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Bruising On Feet Diabetes

Bruising On Bottom Of Foot: Causes, Home Remedies, And Recovery

Bruising On Bottom Of Foot: Causes, Home Remedies, And Recovery

Our feet take a lot of abuse. According to the American Podiatric Medical Association, they log an impressive 75,000 miles by the time we reach 50. The bottoms of your feet are padded with shock-absorbing fat. While they can withstand a lot of wear and tear, theyre not invincible. Its not uncommon for them to bruise due to things like injury, sporting activities, unsupportive footwear, and more. A bruise is called a contusion in medical terms. They can occur anywhere on the body when your soft tissues are injured. Following the injury, small blood vessels under the skin break and allow blood to leak out. Initially, the bruise might be tender and reddish or purplish. As it heals, the tenderness subsides and the blood will be metabolized. As this occurs, bruised skin turns from red to bluish to yellowish, and finally back to normal. It generally takes about two weeks for a bruise to resolve completely. In some cases, your foot may feel as though it has a bruise. It may be tender or swollen, but therell be no discoloration. This may be because the broken blood vessels lie deeper under the skin or because your skin is thick, camouflaging the pooled blood. There are a wide variety of reasons why the soles of your feet may bruise. They include: Your heel pad takes the brunt of the impact when your foot lands after moving forward. That means its a prime spot for bruising. The bruising often results from repetitive, forceful heel strikes. These can occur while playing basketball or volleyball, or running or tackling the long jump in track and field competitions. People who do a lot of marching, such as musicians in a marching band or people in the military, are also at higher risk. Part of the normal aging process is the thinning of skin and the loss of collagen and fat deposi Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Protect Your Feet And Legs

Diabetes: Protect Your Feet And Legs

If you have diabetes, you are more likely than people without this disorder to develop leg and foot problems. Diabetes can destroy nerves and cause you to have poor circulation. Left unchecked, these complications can lead to amputation. But there's a lot you can do to prevent that from happening. How Diabetes Causes Limb Problems First, it's important to understand what causes these diabetes complications. According to Marilyn Tan, MD, an endocrinologist and the clinic chief of the Stanford Endocrine Clinic in California, risk factors include poor circulation from atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease, poor wound healing, and uncontrolled blood sugar increases, which increases the risk of infection. “Think of sugar as fuel for bacteria and fungus,” says Dr. Tan. Researchers also know that high blood glucose levels can cause nerve damage called diabetic neuropathy. The damage can occur in any part of your body, but it is most common in your arms and legs, with the lower extremities affected first. This type of nerve damage is known as peripheral neuropathy. Some people have no symptoms, while others experience numbness, tingling, burning, sharp pain, cramps, extreme sensitivity when touched, and a loss of coordination and balance. When you have peripheral neuropathy, small sores can go unnoticed because of the numbness — you simply don’t feel them. Left untreated, these little problems can become major infections that invade the bones. What’s more, poor circulation from diabetes means any ulcers and infections are harder to heal. If an infection invades your bones, then amputation could be required to save your life. “Diabetes is the leading cause of nontraumatic lower extremity (leg and foot) amputations in the United States,” says Tan. “Five perc Continue reading >>

Foot Conditions A-z

Foot Conditions A-z

Bruise A bruise will initially appear red, reflecting the color of the blood in the skin. But in a day or two, the site appears as a familiar black-and-blue mark. By about day six, the color changes to green and by day eight or nine, the bruise will appear yellowish-brown. Generally, a bruise is repaired by the body and the skin returns to normal in two to three weeks. Foot bruising can occur at any spot on the foot, from the toenail to the back of the heel, and often produces pain or discomfort in the area where it occurs (forefoot / toes, arch or heel). More About Bruise Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Pain

Diabetic Foot Pain

by Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Includes photo of Dr. Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Diabetes is one of the most common reasons people seek relief for painful feet. With diabetes, four types of foot problems may arise in the feet. Nerve Problems due to Diabetes The most common contributor to diabetic foot pain is a nerve problem called Peripheral Neuropathy. This is where the nerves are directly affected by the disease process. There are basically three types of peripheral neuropathy: sensory, motor, and autonomic neuropathy. A large percentage of pain diabetic patients complain of is due to sensory neuropathy. This can show up as "sensitive pain," where the amount of pain is not proportional to the amount of insult that is causing it. For instance, just touching the skin or putting a sheet over your feet in bed could be painful. This can be present at the same time as numbness in the feet. Sensory neuropathy symptoms can include burning, tingling or a stabbing pain. Relief is foremost on someone's mind when painful neuropathy has raised its ugly head. The first thing to do is to check your blood sugar for the past several weeks to see if there has been a trend toward high blood sugar (Editor's Note: The A1c test is traditionally employed to determine this, and should be repeated about every three months.) Persistent high blood sugar can contribute to this type of pain. Massaging your feet with a diabetic foot cream, or using a foot roller, often takes the edge off the pain. Vitamin B preparations are often recommended; and there are a variety of prescription medications that do work. Using cushioned, supportive shoes and foot support inserts is always needed to protect the feet from the pounding, rubbing and irritating pressures that contribute to neuropathic pain. Motor neuropathy can Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Affects The Feet

How Diabetes Affects The Feet

There's no sense in pussyfooting around: Diabetes poses a serious danger to your dogs. Having the condition doubles the risk for foot disease. In fact, about 30 percent of people with diabetes who are older than 40 develop medical problems with their feet. The damaged nerves and poor blood circulation that often accompany elevated blood sugar ensure that there is no such thing as a minor cut, scrape, bump, or bruise on the foot when you have diabetes. While blood-sugar problems can create a dizzying range of hard-to-treat complications, lower-limb diseases that are not properly treated can deteriorate so quickly and so badly that doctors have no other choice but to eliminate the problem altogether. That's another way of saying that people with diabetes account for 60 percent of all lower-limb amputations in the United States. In fact, a patient with diabetes is 10 to 30 times more likely to have a lower limb amputated than a person without the disease. The Feet For two sturdy performers who take a daily pounding, the feet are surprisingly complex structures. Combined, your two feet have more than one-quarter of the bones in your body -- 26 each. Although they form the foundation for the body, the feet aren't static blocks but agile and dynamic machines of movement, with more than 100 tendons, muscles, and ligaments apiece. Given their workload and all those moving parts, it's not surprising that about 75 percent of Americans experience one foot condition or another in their lifetime, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association. (Podiatrists are foot doctors.) The Feet and Diabetes Chronically elevated glucose levels can damage the nervous system, the wiring that transmits signals from the brain throughout the body. The nervous system works the other way, too Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Foot Damage

Symptoms Of Foot Damage

Wounds cuts, burns, grazes or blisters Its important to take action on any wounds, such as cuts, burns, grazes or blisters. Make sure your feet are kept clean, cover the area of damage with a plaster that allows the area to breathe and ensure the area is not rubbed or made worse. Its important to let your doctor know at the earliest opportunity so he or she can advise on the best care advice for you. Contact your doctor, out of hours service or NHS direct if you notice pus or any sign of infection in your feet . Pain may occur as a result of damage, such as a wound, blister or broken bone but can also occur for other reasons including neuropathic pain (nerve pain). In some cases, such as with nerve pain, the feeling of pain may be present despite no other outward changes. A number of people with diabetes report intense pain when the skin on their feet or legs come into contact with material such as bed linen. A burning sensation, which can present difficulty when getting to sleep is also relatively common. These symptoms in people with diabetes tend to be dysesthesia, a type of neuropathic pain . It is important to tell your doctor if you experience pains in your feet. Prickly, tingly feeling unusual sensations in the feet A tingly feeling like pins and needles could be a result of a number of causes. It can be from a temporary block in circulation, such as if you have been resting too much body weight on one part of your leg. However, it could be the result of neuropathy or advancing circulation problems if the sensation is regular and cant otherwise be explained. If you are experiencing these sensations for no good reason, speak to your doctor. You should also mention whether you have any other symptoms in your feet such as numbness in your feet, any changes of colou Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot problems. you might like Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy. Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold, or pain. This lack of feeling is called "sensory diabetic neuropathy." If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. The muscles of the foot may not function properly, because the nerves that make the muscles work are damaged. This could cause the foot to not align properly and create too much pressure in one area of the foot. It is estimated that up to 10% of people with diabetes will develop foot ulcers. Foot ulcers occur because of nerve damage and peripheral vascular disease. Peripheral vascular disease. Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called "peripheral vascular disease." Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart. If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing ulcers or gangrene (the death of tissue due to a lack of blood). Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Diabetes And Foot Problems

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. You might be afraid you’ll lose a toe, foot, or leg to diabetes, or know someone who has, but you can lower your chances of having diabetes-related foot problems by taking care of your feet every day. Managing your blood glucose levels, also called blood sugar, can also help keep your feet healthy. How can diabetes affect my feet? Over time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy, that can cause tingling and pain, and can make you lose feeling in your feet. When you lose feeling in your feet, you may not feel a pebble inside your sock or a blister on your foot, which can lead to cuts and sores. Cuts and sores can become infected. Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene. Gangrene and foot ulcers that do not get better with treatment can lead to an amputation of your toe, foot, or part of your leg. A surgeon may perform an amputation to prevent a bad infection from spreading to the rest of your body, and to save your life. Good foot care is very important to prevent serious infections and gangrene. Although rare, nerve damage from diabetes can lead to changes in the shape of your feet, such as Charcot’s foot. Charcot’s foot may start with redness, warmth, and swelling. Later, bones in your feet and toes can shift or break, which can cause your feet to have an odd shape, such as a “rocker bottom.” What can I do to keep my feet healthy? Work with your health care team to make a diabetes self-care plan, which is an action plan for how you will manage your diabetes. Your plan should inclu Continue reading >>

Bruises On The Feet: What You Can Do

Bruises On The Feet: What You Can Do

The feet take a lot of pounding, and if you run or are physically active, multiply that by four—at least. Adventure races like the recent Met Con Blue at Blue Mountain can put your foundation to the test, and bruising may be the result. While injury and trauma are typically the cause of these discolored, sore areas, there are other reasons for their formation as well. The feet contain many bones, among them are the sesamoids. Bruising can happen when too much pressure is placed on the ball-of-the-foot, and these bones are inflamed or even fractured. Metatarsalgia also presents with a feeling of bruising on the ball-of-the-foot, however, there are no visible signs. Improper footwear is one of the leading causes of this sometimes painful occurrence. Other influences have to do with activity level, weight, age, and how the body is cared for daily. There are also medical conditions that can cause bruising, so unexplainable areas on the skin should be discussed with your medical provider. Proper care for a bruise typically involves icing your feet, allowing time for them to rest and heal, and addressing their cause. While you can’t change the fact that you dropped a heavy box on your foot, you can adjust your footwear, or address issues of obesity. If a bruise isn’t healing, contact our office. This is especially important for the diabetic foot. If your feet need extra support, custom orthotics may be helpful. Chiropodist Tony Abbott understands the work that your feet do for you on a daily basis. Visit Abbott Foot & Ankle Clinic in Collingwood, ON for all of your foot care needs. Call (705) 444-9929, or schedule an appointment online today! Photo credit: artur84 via freedigitalphotos.net Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Foot And Risk: How To Prevent Losing Your Leg

The Diabetic Foot And Risk: How To Prevent Losing Your Leg

Anyone who has ever had an elevated blood sugar level is at risk for foot complications. It may be as simple as knowing that once in your life, even during pregnancy, you have had an elevated blood sugar level. If so, you are at risk and must monitor your feet. Diet-controlled diabetics, whether diagnosed as an adult or as a child, have feet at risk of diabetic complications. The simple rule: If you have ever been told that you are at risk of developing diabetes, you need to consider your feet and work to prevent injury. It starts with daily foot checks: inspecting all sides, including the bottoms, which can be done best with someone's help or with a mirror. During a foot check, any changes in the foot's shape or color, sense of feeling/sensation, painful areas or skin integrity need to be evaluated. Any new bunions, calluses or corns need to be identified and shown to a medical doctor. The overall foot shape could change due to a bone fracture that would also need the attention of a physician. Stress fractures are very small breaks in the bone that will not usually change the shape of the foot, but may cause pain, bruising or swelling. The color of the foot is important as it helps show any changes in blood flow to the foot. Darkening or loss of hair may indicate that the blood or nerve supply has decreased. Less blood to the foot can mean slower healing of cuts and scrapes. Bruises indicate injuries. Especially important are the bruises or cuts found during a foot check that the person was not aware of at the time of injury. Any bruises within calluses are particularly important to show to a physician. To monitor sensation, a feather or facial tissue can be used to brush the foot and test its ability to feel light touch. It is also important to be sure the foot can se Continue reading >>

Caring For Your Feet

Caring For Your Feet

When you have diabetes, your feet need extra-careful attention. That’s because diabetes places you at a higher risk of getting foot infections. There are several reasons for this, and they are all related to high blood glucose levels. First, high blood glucose is associated with damage to blood vessels, which can result in reduced circulation to the feet. If you get a cut or sore on your foot, decreased blood flow will slow the healing process. Second, high blood glucose can keep white blood cells from effectively fighting off an infection. In addition, many people with diabetes develop neuropathy, or nerve damage, in their feet. When nerves are damaged, the ability to sense heat, cold, pressure, and pain may be diminished. Often, changes in sensation in your feet occur over a long period without you even knowing it. You may experience a tingling, “pins and needles” feeling in your feet, or the nerves may become numbed and you may feel very little. When you lose feeling in your feet, you lose the ability to know when you have a sore, blister, or injury. This is called loss of protective sensation. When you don’t feel the pain, you’re less likely to treat the problem – and that could cause serious complications. Leaving a wound untreated can allow it to become infected, and the infection could become serious enough to require amputation. Unfortunately, diabetes-related lower-extremity amputations are on the rise. The financial and emotional costs of such losses are considerable. The good news is that if you pay attention to your foot health daily, you can do much to prevent the conditions that can lead to amputation. About three-fourths of all diabetes-related amputations are preceded by chronic foot ulcers. Therefore, a person with diabetes has a very good c Continue reading >>

Diabetes Sores | Symptom No 7 Of 10 Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes Sores | Symptom No 7 Of 10 Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes Sores, Wounds Or Bruises Diabetes sores, wounds and bruises are very common skin changes for a diabetic with type 2 diabetes symptoms. A side-effect of high blood sugar is the reduced ability of your skin to heal properly. You may find that cuts and sores are slow to heal and may become more easily infected. This is due to poor circulation, nerve damage and an impaired immune system. Your skin is your body’s largest organ and is vulnerable to the effects of elevated blood sugar. It is important to recognize that the condition of your skin and the reduced ability to heal can be an indicator for diabetes sores or wounds problems, caused by type 2 symptoms of diabetes. As many as a third of people with type 2 diabetes will have a skin condition related to their disease at some time in their lives. The most common cause of bacterial skin infections in diabetics is the Staphylococcus bacteria, or staph infection. Another common cause is that diabetes affects the flow of the blood. Without proper blood flow, it takes longer for any wound, cut, sore, blister or bruise to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease and puts diabetics at risk not only for frequent healing wounds but also for infections. Skin infections left untreated can fester and worsen to the point that gangrene can develop. This is why you sometimes hear of diabetics having a toe, foot even part of a leg amputated. Research indicates that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper care when problems develop. A type 2 symptom of diabetes can start with something simple like a blister that becomes infected and develops into a sore. Checking your skin regularly is part of a good health care regime. Other type 2 diabetes symptoms, like nerv Continue reading >>

Amputation And Diabetes: How To Protect Your Feet

Amputation And Diabetes: How To Protect Your Feet

Good diabetes management and regular foot care help prevent severe foot sores that are difficult to treat and may require amputation. Diabetes complications can include nerve damage and poor blood circulation. These problems make the feet vulnerable to skin sores (ulcers) that can worsen quickly. The good news is that proper diabetes management and careful foot care can help prevent foot ulcers. In fact, better diabetes care is probably why the rates of lower limb amputations have gone down by more than 50 percent in the past 20 years. When foot ulcers do develop, it's important to get prompt care. More than 80 percent of amputations begin with foot ulcers. A nonhealing ulcer that causes severe damage to tissues and bone may require surgical removal (amputation) of a toe, foot or part of a leg. Some people with diabetes are more at risk than others. Factors that lead to an increased risk of an amputation include: High blood sugar levels Smoking Nerve damage in the feet (peripheral neuropathy) Calluses or corns Foot deformities Poor blood circulation to the extremities (peripheral artery disease) A history of foot ulcers A past amputation Vision impairment Kidney disease High blood pressure, above 140/80 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) Here's what you need to know to keep your feet healthy, the signs you need to see a doctor and what happens if amputation is necessary. Preventing foot ulcers The best strategy for preventing complications of diabetes — including foot ulcers — is proper diabetes management with a healthy diet, regular exercise, blood sugar monitoring and adherence to a prescribed medication regimen. Proper foot care will help prevent problems with your feet and ensure prompt medical care when problems occur. Tips for proper foot care include the followin Continue reading >>

Foot Bruising... | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Foot Bruising... | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hello everyone, I'm a 22 year old type 1 and I've had diabetes for 11 years. No complications so far. Recently I've noticed on a few occasions I have 'stepped funny' for want of a better way of putting it and had a momentary sort of crunching pain in my foot. We're not talking any real kind of trauma, just stepping funny, particularly on steps. A few days I got out of bed, stepped down onto the (carpeted) floor and got a pain in my right little toe. It hurt for a minute or two, then went away and I thought nothing of it. Today I woke up and found a bruise between my little toe and the next one along. It's a little tender to press on but doesn't hurt to walk on. I've had my feet checked at the GPs recently and passed all of their neuropathy tests, but I'm aware that feet problems can be a problem with diabetes, and wondering if I should be concerned about this? Is it a make an appointment now/mention it the next time I see the GP/just keep an eye on it situation?? Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes and foot problems facts Two main conditions, peripheral artery disease (PAD) and peripheral neuropathy, are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Symptoms and signs of diabetic foot problems arise due to the decreased sensation from nerve damage as well as the lack of oxygen delivery to the feet caused by vascular disease. Diabetic foot problems also include bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, fungal infections, dryness of the skin, and ingrown toenails. These problems are not specific to diabetes, but may occur more commonly due to the nerve and vascular damage caused by diabetes. Treatment depends on the exact type of foot problem. Surgery or even amputation may be required for some cases. Gangrene (dry gangrene) is tissue death due to absence of blood circulation. It can be life threatening if bacterial infection develops (wet gangrene). Many diabetes-related foot problems can be prevented by good control of blood sugar levels combined with appropriate care of the feet. How can diabetes cause foot problems? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cause damage to blood vessels and peripheral nerves that can result in problems in the legs and feet. Two main conditions, 1) peripheral artery disease (PAD), and 2) peripheral neuropathy are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Peripheral artery disease (PAD), sometimes referred to as peripheral vascular disease (PVD), means that there is narrowing or occlusion by atherosclerotic plaques of arteries outside of the heart and brain. This is sometimes referred to as "hardening" of the arteries. Diabetes is a known risk factor for developing peripheral artery disease. In addition to pain in the calves during exercise (medically known as intermitte Continue reading >>

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