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Bv And Diabetes

Risk Of Bacterial Vaginosis In Women Suffering From Diabetes

Risk Of Bacterial Vaginosis In Women Suffering From Diabetes

Bacterial Vaginosis is yet another type of infection occurring in the vaginal area of women, bacterial vaginosis can occur due to warm weather, bad hygiene conditions and usage of device like the intra uterine device for birth control, etc. Women of all ages are susceptible to Bacterial Vaginosis, however risk of contacting this infection in higher in women with menopause and those who are suffering with diabetes. Risk of Bacterial Vaginosis is also higher in women with multiple sex partners; the rate of this infection is higher among the African American women. Another cause of this infection is spread of E.Coli a common resident of the rectum area in vaginal area causing the natural balances to tip. Bacterial Vaginosis can be treated quite easily with the medication available in the market and the ones taken on doctor's advice. This infection sometimes might not be noticed by women before it develops into a pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which is more difficult to treat. Therefore, it is necessary to notice this infection and should be treated in time. Even if you notice something unusual you can contact your doctor and mention this to him. Most of the times women are unaware that they have this infection until they are diagnosed with it during routine pelvic exam and Pap Smear test. Treatment for this infection includes topical application as well as antibiotics dosage, which can cure this infection within 3-4 days. All vaginal infections occur when lactobacillus, the protective bacteria cannot protect the vaginal area, therefore, infections like the yeast infection, trichomoniasis, etc. are most common vaginal infections. These can be prevented by maintaining proper hygiene. During intercourse usage of condoms is a must as these will protect against a series of Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Feminine Health: What Women Need To Know

Diabetes And Feminine Health: What Women Need To Know

Anyone who has experienced a yeast infection knows how unpleasant the condition can be. Abnormal vaginal discharge, itching and burning, painful intercourse and urination, and redness and swelling — any of these common symptoms can put a dent in a woman’s sex life or simply impact her daily comfort level. For women with type 2 diabetes, combating this issue and maintaining feminine health overall can be of particular concern, especially if their blood sugar is poorly controlled. A Greater Risk of Yeast Infections “Control of blood sugars is important for the whole body,” says Mache Seibel, MD, a gynecologist and obstetrician at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “But an area that isn’t much talked about is how elevated blood sugars seep into vaginal tissues and set up an environment that’s more favorable for yeast infections.” Vaginal tissue contains a balance of microorganisms, like yeast and bacteria, Dr. Seibel explains, but excess sugar in the blood can fuel the growth of yeast, potentially leading to an infection. “Think about baking bread and how yeast thrives much better when you add sugar,” says Susan Renda, CDE, doctor of nursing practice and assistant professor in the department of community–public health at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing in Baltimore. “I tell patients, ‘You have a nice little balance in your body, but when you throw a cake and cookie party, all the yeast comes to the party and just starts to go nuts.’” Frequent urination, which can occur when glucose levels are high and the body works to rid itself of excess sugar, can add to the problem by bringing additional sugar found in the urine to the vaginal area. Certain diabetes drugs, such as canagliflozin (Invokana, Invokamet, or Invokamet XR), an SGLT-2 in Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Begins With Bacterial Infection, Suggesting Room For A Vaccine

Type 2 Diabetes Begins With Bacterial Infection, Suggesting Room For A Vaccine

Type 2 Diabetes Begins With Bacterial Infection, Suggesting Room For A Vaccine Scientists working in rabbit models have recreated the hallmark symptoms of type 2 diabetes using a common strain of bacteria found on the skins surface, a new study reports. The findings could pave the way for anti-bacterial treatments and vaccination against microbial invaders. Between 90 to 95 percent of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, an insulin deficiency that develops through lack of exercise and poor diet . This has led to the widespread belief that obesity poses direct risks to developing the disease; however, the new research suggests an alternate route to diagnosis, namely, the Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria living on the surface of the skin. At any given time, 30 percent of folks are colonized in the [nostrils] and other mucosal surfaces with S. aureus, with nearly all of us occasionally colonized, Dr. Patrick Schlievert, the studys senior author and professor of microbiology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, told Medical Daily in an email. As people gain weight, their skin effectively becomes wetter due to increased sweating and greater skin folds, making an ideal home for bacteria to colonize and enter the body. We find that the colonization rate goes up to 100 percent. Schlievert and his colleagues recently wanted to learn more about what happens when staph bacteria colonies grow to extraordinary numbers. Prior studies had shown a superantigen effect. When the bacteria reach a certain threshold, they initiate a defense mechanism against the bodys immune system, targeting key cells involved with immune-related functions, called T-cells. In their latest study, the investigators exposed a group of rabbits to the staph superantigen. Once in the body, the ba Continue reading >>

To Any Ladies Currently Suffering From Recurrent Bv And/or Yeast Infections, I Have Some Advice After Years Of Doctors Visits And Research. : Twoxchromosomes

To Any Ladies Currently Suffering From Recurrent Bv And/or Yeast Infections, I Have Some Advice After Years Of Doctors Visits And Research. : Twoxchromosomes

I made this post because I discussed this with my friend today who was struggling with chronic Bacterial Vaginosis, and thought I could help out some other women out there looking for answers. Perhaps this is now common knowledge, but I'd like to enlighten those who are unaware and silently suffering. For such an understood condition, it should be easily treatable, but anyone who has had the privilege of chronic Bacterial Vaginosis or a Yeast Infection, knows this is not the reality. What you're about to read sounds like an informmercial, I know, but I'm not selling anything but my personal experience, to be taken or left. It is also a bit long. :p Here's my story; Hope it helps, as I wish someone had told me this earlier: So, for about three years--yes, THREE years--I was plagued with seemingly treatment-resistent Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) and yeast infections. Initially, I tried taking OTC anti-fungals like Monistat, but the infections always came back within weeks or weren't cured at all. I then went to see a gynecologist who prescribed me Metronidazole, but after a month it came back, with a fucking vengeance. I tried inserting plain yogurt into my vagina, garlic, wearing only cotton underwear, and cutting alcohol from diet. Nothing worked and soon I ended up with a very nasty UTI because the infection had spread up my urethra. I was given antibiotics for this, which cleared the UTI, but aggravated my BV/YI. My doctor suggested I then get tested for HIV and diabetes as chronic vaginal infections can be common among women with those illnesses. I freaked out at this thought, but thankfully my blood work came back negative for both. I was pissed at this point: "What the fuck am I supposed to do now? Even the doctor can't help me. Stupid broken vagina." Desperate, I sou Continue reading >>

Vaginitis

Vaginitis

Not to be confused with Vaginismus. Vaginitis is inflammation of the vagina. In most cases, it is a symptom of an infection of the vagina.[1] Vulvovaginitis, is an inflammation of the vagina and vulva.[2][3] Infection can result in discharge, itching and pain.[4] The three main causes of vaginitis are infections by bacteria (bacterial vaginosis), yeast (vaginal candidiasis), or the protozoan that causes trichomoniasis.[5] A woman may have multiple infections at any one time. If there is discomfort in the vulvovaginal area, women can request their health care providers evaluate for the presence of an infection.[5] Signs and symptoms[edit] A woman may have vaginal itching or burning and may notice a discharge.[6] The discharge may be excessive in amounts or abnormal in color(such as yellow, gray, or green).[7] The following symptoms may indicate the presence of infection:[5] Irritation or itching of the genital area inflammation (irritation, redness, and swelling caused by the presence of extra immune cells) of the labia majora, labia minora, or perineal area vaginal discharge foul vaginal odor pain/irritation with sexual intercourse Complications[edit] Vaginal infections left untreated can lead to further complications, especially for the pregnant woman. For bacterial vaginosis, these include "premature delivery, postpartum infections, clinically apparent and subclinical pelvic inflammatory disease, [as well as] postsurgical complications (after abortion, hysterectomy, caesarian section), increased vulnerability to HIV infection and, possibly, infertility".[8] Studies have also linked trichomoniasis with increased likelihood of acquiring HIV; theories include that "vaginitis increases the number of immune cells at the site of infection, and HIV then infects those immune Continue reading >>

Hypothyroidism, Bv And Possible Diabetes?

Hypothyroidism, Bv And Possible Diabetes?

I know how ya feel. sorry for the LOONNGGG reply ..lol I have had alot of these same problems. My dr. is taking forever to fully help' me. I am more helping myself. I went to teh ER when I did my test on my finger. *( you can call the company of almost any testing ((I got a accu-cheak meter )) and they sent me everything I needed to test the very next day after I called. It was amazing , and free. Now I am only trying to find out which test strips my insurance will cover, they denied the refills on these. Anyway , call and get yourself a meter. test , test , test. IF your BS is over 200 . then you DEF need meds asap. Mine went up to 479 before I finally took this seriously . I have had weight loss of almost 60 lbs, *( I thought it was a good thing... lol ~~ NOT ) and my pee has a funny oder, and somthing floating in it . I also found out I have a urainary tract infection . *( I have had no burning , just peeing alot, and the smell of strong iron') And I STAY thirsty , And was CRAVING sweets and eating & drinking them as much as I could making cakes all the time, and cookies... VERY BADDDDD ~~ Now after I have been to the ER , They gave me 3 bags of fluid, and a insulin shot, said I should just take meds at home. wrote me 5 diff scripts that no way will my insurance pay for .. so I am jsut taking the metformin My other dr wrote me *( with No diagnose' Mind ya ) once a day of 500mg/ I am also taking a sample pack of actos its only 7 days , they wrote me a 30 day supply , I am hoping teh 7 days will help along with teh HUGE diet changes I am making . MY HARDEST thing . 2 actually . ONE is my dr. pepper , and the other is I dont eat. I rarely eat before 5pm, and then I eat a huge dinner and snack on a bowl of icecream or a handful of chips. NOW ( the last 2 days ) its been Continue reading >>

Appreciates Treatment Options For Recurrent Bv

Appreciates Treatment Options For Recurrent Bv

Appreciates treatment options for recurrent BV Gaydos CA, Beqaj S, Schwebke JR, et al. Clinical validation of a test for the diagnosis of vaginitis. Obstet Gynecol. 2017;130(1):181189. Oduyebo OO, Anorlu RI, Ogunsola FL. The effects of antimicrobial therapy on bacterial vaginosis in non-pregnant women. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(3):CD006055. ROBERT L. BARBIERI, MD (EDITORIAL; JULY 2017) Appreciates treatment options for recurrent BV I thank Dr. Barbieri for his editorial on effective treatment of recurrent bacterial vaginosis (BV). I practice only outpatient gynecology, and recurrent BV is the most frustrating condition I have to deal with. Now I have 3 treatment options in my armamentarium for taking care of patients. I clipped the article pages from OBG Management and am keeping them available for easy access when needed. I have a related question: I see trichomonal vaginitis rarely, maybe 1 to 2 cases in a year. What do you think the reason is? Beyond BV: Candidiasis and diabetes medications Thank you for addressing the recurrent BV problem. After many years of throwing antibiotics at this problem I have been underwhelmed. Patients do not want to keep chasing their tails between BV and yeast. I have been suggesting that patients place plain yogurt containing Lactobacillus in a tampon applicator and apply it to the vagina weekly at night, after the original overgrowth has been treated, to return the good bacteria to the vagina. This avoids overuse of antibiotics (an impending epidemic of resistant organisms), boric acid (a dangerous pill to have around toddlers), and the expense that comes with multiple visits and multiple courses of antibiotics. I believe that in Canada a vaginal ovule with vitamin C and probiotics is available (something to ponder). Another Continue reading >>

Yeast, Diabetes, And Sex

Yeast, Diabetes, And Sex

Vaginal yeast infections are annoying, not dangerous, but they can seriously hamper your sex life, especially if you have diabetes. What’s the connection, and what can you do to prevent and treat yeast infections? According to Chris Illiades, MD, on the website Everyday Health, “Normally, Candida albicans, the fungus that causes yeast infection, lives in balance with the other microorganisms in your body…. But anything that upsets this normal balance can lead to an overgrowth of yeast and can cause a yeast infection.” Diabetes is one of the things that can upset the normal balance because yeast love to eat sugar, especially glucose. In fact, they help make beer by eating sugar and turning it into alcohol, and they are crucial in bread-making because after eating sugar, they produce a gas that makes dough rise. When there’s extra sugar in your blood, there is likely to be more in your vagina and other tissues, so yeast grow better there. Yeast irritating the inside of your vagina is called “vaginitis.” In the tissues around the vagina – the vulva – such irritation is called “vulvitis.” Both are far more common in women with diabetes. There are many causes of yeast infections. One is the use of antibiotics, which can change the balance in the vagina by killing bacteria, thus allowing yeast to grow unchecked. A common pattern is for a woman to treat a bladder infection with antibiotics, only to wind up with a yeast infection that is just as annoying. According to Dr. Illiades, other causes of vaginitis include stress, illness, menstrual periods, pregnancy, and other medications. Diabetes Health writer Linda von Wartburg wrote that menopause may also increase the risk of vaginitis. Preventing Yeast Infections You can reduce your risk of vaginitis by ma Continue reading >>

What Causes Vaginal Infections (with Diabetes) And What Are The Best Treatments?

What Causes Vaginal Infections (with Diabetes) And What Are The Best Treatments?

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. What Causes Vaginal Infections (With Diabetes) And What Are The Best Treatments? SARVER HEART CENTER AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Question: What causes vaginal infections (with diabetes) and what are the best treatments? Answer: Women with diabetes are at higher risk for developing vaginal infections than women without diabetes, and, in addition, if the woman's diabetes is not well controlled and her blood sugars are consistently high, that creates an environment of high sugar in the mucus membranes, and of course, that includes the vagina, and this creates a good environment for the overgrowth of both bacteria and yeast. So, those are the two main areas of infection, the two main causes of infection -- vaginal infection in women -- are bacteria and yeast. If it's a bacterial infection, the woman would need an antibiotic for treatment, and a yeast infection can be treated with anti-fungal agents. So it's important for a woman to see her primary care provider or gynecologist to have this condition diagnosed as probably one or the other. The caveat is, if a woman has had a yeast infection recently and the identical symptoms come back, and she's very confident that it's another yeast infection, she might be able to use an over-the-counter cream or suppository to treat that infection. And, in addition, if the yeast infection is recurrent, she could ask her health care provider for a prescription for an oral anti-fungal agent like fluconazole. But the most important thing is that a woman with diabetes is at higher risk for these vaginal infections when the blood sugar level is out of control, so it becomes critically important, then, to treat these infections with better bloo Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Yeast Infection: The Most Relevant Connection

Diabetes & Yeast Infection: The Most Relevant Connection

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE Leave a Comment If you tend to get yeast infections that are difficult to resolve, it could be a sign that you have diabetes. They are more common in people with this chronic condition. Such infections are caused by a fungus called candidiasis. Severe itching, discharge from the area affected and irritation of the affected area are hallmark signs of a yeast infection. Diabetes is just one of the conditions that can increase your risk of having them somewhere in your body. Women tend to get them more frequently in their vaginal area, but there are many other places that they can occur. In this article, we will look at why diabetes increases your risk of developing fungal infections such as yeast infections. Though yeast is always growing in our bodies, it can present a problem by upsetting our bodys delicate balance if it overgrows. Bacteria, which is considered as our normal flora, or bacteria that is present in our body as part of our normal make-up, can also overgrow and offset yeast growth. Both situations would require attention and treatment. When Cynthia came in for diabetes education, she looked visibly uncomfortable. She couldnt stop moving around in her seat in the clinic room. When asked what was wrong, Cynthia sighed and relayed how she had these nagging vaginal yeast infections that wouldnt go away. She had been to the doctor three times this year. During her first visit, they gave her crme for treatment, and the second time, she was prescribed to take two rounds of pills, one pill each week for two weeks. Despite her best efforts, her infection had come back. We had been working on Cynthias blood sugars. Her A1C was 8.4% and her blood sugars were out of her target range. She hadnt made much progress so far. Her blood sug Continue reading >>

Can Anything Prevent Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis?

Can Anything Prevent Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis?

Can Anything Prevent Recurrent Bacterial Vaginosis? What are the best treatment options and prevention messages for my patients with recurrent bacterial vaginosis infections? Response from Anne M. Teitelman, PhD, CRNP, MSN Assistant Professor, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Nurse Practitioner, University of Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a polymicrobial disease that occurs when the protective peroxide-producing lactobacilli of the vagina are eliminated, permitting an overgrowth of anaerobes and other pathogens, such as Gardnerella vaginalis and Mycoplasma hominis.[ 1 , 2 ] Because the etiology and pathogenesis of BV are not completely understood, treatment for BV is not always effective, resulting in high recurrence rates.[ 3 ] Recurrent BV is generally defined as 3 or more episodes of BV per year, and one study found that 6-month recurrent rates were as high as 80%.[ 2 ] Given the treatment challenges and the fact that BV is the most common vaginal infection for women of reproductive age, the disease causes great frustration for both patients and providers.[ 4 ] The symptoms of BV include a foul-smelling ("fishy") vaginal discharge, which may be accompanied by pruritus, although more than 50% of patients are asymptomatic.[ 2 ] The most common method of diagnosis is the Amsel criteria, which include the following: A white, homogenous discharge that is adherent to the vaginal walls; If at least 3 of the criteria are present, the patient has a positive BV diagnosis. The Nugent criteria, which detect BV by Gram staining, may also be used and are preferred for most clinical trials.[ 1 , 2 ] BV infection is known to increase a woman's risk for pelvic inflammatory disease and susceptibi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

Bacterial Vaginosis Is Associated With Variation In Dietary Indices1,2

Bacterial Vaginosis Is Associated With Variation In Dietary Indices1,2

1Change in odds of BV progression or persistence compared to non-BV maintenance per 10-unit increase in corresponding dietary index value. 2GI, glycemic index; GL, glycemic load; HEI, Healthy Eating Index; NNR, Naturally Nutrient Rich. 3 = 753 in crude analyses and n = 738 in adjusted analyses. 4 = 976 in crude analyses and n = 962 in adjusted analyses. 5Models adjusted for age, race, education, cigarette smoking, alcohol use, BMI, douching frequency, hormonal contraceptive use, and number of sex partners. 6Spline term with node at 70; OR correspond to the slopes < and > HEI = 70. In this study population of predominantly African American women, dietary indices of carbohydrate quality (GI and GL) and overall diet quality (HEI and NNR) were associated with each other and with other demographic factors, including age, education, and race. Mean scores for HEI were below and for GI and GL were above means found in other U.S.-based sample populations (63.9, 50.0, and 100.2, respectively) ( 23 , 26 ), indicating a poorer diet among women in our study. A more healthful diet, as indicated by GL, NNR, and HEI indicating >70% conformance to dietary guidelines, was associated with a lower odds of BV compared to normal vaginal flora. However, only variation in GL remained significantly associated with BV in both cross-sectional and prospective analyses after adjustment for other covariates. Our findings of a lower likelihood of BV among those consuming more healthful diets are consistent with other studies that report an association between nutritional status and BV ( 4 7 ). Unlike those studies, which were limited to assessing individual macro- or micronutrients, our study evaluated the effect of overall diet and carbohydrate quality on BV prevalence, progression, and persistence Continue reading >>

Bv Is Driving Me Insane. (history Of Candida & Diabetes)

Bv Is Driving Me Insane. (history Of Candida & Diabetes)

BV is driving me insane. (history of candida & diabetes) BV is driving me insane. (history of candida & diabetes) i was diagnosed with BV about a week ago by a doctor here on vacation (i researched beforehand about the symptoms/conditioln). ive had these symptoms for months/a year on and off and i always thought it was candida. I'm 17 and am still a virgin (have had oral sex) i get frequent candida overgrowth/UTI's ever since i can remember and i am/was (off insulin) diabetic. i dont have any itching and the most annoying symptoms i have at the moment are bloating and vaginal pain/soreness as well as discharge and smell (not fishy) ive done candida cleanses, canesten, currently on flagyl which helped for 4 days and im on the last day of the treatment and it came back! i cant enjoy my vacation when all im doing is sitting in bed with my legs open basically crying. ive tried everything and even had a horrible allergic reaction to the ovules that the doctor gave me (woke up in the morning with a swollen vagina and horrible burning) i dont know what to do anymore and its been giving me dizzyness as well and just making me feel horrible in general. i just want to hide in bed and sleep all day. i thought it was finally going away with the antibiotics but im feeling so sick. Continue reading >>

Could A Yeast Infection Be An Early Sign Of This Common Disease?

Could A Yeast Infection Be An Early Sign Of This Common Disease?

Could A Yeast Infection Be An Early Sign Of This Common Disease? Hint: If yeast is a persistent problem, get your blood sugar checked. Yeast infections happen. Theyre itchy, icky, and uncomfortable. At least they're usually easy to treat, either with a course of over-the-counter cream or prescription medication (or these highly effective yeast infection solutions ). But what if they keep coming back? Yeast infections, or candidiasis, are incredibly common: More than half of women will have at least one in their lifetime, says Katharine O'Connell White, MD, director of fellowship in family planning at Boston Medical Center. But there's a big difference between getting that gross cottage cheese-like discharge occasionally and having to run to the drugstore (or your doctor's office) several times a year. (Discover the ONE simple, natural solution that can help you reverse chronic inflammation and heal more than 45 diseases. Try The Whole Body Cure today!) If you're in the chronic camp, there's a chance that your yeast infections could be a sign of something more serious. One possibility: diabetes . Candida albicans, the fungus responsible for a yeast infection, normally lives in the vagina in small amounts. It typically won't hurt you, but it flourishes when there's excess sugar available, says Anita Somani, MD, an ob-gyn at Comprehensive Womens Care in Columbus, Ohio. MORE: 6 Everyday Habits That Make Your Yeast Infection Worse If you have undiagnosed (and untreated) diabetes or if you know you have diabetes but it's poorly-controlledyour vaginal secretions are likely to contain excess sugar. And when yeast in your vagina has access to that sugar, the yeast begins to take over and cause an infection, Somani explains. Chances are frequent yeast infections won't be your on Continue reading >>

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