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Buying Insulin In Italy

Italy Guide: Medicines & Chemists, How To Get Medication In Italy: Medicines ( Medicine) Prescribed By A

Italy Guide: Medicines & Chemists, How To Get Medication In Italy: Medicines ( Medicine) Prescribed By A

Medicines ( medicine) prescribed by a doctor are obtained from a chemists ( farmacia), denoted by the sign of a red or green cross on a white background. Most chemists are open from 8.30am until 12.30pm and from 3.30pm to 7.30pm. Outside these hours, at least one chemists in all areas or towns is open until late (or 24 hours in major cities) for the emergency dispensing of drugs and medicines (a duty roster is posted on the door of chemists and published in local newspapers). After midnight you may need to ring a bell to summon the chemist. Chemists are privately owned in Italy, often passed from one generation to another within the same family, and the number is strictly controlled. There are no chain chemists as in Britain and the USA. Prices of medicines arent controlled by the government and vary considerably according to the brand, and many medicines are available without a prescription in Italy that would require one in some other countries. Pills ( pillole) are the most common prescriptions given by doctors, although you may also be prescribed a series of injections ( iniezioni), suppositories ( supposta) or, less commonly, powders ( polveri). Some common medicines, e.g. vitamins and cough linctus, can be surprisingly expensive. If youre registered with social security, you pay a proportion of the cost of prescription medicines (known as the ticket) according to their group, as follows: Insulin, some painkillers (although not aspirin), antibiotics, cortisones, ulcer treatments & eye drops Hormone treatments, antacids & some anti-inflammatory drugs Aspirin, throat pastilles, vitamins, throat gargles & dermatological creams In order to pay the ticket cost of Group A and B medicines, you must produce a doctors prescription. Senior citizens with an annual income of Continue reading >>

Planning To Travel Withdiabetes

Planning To Travel Withdiabetes

When I was 18, just after finishing6th form I decided to fly out to Australia and New Zealand for 6 months. This seemed like a massive deal at the time, my mum was in a frenzy, endlessly worrying about my diabetes control and how I was going to cope with travelling around with 6 months worth of insulin, keeping it all cold and also maintaining a steady blood sugar level. But in the end it didnt need to be that complicated. Ive learnt from the mistakes I made, picked up tips by trial and error along the way and in the end had a bloody good time! Here is a list of tips to ease your mind and not let diabetes stop you. This is the perfect way to keep your insulin cool on the move. A very simple idea, place the wallet in cold water for 5-10 minutes. The water makes the crystals expand into a gel, keeping whatever is inside cool for up to 45 hours. They are reusableand lasted me for the duration of my trip. It is recommended that each pack carries 5 injections. (I had up to 10 injections in mine and Im still alive cheeky!) 2. There is no need to take the amount of insulin for the duration of your trip. In Sydney I had 5 months of insulin stolen out of a communal fridge in a hostel. This left me with just the 2 injections I had on my person. Luckily it was easy enough to visit a chemist, show them my prescription, and purchase some more insulin. Youve got to remember that no matter what country you go too, there are going to be diabetics there. Now they arent all as lucky as us to get insulin free on the NHS but the price isnt going to be high, as locals would not be able to afford it! For my next trip, leaving to Mongolia on June 18th, I have not set an end date, I just know that Imgoing to take 2 months worth of insulin with me. Thats2 FRIO wallets with 10 Lantusand 10 Novo Continue reading >>

Italy - Prescriptions And Medications

Italy - Prescriptions And Medications

We're very social! Follow Expat Focus on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google+ Notify me when new content is added about a country copy of the The Expat Focus Guide To Moving Abroad! Our monthly newsletter contains health and financial news, expat articles, social media recommendations and more. We respect your privacy and you can unsubscribe easily at any time. Read our full privacy policy here . Learn from the experiences of other expats and make new friends in our disccussion forums and Facebook groups The Expat Focus Guide to Moving Abroad contains everything you need to know when planning an international relocation available now, completely free Find the best health insurance provider or foreign currency transfer specialist by comparing free quotes The Expat Focus podcast features interviews with expats living abroad and service providers meeting their needs subscribe today! Italians dont always head to the doctor when they need some medical assistance. Many of them make their way to a pharmacy instead for some advice on medication they should use. Since most varieties of medicines are easily available in Italian pharmacies, many expats choose to pick up their drugs, as and when required, instead of shipping huge quantities across from their home countries. When in need of medication, look for a farmacia, which is the Italian word for a pharmacy. It is easy to spot a chemist as all of them have the sign of a green cross or a white cross on a green background. In any Italian town, at least one pharmacy will be located near the main piazza or close to a train station. Stay away from anyone who offers to sell droga, which is the Italian word for illegal narcotics. In most of the Italian towns and cities, the chemists are open from 8:30AM till 12:30PM and then fro Continue reading >>

Getting Sick In Italy: What You Need To Know About Italian Pharmacies & Medicines

Getting Sick In Italy: What You Need To Know About Italian Pharmacies & Medicines

Achoo! || creative commons photo by William Brawley Getting sick on vacation is one of the last things any traveler wants to deal with, and yet its not uncommon. Between the bizarre air on board your flight to all the surfaces youre touching in a train station to the lack of recuperative sleep youre getting it all contributes to running your immune system down, which makes it much easier to catch a cold or throw your digestive system off. This isnt going to be an article about what to do if you break your leg in Italy (except that Ill say its best if you dont do that!) this is about taking care of the little ailments many travelers get that, were you at home, you wouldnt bother seeing a doctor to diagnose or treat. This is the stuff that, at home, youd deal with by going to your local grocery store or drugstore to pick up a few things anonymously. Which, for the most part, is not how things are done in Italy. The good news is that your first stop for most ailments of this nature is still going to be the pharmacy. The unexpected twist is that the pharmacist you deal with is going to seem a lot more like a doctor than someone simply working a cash register at Walgreens. Italian Pharmacies, Rock Star Pharmacists, & Remedies for Common Ailments Farmacia || creative commons photo by Elliott Brown As mentioned, your first stop if you have a cold or an upset stomach or the like is going to be the pharmacy, or farmacia in Italian (pronounced far|mah|CHEE|ah). There arent chain pharmacies in Italy, but every one is instantly recognizable by the green plus-sign that is their universal symbol. Those green crosses are usually lit up, only sometimes also say farmacia on them ( like this one ), and often have useful information displayed like the temperature or the time . (My pal Ka Continue reading >>

Upon Lantus Cost Comparison, Italian Pharmacy Products Insulin Inch

Upon Lantus Cost Comparison, Italian Pharmacy Products Insulin Inch

Upon lantus cost comparison, italian pharmacy products insulin inch High quality of the products is the matter of major importance to every seller, our pharmacy sells only high-quality products. Once opened, the insulin can be used for 28 days. In order to provide a highly proficient service, we concentrate attention on the quality of our medications. For this purpose, we cooperate with the most dependable manufacturers and select the licensed pharmacists medicines only. The most common side effect of Lantus is hypoglycemia or low blood sugar. Lantus is known under several different names depending on the country in which it is being sold. Lantus is unable to cure diabetes and it is only effective when other courses of treatment are also followed including diet, exercise, eye car, dental care, blood sugar control and weight control. If you have other symptoms, or if you have had high glucose levels on a test, then I would worry. Courier delivery is much faster and provides a benefit of being able to track your parcel in real time via the USPS website. This policy is given to make you aware of how we collect, use and manage information of visitors to our site. BUse an alcohol swab to wipe the rubber seal on the end of the Cartridge System. i have been on lantus for days gone by 6 years and it Her bluff about obtaining the Hidden Immunity Idol proved false as she was blindsided 5-2. Our professional pharmacists are ready to answer your questions! A lot of people erroneously believe that generic medications need more time to work, this is not true. And the test result won't influence treatment decisions in any way. You will find that we can save you up to 50% or more on your local drug store prices. We totally realize that we are responsible for your money. You should not Continue reading >>

U.s. Pays More Than Any Other Country For Prescription Drugs

U.s. Pays More Than Any Other Country For Prescription Drugs

State that the drugs will be shipped from a foreign country Are not licensed by a state board of pharmacy in the U.S. (or equivalent state health authority) Are licensed by the state board of pharmacy in your state and the state where the pharmacy is operating Have a state-licensed pharmacist to answer your questions Levitt noted that most medication sold in America is imported from other countries. If we can do that safely it begs the question why people are saying we cant import low-cost medications safely, he said. The argument against it is often hyperbolic claims about unsafe drugs. Affordable and Safe Prescription Drug Importation Act Cities, counties, school districts and everyday consumers are not the only ones taking a stance on importation of prescription drugs. The bill includes specific requirements to ensure the safety of imported drugs. Provisions include: a clear definition of what drugs may be imported Senators and state representatives are proposing and supporting legislation that would lower the cost of prescription drugs by allowing Americans to import safe, low-cost medicine from Canada. In February 2017, Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Bob Casey (D-Pa.) introduced the Affordable and Safe Prescription Importation Act. The legislation would instruct the secretary of Health and Human Services to put forward regulations allowing wholesalers, pharmacies and individuals to import qualifying prescription drugs from licensed Canadian sellers. It would also grant the secretary authority in two years to permit importation from countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development that have standards for the approval and sale of prescription drugs that are comparable to those in the U.S. Reps. Elijah E. Cummings (D-Md. Continue reading >>

Obtaining Reimbursement In France And Italy For New Diabetes Products

Obtaining Reimbursement In France And Italy For New Diabetes Products

Obtaining Reimbursement in France and Italy for New Diabetes Products We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Obtaining Reimbursement in France and Italy for New Diabetes Products Elmar Schaefer, Attorney-at-Law, Gerald Schnell, PhD, and Jessica Sonsalla, MSc Manufacturers launching next-generation or innovative medical devices in Europe face a very heterogeneous reimbursement landscape, with each country having its own pathways, timing, requirements and success factors. We selected 2 markets for a deeper look into the reimbursement landscape: France, representing a country with central decision making with defined processes, and Italy, which delegates reimbursement decisions to the regional level, resulting in a less transparent approach to reimbursement. Based on our experience in working on various new product launches and analyzing recent reimbursement decisions, we found that payers in both countries do not reward improved next-generation products with incremental reimbursement. Looking at innovations, we observe that manufacturers face a challenging and lengthy process to obtain reimbursement. In addition, requirements and key success factors differ by country: In France, comparative clinical evidence and budget impact very much drive reimbursement decisions in terms of pricing and restrictions, whereas in Italy, regional key opinion leader (KOL) support and additional local observational data are key. Keywords: re Continue reading >>

Travelling Around Europe

Travelling Around Europe

Sorry, I can't give you guidance on the mechanics of sorting it out but in France, insulin is available only on prescription. In theory, you can see any doctor to obtain the necessary prescription and repeat prescriptions can be offered but finding an English speaking doctor might be your first challenge. The European Health Insurance Card covers EEC citizens travelling in the EEC. Mine covers me for all but two countries - France (where I live and am therefore covered by their system) and the UK (who pay my pension and who repay France for any outlays on my health) but it only provides a mechanism to avoid some of the costs of treatment. It doesn't provide any evidence of state of health or medication needs. My only advice is that you actually talk to your doctor about your trip and your worries concerning your insulin supply. Obviously, while you should take enough insulin to cover your entire trip, that isn't possible in your case since you are backpacking and staying in hostels. However, you could ask your doctor if he/she has any contacts in the countries you plan on visiting and whether you could contact them to help in replenishing your supplies. The cost for a 10ml vial of Novorapid costs 237,50kr or $41AU and 5x3ml Flexpens of NovoRapid costs 331kr or $57AU (albeit that is here in Sweden which is not on your itinerary) I'm starting to think I shouldn't do this trip. It will be one thing to come from Sydney and have to get registered with the NHS...but finding a doctor/pharmacy in France to get insulin... I have been googling for answers and I think you don't need a script in Spain, but it costs a fortune. Wait wait, I don't want you to give up the trip of a lifetime for something as silly as this. Diabetes should never limit you in life. Something I have come Continue reading >>

Buying Insulin In Italy

Buying Insulin In Italy

I always like to be prepared and have back up plans for my back up plans. Thus saying this, we will be travelling to Rome, Florence and Sorrento in mid to late October, although I plan to bring enough insulin to last me during this time, I want to see if I could purchase it there in case I run out or something gets damaged/lost/stolen. I will have a prescription with me. Do the pharmacies sell insulin to US citizens, or do they even care about nationality? I would be paying cash for this, of course. Don't know about insulin but we had a great experience with my HU's blood pressure meds. He left them all back in the States. We were going on a 2 week cruise, but starting with a few land days in a small town near the lakes. I was so distraught but we went to the local pharmacy and they gave him what he needed - we did not have the prescription and it was a Sunday so calling the US doctor would have been impossible. We thought they might want us to go to the local hospital but they just said um hum, um hum and pulled out the meds. Cheap too. We call it our own Italian miracle Continue reading >>

How To Travel Long-term Even If You Need Medication

How To Travel Long-term Even If You Need Medication

This is part of my unconventional interview series, designed to demonstrate the wildly varied ways we can live, work, and chase our dreams. Please keep in mind that, since these are interviews, the opinions, methods, and websites contained within do not necessarily reflect my own views or experiences. (Which is, in my opinion, part of what makes them wonderful.) Lately, there’s one travel question that’s been coming up over and over again. Can you travel full-time or long-term if you need medication? After all, it has to be hard to secure prescriptions across continents, to transport temperature-sensitive meds, to get through customs unscathed…right? Because this is an issue that impacts so many people and because one of the most important things I try to do here on the blog is show that travel (even long-term travel) isn’t just for people with perfect situations, I’ve asked two lovely full-time travelers, both with ongoing medical conditions that require medication, to tell us about their experiences and help us understand how they navigate full-time travel while also taking care of their health. The first interviewee is Daniel Schwarz, who you can find here, and the second has asked to remain anonymous. And both have a lot to say about travel with a medical condition. And in addition to these two travelers, I’ll be adding some of my own experiences in the somewhat more minor matter of getting birth control on the road. Without further ado, then… First, tell us about you. What do you do? Where are you from? What’s your story in a nutshell? Daniel: I was a self-taught designer/developer from London, but nowadays I’m a location-independent writer. I love design, make no mistake, and that’s what I write about (mainly), but after freelancing for several Continue reading >>

Italian Pharmacy Information For Tourists

Italian Pharmacy Information For Tourists

Italian Pharmacy Information for Tourists Italian Pharmacy Information for Tourists The Italian pharmacy, or Farmacia, doesn't deal in many non-medical items, but they do have a monopoly on over-the-counter medications like aspirin and decongestants--and those medications may also include alcoholic "elixirs." The number and opening hours of Italian Pharmacies are regulated by law. Pharmacies operate on a "rota" system designed to ensure an open pharmacy (or one which can be opened in a medical emergency) in each general area at night, holidays and Sundays. Each Pharmacy displays a card with its own opening hours, emergency telephone number, and where to go outside of those opening hours for emergency services. Pharmacists in Italy are allowed more leeway in dispensing health advice and selling pharmaceuticals than in the US. If you can describe your condition well, you may be able to procure a prescription directly from a pharmacist in Italy. Likewise, if you need a prescription filled on an emergency basis, you may be able to do so--if you know the scientific or generic name of the medicine you need and can make a good case for the pharmacist to dispense it. For minor aches and pains, cold or flu, and "little" non-critical emergencies, your best bet may be to head over to your local Farmacia. You'll go to a Farmacia for aspirin and even vitamins. Italian pharmacies will often carry homeopathic and herbal remedies as well. Many Italian pharmacists speak at least a little English, but if you are staying in Italy a while, you might want to learn some handy Italian . If you are suffering something more serious, or have had an injury not likely to be helped by aspirin, you can go to the 24-hour casualty departments, or pronto soccorso, at any hospital. If you are unable to Continue reading >>

Italy Travel Guide

Italy Travel Guide

There's a lot to see in Italy and sightseeing often doesn't seem like exercise Italy is home to some of the most famous pieces of architecture in the world, with the Colosseum, St Peters Basilica and the Leaning Tower of Pisa drawing in large crowds of tourists from all over the world. Depending on your holiday plans, the amount of attractions and sights to see in Italy often result in a lot of travelling , especially when walking between nearby places of interest. Around 2.5 million British nationals visit Italy each year, which can be accessed from the United Kingdom either by airplane or a lengthy journey by train or car. On average, a train journey from St Pancras International station in London to Milan will take at least 17 hours, while driving the same journey will be a minimum length of 13 hours. A flight from London to Milan, meanwhile, can take a minimum of two hours. If you are unsure as to how best to stick to your medication schedule then it is best to discuss a plan with your diabetes team. Italy is one hour ahead of British Summer Time and two hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time, which should not necessitate major changes to your diabetes management. The average climate in Italy is comparatively much warmer than the UK, with average high temperatures in Rome summers reaching up to 33C. Prolonged periods of activity, such as walking, can result in enhanced insulin absorption in warm weather so you could consider reducing your dosages if you are worried about hypoglycemia . The currency in Italy is the Euro, although many restaurants, hotels and shops will accept credit and debit cards, while money can be exchanged within hotels and money exchange services. There are no mandatory vaccinations required to enter Italy, however rabies is present in bats in Ita Continue reading >>

Insulin - Rick Steves Travel Forum

Insulin - Rick Steves Travel Forum

I take insulin and of course need to use Syringes. I am concerned about taking a months supply with me to Italy.. American Airline says it is ok to get them on the plane but what about through Italian Customs? Can I buy it over the counter in Italy? I can get a prescription but I am concerned of that. I also take sleeping pills and have them in prescription bottles and properly labeled for the Untied States.. But then I am taking a controlled substance to another country. Does any one here have any experience with this?? Michelle Valrico FL The European authorities aren't going to care about your bottle of prescription sleeping pills. As for insulin, I'm assuming that it needs to stay refrigerated. Have you considered how you're going to do that on the long flight? When we went to Italy this past May, there was a woman near us who handed some medication to a flight attendant and asked her to refrigerate it. The flight attendant told her that they didn't have a refrigerator. (Hard to believe, but she stuck with that story.) They ended up rigging a lot of plastic bags within plastic bags with some regular ice and some dry ice they found. What a mess! Customs is a walk through the "Nothing To Declare" door so no one is going to look at anything except maybe your backside if there is anyone standing by the door. Nothing to be concerned about. AS long as it is unopened it does not have to be refrigerated.. My concern is bring medication into another country. I am concerned that the customs agents will not understand English well and give me a hard time over it. I am a nurse and checked with my pharmacist It would be easier if I did not have to take a months supply and could get syringes in Italy.. Michelle I spent last New Years in Rome and took enough pens for 2 weeks. We Continue reading >>

Diabetic Misadventures In Italy

Diabetic Misadventures In Italy

Posted in communication , coping , diabetes , Family , friendship , Resilience , Uncategorized Tagged diabetes , gelato , italy , love , medicine , parenting , pediatrics , sicily , sick kids I love coming back from vacation and telling my friends and family about it. Ok, I dont really love coming back from vacation, but I do love sleeping in my own bed, petting my kitty cats and seeing friends that Ive missed. This year was a very special trip to Italy and its large southern island of Sicily. While there, we visited with family and friends, we returned to the site of our marriage fifteen years ago, and we saw amazing places along the way. Upon our return to the States, I tell our friends and family about swimming in the Tyrrhenian Sea, about eating at the same restaurant we did on our wedding night. I talk about the flavors of Gelato, beautiful candy and earth colors of them lined up along the freezer, and of choosing new flavors like jasmine or pistachio-chocolate or green fig. I tell them about the massive Greek temple ruins that the girls clambered along, about the graceful Baroque churches, or about the bell-towers or domes we climbed to get the best view. I might tell them about the harrowing drives along the Amalfi Coast, with narrow roads hugging the cliffs or navigating traffic in Sicily where the street signs and traffic lights are more like suggestions than laws to native Italian drivers. Maybe I share stories of encounters with the locals, like the sausage man who threw rings of salami in the air to the kids and persuaded us to buy a link as long as my seven-year-olds arm. These are the stories I tell them. These are the stories that they want to hear. But vacations are not all wonderful moments, and when you have a child with special health care needs, you Continue reading >>

20 Drugs That Cost A Lot Less Outside The U.s.

20 Drugs That Cost A Lot Less Outside The U.s.

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. Researcher of consumer healthcare issues; President of ConsumerLab.com and CEO of PharmacyChecker.com. 20 Drugs That Cost a Lot Less Outside the U.S. Brand-name drugs are less expensive outside the U.S. Sick of high drug prices? Youre not alone. Seventy-seven percent of Americans say the cost of prescription drugs these days is unreasonable. While many generic drugs are affordable in the U.S., the prices of brand-name drugs can be astronomical and are often many times the price for the same exact drug in other countries. Fifteen years ago, I began comparing the prices of drugs across countries. I also built a team to begin evaluating the credentials of the pharmacies selling these medications, looking at their licenses, pharmacy practices, and online business practices. As you might guess, we discovered many rogue pharmacies, but we also identified several dozen highly-qualified pharmacies that I trust just as much as any pharmacy in the U.S. Although both Presidents Trump and Obama initially promised to make it easier for Americans to get lower-priced medicine from abroad, it has not happened. In fact, due to our governments actions, pharmacies in countries like Canada are not even permitted to advertise on search engines like Google to Americans. Nevertheless, millions of Americans do order prescription drugs from outside the U.S. each year and do so safely, often taking advantage of the information we provide at PharmacyChecker.com . Interestingly, while personal drug importation remains technically prohibited and the FDA and pharmaceutical groups continually warn against it, the FDA has not pursued any individual for purchasing prescribed, non-narcotic medication for their personal use Continue reading >>

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