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Buying Insulin In France

T1 Student To Travel To France

T1 Student To Travel To France

My daughter will probably be traveling to France in June-July 2011 with a group of students to study French and live with a host family. They are required to speak only french from the time they land and will not have contact with home except in an emergency. I have a million concerns but am trying to focus on the practical issues related to managing her d on her own. She will bring enough d supplies plus some extra to last the 8 weeks but if she were to need something - say her bag was stolen or something - how can she get insulin and syringes? Can she go to any pharmacy and pick it up or will she need to see a local doctor first for a prescription? Can an Rx from her doctor here be filled there? What is Humalog called in France? Levemir? Glucagon? Is there anything else we should know? Thanks so much. I think the easiest way to find out is to contact the D association there: (ETA: to call there, I think you have to dial 011 (int'l) 33 (for France) then the numbers above (without the 0), but probably easier to send an e-mail) As to Levemir, Humalog and Glucagon, they are called the same. I do not think an US rx is valid in France, but not sure. Does your endo have any contact endos in France? I would think the typical travel letter would be enough to go into a local hospital and get checked out and given a local rx. I hope she has a great time. I did a 7 week backpacking trip throughout Europe after I graduated from college and I had a blast. I echo the advice of others - take more supplies that she'll need and split them up between at least her carry on and her checked luggage. If I remember correctly, you don't need a script for insulin in France. If you ask at the pharmacy, you can pay out of pocket for a vial. I got a fresh vial of Novorapid during my trip because Continue reading >>

Buy Insulin Online - Purchase Insulin Online - Generic Insulin Internet

Buy Insulin Online - Purchase Insulin Online - Generic Insulin Internet

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Cost Of Lantus In France, Order Insulin Ml Dose

Cost Of Lantus In France, Order Insulin Ml Dose

Cost of lantus in france, order insulin ml dose Generic drugs contain the same active ingredients as the original brand drugs. We use the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) protocol which enables end-to-end data protection. All invoices are sent via e-mail as confirmation of order. Please note that orders are shipped on business days only (Monday to Friday, with the exception of public holidays). the initial starting dose of lantus should be 10 units diabetes natural medicine add ml lantus 100 ul can take hawthorn aphids get rid lantus can be used contained by a sliding scale The best pharmacists of the country worked together! A lot of people choose generics because a lot of money is spent by the manufacturers of brand-name drugs to advertise their products. Please refer to the current privacy policy in the terms & conditions section of our order page. We provide delivery to almost all countries around the world. You may order any version, though generic production is many times cheaper due to the lack of promotions, which inflates the cost of a good. In some cases, due to credit card company policies, credit card payment may not be available for certain products and other payment options may be presented. Buying a generic medication one pays less but gets the very same result. Our direct medicines suppliers are based in India - the largest drug manufacturer country, holding more than 80% of pharmacopoeia market today. Most orders are processed and shipped within 24 hours of being received price of lantus cure blood sugar medicine ve been type 1 for 32 years and over the last 10 years have been on the lantus novo mix lantus should work without lows whether you eat or not which is probably why you haven You can see all our shipping rates and other information after selecting a Continue reading >>

U.s. Pays Much More Than Uk For Insulin

U.s. Pays Much More Than Uk For Insulin

A study finds that U.S. consumers pay between 5.7 times and 7.5 times more for Lantus and NovoRapid than UK consumers. A new study finds that people with diabetes in the U.S. are paying between 5.7 times and 7.5 times more than those in the UK for two popular insulins and a rare drug to treat diabetic retinopathy. U.S. consumers absorb this higher cost despite often not being the first in line to have access to new drugs or medical device treatments. According to a Reuters report, researchers from the University of Liverpool (UK) analyzed the drug prices for 20 top-selling drugs worldwide, including Sanofi’s Lantus, Novo Nordisk’s NovoRapid insulins, and Roche’s Lucentis, a macular degeneration drug recently approved by the FDA to treat diabetic retinopathy. U.S. consumers ended up paying 5.7 times more for Lantus, 7.5. times more for NovoRapid, and 7.5 times more for Lucentis than their UK counterparts, according to a chart published by the Daily Mail (UK). The average price difference of the Top 20 drugs sold was 3 times higher in the U.S than in the UK. The gap between drug prices in the U.S. and prices in other industrialized countries is even greater – 6 times higher than in Brazil and 16 times higher than in India, for example. That difference comes mostly because other countries implement price controls, while the U.S. usually allows the market to set prices, according to a Reuters report. In the report, representatives of the pharmaceutical industry pushed back against the study, saying that the market price for a drug is often not the one paid by the consumer, as many insurers demand a deep discount. In 2014, for example, Sanofi’s then-CEO Chris Viehbacher warned that sales for Lantus might flatline as insurers would demand discounts in 2015 for the p Continue reading >>

Diabetessisters

Diabetessisters

Before moving to Europe both times, I've gotten this question quite often: But how will you get your insulin over there? While studying abroad in France when I was 21, I brought enough insulin for a 3-month stay. I was to be there for 4 months (which turned in to 9 months but that's another story for another time), but I was supposed to get my visa by the second month. That visa would grant me health benefits akin to French citizens. However, if you've ever lived in France, you know how the French bureaucracy works. Read: slowly. Fast forward to month #3, visa "on it's way- should arrive within the month," and I'm cracking open the last of my Humalog supply. Obviously, I had to get more- but how, without insurance, without a visa? Without really speaking French? Without a doctor, or any clue where to begin? I emailed my study abroad advisor, and asked for her advice. She wasn't extremely helpful, but she did send me the address to a walk-in clinic in the area. The next day, with a map in one hand and copies of my American prescriptions in the other, I began Mission Insulin. When I opened the door to the clinic, I was instantly confused. I was expecting what I am used to in the states: walls lined with clean, comfortable chairs, a plethora of health-related magazines, an unenthused secretary perched behind a wall of glass. There were indeed many chairs lining the walls of the small, stuffy room, but there was no secretary. No clipboard where you sign in, no ticket machine to get a number in line. There were 5 other people in the room, speaking quiet French to each other or coughing or checking the time. Because I didn't know what else to do, or where else to go, I simply took a seat. Several minutes passed, and I looked around, growing more bewildered by the minute, as Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin If Working In France

How To Get Insulin If Working In France

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My daughter is going to work as a chalet host for 4-5 months in France. She is a UK resident, type 1 Diabetic on Lantus and Novorapid, but planning to switch to a pump soon, and has a European Health card - can she get medication when she is in France, and will she have to pay for it ? Hope all goes well for your daughter in France! This is about using an EHIC. It would be different if she was paying French contributions and tax... though given my experience with the system she would only just about get registered when it was time to go home. She will have to pay up front to see a doctor to get a prescription If she has any lab tests she would again pay upfront. She will only be reimbursed at 70% for doctors visits /lab costs (of I think 22 for a GP, 41 for a specialist about 20; for an HbA1c ) She may be better going to a diabetologue , I don't think many T1s are cared for by GPs but of course any doctor can prescribe insulin. Be very careful though about whether they are sector 1 or 2. Sector 2 docs can charge considerably more than the amount the authorities will base their reimbursement on. ) Again at the the chemists she will probably have to pay upfront for for insulin/strips etc Prices (2010) 5 rapid insulin pens 43,18 euros, 5 basal pens (lantus or levimir) 67.41E, 1 vial rapid insulin 21,65 E I am not certain whether she will be 100% reimbursed for insulin, the article suggests that some medications get 100% back, and insulin seems to me to be an essential medici Continue reading >>

Getting Insulin Abroad (in France)

Getting Insulin Abroad (in France)

This story was originally published as a guest post in 2 parts for the Type 1 Diabetes Blog I write bi-weekly for Diabetes Sisters. Before moving to Europe both times, I’ve gotten this question quite often: But how will you get your insulin over there? While studying abroad in France when I was 21, I brought enough insulin for a 3-month stay. I was to be there for 4 months (which turned in to 9 months but that’s another story for another time), but I was supposed to get my visa by the second month. That visa would grant me health benefits akin to French citizens. However, if you’ve ever lived in France, you know how the French bureaucracy works. Read: slowly. Fast forward to month #3, visa “on it’s way- should arrive within the month,” and I’m cracking open the last of my Humalog supply. Obviously, I had to get more- but how, without insurance, without a visa? Without really speaking French? Without a doctor, or any clue where to begin? I emailed my study abroad advisor, and asked for her advice. She wasn’t extremely helpful, but she did send me the address to a walk-in clinic in the area. The next day, with a map in one hand and copies of my American prescriptions in the other, I began Mission Insulin. When I opened the door to the clinic, I was instantly confused. I was expecting what I am used to in the states: walls lined with clean, comfortable chairs, a plethora of health-related magazines, an unenthused secretary perched behind a wall of glass. There were indeed many chairs lining the walls of the small, stuffy room, but there was no secretary. No clipboard where you sign in, no ticket machine to get a number in line. There were 5 other people in the room, speaking quiet French to each other or coughing or checking the time. Because I didn’t kno Continue reading >>

You Can Buy Insulin Without A Prescription, But Should You?

You Can Buy Insulin Without A Prescription, But Should You?

As anyone with diabetes can tell you, managing the disease with insulin usually means regular checkups at the doctor's office to fine-tune the dosage, monitor blood-sugar levels and check for complications. But here's a little known fact: Some forms of insulin can be bought without a prescription. Carmen Smith did that for six years when she didn't have health insurance and didn't have a primary care doctor. She bought her insulin without a prescription at Wal-Mart. "It's not like we go in our trench coat and a top hat, saying, 'Uh I need the insulin,' " says Smith, who lives in Cleveland. "The clerks usually don't know it's a big secret. They'll just go, 'Do we sell over-the-counter insulin?' " Once the pharmacist says yes, the clerk just goes to get it, Smith says. "And you purchase it and go about your business." But it's still a pretty uncommon purchase. Smith didn't learn from a doctor that she could buy insulin that way. In fact, many doctors don't know it's possible. When she no longer had insurance to help pay for doctors' appointments or medicine, Smith happened to ask at Wal-Mart if she could get vials of the medicine without a prescription. To figure out the dose, she just used the same amount a doctor had given her years before. It was a way to survive, she says, but no way to live. It was horrible when she didn't get the size of the dose or the timing quite right. "It's a quick high and then, it's a down," Smith says. "The down part is, you feel icky. You feel lifeless. You feel pain. And the cramps are so intense — till you can't walk, you can't sit, you can't stand." Smith says her guesswork put her in the emergency room a handful of times over the years. The availability of insulin over the counter presents a real conundrum. As Smith's experience shows Continue reading >>

Advice Needed! I'm Type 1 Diabetic & Want To Move To France

Advice Needed! I'm Type 1 Diabetic & Want To Move To France

FrenchEntre The Forum Living in France Health and Social Welfare ADVICE NEEDED! I'm Type 1 Diabetic & want to move to France ADVICE NEEDED! I'm Type 1 Diabetic & want to move to France Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total) Im 52 and want to move to as far South in France as I can, with my 17 yr old and 2 cats! I have limited funds and want to know what you do about insulin and other medication, Diabetic advice and driving (do you insure from the UK or in France?). I need to do this move now, rather than never fulfil my dream. My grandmother lived in the South of France and so I feel comfortable down thereAny help and advice will really help me. I dont earn much but I have my own internet business, and so internet connection (as fast as possible) is really important.Tax? You seem to need a lot of advice. I would suggest you put each question into the relevant section i.e. tax queries in the Taxation section and be specific about what you want to know. You may have to give a bit of personal information or you may just want to know how to register. As for the diabetes, I am type 2 and get treated very well. I am on insulin and my doctor sends me for blood tests every 3 months and then I have a consultation with him. All the meds here are practically the same but here is the problem. I am registered with CPAM (the French Health System) but I am not sure what you will have to do as new immigrants come under different rules. I believe you have to have an S1 from Newcastle which will cover you for around 18 months. I get free treatment for diabetes as a Ailment longe duree with 100% refund but I dont know if this will apply to you under the new system. You need some serious advice on this as your health cover could cost you a lot of money. Also, as you say you will be Continue reading >>

Travelling Around Europe

Travelling Around Europe

Sorry, I can't give you guidance on the mechanics of sorting it out but in France, insulin is available only on prescription. In theory, you can see any doctor to obtain the necessary prescription and repeat prescriptions can be offered but finding an English speaking doctor might be your first challenge. The European Health Insurance Card covers EEC citizens travelling in the EEC. Mine covers me for all but two countries - France (where I live and am therefore covered by their system) and the UK (who pay my pension and who repay France for any outlays on my health) but it only provides a mechanism to avoid some of the costs of treatment. It doesn't provide any evidence of state of health or medication needs. My only advice is that you actually talk to your doctor about your trip and your worries concerning your insulin supply. Obviously, while you should take enough insulin to cover your entire trip, that isn't possible in your case since you are backpacking and staying in hostels. However, you could ask your doctor if he/she has any contacts in the countries you plan on visiting and whether you could contact them to help in replenishing your supplies. The cost for a 10ml vial of Novorapid costs 237,50kr or $41AU and 5x3ml Flexpens of NovoRapid costs 331kr or $57AU (albeit that is here in Sweden which is not on your itinerary) I'm starting to think I shouldn't do this trip. It will be one thing to come from Sydney and have to get registered with the NHS...but finding a doctor/pharmacy in France to get insulin... I have been googling for answers and I think you don't need a script in Spain, but it costs a fortune. Wait wait, I don't want you to give up the trip of a lifetime for something as silly as this. Diabetes should never limit you in life. Something I have come Continue reading >>

Insulin Prices Skyrocket: Putting Pressure On Pharma To Explain

Insulin Prices Skyrocket: Putting Pressure On Pharma To Explain

Insulin Prices Skyrocket: Putting Pressure on Pharma to Explain The Journal of the American Medical Association published a new study which highlights an alarming fact about diabetes management: the cost of insulin has beyond tripled between 2002 and 2013. The cost per year, per patient has risen from an average of $231 to $736. A milliliter of insulin rose 197% from $4.34 to $12.92 during those same years. According to the study , during the same time period, for patients with diabetes using non-insulin diabetes medications, the amount of money spent decreased by 16%from $600 to $502. Life Saving Medication Becoming Increasingly Expensive Dr. William Herman, a coauthor of the study and a professor of medicine and epidemiology at the University of Michigan School of Public Health is very concerned about these findings. He said, Insulin is a life-saving medication, and There are people with type 1 diabetes who will die without insulin. And while there have been incremental benefits in insulin products, prices have been rising. So there are people who cant afford them. Its a real problem. Study to Find out Cost of Diabetes Medications The study, which is the first of its kind, also found that popular oral diabetes medications became more affordable or rose only slightly. Metformin, which has the additional advantage of being available as a generic drug went from $1.24 per tablet in 2002 to 31 cents a tablet in 2013. The researchers studied data from almost 28,000 patients with diabetes found in the Medical Expenditure Panel which is a database on health care costs managed by the US Department of Health and Human Services. Approximately 1 of every 4 people in the study used insulin and two-thirds took an oral medication. Close to the end of the study a small percentage of Continue reading >>

Filling An Insulin Prescription In Europe

Filling An Insulin Prescription In Europe

Filling an insulin prescription in Europe Filling an insulin prescription in Europe I'm insulin-dependent. I buy insulin at home in the US in vials of 100 units, with a prescription. They must be kept refrigerated till I start using an individual vial. Insulin has a "shelf-life" of 28 days after it reaches room temp. So once I take a vial out of the fridge, I must discard it within 28 days whether it's empty or not. I am considering a trip to Europe. So unless I could get a prescrip filled in Europe while I'm there, I could only take 28 days of insulin with me and I'd need to be back home in 28 days or sooner. I've filled a prescrip in Canada by finding a walk-in clinic that'd take a US citizen and the Dr wrote me a prescrip a Canadian pharmacy would fill, using my written US prescrip, of course, which I had with me So my question now is: is it reasonable to expect that I might find places like that in Europe that would also write a prescrip, using my USA one, that a local pharm would fill? If so, it would mean I could plan a longer trip than 28 days, which I would REALLY like to do! I am delighted the Frio will be good for you. It really is a superb piece of kit and whenever travelling to warm/hot countries it has never let me down. What makes it so good is that it only needs cold water and each 'fill' lasts about 5 days. When you feel the crystals through the material you simply buy some more cold water! BTW it was another regular and long-time contributor here, billbarr, who tipped me off about the Frio. It's a British product now available in the USA and he has used one for years during his travels to Greece. He did me a huge favor when he wrote me about it just before a trip to Spain when I was worried about the hot temperatures and how it would affect my insulin Continue reading >>

Insulin - Rick Steves Travel Forum

Insulin - Rick Steves Travel Forum

I take insulin and of course need to use Syringes. I am concerned about taking a months supply with me to Italy.. American Airline says it is ok to get them on the plane but what about through Italian Customs? Can I buy it over the counter in Italy? I can get a prescription but I am concerned of that. I also take sleeping pills and have them in prescription bottles and properly labeled for the Untied States.. But then I am taking a controlled substance to another country. Does any one here have any experience with this?? Michelle Valrico FL The European authorities aren't going to care about your bottle of prescription sleeping pills. As for insulin, I'm assuming that it needs to stay refrigerated. Have you considered how you're going to do that on the long flight? When we went to Italy this past May, there was a woman near us who handed some medication to a flight attendant and asked her to refrigerate it. The flight attendant told her that they didn't have a refrigerator. (Hard to believe, but she stuck with that story.) They ended up rigging a lot of plastic bags within plastic bags with some regular ice and some dry ice they found. What a mess! Customs is a walk through the "Nothing To Declare" door so no one is going to look at anything except maybe your backside if there is anyone standing by the door. Nothing to be concerned about. AS long as it is unopened it does not have to be refrigerated.. My concern is bring medication into another country. I am concerned that the customs agents will not understand English well and give me a hard time over it. I am a nurse and checked with my pharmacist It would be easier if I did not have to take a months supply and could get syringes in Italy.. Michelle I spent last New Years in Rome and took enough pens for 2 weeks. We Continue reading >>

The Prices For Life-saving Diabetes Medications Have Increased Again

The Prices For Life-saving Diabetes Medications Have Increased Again

A Type 1 diabetes patient holds up bottles of insulin. Reuters/Lucy Nicholson Insulin prices have been rising — increases that mean some people are spending as much on monthly diabetes-related expenses as their mortgage payment. It's led some people living with diabetes to turn to the black market, crowdfunding pages, and Facebook pages to get access to the life-saving drug. At the same time, the companies that make insulin have faced pressure from politicians including Senator Bernie Sanders, class-action lawsuits that accuse the companies of price-fixing, and proposed legislation in Nevada. Even in the face of this criticism, two of those drugmakers — Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk — raised the list price of their insulins again in 2017. Diabetes is a group of conditions in which the body can't properly regulate blood sugar that affects roughly 30 million people in the US. For many people living with diabetes — including the 1.25 million people in the US who have type-1 diabetes — injecting insulin is part of the daily routine. Insulin, a hormone that healthy bodies produce, has been used to treat diabetes for almost a century, though it's gone through some modifications. As of May 2, the list price of Humalog, a short-acting insulin, is $274.70 for a 10 ml bottle, an increase of 7.8% from what the list price had been since July 2016. On May 2, Lilly also took a 7.8% list price increase to Humulin, an older form of insulin. Novo Nordisk, which also makes a short-acting insulin, increased its prices to the drug in 2017. In February, the drugmaker raised its price to $275.58 for a 10 ml bottle, up 7.9% from what the list price had been since July 2016. In December, Novo Nordisk committed to limiting all future drug list price increases from the company to single d Continue reading >>

Travel Guide For People With Diabetes

Travel Guide For People With Diabetes

Josiane Paiement, 2005 Winner of the Educational Production Contest Stéphane Chouinard, Pharmacist Coordination : Élyse Dion Design graphic and illustrations : Laurent Lavaill Diabetes Québec 8550, Pie-IX blvd. Suite 300 Montréal (Québec) H1Z 4G2 Phone: 514.259.3422 Toll Free: 1.800.361.3504 www.diabete.qc.ca Josiane Paiement, Type 1 diabetic 2005 Winner of the Educational Production Contest Stéphane Chouinard, Pharmacist Travel Guide for People with Diabetes Table of Contents What to do before you leave 7 What you should bring on your trip 12 At the airport 16 During your trip 17 Tips about insulin 21 Commercial brand names of insulin around the world 23 Tips for people taking diabetes pills 25 Diabetes pills 26 Meals 27 Exercise prior to boarding and during your flight 29 If you drive 30 Some useful phrases 31 Our goal is to provide you with the practical knowledge you need to confidently leave home and explore the world, despite certain restrictions imposed by your diabetes. This travel guide covers what you need to do before and during your trip to ensure that it is as enjoyable as possible. Before planning a trip, you need to be absolutely sure that you are healthy enough to go and your diabetes is very well controlled because travel can affect your blood sugar control. Be sure to consult your doctor before you plan your trip. Once you and your doctor have determined that you are healthy enough to travel, use this travel guide to organize your trip and avoid potential problems. 6 Gather information Learn as much as possible about the countries you intend to visit by consulting the following websites: World Health Organization www.who.int This website is an excellent resource for learning about the health and disease situation in the countries you Continue reading >>

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