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Can A Diabetic Be A Nurse

How To Deal With A Diabetic Patient

How To Deal With A Diabetic Patient

Scrubs Magazine is the lifestyle website for and about nurses. Here youll find weekly giveaways, best of lists, and both the lighter side and the serious side of nursing with cartoons, scrubs style DOs and DONTs, beauty, health and wellness. Scrubsmag.com also features revealing stories from nurse bloggers ranging from a newly minted nurse to a seasoned RN to a misunderstood male nurse. Follow us on Twitter and join our conversation on Facebook . Advanced Practice Nursing and the 2015 DNP A diabetic patient can be difficult to handle, especially if the patient has been recently diagnosed. Treating diabetes requires careful monitoring of blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Newly diagnosed diabetic patients may also have to abruptly change their diet, get more exercise and take insulin. As a caregiver, youll probably not only treat the patient but also serve as a Diabetes 101 educator. 1. Teach the patient to administer her own insulin. She can also be taught to administer her own glucose test with a glucose meter. The patient may not always be under your supervision. Its good to help her become self-sufficient. 2. Help the patient plan meals. She may have trouble adapting to her new dietary needs. 3. Outline the recommended exercise regimen for diabetics and give them the encouragement and push that they need to follow through. Undertaking a new exercise program is hard for most people, but a diabetic patients life may depend on it. 4. Make sure the patient follows every step to manage her diabetes. If you see the patient snacking or slacking, call her on it. You dont have to be a strict disciplinarian, but you can interrupt bad habits and give the patient positive reinforcement when she does well. Be there for your patient. Being diagnosed with diabet Continue reading >>

Top 5 Things About Diabetes Every Student Nurse Needs To Know

Top 5 Things About Diabetes Every Student Nurse Needs To Know

Top 5 things about diabetes every student nurse needs to know Diabetes is a world health issue with 3.5 million people in the UK diagnosed and a further 549,000 who may have the condition and not know it. By 2030, it could be the 7th leading causes of deaths according to the WHO . Once diagnosed, patients typically only spend 3 hrs per year with a health professional. 8757 hours they manage their diabetes themselves ( source ). So, how can we make the best use of that time and to help patients manage their diabetes in a way thats meaningful for them and their health goals? Following a #NurChat discussion on the topic of beating diabetes and World Health Day 2016, here are some of the essential things every student nurse should know about diabetes and supporting patients. Diabetes occurs when either the pancreas produces no insulin or the insulin that is present is insufficient or not working correctly. The most well-known forms of diabetes are type 1 (T1) and type 2 (T2), however there are others: Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) About 10% of adults with diabetes have T1, and 90% have T2. Patients with diabetes will usually need insulin and / or medication combined with a healthy lifestyle and exercise routine. In some cases, healthy lifestyle choices and exercise can be enough to manage the condition, but as it progresses this may be less effective without medication. Additional resource: What is Diabetes? Diabetes UK What are the potential complications from diabetes? Short or long term complications as a result of diabetes are varied and personal to the individual. Everything from short term low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia or hypo) to long term tissue damage to organs, eyes, skin, feet and nerves can occur. Short term: hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar), urin Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Nurse Teachings

Diabetes | Nurse Teachings

SN explained that the Diabetes can affect the small blood vessels of the body that supply the skin with blood. Changes to the blood vessels because of diabetes can cause a skin condition called diabetic dermopathy. This appears as scaly patches that are light brown or red, often on the front of the legs. SN instructed patient on the diabetes. Make wise food choices. Choose fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish, lean meats, and low - fat dairy products. Learn when to eat and how much to have.Be physically active for 30 to 60 minutes most days, such as taking a brisk walk as tolerated. Two times a week do activities to strengthen muscles and bone, such as lifting weights or sit - ups. Reach and stay at a healthy weight. Making wise food choices and being active can help you control your weight. Take your medicines as prescribed and keep taking them, even after youve reached your targets. Sn instructed patient on diabetes management. Aim for your A1c level to be between 6-7%. For every 1% you decrease your A1c levels you decrease your risk of Diabetic complications. Physical activity helps to decrease blood sugar levels and monitor your food intake such as carbohydrates and fats. Patient verbalized understanding. SN instructed patient on diabetes and kidney problem, that diabetes mellitus ( DM ) is one of the leading cause of kidney failure in the United States. Approximately one-half of people who need dialysis have kidney disease from diabetes.With that, tight control of blood sugar must be done by avoiding concentrated sweets and high-carbohydrate content foods.Diabetic patients with hypertension have a special lower blood pressure target of less than 130 / 80 mmHg to reduce cardiovascular risk and delay progression of kidney disease. SN instructed that if you have di Continue reading >>

What Is A Diabetes Nurse Educator?

What Is A Diabetes Nurse Educator?

A diabetes nurse educator is a nurse who specializes in the care and management of patients with diabetes. They can be registered nurses, advanced-practice nurses , or nurses working in an expanded role. They can manage patients with both Type I and Type II diabetes, as well as women with gestational diabetes . Diabetes education can be one on one with patients, or via a group class. They teach patients the causes, pathophysiology, and signs and symptoms of diabetes as well as hypo and hyperglycemia. Patients need to understand these concepts to remain compliant with treatment and follow up. For example, many lay people don't realize that diabetes can affect multiple organ systems. Patients need to learn how to assess their extremities, especially the feet, for wounds, lacerations, and ulcers as diabetes can affect healing. They need to get routine eye exams to check for retinopathy. Diabetes nurse educators must also reach patients about the importance of diet and nutrition. Patients must learn to count carbohydrates and read food labels. They also need to learn to log their blood sugars and food to find out how they respond to the foods they choose. Logging blood sugars and diet also helps diabetes nurses and physicians change medications or treatments to ensure their blood glucose remains within a desirable range. Patients must also learn about medications used for diabetes, whether it's oral or injectable medications. They must learn time frames in which the peak effect of the medication takes place, and what signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia are and how to avoid "bottoming out." Insulin-dependent diabetics especially need close monitoring-they must learn about the different types of insulins along with their onset of action. Diabetes nurse educators also help mon Continue reading >>

What Are Diabetes Specialist Nurses?

What Are Diabetes Specialist Nurses?

If you have recently been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, or are having trouble managing your type 2 diabetes, you may be referred to a diabetes specialist nurse. Some 2.9 million people in the UK have diabetes, a condition that, if not well controlled, can lead to serious complications, such as heart disease, stroke, eye and kidney problems and nerve damage in the feet, which may in turn lead to foot ulcers and even amputation. Pioneering nurse, Janet Kinson, was the first to recognise the need to train nurses to educate and support people with diabetes and their families some 70 years ago. Today there are some 1300 diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs) working in hospitals, doctors’ surgeries and the community. There is also a growing number of diabetes nurse consultants, with a more extensive role in leading and planning services. Who are diabetes nurses? A trained nurse with special expertise in the care and treatment of diabetes, a DSN can be an invaluable source of information, advice and support, for example if you have to start using insulin, if your blood sugar becomes uncontrolled or if other health problems emerge that complicate your diabetes. They will liaise on your behalf with other healthcare professionals such as your GP, practice nurse, dietitian, podiatrist (foot specialist) and optometrist (eye screening specialist). You can talk to them on the phone, see them when you visit the diabetes or other clinic or they may visit you at home if you are housebound. What are the benefits of seeing a diabetes specialist nurse? Managing diabetes isn’t always easy and your needs may change over time as the condition progresses. “Usually DSNs work with people with diabetes who have complications, such as foot disease or kidney failure, and with people who need mo Continue reading >>

Top 2 Online Msn In Diabetes Nursing Programs – Ccne Accredited

Top 2 Online Msn In Diabetes Nursing Programs – Ccne Accredited

Recent research commissioned by the U.S. Department of Education has shown that students benefit tremendously from being able to complete their coursework online. Indeed, their academic outcomes are often better than those of students who have completed their work in classroom settings. The nursing profession, which is keen to ensure their entire workforce is as highly educated as possible, has taken this to heart. As a result, various MSN nursing programs are now offered partially or fully online. Diabetes nurses are those who help people with a disease that stops the body from absorbing or producing enough insulin. The largest proportion of the working day of a diabetes nurse is spent on liaising between patients, their family members and their doctors. As such, communication skills are absolutely vital in this field. Indeed, as a diabetes nurse, you will become an advocate for people who suffer from this disease, or for those who are likely to develop it. Prevention is very important, and educating people about healthy lifestyle choices is a hugely important part of your job. At present, only two online MSN degrees in diabetes nursing exist in the country. One of these is accredited through CCNE, which is the Capella University program. The other one, which is offered by Columbia University, is not accredited. The college itself is accredited through the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. The program is also known by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. However, this association does not currently offer accreditation at all. Hence, although this program is not CCNE accredited, we have still decided to add it in this information, as it is still a high quality program that you may want to enroll in. 1. Capella University At Capella University, stu Continue reading >>

Msn Career Spotlight: Diabetes Management Nurse

Msn Career Spotlight: Diabetes Management Nurse

Across the United States, millions of people are living with diabetes, and some don’t even know it. More than 30 million people have been diagnosed with types 1 and 2 diabetes. At the same time, 7.2 million people are living with undiagnosed diabetes. In the past 30 years, the rate of diabetes diagnoses has become a national health crisis. With 9.4 percent of the U.S. population living with the disease, the need for healthcare professionals to help has grown exponentially. The medical professionals who help diabetic patients monitor and manage their condition are known as diabetes management nurses. They provide information to patients and, in some cases, the patient’s family members, to help them make educated health decisions with a goal of diabetes self-management. Diabetes management nurses also interact with physicians to provide ongoing information about the patients. Many diabetes management nurses are family nurse practitioners (FNPs) who work with endocrinologists to care for diabetic patients. In the role of diabetes management nurse, healthcare providers can help patients fight the disease. To become an FNP and a diabetes management nurse, registered nurses (RNs) will first need to earn a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) such as the one offered online by Duquesne University. There are other necessary skills as well. FNPs who specialize in diabetes management need practical expertise and knowledge to provide effective care for their patients. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) provides a list of necessary skills for diabetes management nurses: Analytical skills: Diabetes management nurses must process and analyze patient information to make appropriate adjustments for diabetes care. This includes changing insulin dosage, prescribing thyroid medica Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Childhood The Nurses Role

Diabetes In Childhood The Nurses Role

The nurse plays an important role in the education of diabetic children and their families, writes Deirdre Bowers The nurse plays an important role in the education of diabetic children and their families, writes Deirdre Bowers Education of diabetic children can take a lot of time and patience, but it is up to us as nurses to remain updated so that we can make life a little easier for these children and their families The nurse is the primary educator but acts as part of a team. This initially involves the paediatrician, the nurse or nurse specialist and the dietitian. Other professionals involved may include the psychologist, the social worker, the ophthalmologist, the GP, the public health nurse, the dentist and the chiropodist. All of these professionals have their own specialties, but their combined information given to children and their families can make it easier to understand diabetes and how to control it. Education should be approached on an individual basis, taking into consideration the age of the child, the IQ, previous knowledge of diabetes, social background and family support. It is the responsibility of the nurse to obtain any relevant information from the family and assess the type of approach most suited to them. The nurse is often the first person from the team to meet the child and the family, so a friendly approach is required. The aim of education is to teach the child to be as independent as possible, bearing in mind their age. The family also needs to be educated as a support team. A measure of responsibility for the child can avoid diabetes taking over the lives of the whole family. Other people may require education, eg. teachers, hobby instructors or babysitters. It is the responsibility of the nurse to provide all leaflets and relevant info Continue reading >>

Diabetes Nurse | Nursing Schools.net

Diabetes Nurse | Nursing Schools.net

Diabetes nurses care for patients that suffer from diabetes, a condition that affects the body's ability to produce or absorb enough insulin. This includes assisting patients in monitoring their blood sugar and medications, helping to minimize diabetic nerve damage, conducting nutritional therapy, dealing with psychosocial issues and behavioral management. They also spend a considerable amount of time educating patients and families on proper dietary, exercise and lifestyle habits to keep symptoms under control. These nurses also have a specialized knowledge of the endocrine system, including the hypothalamus, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenals, pineal body and the reproductive glands. Diabetes nurses must possess excellent communication skills in order to relay information between patients, physicians, family members and even insurance companies. They must also be compassionate as they are dealing with a disease that is often chronic and can be life threatening. Many diabetes nurses become advocates for diabetes awareness and even go on to become diabetes educators. Becoming a diabetes nurse requires both education and experience. First a student must become a registered nurse via either a two year associate's or four year bachelor's degree. Then students must take and successfully pass the National Council Licensing Examination (NCLEX-RN) to become a registered nurse. Many facilities also require diabetes nurses to become certified as advanced diabetes specialists. In order to become eligible for the certification exam, nurses must possess a master's level degree and a minimum of 500 hours of professional nursing experience in a diabetes setting. This exam is called the Advanced Diabetes Management Certification and is administered via the American Association of Diabete Continue reading >>

How Can Nurses Help Diabetes Patients?

How Can Nurses Help Diabetes Patients?

People diagnosed with diabetes must follow lifelong care plans to manage the disease. Nurses are at the forefront of educating and treating diabetic patients. While doctors may create a diabetic care plan, it usually falls to nurses to provide care and to educate patients about managing diabetes. Diabetes is a complex disease that requires nurses to stay up-to-date on the latest approaches to managing the condition. RNs can gain expert knowledge and skills vital to improving diabetic care by completing an RN to BSN program . These programs offer additional training in evidence-based nursing care. In the doctors office, nurses can assess patients before they see the doctor and then answer questions after the doctors visit. Nurses can also provide diabetic wound care. This care is important because diabetes slows the healing of wounds, especially on the feet. In the hospital, nurses can look for signs that an undiagnosed person might have diabetes. Nurses know that diabetic patients are at higher risk for problems such as infections, disturbed sensory perception and nutritional imbalances. Nurses can identify these problems early and provide the needed care. Nurses working with diabetic patients have five priorities, according to Nurselabs.com: Restore the balance of fluids, electrolytes and the acid-base balance. Correct/reverse abnormal metabolic functions. Educate patients about diabetes and how it affects the body, self-care and necessary treatments. Beyond treating diabetic patients in a doctors office or hospital, nurses can take on the specialized role of diabetes educator. These educators teach people with diabetes to understand and manage the following: How to change health habits, including making supportive food choices, exercising and quitting smoking, if app Continue reading >>

Will My Diabetes Affect My Future In Nursing?

Will My Diabetes Affect My Future In Nursing?

Will my diabetes affect my future in nursing? Hi all, new here. I am planning on starting nursing school in fall 2016. I am in the very beginning phase of this journey. I am a 22 year old type *2* diabetic, diagnosed 4 months ago. Ever since the onset of puberty and severe PCOS, I've struggled with insulin resistance. It eventually developed into diabetes because I was young, uneducated, and thought it didn't really matter. Anywho, now my sugar is very well controlled after losing 30 pounds. I am NOT on insulin. I just take metformin and watch my carb intake. My hba1c is 5.8%, fasting this morning was 89. I have no issues with low or high sugar. I also don't have any complications such as nerve damage, eye damage, kidney problems, etc. So my question is, do you think my diabetes will affect my chances of getting jobs? I know there are laws in place against discrimination and such, but I don't know how much of that applies to medical issues. I just worry that a hospital will want a physical and worry that I'm diabetic and assume my sugar is just out of control, even if my a1c is a good number. Thanks for reading and any insight on this question! Continue reading >>

Diabetics In Scrubs: Don't Let The Disease Slow You Down

Diabetics In Scrubs: Don't Let The Disease Slow You Down

Diabetics In Scrubs: Don't Let The Disease Slow You Down Diabetes is a disease that affects one in every three people, which means its a given that some of the people who live with diabetes are also nurses. As any diabetic can tell you, managing the disease is a full time job-there are lots of variables to keep track of at all hours of the day-and for nurses, who spend their days tracking other peoples health, the added stress can be overwhelming at times. Imagine trying to keep track of your own blood sugar levels and remember how many carbs you ate in the last hour all while hurrying from patient to patient checking their vital signs, administering medicine, and updating charts. At times, it might feel like trying to do complex math while someone shouts random numbers behind you. But if youre a nurse with diabetes, or youre interested in beginning a nursing career but are worried about how your diabetes might get in the way, take heart. You arent alone, and many nurses have already blazed the trail. Nurse Berit Bagely, for example, recounts her struggles after learning she was a diabetic. An emergency room nurse, Bagely was floored when she received her diagnosis, and described herself as overwhelmed, sad, angry, scared, lost. But while she struggled at first-keeping her insulin shots regular during unpredictable night shifts, avoiding the urge to over-test, etc-she not only mastered her condition, she let it motivate her into creating new career goals. She embraced her struggles, and eventually took a job in diabetes education-helping others like her cope with the diagnosis and life changes that follow. Nurse Debra Johnson also struggled when she was first diagnosed at age 54 with adult-onset diabetes. A 34-year health care veteran, Nurse Johnson knew all too well t Continue reading >>

On Being A Nurse, Mother To A Type 1 Diabetic, And A Diabetes Educator

On Being A Nurse, Mother To A Type 1 Diabetic, And A Diabetes Educator

I am fortunate enough to have been chosen as the new Diabetes Educator. I could not feel more excited and fulfilled in my newest adventure being with the Endocrinology Team! Although I’ve enjoyed functioning in many roles as an registered nurse, I have found my niche being in a position that serves to educate and support individuals in their health journey; particularly with a chronic condition. I will preface this by saying that although I consider myself a supportive member of an interdisciplinary team, I fell short in being a supportive mother. You see, my son was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) on mother’s day last year. Since that day, I found that what makes me likable as a bedside nurse did not translate well into being a T1D mother. I’m positive I became the ultimate helicopter mom demanding to oversee his injections, peeking at his glucometer, and hawk-eyeing his nutritional intake. You say, “Good job! You’re a great mother!” Thank you. I tried to be the best right hand man to my then 12-year-old son. The reality, though, is I did everything wrong in supporting him in his journey into physical, emotional, and mental well-being. Looking back at my actions, I truly did mean well. After all, I love and care for him! But, he begged to differ. Since then, I’ve changed my relationship with him and was able to educate myself on how I can better support him. So, I thought I could share tips on Diabetes Etiquette from the Behavioral Diabetes Institute. Nurse educators encourage those who don’t have diabetes to understand how to support their loved ones. Do understand that diabetes is hard work. It’s a full time job with no time off. It involves thinking about what, when, and how much is eaten, all the while factoring in exercise, medication, stres Continue reading >>

What Does A Diabetes Educator Do?

What Does A Diabetes Educator Do?

By Patty Cebulko, manager of The Health Plan’s Disease Management department. Patty is a Registered Nurse and Certified Diabetes Educator, and works to educate and support people to understand and live well with diabetes. November is Diabetes Awareness Month, and November 6 through 12 is National Diabetes Educators Week. This week is set aside to give special recognition to the nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and other licensed health care professionals who specialize in educating people with diabetes about their condition. The training, counseling, and support that diabetes educators provide to patients is known as diabetes education or diabetes self-management training (DSMT). What does a diabetes educator do? Empowers and assists patients to modify lifestyle and adopt healthy self-care behaviors Trains patients and caregivers to use diabetes devices, such as blood glucose meters, insulin pens and pumps, and continuous glucose monitors Teaches problem-solving strategies and skills to help people with diabetes live healthy, active lifestyles Provides nutrition education that is individualized for each person and allows people with diabetes to eat “regular” foods Works with physicians and other members of your health care team to help manage medication regimens based on physician-directed protocols Helps you develop emotional coping skills Some diabetes educators carry the title of Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE). A CDE is a health professional who possesses comprehensive knowledge of and experience in prediabetes, diabetes prevention, and diabetes management. To become certified requires years of practice-based experience in diabetes education, along with specific knowledge and education requirements, along with a written examination with minimum passing requi Continue reading >>

Seven Facts Nurses Should Know About Diabetes

Seven Facts Nurses Should Know About Diabetes

Seven Facts Nurses Should Know About Diabetes Seven Facts Nurses Should Know About Diabetes Out of all the patients you see in a day, how many have or might have diabetes? Nearly 26 million adults and children in the United States have diabetes, representing 8.3 percent of the population, which means that nurses will frequently encounter patients who are diabetic. Yet many will present with other problems. Sometimes there is so much focus on the other condition that glucose control can get overlooked. It is important to work with the clinician who is treating the patients diabetes to ensure that blood sugar levels are well managed while treating other conditions. Steroids can increase blood sugar levels and diabetics can face difficulties while recovering from surgeries, explained Marjorie Cypress, RN, PhD, NP, CDE, president-elect of healthcare and education for the American Diabetes Association. Taking factors like these into account helps to ensure the well-being of your patients. Diabetes is an area of high interest for health professionals, with a great deal of research and investment behind the frequent changes in medications, treatments and care protocols. Thus, TravelNursing.com has gathered some recent findings, interesting facts and helpful resources about diabetes to help keep you and your patients up to date. Seven facts about diabetes you should know: 1. In the last 13 years, 13 new diabetes medications and insulins have been released. We have a lot more to choose from and we can individualize treatment better. We are seeing that the gut has a much bigger role in the disease than we realized and now we have hormones that can treat these defects, said Cypress. 2. Regular eye exams are critical for preventing severe vision loss in diabetic patients. Diabetic Continue reading >>

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