yourself discombobulated in the dairy section, refer to this handy guide for stocking up and still losing weight. This yogurt is impressively low cal for a cookie-strewn treat. While it does have a bit more sugar than wed ideally like to see its relatively low when you compare it to the competition. Save 120 calories and 5 grams of sugar by picking YoCrunch over Chobani. While the majority of the extra calories and fat in Chobani's breakfast treat come from the almonds, the chunks of chocolate and coconut flavored yogurt are loaded with sugar. Matter which option you ultimately choose, these chocolate and candy filled yogurts should only be once and awhile treats not daily dishes. When it comes to indulgences, its all about portion control. Chobani hits the nail on the head with this kid-sized chocolaty bend. You could eat more than three of these 2 ounce containers of yogurt before youd take in the sugar-equivalent of Yoplaits similar variety. How Yoplait packs so many calories and sugar in such a small container, we may never know. A half cup of chocolate soft serve actually has less sugar than this yogurt, and wouldnt you rather just have that? We know we would. Kefer is 99 pe Continue reading >>

Choosing The Best Yogurt For You

Choosing The Best Yogurt For You

Have you taken a good hard look at the dairy case lately? If it’s a lot bigger than you remember, it’s likely because yogurt has commandeered much of the space. With so many flavors and varieties to choose from, it can be tricky to figure out what to buy. What is yogurt? Yogurt is probably one of the oldest foods around. The word yogurt is Turkish in origin, and it’s thought that it dates back to the Neolithic people of Central Asia around 6000 B.C. Yogurt was actually “discovered” accidentally: herdsman would carry milk in animal stomachs. The enzymes from the stomachs curdled the milk, turning it into what we know today as yogurt. Turkish immigrants brought yogurt to North American in the 1700s but it really caught on in the 1940s when the son of the Danone company founder started a small yogurt factory in the Bronx. We now know this company now as Dannon. Why eat yogurt? Yogurt has a lot going for it. It’s rich in a number of nutrients, including: • Calcium • Protein • Potassium • Magnesium • Vitamin D • Vitamin B-12 • Vitamin B-2 Protein and magnesium are two key nutrients for diabetes management. Protein provides a feeling of fullness and can even out blood sugar levels. Magnesium helps improve insulin sensitivity, which can also help improve blood sugar levels. Along with the above nutrients, yogurt contains probiotics, also known as “good” bacteria. While more research is needed, evidence points to these friendly bacteria as helping to boost the immune system, improving digestion, preventing urinary tract infections, and easing certain skin conditions, such as eczema. Yogurt’s darker side Sugar: While yogurt seems to be bursting with nutrition, some types of yogurt contain ingredients that aren’t so healthful. Many yogurts on the Continue reading >>

The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes

The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes

Yogurt can be one of the best foods for people with diabetes to eat. Or one of the worst. It is the probiotic food that we eat the most. These foods have friendly bacteria that help us to drive out the bad ones. This can be good for our health, the U.S. Government’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine says. But to get this benefit from yogurt or other probiotic foods, we have to avoid any of them that say on the label that they were heat treated after culturing. That kills the active cultures. Even worse is when we eat the usual yogurt preparations that are loaded with added sugars. This includes not only frozen yogurts but also what most of us think of as regular yogurt. For example, a little 6-ounce container of "Yoplait Original Blackberry Harvest" sounds great. But its 13 ingredients include so much sugar that it packs 33 grams of carbohydrate, according to the Nutrition Facts label on the company’s website. When we want to eat a healthy yogurt, we have to start by limiting our selection to plain ones. Then, if we like, we can add a little fresh fruit and perhaps some non-caloric sweetener. I often add a few organic blueberries and a small sprinkling of stevia. Somebody asked me a few months ago if I could find any organic, Greek style, full fat, plain yogurt. I can’t. But we can come close. I recommend full fat yogurt, particularly for those of us who follow a low-carb diet, because non-fat or 2 percent yogurts always have added bulking agents that increase the carbs. They don’t taste as good either. I also recommend organic yogurt, but perhaps out of an excess of caution. I do eat organic fruit and vegetables whenever I have a choice, because I want to avoid consuming all the insecticides and herbicides conventional farmers spray on Continue reading >>

Greek Yogurt - The 20 Best And Worst | Eat This, Not That!

Greek Yogurt - The 20 Best And Worst | Eat This, Not That!

Find out which thick and creamy yogurt is the best bet for your belly. By Eat This, Not That! Editors April 13, 2015 Like the majority of Americans, Greek yogurt is also an immigrant and landed in the good old U.S. of A. around 10 years ago. Since then, the dairy product has rightfully earned itself a spot as consistent healthy breakfast idea and its easy to see why. The Mediterranean yogurts creamy, smooth, and slightly thick texture is comforting but indulgent. Its pleasantly sour and moderately sweet taste is intriguing yet familiar. And between the gut-friendly probiotics, healthy fats, and muscle-building protein, it boasts an impressive display of health benefits. And it isnt just a great replacement for your sugary cereal. Its ratio of protein to carbs makes it an ideal post-workout snack for repairing muscles and replenishing spent energy stores, while a full-fat carton is a primo appetite-stabilizing treat to quell those angry 3 p.m. hunger pangs. And did we mention it can help you lose weight? Researchers have found that adding low-sugar, high-protein snacks to your daily diet can help fuel weight loss efforts by boosting metabolism and minimizing hunger pangs. Unfortunately, navigating the dairy aisle is no easy task. With tons of companies offering authentic yogurt lined up on your grocery store shelves, you may need a little help weeding out the good from the bad. Thats why weve rounded up the best (and worst) Greek gurtsso you dont have to stress or even read nutrition labels on your next grocery trip. These yogurts are low in what makes the Mediterranean dairy product so helpful for burning fatproteinand high in ingredients that really dont deserve a place in these small containers. Nutrition: 5.3 oz, 140 calories, 0 g fat (0 g saturated fat), 50 mg sodi Continue reading >>

Yogurt: Types, Health Benefits, And Risks

Yogurt: Types, Health Benefits, And Risks

Yogurt is a dairy product made by fermenting milk with a yogurt culture. It provides protein and calcium, and it may enhance healthy gut bacteria. Health benefits range from protecting against osteoporosis to relieving irritable bowel disease and aiding digestion, but these depend on the type of yogurt consumed. Added sugar and processing can make some yogurt products unhealthy. Yogurt starts as fresh milk or cream. It is often first pasteurized, then fermented with various live bacteria cultures, and incubated at a specific temperature to encourage bacteria growth. The culture ferments the lactose, the natural sugar found in milk. This produces lactic acid, which gives yogurt its distinctive flavor. Yogurt is made by fermenting milk wth a yogurt culture. Health benefits can include promoting bone health and aiding digestion. Some yogurts contain active, living bacteria known as probiotics, which can help keep the intestines healthy. Yogurt products that go through heat treatment have no active bacteria, reducing the health benefits. Yogurt-covered raisins are an example. Yogurts contain calcium , vitamins B6 and B12, riboflavin, potassium , and magnesium . The amounts depend on the type. Yogurt can be a tasty, nutritious addition to any diet. However, there are plenty of different yogurts, and some are more healthful than others. There are many types of yogurt that provide varying levels of nutritional benefit. Whether yogurt is a healthful choice depends on the person consuming it and the type of yogurt. Yogurts can be high in protein, calcium, vitamins, and live culture, or probiotics, which can enhance the gut microbiota. These can offer protection for bones and teeth and help prevent digestive problems. Low-fat yogurt can be a useful source of protein on a weight- Continue reading >>

The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes

The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes

Yogurt can be one of the best foods for people with diabetes to eat. Or one of the worst. It is the probiotic food that we eat the most. These foods have friendly bacteria that help us to drive out the bad ones. This can be good for our health, the U.S. Government’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine says. But to get this benefit from yogurt or other probiotic foods, we have to avoid any of them that say on the label that they were heat treated after culturing. That kills the active cultures. Even worse is when we eat the usual yogurt preparations that are loaded with added sugars. This includes not only frozen yogurts but also what most of us think of as regular yogurt. For example, a little 6-ounce container of “Yoplait Original Blackberry Harvest” sounds great. But its 13 ingredients include so much sugar that it packs 33 grams of carbohydrate, according to the Nutrition Facts label on the company’s website. When we want to eat a healthy yogurt, we have to start by limiting our selection to plain ones. Then, if we like, we can add a little fresh fruit and perhaps some non-caloric sweetener. I often add a few organic blueberries and a small sprinkling of stevia. Somebody asked me a few months ago if I could find any organic, Greek style, full fat, plain yogurt. I can’t. But we can come close. I recommend full fat yogurt, particularly for those of us who follow a low-carb diet, because non-fat or 2 percent yogurts always have added bulking agents that increase the carbs. They don’t taste as good either. I also recommend organic yogurt, but perhaps out of an excess of caution. I do eat organic fruit and vegetables whenever I have a choice, because I want to avoid consuming all the insecticides and herbicides conventional farmers spray Continue reading >>

Why Greek Yogurt Should Be Part Of Your Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Why Greek Yogurt Should Be Part Of Your Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Smooth, creamy, thick — Greek yogurt is one of the hottest foods around, and its popularity shows no signs of abating. With a pudding-like texture and a slightly tart flavor, Greek yogurt also has more protein and fewer carbs and fewer sugars than traditional yogurt. This means that Greek yogurt can be even better for people with type 2 diabetes, says Tami Ross, RD, CDE, a diabetes educator in Lexington, Kentucky. "My patients love the consistency of it," Ross explains. "Even the patients who are not big on yogurt or milk products overwhelmingly seem to like Greek yogurt." Greek yogurt's thick consistency comes from straining it to remove liquid whey. This process increases the amount of protein per serving and removes some of the carbohydrates, which people with diabetes must watch carefully. "For folks with diabetes, the lower carbs are a plus," Ross notes. "You can work in the yogurt for a snack without having to account for so many carbohydrates." The increased protein can also help you feel that you've had a more substantial snack, so you'll feel more satisfied and won't be hungry for something else quite so quickly. "In terms of promoting satiety and helping people feel full, it's great," Ross says. And starting your day with Greek yogurt may even help you manage your blood sugar throughout the day. Eating low-GI foods for breakfast helps prevent blood-sugar spikes later on, one recent study found. How to Find the Right Greek Yogurt Of course, not all Greek yogurts are created equal. With many brands and flavors on the market, it's important to read nutrition labels carefully to find one that will work with a diabetes-friendly diet. Carbohydrate content is the most important item to look for on the nutrition label of Greek yogurt, since it accounts for the sugar Continue reading >>

Prevention Of Diabetes: How Yogurt Can Help

Prevention Of Diabetes: How Yogurt Can Help

Prevention of diabetes: how yogurt can help We know yogurt prevention of diabetes and diabetes management require particular attention with regard to diet. In the context of the Diabetes Awareness Month, Registered Dietitian and Diabetes Educator Toby Smithson explains how to compose a healthy diabetic plate and the role yogurt can play as a part of it. How do you educate your patients to compose a heathy plate for a diabetic diet? A healthy plate for people with diabetes includes three elements. First we need protein, which can be either meat, poultry, dairy like cheese and yogurt, fish or soy. Then the diabetic plate should include carbohydrate such as whole grains, fruit, starchy vegetables, breads and cereals. And finally, we want to have healthy fats like olive oil, vegetable oil, margarine, avocado or nuts. Yogurt fits on the healthy plate counting as a source of carbohydrate and a good source of protein if using Greek yogurt. What are the benefits of yogurt in the prevention of diabetes? In my opinion the main prevention of diabetes benefit with yogurt is weight management. Recent studies have shown those who consume yogurt as part of a healthy diet were associated with less weight gain over time. This is an important prevention factor for developing type 2 diabetes. Specifically, study participants who consumed three or more servings of yogurt per week had smaller waist circumference gain compared to those who consumed one serving yogurt per week. How regularly do you recommend your patients to have yogurt? I recommend my patients with diabetes to have Greek yogurt daily. This is great for osteoporosis prevention and for the combination of nutrients to help stabilize blood glucose levels. Yogurt is a food with extra benefits. While it is mostly known as a good Continue reading >>

What's In Your Pot?

What's In Your Pot?

According to consumer research, the UK population spends a staggering 1.7 billion a year on yogurt and fromage frais. With an ever-increasing range of yogurt varieties on offer, it can be difficult to work out why one variety may be more or less healthy than another. Here at Enjoy Food, we thought it was about time we took a closer look at this popular product and find out what exactly is in those pots… The good news Yogurt provides many health benefits. Made with milk, it contains protein and calcium needed for healthy bones and teeth. Some yogurts also have added vitamin D, which helps our body to absorb calcium. It’s also good to know that low-fat yogurts have just as much calcium as the full-fat versions. Some research even suggests that eating yogurt can help you to feel fuller, which may make it easier to manage your weight. As well as a useful portable snack, or instant pudding when you fancy a sweet fix, plain, natural, or greek yogurt can be used as a topping on fruit and desserts instead of cream, in smoothies, or in cooking. Spotlight on sugar As with most manufactured food products, you need to take a step back from the marketing hype and take a closer look at the food label, to check whether that innocent looking pot is as healthy as it seems. Many yogurts, particularly the ones aimed at children, are crammed full of the ‘free sugars’ we all need to cut back on. Looking at the label, the carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ provides useful information. An amount in grams (g) will be given. Spotting 'free sugars' This figure includes sugars which come naturally from the milk used to make the yogurt, known as ‘lactose’, as well as any sugar added to the yogurt, ie ‘free sugars’, and sugar that comes naturally from any fruit or fruit puree that h Continue reading >>

Greek Yogurt Nutrition: Whats The Healthiest Yogurt? | Time

Greek Yogurt Nutrition: Whats The Healthiest Yogurt? | Time

Not many foods contain the nutritious trio of protein, probiotics and healthy fatsbut yogurt does. And people cant get enough. The North American yogurt market churned up more than $11 billion in profits in 2015 and is expected to reach nearly $15 billion by 2024. This yogurt boom explains why the dairy cooler at your local supermarket is now the size of a semitrailer. You have to choose from different flavors, fat percentages and even nationalities, including Greek, Icelandic and Australian yogurt varieties. The dairy-free options of yogurtsoy, coconut, cashew, almond and moreare also vast. To answer this, you must get comfortable with a little uncertainty. The research needed to back up specific health benefits of yogurt has not kept pace with all this innovation. Crowning a yogurt champ would require many years of data on how eating each impacts a persons risk for diabetes and heart disease, says Walter Willett, a professor of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. We dont have anything like that, so what youre about to read is educated guesswork. Disclaimers aside, you can probably eliminate most of the dairy-free options from title contention. With the exception of soy yogurt, dairy-free products tend to contain very little appetite-suppressing protein , says Alissa Rumsey, a registered dietitian and New York-based nutrition and wellness coach. While some research suggests soy yogurt may outperform dairy when it comes to limiting risk for diabetes, soy-based yogurts tends to be thinner and less savory than milk-based products. To improve their taste and texture, manufacturers often load them up with additivesincluding sugar making them not so great for you. Among the dairy options, Greek and Icelandic varieties stand out for a few reasons, Rumsey says. Both Continue reading >>

What's The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes?

Yogurt, typically made from cow's milk (however, nowadays there are many alternatives), is a source of carbohydrate which is also full of good bacteria, calcium, and protein. If you have diabetes, yogurt can be a smart food choice; however, the trick is to know which kind of yogurt to choose and which to skip out on. What to Look for in a Yogurt In the best kinds of yogurt, you get a good balance of protein and carbohydrate, along with calcium and healthy probiotics. You also don't get a lot of added sugar, additives, food coloring, or saturated fat. Choosing a low-fat or non-fat yogurt version can help you to reduce your total calorie intake as well as keep your saturated fat (the type of fat that increase bad LDL cholesterol) low. In addition, since yogurt is a source of carbohydrate, you'll want to choose a yogurt that is low in added sugars such as fruited yogurts or those yogurts with added granola, or other toppings that are rich in sugar. Therefore, it's best to choose plain, low-fat yogurt. If you need to add sweetness, top your yogurt with some berries or peaches. Frozen varieties can make your yogurt seem "syrup-y", too, for more fiber and less added sugar. Greek Yogurt vs. Regular Yogurt Greek yogurt is regular yogurt that's been strained, removing some of the whey and leaving behind a thicker, more protein-rich yogurt. Greek yogurt is readily available in regular grocery stores; find it in the refrigerated dairy section. Regular yogurt provides 5 grams of protein per 6-ounce serving, while Greek yogurt provides up to 20 grams, depending on the brand. Because it has more protein, Greek yogurt has about 1/3 the carbohydrate of regular yogurt. And, because lactose is a source of carbohydrate in dairy products, this means that many people find Greek yogurt easie Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Yogurt?

Can Diabetics Eat Yogurt?

Diabetes, a metabolic disorder that disrupts insulin production, affected 23.6 million Americans in 2007, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes requires dietary adjustments to keep blood sugar levels within an acceptable range. High blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels, including those in the eyes and kidneys. Diabetics can eat any food, as long as they incorporate it into their daily carbohydrate allowance. Video of the Day Diabetic Food Plan Every diabetic should follow a food plan designed specifically for them. Overweight diabetics will follow a reduced-calorie eating plan which also limits daily carbohydrates. Diabetic diets generally restrict carbohydrate intake to a certain number of carbohydrates per meal or per day. Although complex carbohydrates such as whole grains add more nutritional value than simple sugars found in sweets, you can eat sweets in moderation, as long as your carbohydrate count remains within limits. People on a 1,600- to 2,000-per-day calorie level, for example, can eat eight starches per day, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders. The nutritional value of yogurt depends on the type you eat. Full-fat Fage plain Greek yogurt contains 20 grams of fat, 31 percent of your daily fat intake, and 16 g of saturated fat, 80 percent of your daily intake, while its 2 percent contains 4 g of fat, 3 g from saturated fats. Fage fat-free brand has no fat at all. Fage plain 2 percent yogurt has 8 g of carbohydrate compared to 19 g, all from sugar, for the strawberry flavor. Dannon’s Fruit on the Bottom strawberry contains even more sugar, 28 g. A serving also contains approximately 6 to 17 g of protein, depending on the type of yogurt and container size. Yogurt supplies an excellent so Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a serving a day of yogurt may lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. "The data we have gathered show that yogurt consumption can have significant benefit in reducing the risk of diabetes," said senior study author Dr. Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, in Boston. "It's not a huge effect, about an 18 percent reduction [in risk]." "Yogurt is not magic for curing or preventing diabetes," Hu said. "That's the bottom line and the message we want to convey to our consumers, that we have to pay attention to our diet pattern. There is no replacement for an overall healthy diet and maintaining [a healthy] body weight." The study is published online Nov. 24 in the journal BMC Medicine. It was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. In type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells develop a resistance to insulin, and blood sugar levels then get too high. For the study, Hu and his team pooled the result of three large studies that tracked the medical histories and lifestyle habits of health professionals: the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study of more than 51,000 male health professionals; the Nurses' Health Study, which included more than 121,000 women nurses; and the Nurses' Health Study II, which followed nearly 117,000 women nurses. During the study follow-up, there were about 15,000 cases of type 2 diabetes. When they looked at total dairy intake, they saw no effect on the risk of diabetes. However, when they zeroed in on yogurt, they found one serving a day was linked with about a 17 percent reduced risk. The researchers next pooled their result with other published studies that lo Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Prevent dangerous blood sugar spikes with the help of these foods. Yogurt Low-fat yogurt naturally contains both high-quality carbohydrates and protein, making it an excellent food for slowing or preventing an unhealthy rise in blood sugar. Studies also show that a diet high in calcium from yogurt and other calcium-rich foods is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Be sure to stick to low-fat or nonfat brands; fat-free Greek yogurt is my top pick because it has twice as much protein as regular nonfat yogurt. Previous Next More Photos Almonds Fish Continue reading >>

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