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Can A Cat Recover From Diabetes?

Natural Ways To Manage Diabetes In Cats

Natural Ways To Manage Diabetes In Cats

If your cat has been diagnosed with diabetes, there are several treatment options available to help your feline live a long, healthy life. But is there a way for cat parents to avoid regular insulin shots and rely on natural remedies alone? Not exactly, says Dr. Tara Koble, DVM of The Cat Doctor Veterinary Hospital, in Boise, Ida. “Some diabetic cats can be managed on a low-carb food alone, without insulin,” says Koble. ”This is the only ‘natural’ treatment that sometimes works by itself. Many cats need a combination of a low-carb food and insulin.” Most veterinarians agree that natural supplements that tout diabetes remedies don’t work as effective treatment options. Insulin shots may be a necessary means to managing a diabetic cat’s health. “There is no ‘natural’ replacement for insulin. However, insulin itself is a naturally occurring hormone, and in cats who need it, we are just technically replacing what is lacking,” says Koble. “Other natural supplements that are marketed for diabetes just help support the overall health of the cat but they don't treat the disease directly.” On the other hand, there is a natural approach to preventing diabetes in cats that is highly effective. Koble recommends pet parents pay close attention to diet and exercise. “The two best things any cat parent can help do to protect from diabetes would be to feed the highest quality canned, low-carb or raw diet that is possible,” she says. “The second critical thing to help prevent diabetes is to get your cat moving. Exercise is protective against diabetes, and indoor only cats are usually lacking severely in activity.” What Causes Diabetes In Cats Not dissimilar to type 2 diabetes in people, most cases of diabetes in cats occur when a cat’s blood sugar r Continue reading >>

Glucose Toxicity And Hypoglycemia

Glucose Toxicity And Hypoglycemia

Go to site For Pet Owners Glucose toxicity Glucose toxicity occurs when insulin secretion is reduced by prolonged hyperglycemia. Prolonged hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus can occur following prolonged and high-dose therapeutic use of glucocorticosteroids or exogenous progestogens. Progestogens have an antagonist effect on insulin, as they can lead to growth hormone excess and also have an affinity for glucocorticosteroid receptors. Hypoglycemia in feline diabetes Hypoglycemia occurs when the blood glucose level drops to 60 mg/dL or less. Hypoglycemia may be triggered by: Insulin dose too high Overlapping insulin dosage Loss of appetite Vomiting Excessive exercise This serious and potentially fatal condition can occur at any stage, even after stabilization has been achieved. In some instances no particular trigger is identified. Clinical signs of feline hypoglycemia The clinical signs of hypoglycemia that cat owners should be able to recognize are (in order of severity): Hunger Restlessness Shivering Incoordination Disorientation Convulsions and seizures Coma It’s important to alert your cat-owning clients that early signs of hypoglycemia may be subtle. Also, some cats will simply become very quiet and inappetent. Coach your clients with diabetic cats to watch for abnormal behaviors associated with hypoglycemia. Treatment of hypoglycemia Instructions for cat owners Alert your cat owners that hypoglycemia can be fatal to their pet and make sure they keep a glucose source, such as corn syrup, on hand. Instruct your cat owners to rub corn syrup into the cat’s gums and call your veterinary hospital immediately if they suspect hypoglycemia. Remind clients never to force liquids or food on an animal that is unable to swallow. Emergency Treatment of Hypoglycemia Immedia Continue reading >>

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes is a very serious issue – and not just in people either. That’s right, this chronic and potentially debilitating condition also affects cats (and dogs). And while it’s difficult to know the exact incidence of diabetes in cats, best estimates put it somewhere in the range of 1 cat in every 100-200 cats will become diabetic. What’s even sadder is that this incidence seems to be on the increase. Fortunately, armed with some good information, important tips, and a good working relationship with your veterinarian, you can give your cats the best chance at avoiding this frustrating condition. And if they’ve already developed it, know that these same tools can help you best manage your cat’s diabetic state; avoiding the potential complications and perhaps even getting them into diabetic remission. What is diabetes? In the most basic sense, diabetes mellitus is a disorder where blood sugar, or glucose, cannot be effectively utilized and regulated within the body. There are several hormones within the body that play important roles in glucose metabolism. Insulin is one of the most important, if not the most important, and it’s the hormone most central to the development and control of the diabetic state. Glucose fuels the body and insulin is the hormone that helps to get it into most cells within the body. Diabetes is often easily diagnosed and controllable. However, when undiagnosed or poorly managed, diabetes can be devastating. Diabetes can absolutely be managed and your cat can still lead a long and happy life. Routine veterinary care and evaluation are important, as is achieving and maintaining an appropriate weight in your cat and feeding him an appropriate diet. There are two types of diabetes – Type I and Type II. In Type I diabetes, the pancreas Continue reading >>

What To Expect When Your Cat Goes Into Diabetic Remission

What To Expect When Your Cat Goes Into Diabetic Remission

This week I received an email from one of our readers asking what to expect as her cat seems to be going into diabetic remission. So I got out my crystal ball and… Wait! I don’t have a crystal ball. How it plays out varies from pet to pet. I suppose what I can share with you is what I have seen over the years with some of my feline patients who have gone into remission. And I can offer some pointers to help keep the kitty in remission. Cats are usually type 2 diabetics, meaning they may yet produce insulin but don’t react to it as well as they should. This is called insulin resistance. Factors that commonly cause insulin resistance include obesity, high carbohydrate diets (such as cat kibble), infections (such as dental disease) and lack of exercise (rampant with indoor kitties). If we address these issues and provide them with supplemental insulin, a good portion of cats can go back into a non-diabetic state. This is called remission. How amazing is it that we can turn the situation around and actually “cure” these cats! Now, how this plays out varies. If you are very attuned to your diabetic feline and monitor the blood glucose at home, you will have a better outcome. As much as we hope for diabetic remission, if we fail to notice signs of diabetic resolution, the typical dose of insulin that had been working just fine for months might result in hypoglycemia. Mild hypoglycemia may not be noticed. Moderate hypoglycemia may look like a drunken cat. If the blood glucose gets below 20 or 30 mg/dl, the pet could seizure. If no one is home, this could be life threatening. To avoid tragic events like this one, I want all my clients with a diabetic to have a glucose meter at home. I keep close contact with them. If the pet is acting odd or goofy in any way, I have t Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis In Your Cat

Pancreatitis In Your Cat

Ron Hines DVM PhD Lots of my articles are plagiarized and altered on the web to market products and services. There are never ads running or anything for sale with my real articles. Try to stay with the ones with in the URL box or find all my articles at ACC.htm. What Is Pancreatitis? Your cat’s pancreas has the same function as yours. It is a pale pink organ with two functions and two different tissue-type areas inter-dispersed. One of the tissue types (the pancreatic acini), produce enzymes that are released into your cat’s intestine to help digest its food; the other tissue areas (the islets of Langerhans), produce the hormones that regulate your cat’s blood sugar level and digestion (insulin, glucagons and somatostatin). Both are critical to your cat’s well being. Veterinarians used to believe that pancreatitis was more common in dogs that cats. That no longer seems to be the case. (ref1, ref2) Many if not most cases of pancreatitis in cats are part of a general inflammatory disease of cats affecting their digestive tract. I call triad disease. I try to keep my web articles as readable as I can for pet owners. If you want a more detailed medical explanation of acute pancreatitis in cats or other perspectives, go here. For a more detailed explanation of chronic pancreatitis, go here When your cat’s pancreas is inflamed, the problem is called pancreatitis. Since inflammation can be mild, substantial or severe, all degrees of pancreatitis occur in cats. Inflammation can be acute (sudden) or it can be continuous and progressive (chronic pancreatitis). Pancreatitis can occur only once, or it can reoccur again and again. The signs can be mild and barely noticeable to you; or they can be severe and life threatening. When your cat’s pancreas is inflamed, it leak Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a condition where there is an absolute or relative deficiency of the hormone insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas in response to a meal and its main actions are to help the body’s cells uptake and use substances such as glucose (sugar). Diabetes mellitus is a condition where there is an absolute or relative deficiency of the hormone insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas in response to a meal and its main actions are to help the body’scells uptake and use substances such as glucose (sugar). If the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin the sugar levels in the blood stream rise and spill over into the urine. This causes excess water to be secreted by the kidneys, which produces the classic diabetic signs of increased urination and subsequently, thirst as the body tries to replace the lost water. Because the body cannot effectively utilise building-blocks such as glucose, weight loss and hunger are also common signs of diabetes. The type of diabetes that most cats get is similar to type 2 diabetes in humans. This is characterised by a loss of sensitivity to insulin by the body’s tissues (insulin resistance). As a consequence, the pancreas must produce more and more insulin, until it eventually gets ‘burnt-out’. Why does my cat have diabetes? The reason why a particular individual becomes diabetic is not completely known. Uncommonly, the pancreas may become destroyed by disease processes. More likely, diabetes is due to a combination of genetic susceptibility, inactivity, obesity and/or a high carbohydrate diet producing insulin resistance. How is diabetes diagnosed? In some circumstances diabetes is difficult to diagnose because normal cats may have transiently high blood sugar due to the stress caused by a visit to the vet. Us Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What Does It Mean For Me And My Cat?

Diabetes: What Does It Mean For Me And My Cat?

The incidence of feline diabetes is on the increase, with a recent UK survey suggesting that nearly one in 200 cats are diabetic. This article addresses the practicalities of dealing with a diabetic cat. Despite being such a common disease, feline diabetes is often surrounded by much confusion. The disease has many differences when compared with diabetes mellitus in people (and in dogs), and it can be difficult to manage. However, with the right information and support, and by working closely with their veterinary practice, owners of diabetic cats usually cope well. Indeed, as an owner, you play a vital role in maximising the chance of successful treatment. What to expect If your cat is diagnosed with diabetes, your vet or veterinary nurse will first want to ensure that you fully understand what the disease is, and what the implications are of having a diabetic cat. Any additional concerns that need to be addressed in order to successfully treat the diabetes in your cat, such as obesity, will be discussed. It will also be explained to you how to store insulin, how to draw up an accurate dose and how to give the injection. You will find out what to monitor your cat for - in particular, signs of an insulin overdose. You may be asked to collect some urine samples from your cat (and advised how to do this!) and, if necessary, given advice on what diet to feed, how much food to give and when to give it. Another appointment will be arranged for fairly soon afterwards to assess how you and your cat are getting on. Did you know? Obesity is a common cause of diabetes, so preventing obesity can prevent diabetes in some cats Early in the course of the disease you may not notice anything is wrong with your cat. Routine health checks at your veterinary surgery, including urine check Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis And Diabetes

Pancreatitis And Diabetes

Background Causes Risk Factors Signs Diagnosis Treatment - Dogs - Cats Long-term management Complications Considerations for diabetics Personal experiences Note Resources References BackgroundThe pancreas is a small organ located in the abdomen. In addition to being part of the endocrine system and producing the hormones insulin and glucagon, it produces digestive enzymes that are necessary for the proper digestion of food. This aspect of the pancreatic function is called the exocrine pancreas. The digestive enzymes produced by the pancreas are normally inactive until they are secreted into the small intestine. Once in the intestine, the enzymes become active and aid in the digestion of food. Pancreatitis means the pancreas is inflamed. The inflammation can become severe, and the digestive enzymes that are normally inactive can become active and the enzymes cause damage to the pancreas. This causes a cycle of increasing inflammation. Pancreatitis can be acute - meaning the inflammation occurs suddenly, or chronic - where the inflammation is slow and gradually occurs over a long period of time. Acute pancreatitis causes little or no permanent damage to the pancreas. Acute pancreatitis is rare in cats. Chronic pancreatitis can result in scar tissue forming in the pancreas, which in turn decreases the ability of the pancreas to function properly. There are many differences in the causes and treatment of pancreatitis in dogs and cats Causes The exact cause of pancreatitis is unknown but may be due to: high fat, low protein diet trauma (car accidents, a fall from tall building) other diseases (Cushing's syndrome, diabetes) tumors some drugs and toxins (some diuretics, antibiotics, insecticides) in cats - toxoplasmosis, FIP, feline herpesvirus, or inflammation of the bile duc Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes Mellitus

Feline Diabetes Mellitus

articles In Part 1 of this article (IVC, Winter 2012), I covered the diagnosis of feline diabetes mellitus, and how early DM can be managed with diet, medication and herbs. Now I’ll discuss insulin stabilization and home monitoring, the complications that can occur with the disease, and the reasons why some cats don’t recover. Insulin requirements Feline DM is treated with Rx insulin injections twice a day (BID) combined with home BG monitoring. Cats metabolize insulin twice as fast as dogs or humans, and ideally, a cat with DM should be eating a very low carbohydrate diet twice a day. Hence the ultra-long-acting human insulins, Glargine “Lantus” or Detemir “Levemir”, work best for these cats. • Rx Glargine = “Lantus”: This acid pH insulin precipitates in the neutral pH of the body and is absorbed slowly. The initial dose is 1 to 2 IU/cat twice a day. It lasts 12 to 18 hours. The bottles are 10 ml and fairly expensive. • Rx Detemir = “Levemir”: The Detemir insulin is strongly protein bound (that is, albumin bound) and slowly released. The initial dose is 1 to 2 IU/cat twice a day. It lasts 18 to 21 hours. One box contains 5 x 3 ml vials. Detemir appears to be better tolerated than Levemir in some cats, and may have less variability. As Detemir is strongly protein bound, there is the potential for drug interactions. Other drugs commonly used in cats that are also strongly protein bound include the injectable long-acting penicillins, long-acting cephalexin, and Rx Propofol, an injectable anesthetic. I now prefer “Levemir” insulin in my diabetic cats. I find the BG nadir occurs, on average, about three to six hours after injection, and there is a fairly flat BG curve. On “Lantus” and “Levemir”, over 80% of my newly diagnosed diabetic cat Continue reading >>

Consider This Case: An Uncontrolled Diabetic Cat

Consider This Case: An Uncontrolled Diabetic Cat

Ann Della Maggiore, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM University of California—Davis Sugar, a 12-year-old spayed female Maine Coon cat, presented for poorly controlled diabetes and diabetic neuropathy. HISTORY Sugar was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus 2 years prior to presentation. Initially, her diabetes was moderately controlled on 5 to 6 units of recombinant human protamine zinc insulin (PZI) (40 U/mL; ProZinc, bi-vetmedica.com), but over the year prior to presentation the insulin dose had been progressively increased with no improvement in glycemic control. Upon presentation, Sugar was receiving 14 units of recombinant human PZI. The owner was performing blood glucose curves at home, but struggling to maintain Sugar’s blood glucose below 300 mg/dL. In addition to diabetes mellitus, Sugar had concurrent hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and chronic rhinitis, and persistent polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and weakness. Key Points: Feline Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes is a disease of insulin deficiency. Diabetes in cats is most commonly classified as type 2-like diabetes—a disease process in which insufficient insulin production from beta cells takes place in the setting of insulin resistance. Insulin requirements can be altered by obesity, inflammation, or concurrent endocrine disease, such as hypersomatotropism (acromegaly) or hyperadrenocorticism. Some refer to a subclass of diabetic cats with secondary diabetes—patients in which diabetes occurs subsequent to (1) another endocrine disease (eg, acromegaly, hyperadrenocorticism) or (2) administration of diabetogenic drugs (eg, glucocorticoids).1 PHYSICAL EXAMINATION Physical examination revealed a symmetrically muscled cat, weighing 7.7 kg, with a body condition score of 6/9. Sugar had an unkempt hair coat, mild prognathia infer Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes: Symptoms, Treatments, Prevention, And Diet Tips

Feline Diabetes: Symptoms, Treatments, Prevention, And Diet Tips

An alarming number of cats are developing diabetes mellitus, which is the inability to produce enough insulin to balance blood sugar, or glucose, levels . Left untreated, it can lead to weight loss, loss of appetite, vomiting , dehydration, severe depression, problems with motor function, coma, and even death. To find out why so many cats are being diagnosed with diabetes, and what owners can do, WebMD talked to Thomas Graves, a former feline practitioner who is associate professor and section head of small animal medicine at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine. Graves’ research focus is on diabetes and geriatric medicine. Q: How common is feline diabetes? A: The true incidence isn’t known, but it’s estimated at 0.5% to 2% of the feline population. But it’s also probably under diagnosed. Q: What are the signs of diabetes in cats? A: The main symptoms are increased thirst and increased urination. And while we do see it in cats with appropriate body weight, it’s more common in obese cats. Some cats with diabetes have a ravenous appetite because their bodies cannot use the fuel supplied in their diet. Q: What’s the treatment for a cat with feline diabetes? A: Diet is certainly a component. It’s felt that a low-carbohydrate diet is probably best for cats with diabetes. Treatment is insulin therapy. There are some oral medications, but they have more side effects and are mainly used when insulin can’t be used for some reason. There are blood and urine tests, physical examinations, and behavioral signals, which are used to establish insulin therapy. This is done in conjunction with your veterinarian. We don’t recommend owners adjust insulin therapy on their own because it can be sort of complicated in cats. Most patients come in every t Continue reading >>

An Individual Approach To Feline Diabetes Care: A Case Report And Literature Review

An Individual Approach To Feline Diabetes Care: A Case Report And Literature Review

Go to: Case presentation A five-year-old female neutered Burmese (Swedish and UK origin) was started on a management strategy for allergic dermatitis consisting of short course of 5 mg prednisolone twice daily, rapidly tapering and withdrawn after 3 weeks. This programme was repeated five times over the next 6 years until at 11 years of age the cat received a single injection of methylprednisolone (Depo-Medrol 20 mg i.m.) and, within 5 days, was observed to have polydipsia and polyuria. Home urinalysis (Keto-Diastix, Bayer) revealed glucose (2+) without ketonuria and, at initial veterinary assessment 2 days later the cat weighed 3.2 kg (last recorded weight was 3.5 kg 18 months previously) and had a body condition score of 4 (on a 9 point scale [23]) with no other significant abnormalities detected on physical examination. Routine serum biochemistry revealed marked hyperglycemia (blood glucose concentration 29.8 mmol/L (reference range 3.9–8.8) and increased fructosamine concentrations (481 µmol/L, 190–340). All other measured parameters were within normal limits. Initial management consisted of a high protein, low carbohydrate diet (Purina DM wet and dry food, fed ad libitum in a ratio of at least 3:1) and twice daily porcine lente insulin (Caninsulin, MSD Animal Health), starting with 1 unit q12 h, started immediately (on day seven after the injection of methylprednisolone). Capillary blood monitoring from the pinna of the ear was commenced using a blood glucose meter calibrated for human blood that is used in cats (Accu-Chek Aviva, Roche UK; feline reference range 2.8–5.5 mmol/L for meter [14]). Blood glucose was taken prior to insulin injection. On some days glucose was also measured more frequently between insulin injections; for example every 3 h or when hy Continue reading >>

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

Caring for a diabetic pet can be challenging, but there are certain precautions pet owners can take to prevent a diabetic emergency like hypoglycemia. Preventing a health crisis in a dog or cat with diabetes involves employing a consistent daily routine involving diet, exercise, insulin therapy, and supplementation. It also involves avoiding any and all unnecessary vaccinations. Even the most diligent pet parent can find himself facing a diabetic emergency with a dog or cat. Hypoglycemia is the most common health crisis, and is usually the result of an inadvertent overdose of insulin. Symptoms of hypoglycemia can appear suddenly and include lethargy or restlessness, anxiety or other behavioral changes, muscle weakness or twitching, seizures, coma, and death. At-home treatment for a diabetic pet with hypoglycemia is determined by whether or not the animal is alert. Signs of other potential impending diabetic emergencies include ketones in the urine; straining to urinate or bloody urine; vomiting or diarrhea; or a complete loss of appetite or reduced appetite for several days. By Dr. Becker Caring for a diabetic pet can be quite complex and time consuming. It involves regular monitoring of blood glucose levels, making necessary dietary adjustments, giving insulin injections or oral medications, and keeping a careful eye on your pet at all times. Frequent veterinary visits are the norm for dogs and cats with diabetes, as are the costs associated with checkups, tests, medical procedures, and insulin therapy. And unlike humans with the disease, our pets can’t tell us how they’re feeling or help in their own treatment and recovery. Preventing Diabetic Emergencies The key to preventing diabetic emergencies with a pet involves implementing a consistent daily routine and sti Continue reading >>

Vomiting In Diabetic Cats

Vomiting In Diabetic Cats

It’s not difficult to recognize the more common diabetes symptoms in cats. They drink a lot of water, urinate more frequently and lose weight. Treatment of diabetes involves regular injections of insulin to keep blood glucose levels within normal limits. Vomiting isn’t one of the most common feline symptoms of this disease. Having said that, if a cat is being treated for feline diabetes, vomiting is definitely something to watch out for. It can indicate that their blood glucose is not being well controlled, and they may be developing diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a potentially fatal condition that needs urgent veterinary treatment. However, if a diabetic cat starts throwing up, it doesn’t necessarily mean that their diabetes is worsening. Other symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis to look for are increased thirst, loss of appetite and extreme lethargy. Another reason for diabetic vomiting in cats is pancreatitis. This condition can be hard to diagnose in our feline family members but should always be considered when cat vomiting in a diabetic pet becomes a problem. Some veterinarians believe that up to one half of all cases of diabetes in cats are accompanied by a low grade chronic inflammation of the pancreas. When they have a flare up, it can reduce their appetite and make them vomit. They need to be closely monitored until they recover because the change in their food intake will affect the amount of insulin they need. Don’t forget that there are many other cat vomiting causes that are totally unrelated to diabetes. Some examples include gastroenteritis, kidney disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Because a diabetic cat has an underlying chronic medical condition, any illness will need a thorough investigation including comprehensive blood tests and possibly Continue reading >>

's Experience With Ketoacidosis.

's Experience With Ketoacidosis.

Signs Treatment Zama's experience Diabetic ketoacidosis is caused by a lack of insulin or an insufficient amount of insulin. Since the lack of insulin means that glucose in not able to be used, the body searches for a new source of energy. In this condition, the diabetic breaks down body fat (lipolysis) to use as energy. During lipolysis, waste products called ketones are produced. Ketones are eliminated in the urine and through the lungs. Under normal conditions, the body can tolerate and eliminate ketones. But in diabetic ketoacidosis, fats are being broken down at such a high rate that the body can not eliminate the ketones fast enough and they build up in the blood. In high amounts, ketones are toxic to the body. They cause the acid-base balance to change and serious electrolyte and fluid imbalances result. Some of the signs of ketoacidosis include polyuria polydipsia lethargy anorexia weakness vomiting dehydration There will probably be ketones in the urine (ketonuria) The breath may have a sweet chemical smell similar to nail polish remover. However, some owners have said that even during documented ketoacidosis, their pet's breath did NOT have any unusual odor. Treatment Mildly ketoacidotic animals can be alert and well hydrated. After your pet is stabilized, your pet can return home and be treated with proper diabetes management techniques including insulin therapy, diet, and exercise. "Sick" ketoacidotic animals require intensive medical management in the vet hospital. This is a life-threatening emergency that requires complex medical management and monitoring. It may take several days for the animal to be out of danger. Treatment involves injections of regular insulin, intravenous fluids, electrolytes, and frequent monitoring of blood glucose, blood chemistry, Continue reading >>

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