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Can A Diabetic Drink Protein Shakes

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

Have you heard that eating too much sugar causes diabetes? Or maybe someone told you that you have to give up all your favorite foods when you’re on a diabetes diet? Well, those things aren’t true. In fact, there are plenty of myths about dieting and food. Use this guide to separate fact from fiction. MYTH. The truth is that diabetes begins when something disrupts your body's ability to turn the food you eat into energy. MYTH. If you have diabetes, you need to plan your meals, but the general idea is simple. You’ll want to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. Choose foods that work along with your activities and any medications you take. Will you need to make adjustments to what you eat? Probably. But your new way of eating may not require as many changes as you think. MYTH. Carbs are the foundation of a healthy diet whether you have diabetes or not. They do affect your blood sugar levels, which is why you’ll need to keep up with how many you eat each day. Some carbs have vitamins, minerals, and fiber. So choose those ones, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Starchy, sugary carbs are not a great choice because they have less to offer. They’re more like a flash in the pan than fuel your body can rely on. MYTH. Because carbs affect blood sugar levels so quickly, you may be tempted to eat less of them and substitute more protein. But take care to choose your protein carefully. If it comes with too much saturated fat, that’s risky for your heart’s health. Keep an eye on your portion size too. Talk to your dietitian or doctor about how much protein is right for you. MYTH. If you use insulin for your diabetes, you may learn how to adjust the amount and type you take to match the amount of food you eat. But this doesn't mean you Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Whey Protein Powder And Diabetes (type 1 & 2)

Everything You Need To Know About Whey Protein Powder And Diabetes (type 1 & 2)

WHAT YOU’RE ABOUT TO GET INTO? KEY POINTS Whey protein is the least important thing you need to worry about when it comes to building a better looking body. Certain types of whey protein are overpriced and aren’t worth the money. Whey protein will not ruin your kidneys or liver. Whey protein can affect your blood glucose levels and needs to be accounted for with the appropriate level of medication. Does whey protein live up to the hype for people with diabetes? Can I take whey protein safely if I have Diabetes? What about my kidneys? Am I wasting my money on another marketing scam? My health care professional says I do not need protein supplements, do they really know, or are they playing it safe? All my gym buddies take whey and getting results, but they don’t have diabetes, will it work for me? These are questions I hear all the time in my clinical Diabetes practice. Mainly by young men and women who are starting at the gym and want to build a great physique. They want to maximise their gym efforts by supplementing with whey protein. But they are concerned with safety, effect on blood glucose, and their finances. Sound familiar? There are some amazing articles online that have every last detail on whey protein. But I am guessing you do not want every last detail, right? If you want the most potent information, in an easy to understand format, that is specific to diabetes? This article is perfect for you. Not only that, it details the best practical strategies, taken straight from the pioneering Diabetic Muscle and Fitness Training Lab . These strategies are guaranteed to put you in control of your blood glucose level, and get the most out of whey protein. Oh, one more thing, I guess you want a diabetes specific guide for how to choose the right whey? Don’t wor Continue reading >>

The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics

The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics

Whether you are looking to kick start your current weight loss plan or gain muscle in the gym, protein powders can very helpful. However, if you are diabetic you need to take extra care when choosing a protein powder. Ensuring that the supplement you choose fits with your current lifestyle and dietary needs is very important. Read on to find out exactly what the best protein powder for diabetics is. Who Are Protein Powders Designed For? There are a number of protein powders available, all of which are usually marketed for specific uses. For example, you can find protein for weight loss, powders for bulking up and gaining muscle and meal replacements. Traditionally though, most people tend to use protein powder as a post workout shake in order to aid their fitness goals. The Benefits Of Protein Powder Protein Powder Aids Weight Loss While Preserving Muscle If you are starting a serious weight loss program, especially if you’re attempting to improve or reverse the effects of type 2 diabetes, following a very low calorie diet (VLCD) is a good plan. Programs such as the blood sugar diet can be a great way to lose weight fast. One thing to be careful of is that restricting calories to this level can cause your body to break down muscle as you workout while it attempts to hold onto your fat stores. Drinking a protein shake post workout can help preserve muscle and burn more calories. Protein Powder Controls Hunger If you are trying your best to complete a weight loss program, constantly feeling hungry can be a huge obstacle. However, research has shown that drinking shakes with 50 grams of whey protein can reduce the hormones which tell the brain you’re hungry for up to four hours (source). Protein Powder Can Help You Beat Stress If you are feeling stressed, run down and Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Use Whey Protein Shakes?

Can Diabetics Use Whey Protein Shakes?

Whey protein will help you curb hunger, recover quickly from exercise and lose fat while maintaining muscle, according to the National Dairy Council. Whey is the liquid fraction of protein that is left when removing the curds, or the solids, from dairy. You can use whey protein if you have diabetes. In fact, it may help you gain better control over your blood sugar levels. Talk to your doctor before taking whey protein shakes, though, especially if you have diabetes, and don't stop taking medication that has been prescribed. Video of the Day Whey With Your Meal Test subjects with Type 2 diabetes showed a higher insulin response after eating a carbohydrate-containing meal that included whey protein powder than a similar meal without whey. Researchers mixed the powder into mashed potatoes. The increased insulin response was accompanied by lower post-meal blood sugar levels. This effect has the potential to delay the need for diabetes medications and has not been shown to cause hypoglycemia, reported the researchers in a 2005 issue of the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition." Researchers who published a study in 2014 in "Diabetologia" found similar results. Participants had 28 percent lower blood sugar levels and 96 percent higher insulin levels after a high-carbohydrate meal when they drank a whey protein shake beforehand. Look for a whey protein concentrate powder that contains no added sugars. Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Protein2o

Diabetes - Protein2o

Dr. Archer is the Chief Medical Officer for Protein2o and a clinical associate professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. Dr. Archer has a background in organic chemistry and pharmacology and is also a licensed pharmacist. He is involved in health care reform efforts that seek to improve access for all patients and coordinate care for those most in need. His medical practice includes caring for and advising several top level professional athletes. Dr. Archer has also competed himself in the past as a bodybuilder and martial artist and more recently has taken on triathlons, road and obstacle course racing when tricked into signing up by his wife, Kris. He and Kris are owners of a gym and promote strength and fitness training in their community. Dr. Archer is the Chief Medical Officer for Protein2o and a clinical associate professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. Dr. Archer has a background in organic chemistry and pharmacology and is also a licensed pharmacist. He is involved in health care reform efforts that seek to improve access for all patients and coordinate care for those most in need. His medical practice includes caring for and advising several top level professional athletes. Dr. Archer has also competed himself in the past as a bodybuilder and martial artist and more recently has taken on triathlons, road and obstacle course racing when tricked into signing up by his wife, Kris. He and Kris are owners of a gym and promote strength and fitness training in their community. Get the Diabetic Advantage with the Whey Protein Isolate in Protein2o If you have diabetes, its time to consider adding Protein2o to your daily diet not only for purposes Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shakes | Walgreens

Diabetic Shakes | Walgreens

Sale price is $9 and 99 centsAnd Regular price is $10 and 79 cents Sale price is $21 and 99 centsAnd Regular price is $25 and 99 cents Sale price is $21 and 99 centsAnd Regular price is $25 and 99 cents Sale price is $9 and 99 centsAnd Regular price is $10 and 79 cents Sale price is $9 and 99 centsAnd Regular price is $10 and 79 cents End of simulated dialog for signin overlay A healthy diet is a vital part of diabetic care, as what you eat every day can have a major impact on your blood sugar levels. When you eat well, you can keep those levels better controlled and as a result lower your risk of developing complications due to diabetes. It's not always easy to find time to eat healthy, but there are solutions available to supply you with nutrients when you're on the go. At Walgreens, we have a selection of diabetic shakes from popular brands like Glucerna that can fit easily into any healthy eating plan for diabetes care. Often times, the foods that are easiest to purchase and consume on the go are the least healthy. Fast food is high in saturated fats and sodium, both of which experts caution against consuming too much. Snacks from vending machines may also contain excess fat and sodium as well as sugar, making them less than ideal for diabetics. Diabetic shakes are every bit as convenient as these other readily available foods, as they can be enjoyed quickly anytime, anywhere. The shakes are formulated to supply a complete array of nutrients and the calories needed to supply the body with fuel for energy. This can make them a good alternative to hitting the vending machine or the drive-thru when you're short on time. Diabetic shakes are formulated especially for people with diabetes. As a result, they typically include a unique blend of carbohydrates and often do n Continue reading >>

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Whey protein is one of the two major proteins found in milk and dairy products. The other major protein in dairy products is casein—many people have sensitivities to casein, but few people seem to have any sensitivity to whey protein. When rennin, a protein that curdles milk, is added to milk and other dairy products, the curds (casein) and whey separate, just as they did in the old nursery rhyme. Whey protein is used for a number of purposes—it is used to maintain daily protein intakes, to build muscle mass, and to increase fat loss. Whey isn’t the only protein to increase fat loss—most proteins do, but most proteins aren’t available in an easily dissolved powder as whey is. Whey Protein, Insulin and Blood Sugar There are a number of properties of whey protein that appear to be useful in diabetes. [1] Whey protein is a good source of the amino acid L-cysteine. L-cysteine is used to synthesize glutathione, one of the body’s most important antioxidant. Oxidative stress—the buildup of damaging free radicals—is thought to be one of the underlying causes of insulin resistance and to be responsible for some of the complications of diabetes such as peripheral neuropathy, retinopathy and kidney damage. Whey protein, when added to a meal, also appears to increase insulin secretion and to decrease blood sugar after a meal. (Post-prandial blood glucose)[2] Whey protein can also decrease triglyceride levels in diabetics after meals. In a recent study, blood sugar levels were 28% lower in those who had whey protein along with their meal. Insulin levels were increased (doubled) and, importantly, the insulin response lasted longer. The study was small, only examining the responses of 15 individuals, but the design of the study made the results significant.[3] Whey has Continue reading >>

Whey Protein Could Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Whey Protein Could Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Whey protein could help control type 2 diabetes Charity, Research Self management Self-monitoring of blood glucose Type 2 prevention Eating whey protein before breakfast could help prevent or control type 2 diabetes, two separate studies by Newcastle University have shown. The findings, which were unveiled at the Diabetes UK Professional Conference , found obese men and males with type 2 diabetes had better blood sugar levels after eating the protein first thing.One of the studies also showed ithelped stifle appetite. The first study looked at how 20 grams of the whey protein affected 12 obese men, before they took part in 30 minutes of light walking and then ate a carbohydrate heavy breakfast. The researchers said the combination of the protein and exercise helped control blood sugars. A total of 11 men with type 2 diabetes participated in the second study. They were given 15 grams of whey protein before breakfast and again, their blood sugars remained stable. Lead researcher Dr Daniel West from Newcastle University said: We know that high blood glucose levels after eating can contribute to poor blood glucose management and can also be detrimental to cardiovascular health. Weve shown that consuming small amount of whey protein before a meal could help people avoid those high blood glucose levels and may help them to feel more satisfied after mealtimes. Diabetes UKs director of research Dr Elizabeth Robertson said: Finding ways to keep blood glucose levels as stable as possible after eating is an important area of scientific research, to help people manage their diabetes well. This new research adds to other small scale studies that have promising results. However, larger scale studies involving a lot more people are needed to test this idea further, so we can understa Continue reading >>

The Skinny On Shakes For People With Diabetes

The Skinny On Shakes For People With Diabetes

1 / 6 Learn All About the Best Weight Loss Shakes for Diabetes Diabetes is an increasingly common condition that causes blood sugar levels to rise higher than normal. There are several types of diabetes, but type 2 diabetes is the most common form. Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight or obese and must be medically managed to prevent serious diabetes complications. Along with making lifestyle changes and taking medication, people with diabetes must keep a watchful eye on their blood glucose levels and the foods they eat throughout each day. Whether you’re watching your weight or looking for a quick diabetes-friendly meal on the go, a meal replacement shake may be a good — or not so good — option for those with diabetes. Of course, a healthy diet of whole foods is always best, but shakes can provide a nice “safety net” for when a healthy meal is not an option. While meal replacement shakes may fill you up, even the best weight loss shakes don’t provide complete dietary nutrition. If you rely on weight loss or meal replacement shakes regularly, you will still need a healthy balance of real food each day, including: Fat-free or low-fat dairy Fresh fruits and vegetables, especially nonstarchy vegetables Lean protein Legumes, like beans and peas Nuts Seafood Soy Whole grains Also, not all meal replacement shakes are created equal; even the best weight loss shakes designed for people with diabetes may fall short when it comes to complete nutrition. For example, the Glucerna Rich Chocolate Shake is gluten-free and great for people who are lactose intolerant. But the Glucerna Shake is only enough to replace a moderate snack or part of a meal — not an entire meal. You will need to read the label and find out what’s missing when it comes to fat, pro Continue reading >>

Whey Protein May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

Whey Protein May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

A large breakfast that includes whey protein may help control Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study presented at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society. Approximately 29 million people in the United States have Type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are living with prediabetes. Previous research has indicated that a large, high-protein breakfast, medium-sized lunch, and small dinner can help manage blood sugar levels and weight in people with Type 2 diabetes. To evaluate whether eating whey protein (a milk byproduct created during cheese production) at breakfast is more effective than eating other proteins for controlling blood sugar, HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over the previous 2–3 months), weight, and hunger, the researchers recruited 48 overweight and obese people with Type 2 diabetes. The participants, who had an average age of 59, were randomly assigned to one of three diets containing the same amount of calories for 23 months. The only differences between the diets were in the amount and and type of proteins included at breakfast: The first group ate breakfasts containing 42 grams of 80% whey protein concentrate, such as whey-based shakes; the second group ate breakfasts containing 42 grams of non-whey proteins such as eggs, tuna, and soy; and the third group ate high-carb breakfasts with on 17 grams of protein. After 12 weeks, the whey protein group had lost an average of 16.7 pounds, compared to 13.4 pounds for those eating other proteins and 6.8 pounds for those eating primarily carbohydrate. Participants eating whey protein also felt less hungry throughout the day, had lower post-meal blood sugar spikes, and had larger decreases in HbA1c compared to those on the other two diets. “Recent reports have shown that whey protein Continue reading >>

8 Protein Drinks For People With Diabetes

8 Protein Drinks For People With Diabetes

Protein shakes and smoothies are all the rage these days. These popular pre- and post-workout drinks can include almost any ingredient under the sun, so if you have diabetes, it’s natural to wonder how they’ll affect your blood sugar. That said, there’s no reason to shy away from these drinks. There are countless diabetes-friendly recipes available online. Here, we round up our top eight protein shake and smoothie recipes for people with diabetes. Protein drinks 101 In general, protein drinks are made from protein powder and a liquid. Depending on your dietary needs, this liquid may be: water dairy milk nut milk rice milk seed milk Other protein add-ins include: cottage cheese yogurt nut butters raw nuts Sweeteners, fresh or frozen fruit, and fresh vegetables may also be added. No one food is off-limits if you have diabetes. Still, it’s important to limit refined carbohydrates that are more likely to spike your blood sugar. Eating fat with carbohydrates may help slow digestion. This can slow down the length of time it takes sugar to hit your bloodstream. Sources of fat that taste great in protein drinks include: nut butters raw nuts hemp seeds flaxseeds chia seeds avocados If possible, add fiber to your protein drink. It helps slow your body’s absorption of sugar. Oatmeal, ground flaxseed, chia seeds, and wheat bran are high in fiber and are protein-drink friendly. Some protein drink recipes call for maple syrup or Stevia. Maple syrup is high in sugar, but can be enjoyed sparingly. Stevia is a non-nutritive, no-calorie sweetener that won’t raise your blood sugar. When making shakes and smoothies, use the least amount of sweetener possible. Many pre-made protein shakes and smoothies are loaded with refined sugar. Your best bet is to make them at home where yo Continue reading >>

Recommended Protein Shakes For Diabetics

Recommended Protein Shakes For Diabetics

Whether you're looking for something to aid in your weight-loss efforts or trying to find a meal replacement for those days you're too busy to eat a decent meal, a protein shake may work. When you have diabetes, you need to find a protein shake that fits your diet plan and doesn't cause your blood sugar to spike. These shakes do not provide all the nutrients your body needs and should not be your only source of nutrition. Consult your doctor or dietitian to discuss protein shake options that fit your lifestyle. Video of the Day Some protein shakes specifically designed for people with diabetes contain fiber and resistant starch, a starch naturally found in foods such as beans that your body cannot digest. The fiber and resistant starch -- usually maltodextrin in the ingredient list -- in the shakes aid in blood sugar control. Protein, carb and calorie content in these shakes vary depending on brand, ranging from 10 to 16 grams of protein, 6 to 27 grams of carbs and 180 to 200 calories. Shakes with Cornstarch Like fiber and resistant starch, uncooked cornstarch also aids in blood sugar control and is an ingredient in some protein shakes for people with diabetes. Uncooked cornstarch is a slow-digesting carb that causes a more gradual rise in blood sugar. When mixed with water, one protein shake mix that contains uncooked cornstarch provides 15 grams of protein, 12 grams of carbs and 110 calories. You can also make your own protein shake using whole foods. For example, you can blend a small banana, 1/2 cup of whole strawberries, 1/2 cup of soft tofu, 1 cup of nonfat milk and ice. This shake contains 15 grams of protein, 35 grams of carbs and 255 calories. Adding a little fat to your shake, such as peanut butter or flaxseeds, may help slow the digestion of your shake and he Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should a Person With Diabetes Eat? Protein itself does not have much of an effect on blood sugar levels, though the food the protein is in may. Typically, people with diabetes don't need any more protein than people who don't have diabetes. There are, however, times when less protein isbetter. Protein is one of three essential macronutrients; the other twoare fat and carbohydrate. These are needed in large amounts to maintain health and vital functions. The body uses protein to build, repair, and maintain most of your body's tissues and organs. Proteins are also necessary for immune system function and they help some additional physiological processes. As long as your kidneys are healthy, about 15 to 20 percent of your daily calories should come from protein. This is the same amount suggested for a balanced non-diabetic diet. About 45 to 50 percent of your caloric intake should come from carbohydrates and the rest should come from fat. A person who needs 2,000 calories per day needs about 75 to 100 grams protein per day. It would be more accurate, however, to use the standard formula of 0.8 grams protein per kilogram of body weight. To do the kilogram conversion, divide your weight in pounds by 2.2. For instance, if you weigh 150 pounds, that is equal to 68 kilograms. Divide that by 0.8 and you get a protein goal of 85 grams. According to the USDA Dietary Guidelines , it is recommended to eat 5 1/2 ounces of protein-rich food each day. Foods that are high in protein include meat, fish, seafood, chicken, eggs, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds. One-half chicken breast has 29 grams protein A 3-ounce portion of steak has 26 grams protein When choosing proteins for a diabetic diet, the concern is more with the fats and carbohydrates that these foods Continue reading >>

The Best And Healthy Protein Shakes For Diabetics

The Best And Healthy Protein Shakes For Diabetics

The Best and Healthy Protein Shakes for Diabetics Meal replacement shakesincluding protein shakesare fast becoming a viable alternative for those living with Type 2 Diabetes. Not only are they a quick alternative to complicated meals, but they can be a great choice for reducing glucose intake. After all, a protein-heavy shake tends to be low in carbs and sugars, so theres no risk of blood sugar spikes after a protein shake. Below, weve got everything you need to know about protein shakes for diabetics. What makes them useful to various store-bought options to recipes you can make for yourself. By the end of this page, youll know everything you need to know to start making your own awesome protein shakes! Protein shakes are an awesome meal replacement or alternative for a number of reasons: Theyre packed with protein. The protein powder used to make these shakes deliver a hefty dose of amino acids. This is without all the fats, carbs, and sugar you get from a complete meal. Its concentrated protein but far lower in calories. Theyre low-sugar.There are many low-carb protein powders that are made with no added sugar. Or even with the lactose (milk sugar) removed. These low-carb options will prevent blood sugar spikes after eating. Theyre easily digested.Fast-acting whey protein powder is very easy on your digestive system. It can help to reduce digestive upset. Best of all, the nutrients are put to good use right away! Lets get one thing clear: protein shakes are not a replacement for every meal. They dont deliver all the fiber, vitamins, minerals, healthy fats, and complex carbs you need. Theyre exclusively a good source of protein. Which is only one of the macro and micro-nutrients your body requires. A diet made up of protein shakes alone is not a healthy one. However, Continue reading >>

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease where the body cannot maintain normal levels of blood sugar, and blood sugar levels go too high. Blood sugars that are too high can cause symptoms such as dry mouth, increased thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, and increased urination at night. High blood sugar levels over time can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels. What people eat has a huge impact on their blood sugars. Carbohydrates found in foods cause blood sugar to go up. Foods that digest slower cause a slower rise in blood sugar, which is helpful for those with diabetes. But what about protein shakes? What is protein? The three essential macronutrients found in food are protein, carbohydrates, and fat. Protein helps to maintain, rebuild, and repair muscle. Protein is also a building block for the skin, nails, bones, and even blood. It makes up hormones, enzymes, and antibodies. Protein in foods has staying power because it digests slower than carbohydrate. Proteins do not raise blood sugar. Periods of growth, such as during infancy and pregnancy, need more protein. Protein needs are also raised for people with injuries, those who have had surgery, or active people. Most people, including those with diabetes, are looking for healthy options to grab on the go like protein shakes or bars. While it is important to rely on packaged food products as little as possible, it is smart to have some healthier options in mind when needed. The problem with protein shakes is that they often have lots of artificial ingredients and can have as much sugar as soda. Protein requirements The total amount of protein consumed in a day is important, but so is how that intake is spread out over the day. Many people will consume a small amount at breakfast, a moderate amount at lunch, and a lar Continue reading >>

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