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Can A Child Outgrow Type 1 Diabetes?

Can You Outgrow Juvenile Diabetes

Can You Outgrow Juvenile Diabetes

written by: Victoria Trix edited by: dianahardin updated: 3/29/2011 Diabetes is a disease affecting many children today. Here we look at the common question - Can you outgrow juvenile diabetes? Diabetes refers to the condition in which blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels in the body are too high. There are two types of diabetes, noted as Type 1 and Type 2, and in the case of children who are diagnosed with a diabetic condition, there is conflicting opinion as to whether chldren can outgrow diabetes. The Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas no longer produces insulin, which is required to regulate the amount of sugar in the blood and energy at the cellular level. Treatment for this type of diabetic condition requires daily insulin injections to replace lost insulin in the blood, as well as monitoring of food intake to reduce the likelihood of having too much insulin in the system. In Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas continues to produce insulin, but the body is unable to respond effectively to the presence of insulin in the system. While genetic factors seem to play a large part in the occurrence of Type II diabetes, it is most prevalent in persons whose diet results in unhealthy weight gain, which increases the risk for developing this condition. Many people feel that children may outgrow their diabetic condition. Often times, the introduction of a balanced diet and sustaining weight loss is effective in helping children to outgrow this form of diabetes. In addition to reversing the effects of a poor diet to outgrow Type 2 diabetes, doctors are encouraged by findings that suggest an outgrowing of the condition with puberty. Since insulin is a hormone, many doctors are studying the effects of puberty on the bodys ability to effec Continue reading >>

Can Children Out-grow Juvenile Diabetes? - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

Can Children Out-grow Juvenile Diabetes? - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

My 5 year old son recently had his urine tested and the ketones were high.They then tested his blood sugar which was 160. He is supposed to go back and have it checked again, only fasting. What are the chances this is Type-1 diabetes and can children outgrow it?Some people have said yes and others no. Hi Silverbell!Looks like Mark has some pretty terrific information for you.I am not a medical professional, but in my personal opinion, I'd like to encourage you to keep up on this situation and learn as much as you can about diabetes.It is very important that this situation is addressed as soon as possible as the high ketones are not good.It is a tough situation, but if you educate yourself on what you need to do for your son to keep him in the best of health, things should be OK.If he is diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, he will not outgrow it.My daughter was diagnosed at the age of 21 months so I have been through all of the stages of child development with her and can tell you that diabetes can complicate life sometimes.With a lot of learning, you can deal with whatever diabetes sends your way.Please visit the website @ www.jdrf.org to speak with some pretty terrific people who can help you through this and give you the support and information that you need if it is indeed type 1 diabetes.Please let us know how you make out with your son. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: An Overview

Type 1 Diabetes: An Overview

Print Type 1 diabetes is a condition where the pancreas stops producing insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps your body control the level of glucose—or sugar—in your blood. Your body produces glucose, and also gets glucose from foods that contain carbohydrates—such as bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, milk and fruit. Without insulin, glucose builds up in your blood instead of being used by your cells for energy. Symptoms of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes include: Increased thirst Increased urination A lack of energy Weight loss A person with type 1 diabetes must take insulin either by injections or through an insulin pump. What causes type 1 diabetes? The cause of type 1 diabetes is not known. What we do know is that type 1 diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar. It cannot be prevented. Type 1 diabetes is currently understood as an auto-immune disease, meaning the body’s immune system destroys the cells that produce insulin. What is it like to manage type 1 diabetes every day? A healthy pancreas automatically releases just the right amount of insulin to keep blood sugar in a healthy range. It is constantly adjusting, minute to minute, responding to how much food we eat, activity, stress levels, and other factors. The pancreas is a very complex organ. Doing the job of the pancreas is very difficult. It is impossible to have that perfect minute-to-minute adjustment. No matter how closely they manage their disease, people with type 1 diabetes can still experience swings in their blood sugar levels. People with diabetes must check their blood sugar several times a day: If blood sugar levels go too low, they must eat or drink a fast-acting sugar (like juice or candy) to raise their blood sugar. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can be dangerous if it is not treated Continue reading >>

Debunking Old Wives' Tales: 10 Myths About Diabetes

Debunking Old Wives' Tales: 10 Myths About Diabetes

You’ve probably heard the old wives’ tale, “don’t let your child eat sugar, or they’ll get diabetes.” Is this true? Is it true that there is a cure for diabetes? Access to the Internet has created an explosion in information available to people, but it can be hard to tell what is true, and what isn’t. Dr. Cindy Gellner debunks common diabetes myths, and shares what’s true when it comes to your children. Transcript Dr. Gellner: There are a lot of old wives' tales, or myths and facts, about diabetes out there. Especially when it comes to diabetes and kids. We'll sort out the facts from fiction about diabetes on today's Scope. I'm Dr. Cindy Gellner. Announcer: Keep your kids healthy and happy. You are now entering "The Healthy Kids Zone" with Dr. Cindy Gellner on The Scope. Dr. Gellner: Although Dr. Google is full of information on diabetes, not all of it is really true. Yes, even well-meaning family members and friends can give bad information. So let's talk about the myths. Myth #1: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. Yes, and no. Type 1 diabetes? Nope, not due to eating too much sugar. That's caused by your child's body attacking the pancreas so it stops making insulin. It has nothing to do with how much sugar your child eats. Type 2, on the other hand, isn't directly caused by eating too many sweets, but an unhealthy diet full of sugar leads to childhood obesity and obesity can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Myth #2: Kids with diabetes can never eat sweets. If you were a kid and your friend had sweets, wouldn't you be jealous and want some, too? Well, luckily, this myth isn't true. Kids with diabetes can eat a certain amount of sugar, they just have to watch how much and make sure they balance the treats with the healthy options, just like we Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

Type 2 Diabetes In Children

For decades, type 2 diabetes was considered an adults-only condition. In fact, type 2 diabetes was once called adult-onset diabetes. But what was once a disease mainly faced by adults is becoming more common in children. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects how the body metabolizes sugar (glucose). Over 5,000 people under the age of 20 were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 2008 and 2009. Until 10 years ago, type 2 diabetes accounted for less than 3% of all newly diagnosed diabetes cases in adolescents; it now comprises 45% of all such cases. It’s more common in those aged 10-19 and in non-Caucasian populations, including African Americans, Native Americans, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics. Being overweight is closely tied to the development of type 2 diabetes. Overweight children have an increased likelihood of insulin resistance. As the body struggles to regulate insulin, high blood sugar leads to a number of potentially serious health problems. In the past 30 years, obesity in children has doubled and obesity in adolescents has quadrupled, according to the CDC. Genetics may also play a role. For instance, the risk of type 2 diabetes increases if one parent or both parents has the condition. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes are not always easy to spot. In most cases, the disease develops gradually, making the symptoms hard to detect. Many people do not feel any symptoms. In other cases, children may not show any obvious signs. If you believe your child has diabetes, keep an eye out for these signs: Excessive fatigue: If your child seems extraordinarily tired or sleepy, their body may not have enough sugar to properly fuel their normal body functions. Excessive thirst: Children who have excessive thirst may have high blood sugar levels. Frequent Continue reading >>

Top 10 Things Never To Say To A T1d Parent

Top 10 Things Never To Say To A T1d Parent

They mean well. They really do. But many people just don’t realize that the seemingly “helpful,” reassuring, or casual, off-hand remarks they make upon learning that your child has type 1 diabetes just…aren’t. And who can blame them? They probably know as much about type 1 as you did before your son or daughter was diagnosed. Still, some of the comments T1D parents hear can be supremely frustrating or even downright hurtful. So here’s your chance to set these well-intentioned friends, family members and acquaintances straight — by sharing this list as a public service announcement or by picking up some ideas for clever, tactful ways to respond when you hear one of these doozies, courtesy of Jeniece Trast, R.N., C.D.E., M.A., clinical research nurse manager and certified diabetes educator at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. 1. “Well, at least it’s not fatal.” This type of statement minimizes all the work parents do to manage their child’s diabetes — and ignores the fact that many parents do worry very much about their child’s long-term health and safety. “Diabetes is a challenging disease to manage because it involves food, insulin, blood sugar monitoring, exercise and so much more,” says Trast. “People who are able to manage their diabetes well are usually healthy individuals who lead long successful lives. However, there is always the risk of low and high blood sugars no matter how well controlled a person’s diabetes is, and both of these things can be life-threatening if not properly treated.” Parents, consider responding: “I am so glad that my child is happy and healthy right now. However, diabetes unfortunately can cause medical emergencies that can be very dangerous, so we work hard every day to try to prevent those. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Facts And Myths

Diabetes Facts And Myths

en espaolLa diabetes: mitos y realidades You want to educate yourself about diabetes so you can help your child manage it. This means having the right information. There's so much online content about diabetes, but it's not always accurate. Even well-meaning family members and friends can give bad information. And this can hurt your child. Here's the truth about some of the common things you might hear. Does eating too much sugar cause diabetes? No, it doesn't. Type 1 diabetes happens when cells in the pancreas that make insulin are destroyed. This happens because something goes wrong with the body's immune system . It has nothing to do with how much sugar a person eats. Sugar doesn't cause diabetes. But sugar can play a role in type 2 diabetes . Eating too much sugar (or sugary foods and drinks) can make people put on weight. Gaining too much weight can lead to type 2 diabetes in some people. Of course, eating too much sugar isn't the only reason why people gain weight. Weight gain from eating too much of any food can make a person's chances of developing type 2 diabetes greater. Yes! People with diabetes can still enjoy sweets sometimes. But like everyone, they should put the brakes on eating too many. Kids with type 1 diabetes don't grow out of it. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin and won't make it again. People with type 1 diabetes will always need to take insulin , at least until scientists find a cure for diabetes. Kids with type 2 will always have a tendency to get high blood sugar levels. But sometimes taking steps to live a healthier life can lower their blood sugar. If people eat healthy foods and exercise enough to get their blood sugar levels back on track, doctors might say they can stop taking insulin or other medicines . Can you ca Continue reading >>

The Infant And Toddler With Diabetes: Challenges Of Diagnosis And Management

The Infant And Toddler With Diabetes: Challenges Of Diagnosis And Management

Go to: Infants and toddlers comprise a small minority of individuals with type 1 diabetes. However, epidemiological data provide evidence of a trend towards diagnosis at a younger age. These very young children pose significant challenges to both the health care professionals involved in their care as well as to their families. At diagnosis, younger children often do not present with classical symptoms of diabetes. Unless health professionals remain alert to the possibility of diabetes being the underlying cause of a child’s illness, the diagnosis may be missed. Once the diabetes has been diagnosed, the major challenge is to set up a treatment regimen that is both reasonable and realistic; in the youngest children, the goal of very tight metabolic control may expose them to episodes of severe hypoglycemia which may lead to subtle cognitive impairments later in life. The therapeutic regimen must balance the naturally erratic eating and exercise patterns of very young children with the need to maintain adequate metabolic control. Setting a blood glucose target range of 6 to 12 mmol/L usually allows this to be accomplished. Diabetes during early childhood creates a psychosocial challenge to the families of these children. Successful management of infants and toddlers with diabetes depends on a well functioning and educated family, the availability of diabetes health care team experienced in the treatment of these youngsters, and the involvement of the extended family, child care personnel and others who play a role in their daily care. Keywords: Infants, Metabolic control, Toddlers, Type I diabetes Children under three to five years of age with type I diabetes comprise a small proportion of all those with this disorder: less than 1% of all children are diagnosed in the f Continue reading >>

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 Things School Staff Should Know About Type 1 Diabetes

10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes 10 things school staff should know about type 1 diabetes Children will not outgrow type 1 diabetes: With type 1 diabetes, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin have been destroyed. People with type 1 diabetes will always have to take insulin injections (until there is a cure). Changes in lifestyle or diet will not improve type 1 diabetes. Insulin is not a cure: But it is the only treatment. Without insulin, people with type 1 diabetes would die. It takes a lot of work to manage diabetes: Children with type 1 diabetes usually look healthy. Thats because they and their families are working hard to keep blood sugar levels in a target range. They do this by checking levels frequently, and acting quickly when neededsuch as adding insulin to account for a special treat, or having a snack because of extra physical activity. Technology is helpful, but it doesnt work on its own: Some students wear insulin pumps to deliver insulin. A pump is another way to deliver insulin, and whether or not to use a pump is an individual choice. Other students wear continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), which take blood sugar readings every few minutes. But none of these devices works on its own. People still have to carefully monitor blood sugar, food intake, and activity, and make decisions about how much insulin to give and when. Blood sugar levels can change quickly: Its important to check blood sugar often, because there are many factors that can cause it to change from minute to minute. Low blood sugar needs immediate attention: If a student feels low, or you suspect a student is low, act right away. Do not leave the student alone. Check blood sugar, and give fast-acting sugar as needed. High blood sugar means extra trips to t Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What's True And False?

Diabetes: What's True And False?

en espaolLa diabetes: Qu es cierto y qu es falso? There's a lot of info and advice out there about diabetes, but some of it is wrong or bad. And following advice that's wrong could make people with diabetes really sick. Ask your doctor or a member of your diabetes health care team if you ever come across information that doesn't seem quite right or sounds too good to be true. Here's some stuff you might hear about diabetes and the facts about what's true and what's not. True or False: Eating Too Much Sugar Causes Diabetes False: When kids get type 1 diabetes , it's because their bodies can't make insulin anymore. The insulin-making cells in the pancreas (say: PAN-kree-us) get destroyed, and it doesn't have anything to do with eating sugar. This isn't true for type 2 diabetes either, but there is a connection between type 2 diabetes and being overweight. With type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can still make insulin (say: IN-suh-lin), but the insulin doesn't work like it should. Eating too much sugar (or foods with sugar, like candy or regular soda) can cause weight gain, and if someone becomes overweight , it can lead to type 2 diabetes. True or False: Kids With Diabetes Can Never Eat Sweets False: Kids with diabetes can eat some sweets as part of a balanced, healthy diet. Like everyone else, a person with diabetes shouldn't eat too many sweets because they are high in calories and they don't have many vitamins and minerals. True or False: Kids With Diabetes Can Exercise True:Exercise has many benefits. It can help you get to a healthy weight, it's good for your heart and lungs, it can improve your mood, and it's great for your diabetes. Your diabetes health care team can help you and your parents come up with an exercise plan that's good for you. True or False: You Can't C Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Overview Type 1 diabetes in children is a condition in which your child's body no longer produces an important hormone (insulin). Your child needs insulin to survive, so you'll have to replace the missing insulin. Type 1 diabetes in children used to be known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children can be overwhelming at first. Suddenly you and your child — depending on his or her age — must learn how to give injections, count carbohydrates and monitor blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes in children requires consistent care. But advances in blood sugar monitoring and insulin delivery have improved the daily management of the condition. Symptoms The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. These signs and symptoms include: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your child's bloodstream pulls fluid from tissues. As a result your child might be thirsty — and drink and urinate more than usual. A young, toilet-trained child might suddenly experience bed-wetting. Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs lack energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign of type 1 diabetes to be noticed in children. Fatigue. Lack of sugar in your child's cells might make him or her tired and lethargic. Irritability or behavior changes. In addition to mood problems, your child might suddenly have a decline in performance at school. Fruity-smelling breath. Bu Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Challenges For Parents Of Type 1 Diabetics - Get Real Health

The Top 10 Challenges For Parents Of Type 1 Diabetics - Get Real Health

A childs type 1 diabetes diagnosis brings with it a variety of challenges for parents.From kids sneaking candy to skipping insulin injections in an effort to just be normal, the trials are numerous for parents of type 1 diabetics. According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 200,000 American children are living with juvenile diabetes, also known as type 1 diabetes. In an effort to raise awareness and ease parents minds during Juvenile Diabetes Month and all year long, we have solutions to 10 of the most common challenges parents of type 1 diabetics face. Navigating the sea of candy that flows at school events and friends birthday parties is tough, and adhering to dietary guidelines that may preclude piatas can be difficult for a kid. Especially since no parents wants their children to feel like the odd man out at celebrations. But diabetes-friendly alternatives help. We would frequently drop off low-carb-but-still-yummy alternatives for our daughter at birthday or school parties, says Red Maxwell, whose daughter Cassie, now 17, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 18 months old. Often my wife would make enough for the whole class. Some of the moms would even make or bake a treat especially for Cassie. Kids with diabetes dont want to stand out or be perceived as different during recess, on the bus or whenever peers are around. By taking a direct approach when hurtful questions are asked, children can prevent (or stop) hurtful situations from arising. We teamed up to bring in a diabetes educator, recommended by my sons physician, to teach the whole class about type 1 diabetes, including issues like what it is, how it works and how its managed, says Robin Wiener , a Rockville, Maryland, mom whose son Ben was diagnosed at age 11. The kids saw how Ben checks h Continue reading >>

The Challenge Of Childhood Diabetes: Helping Children Manage Their Disease

The Challenge Of Childhood Diabetes: Helping Children Manage Their Disease

Online Health Chat with Dr. Douglas Rogers Introduction Cleveland_Clinic_Host: Everyday in the United States nearly 80 people are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes. One in every 400 children and adolescents is living with type 1 diabetes. Juvenile diabetes is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells to produce energy. Juvenile diabetes develops when the body attacks beta cells in the pancreas. The beta cells become unable to produce insulin, which the body requires to convert glucose in food to energy. In order to stay alive and healthy, children with type 1 diabetes must constantly monitor their food intake and receive insulin injections. When a child is diagnosed with juvenile diabetes, it is important for the entire family to be involved in the understanding and management of the disease. Juvenile diabetes can be controlled with proper care, which includes regular visits with your child’s endocrinologist, developing an individualized treatment plan, and monitoring glucose levels. Douglas Rogers, MD, joined Cleveland Clinic in 1991 as Head of the Section of Pediatric and Adolescent Endocrinology. Dr. Rogers completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. He graduated from The Chicago Medical School, Chicago, IL, in 1978 and trained in pediatrics at SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center, St. Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. Dr. Rogers also completed a fellowship in pediatric endocrinology at St. Louis Children's Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. He is board certified in both pediatrics and pediatric endocrinology. Dr. Rogers was the Medical Director of Grea Continue reading >>

Diabetes 101: Commonly Asked Questions

Diabetes 101: Commonly Asked Questions

This blog was co-authored by Dr. Jake Kushner and Dr. Daniel DeSalvo. Texas Children’s Diabetes and Endocrine Care Center is a national leader in the research and treatment of children with diabetes. We treat and educate patients and their families in self-management aspects of the disease. Our goal is help children, adolescents and young adults manage their diabetes so they can live long, healthy and active lives. A diagnosis of diabetes can be challenging for families as they learn to cope with many changes in their daily life. Misunderstandings and misperceptions about diabetes can create frustration for families facing the every day challenges of living with diabetes. The following scenario includes common questions families may ask: Remind me again — there are multiple kinds of diabetes? Which one do kids get? Diabetes comes in multiple forms in children and adults. The most common form in children is type 1 diabetes, which is caused by a deficiency in the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed in adults, but can also affect young adults and even some adolescents. Are you born with diabetes? Type 1 diabetes (previously called juvenile diabetes) affects children and adults across a wide range of ages (from 6 months to 60 years), with the peak age of diagnosis around 8. Did (s)he eat too much sugar? Type 1 diabetes doesn’t have anything to do with diet. It is a random autoimmune condition that is also influenced by complex genetics factors. The Texas Children’s Diabetes and Endocrine Care Center is active in Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, an NIH funded network of researchers who explore ways to prevent, delay and reverse the progression of type 1 diabetes. If you have a relative with type 1 diabetes, you may be eligible Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Myths: Clear Up Common Mix-ups

Type 1 Diabetes Myths: Clear Up Common Mix-ups

Type 1 Diabetes: Are You as Smart as a 2nd Grader? All you really need to know about type 1 diabetes Eric Hamblin likely learned in kindergarten. This 8-year-old was diagnosed at 18 months of age, and he already has enough smarts to teach first-year med students a thing or two about the disease. I just want to say one thing, and thats you guys dont know anything about diabetes, the class clown told a capacity crowd at a University of New England Medical School seminar. His line got the laughs he was after, but theres truth behind it. Of an estimated 29 million Americans with diabetes , about 3 million have Eric's form of the disease. The smaller proportion of people with type 1 may be a big reason the condition so misunderstood. Types 1 and 2 both cause high blood sugar and have insulin as the problem. Insulin is a hormone that unlocks cells to let in blood sugar, and that creates energy. You cant live without insulin. If you have type 1 diabetes, your body doesnt make enough of it. If you have type 2, your body cant use it properly. There are many other differences between the conditions. Erics mom, Elizabeth Pratt Hamblin, knew the basics thanks to her job as a medical editor. But I didnt know what having type 1 really meant or how it was treated until he was diagnosed, she says. What began as an overwhelmed mothers quest to learn how to care for her son turned into a self-help book for others: 100 Questions & Answers About Your Childs Type 1 Diabetes. Pratt Hamblin covers many myths about type 1 diabetes in her book, including that it only affects children. Thats not true, although it doesnt help that the condition used to be called juvenile or juvenile-onset diabetes. About 18,000 kids a year are diagnosed with the disease, but it can happen at any age. About 5% of Continue reading >>

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