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Can A Child With Type 1 Diabetes Get Social Security

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes - Condition Diabetes is a medical condition in which a person’s level of glucose, or blood sugar, is elevated. In a properly functioning circulatory system, blood carries glucose to all the cells in the body in order to produce energy, while the pancreas produces insulin to help the body absorb excess glucose. High levels of glucose in the blood are an indication that the body is not producing enough insulin, or that the insulin produced is not working as it should to help the body absorb glucose, indicating a Diabetic or pre-Diabetic condition. There are three types of Diabetes: Type 1, or “juvenile” Diabetes Type 2, or “adult onset” Diabetes, and Gestational Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is the medical name for both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. Pre-Diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, indicating that an individual has a high risk of developing full-fledged Diabetes. Diabetes is a very serious disease which can result in high blood pressure, damage to the eyes, nerve damage, kidney disease, heart disease, blindness, and stroke. In addition, it is not uncommon for a long term diabetic to loose limbs to amputation because of poor circulation. Symptoms The presence of Diabetes is generally indicated by some combination of several symptoms. A diabetic will often experience unexplained: frequent need to urinate, especially if it is combined with extreme thirst, chronic hunger, especially between meals, fatigue, weight loss, and/or general feelings of irritability Many diabetics report dry, itchy skin and trouble with genital itching and fungal infections. A tingling sensation or numbness in the feet is another indication, as is blurred vision. Finally, the skin of many diabetics is slow to heal from wounds, skin abrasions, or so Continue reading >>

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

How costly is diabetes management and treatment? Diabetes management and treatment is expensive. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the average cost of health care for a person with diabetes is $13,741 a year—more than twice the cost of health care for a person without diabetes.1 Many people who have diabetes need help paying for their care. For those who qualify, a variety of government and nongovernment programs can help cover health care expenses. This publication is meant to help people with diabetes and their family members find and access such resources. 1American Diabetes Association. Economic costs of diabetes in the U.S. in 2012. Diabetes Care. 2013;36(4):1033–1046. What is health insurance? Health insurance helps pay for medical care, including the cost of diabetes care. Health insurance options include the following: private health insurance, which includes group and individual health insurance government health insurance, such as Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), TRICARE, and veterans’ health care programs Starting in 2014, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) prevents insurers from denying coverage or charging higher premiums to people with preexisting conditions, such as diabetes. The ACA also requires most people to have health insurance or pay a fee. Some people may be exempt from this fee. Read more about the ACA at HealthCare.gov or call 1–800–318–2596, TTY 1–855–889–4325. Key Terms Some terms listed here have many meanings; only those meanings that relate to the financial and medical aspects of diabetes and its management and treatment are included. affiliation period: a period of time that must pass before health insurance coverage provided by a health maintenance organization (HMO) be Continue reading >>

Should I Try To Apply For Social Security Disability For My 5 Year Old Child Who Was Recently Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes?

Should I Try To Apply For Social Security Disability For My 5 Year Old Child Who Was Recently Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes?

I have previously applied for Social Security for my child because he was very premature at a little over 2lbs and being 2 months early as well as being asthmatic but was denied twice. Now with my child having type 1 Diabetes on top of being asthmatic im not sure if I should try to re-apply. Still under average height and weight compared to other kids this age and will soon be 6 in a couple of months. Currently taking 6 insulin shots daily and testing sugar about 6-8 times daily because of highs and lows. Any help or advice would greatly be appreciated. Thank you! Continue reading >>

Getting Social Security For Adhd Children

Getting Social Security For Adhd Children

It is possible to get Social Security benefits for your ADHD child. Read my experience plus helpful tips about applying and links. My Two Cents on Social Security Several years ago, I applied for Social Security benefits for my son James who has ADHD. I did this for several reasons. The first was because of his medical condition and the second was for the medical benefits. Being disabled myself left me with no other medical coverage for my son other than the states med-i-cal program which was hit very hard in the mental health services for children shortly after James was diagnosed. On top of already scarce mental health clinics with large and long waiting lists, children's mental health services took huge budget cuts. This left help for children such as James at a minimum and only children who were in danger of being removed from their homes and placed into foster care or children who had crossed the boundaries into the Judicial system were given access to mental health services. Having social security benefits did several things for my son. 1). It opened the doors to doctors that before would not see him because he was on the state med-i-cal program, and two. Secondly, it allowed a cash benefit to obtain services that were not covered by giving us the extra cash we needed to pay for those services. It also allowed me to put James into programs that helped him tremendously with self esteem and social issues that we could not otherwise afford. Social Security Benefits for Children with ADHD I had a reader write to me and ask me for my best advice on applying for social security benefits for children with disabilities, so I thought that I would share what I learned with all my readers. At the time I applied for SSI for my son, I felt, as did his doctors, that James had a Continue reading >>

Can You Work If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Work If You Have Diabetes?

This is the question that Aidan sent to The Diabetes Council last week: Can you work if you have diabetes? Of course you can work if you have diabetes, or can you? Seemingly this is a simple question, but there are three answers: Yes No Maybe – you can work if you have diabetes by fighting the system Careers that you cannot have with diabetes There are some careers that preclude you from working as a person with diabetes. These careers are not open to people with diabetes who are taking insulin. For example, if you have Type 1 diabetes, you are not allowed to pilot a plane commercially in the United States, no matter how well controlled your diabetes is. The FAA currently will not allow it. However, if you want to pilot a plane in Canada or the United Kingdom, there are regulations set up that allow persons with Type 1 diabetes who are in good control of their diabetes to pilot a plane commercially. We have looked at a lot of different careers at The Diabetes Council. We have looked at whether or not you can be in the military with diabetes, be a firefighter or a law enforcement officer with diabetes, astronaut, work as an EMT/paramedic, a long-distance truck driver, or be a pilot with diabetes. Soon, we will look at whether or not you can be a flight attendant with diabetes. Please read the articles above to find out what the specifics of working in these careers with diabetes are, and what kind of rules and regulations you must follow. The careers we have looked at so far all have certain rules and regulations that apply to people with diabetes. These rules and regulations are put into place to ensure the safety of the employee with diabetes, and also the safety of the general public. For example, a pilot with poorly controlled diabetes who has a low blood sugar cou Continue reading >>

Learning Disabilities And Social Security Disability Benefits

Learning Disabilities And Social Security Disability Benefits

When living with a learning disability, you’re empowered to thrive in all aspects in life despite the challenges that can be faced daily. However, in some situations, adults who suffer from severe learning disabilities can find it difficult to maintain gainful employment to support their families. Also, if you have a child who lives with a severe learning disability, it can be hard finding and affording opportunities for them to success both in and out of the classroom. In either situation, the financial effects can, sometimes, be overwhelming to an individual or a family. The good news is that Social Security Disability benefits can help alleviate this financial strain and provide much-needed medical coverage to help pay for treatments and other medical bills. The Social Security Disability Programs The Social Security Administration (SSA) offers two different disability programs including Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Both programs provide a monthly payment and medical coverage to severely disabled individuals. In addition to meeting the SSA’s disability criteria to receive such benefits, one must also meet the financial requirements of each respective program. To be eligible for SSDI benefits, an individual must have worked enough in the past to earn sufficient work credits by paying Social Security taxes. For every $1,200 earned, an individual receives one work credit and can receive a maximum of four work credits per year. If you are 62 years of age, you will need 40 work credits to qualify, 20 of which must have been earned in the last 10 years. If you are under 62 years of age, you can qualify for benefits with fewer credits. The exact number of credits needed is determined by your age. If an individual do Continue reading >>

Financial Assistance & Your Rights

Financial Assistance & Your Rights

What financial assistance programs for people with diabetes are available in my province? For more information on government and community financial assistance programs available in your province, please click on the appropriate Financial Assistance Resource below. Do people with diabetes qualify for any disability benefits? There is no standard definition of “disability” in Canada; each federal, provincial/territorial government program and private insurer may interpret “disability” differently and set their own rules for eligibility. For most programs, eligibility is based not on which disease or disability you have, but on how the disease/disability affects your ability to work, participate in society, etc. Do people with diabetes qualify for CPP disability? CPP disability benefit is a monthly amount available to Canadians (under 65 years of age) who have become unable to work because of a disability. You must have paid into the Canada Pension Plan while you were working, in order to qualify. To be eligible for CPP, your disability must be “severe” and “prolonged”. CPP defines a “severe” disability as one that prevents you from doing your former job, or any other job, on a regular basis. So having diabetes alone normally will not qualify you for CPP disability; however if you are experiencing certain diabetes-related complications that have affected your ability to work, you may qualify. Eligibility is determined by CPP medical adjudicators based on information submitted in your application and supporting documentation. Do you have any other questions? Please send them to [email protected] Continue reading >>

Common Types Of Health Conditions

Common Types Of Health Conditions

Census data shows that approximately 1 in 5 Americans live with a disability, or a total of about 57 million people. Among them, roughly 8.9 million disabled workers received $10 billion in 2013 through the Social Security Administration’s disability benefits program. But while monthly SSA benefits are an indispensable lifeline for millions of disabled Americans, qualifying to receive aid can be a challenge. The disability benefits program is notorious for rejecting more applicants than it accepts, and many claims are denied because applicants’ disabilities fail to meet SSA requirements. To help you determine if your disability can qualify you for monthly assistance, the New Jersey and Pennsylvania disability attorneys of Young, Marr & Associates have assembled this guide to how the SSA evaluates different conditions and illnesses. Simply click the link to your condition below to find out more about how your claim can be approved. Cancer (Malignant Neoplastic Diseases) The term malignant neoplasm refers to a cancerous tumor. Therefore, malignant neoplastic diseases refer to various forms of cancer. The American Cancer Society estimates that 1,665,540 new cancer cases will be diagnosed in 2014. Bladder Cancer The two most common types of this cancer in the United States are squamous cell carcinoma and transitional cell carcinoma. White males are at an increased risk for developing bladder cancer. Breast Cancer While this type of cancer most often affects females, breast cancer can also develop in men. The National Cancer Institute reported about 230,000 new cases in women and approximately 2,300 new cases in men in the United States in 2014. Esophageal Cancer The esophagus is the tube which carries food from the mouth into the stomach. Symptoms can include weight los Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes – How Can You Win A Claim

Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes – How Can You Win A Claim

If you are diabetic and unable to work because of your diabetes you may want to know if you qualify for social security disability benefits and how can you win your disability application. This article will give you a look at how I approach a SSDI or SSI claim to put in the best light possible for success at a financial future when your diabetes prevents you from working. How is Diabetes Defined by Social Security Social security used to recognize diabetes as one of its listed disorders. This means that if certain criteria are met then you are found disabled without regard to what you can or can not do in terms of basic work activities. However in 201l social security did away with the listing and only kept a new portion of it that gave what the ssa administration called guidance. (1) The social security administration guidance still is instructive in determining disability for diabetes as the “guidance” they give in listing 9.00 discusses in general endocrine disorders and how they can be disabling. Watch Tips for Diabetics and SSDI As paraphrased from listing 9.00, Diabetes mellitus is a pancreatic gland disorder that disrupts the production of insulin. There are two types of diabetic disorders . Type 1 Diabetes: This goes by the name of insulin dependant diabetes or juvenile diabetes. It is an absolute deficiency in insulin that commonly begins in childhood and is a chronic lifelong illness. Type 2 Diabetes: This is often call adult onset or non insulin dependant where the cells of the body fight off insulin affecting blood sugar metabolism. In some cases diabetes can be controlled and in others it is not controlled well. These are usually the persons that end up with severe symptoms that affect their ability to work . Statistics on Diabetes Are Staggering The nu Continue reading >>

Disability Benefits For Uncontrolled Diabetes And Severe Diabetic Complications

Disability Benefits For Uncontrolled Diabetes And Severe Diabetic Complications

This is a guest post by Molly Clarke. Molly is the Social Media Coordinator for Social Security Disability Help. She contributes regularly to the Social Security Disability Help blog where she works to promote disability awareness and assist individuals throughout the disability application process. Diabetes is a fairly common medical condition that can often be controlled with medication and lifestyle changes. Unfortunately, not every diabetic is able to manage their symptoms. When diabetes cannot be controlled, serious health complications can arise. These may include kidney disease, vision loss, neuropathy, or tissue necrosis. Serious side effects such as these can make it impossible to maintain employment and earn a living. If—despite following medical instructions—serious complications keep you from working, you may be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits. The following article will give you a general overview of Social Security Disability and will provide you with the information needed to begin the application process. Overview and Basic Requirements The Social Security Administration is responsible for two different types of benefits. These are: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - this type of benefit is offered to disabled workers and their dependent family members. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) - this type of benefit is offered to elderly, blind, or disabled individuals who earn very little income. To qualify for benefits from either program, you must first meet the SSA’s definition of disability. This definition is comprised of the following: You are considered to have a disability if you suffer from a medical condition(s) that prevents gainful employment (Gainful employment is considered to be $1,040 a month for a disabled in Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes is a life-threatening condition that affects almost 30 million Americans, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) reported. The number of cases of diabetes has been rising steadily over the years, causing almost 70,000 deaths in 2010 and contributing to about 230,000 more. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with diabetes, there is help available. The Social Security Administration (SSA) offers financial benefits for those struggling to work due to a disabling disease. The Financial Costs of Diabetes Diabetes is an expensive condition, costing individuals more than twice as much in healthcare costs than their healthy counterparts. ADA reports that those suffering from the condition will pay an extra $7,900 each year in hospital care, prescriptions, supplies, doctor’s visits and other direct medical expenses. In addition to direct medical costs, diabetes caused $69 billion dollars in indirect costs, which include missed workdays, decreased productivity at work, and the inability to work. This means, on average, those with diabetes are also losing almost $2,500 per year. Diabetes Self-Management pointed out that many with diabetes have trouble affording the necessary prescriptions and supplies, even with the help of insurance. Though some pharmaceutical companies offer assistance for those who can’t afford to pay full prices, people with diabetes are two and a half more times likely to be unemployed or live in poverty. There are three types of diabetes. Type 1 or juvenile, is often diagnosed in children or young adults, and happens when their bodies can’t make enough insulin. Type 2 or adult onset, is usually caused by unhealthy lifestyles, and happens when their bodies can’t use insulin correctly. The third, gestational diabetes, occurs during pregn Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability And Diabetes

Social Security Disability And Diabetes

When determining whether or not a person is "disabled" under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program, the Social Security Administration (SSA) looks at many factors, which are outlined in its "Blue Book." The Blue Book describes diabetes under Section 9.00, Endocrine Disorders. Diabetes mellitus has two major categories. The first is Type 1 diabetes, previously referred to as juvenile diabetes, and is a deficiency of insulin production. In the second, Type 2 diabetes (adult onset diabetes), the body's cells resist insulin. The major distinction between the two is that Type 1 diabetes requires daily insulin, while Type 2 diabetes ordinarily can be controlled by changes in exercise, diet and occasionally insulin or other medication. Individuals with either type of diabetes can apply for Social Security disability benefits. Whether a person will receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) for diabetes depends largely upon his or her ability to work. If he or she is physically capable of doing his or her previous work or any other work that someone similarly afflicted can do, the SSA will deny benefits. The SSA will also deny benefits if the person with diabetes makes more than $1,000 per month. While Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus are usually controlled by lifestyle changes and insulin, some people may be unable to work due to hypoglycemia unawareness, other physical and mental disorders that impact diabetes, or inadequate treatment. Applying for SSDI for Your Diabetes Applying for SSDI is a multistep process. First, the initial application must be completed, along with a "detailed activities of daily living questionnaire." A doctor must verify the relevant medical information and confirm that the diabetes will last for at least a year. Only 35 Continue reading >>

Disability Advocates Group, Inc.

Disability Advocates Group, Inc.

How Does the Social Security Administration Decide if I Qualify for Disability Benefits for Diabetes? If you have diabetes, Social Security disability benefits may be available. To determine whether you are disabled by diabetes, the Social Security Administration first considers whether your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal a listing at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. See Winning Social Security Disability Benefits for Diabetes by Meeting a Listing. If your diabetes is not severe enough to equal or meet a listing, the Social Security Administration must assess your residual functional capacity (RFC) (the work you can still do, despite your diabetes), to determine whether you qualify for benefits at Step 4 and Step 5 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. See Residual Functional Capacity Assessment for Diabetes. About Diabetes and Disability The complete name for diabetes is diabetes mellitus. Also known as “sugar” diabetes, diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder. The cells of the body need a form of sugar called glucose for energy. The body breaks down various carbohydrates in the diet to glucose. Glucose then circulates to the body’s tissues through the blood. But glucose cannot get from the blood to the inside of the cells where the cells can use it, unless the hormone insulin is also present. Insulin permits passage of glucose through the cell membrane. Insulin is secreted by the pancreas. The pancreas is an elongated organ located behind the stomach. Special cells, known as the Islets of Langerhans, are spread throughout it. These cells produce insulin that is released into the blood. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce any or enough insulin or when the body is unable to use effectively the insulin that is produced. High Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of Social Security For Grandfamilies

The Benefits Of Social Security For Grandfamilies

Introduction “Today, more and more children are being raised by their grand- parents. These grandparents provide a crucial safety net, allow- ing children whose parents can’t provide for them to remain in families, instead of winding up as wards of the state. But as the recession hits “grandfamilies,†that safety net is under stress.†– The Wall Street Journal, April 4, 20091 Grandfamilies are families headed by grandparents and other rel- atives who are sharing their homes with their grandchildren, nieces, nephews, and/or other related children. More than 6.5 million children across the country are living in households maintained by grandparents or other relatives.2 These unique families take many forms: In some, the parents of the child may not be present in the home and the grandparent or other relative provides full time care for the child. In others, a parent may live in the home but a grandparent, aunt, or uncle assists or provides full time care for the child. Grandfamilies come together for many reasons. Some form out of economic necessity, such as when a parent loses a job or lacks affordable housing. Some are created when a parent dies, joins the military or is otherwise unable to care for a child. Many types of grandfamilies benefit from Social Security’s contribution to their family income. Social Security provides critical economic security for caregivers and children in these unique families. Created 75 years ago, Social Security is the nation’s preeminent insurance program for American families. It is most well known for paying guaranteed pensions to workers when they retire, but it also provides critical income protection for workers and their families in the unfortu- nate event of death or disability. Soci Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus In Children

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus In Children

What is type 1 diabetes in children? Diabetes is a condition in which the body can't make enough insulin, or can't use insulin normally. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder. The body's immune system damages the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. Insulin is a hormone. It helps sugar (glucose) in the blood get into cells of the body to be used as fuel. When glucose can’t enter the cells, it builds up in the blood. This is called high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). High blood sugar can cause problems all over the body. It can damage blood vessels and nerves. It can harm the eyes, kidneys, and heart. It can also cause symptoms such as tiredness. Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a long-term (chronic) condition. It may start at any age. Only 5% of people with diabetes have type 1. Insulin from the pancreas must be replaced with insulin injections or an insulin pump. There are two forms of type 1 diabetes: Immune-mediated diabetes. This is an autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system damages the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. This is the most common kind of type 1 diabetes. Idiopathic type 1. This refers to rare forms of the disease with no known cause. What causes type 1 diabetes in a child? The cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown. Researchers think some people inherit a gene than can cause type 1 diabetes if a trigger such as a virus occurs. Which children are at risk for type 1 diabetes? A child is more at risk for type 1 diabetes if he or she has any of these risk factors: A family member with the condition Caucasian race Being from Finland or Sardinia Is age 4 to 6, or 10 to 14 What are the symptoms of type 1 diabetes in a child? Type 1 diabetes often appears suddenly. In children, type 1 diabetes symptoms may be like flu symptoms. Symptoms ca Continue reading >>

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