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Broad Beans And Diabetes

Beans A Boon For People With Diabetes, Study Finds

Beans A Boon For People With Diabetes, Study Finds

Eating more legumes, such as beans, lentils and chickpeas, can lower blood sugar, blood pressure Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Oct 22, 2012 (HealthDay News) -- People suffering from type 2 diabetes can see an improvement in both their blood sugar levels and blood pressure if they add beans and other legumes to their diet, Canadian researchers report. Chickpeas, lentils and beans are rich in protein and fiber, and these may improve heart health. Because they are low on the glycemic index, a measure of sugar in foods, they may also help control diabetes, the researchers explained. "Legumes, which we always thought were good for the heart, actually are good for the heart in ways we didn't expect," said lead researcher Dr. David Jenkins, the Canada Research Chair in Nutrition and Metabolism at the University of Toronto. Among diabetics, "not only did their glucose control become better, but -- and this surprised us -- it had a significant effect on blood pressure," he said. Exactly why legumes have this effect on blood sugar and blood pressure isn't known, Jenkins said. The effect is most likely due to the protein, fiber and minerals they include, he noted. Jenkins recommends adding more legumes to the diet. "They will do well for you," he said. "They will help you keep your blood pressure down and your blood glucose under control, and help you keep your cholesterol down." The report was published online Oct. 22 in the Archives of Internal Medicine. For the study, Jenkins Continue reading >>

Fava Bean Contraindications

Fava Bean Contraindications

WHEN IS IT NOT GOOD TO CONSUME FAVA BEANS? What are the contraindications of fava beans? Fava beans or broad beans (Vicia faba) are edible vegetables consumed in the diet for millennia. Because of some of the components of this legume, or as a result of certain food intolerances, fava beans are not suitable for some people: Fava beans can be very indigestible when not cooked properly. Dried fava beans should be soaked at least 48 hours to hydrate and to be well-cooked, otherwise they would be very difficult to digest. They should be boiled in salted water for about two hours. Soaking fava beans and cooking them in salted water helps eliminate anti-nutrients present in the seeds, substances responsible for some poor digestion of legumes, especially when not properly prepared ( saponins , protease inhibitors, amylase inhibitors, phytates, etc.). In people who do not chew enough, we recommend adding mashed beans into a puree, so that they can taste good and offer better digestion. Another option is to germinate beans, then boil. Germination increase the vitamins of broad beans and decreases its anti-nutrients content. What to do if the fava beans produce a lot of gas? Like many legumes, fava beans are known to cause flatulence and many gases, because it is a food with a high fiber content. People with a tendency to have gas are recommended to consume a lesser amount, as in a soup with noodles or rice. People with favism must not eat beans. It is also important NOT to accompany fava beans with too much protein and animal fat (like sausages), sauces high in fat or oil, too much salt, or hot spices, because these ingredients combined can produce slow digestion and stomach pain . Contraindications of fava beans. Who should not eat beans? Fava beans are a very tasty and nutrit Continue reading >>

Are Roasted Fava Beans Good For Me?

Are Roasted Fava Beans Good For Me?

Home Are roasted fava beans good for me? Fava beans are packed with nutrition. Also known as broad beans, vicia fabas, horse beans, windsor beans or field beans these delicious legumes have been enjoyed around the world for thousands of years and deservedly so. Fava beans boast a very long list of nutritious benefits. Fava beans, like all other legumes, are naturally high in fibre and protein, thus providing a number of health benefits. Fibre in the diet is very important for maintaining a healthy digestive system. Soluble fibre can assist with reducing the absorption of cholesterol into the bloodstream and helps maintain blood sugar levels, which can help to reduce the risk of developing heart disease and can aid in managing diabetes. The dietary fibre in fava beans and low glycemic index can also assist with weight loss by making you feel fuller for longer. Nutrition Australia recommends males should aim to include 30 grams of fibre in their diets per day and females should aim for 25 grams. Amazingly, one cup of fava beans contains approximately 9.2 grams of dietary fibre. Fava beans are also high in protein and iron so they are a brilliant substitute for meat. Protein is essential for the human body to perform the most basic of tasks, essentially we cannot function without it. Skin, muscle, brain cells, hair and nails are all protein-based parts of the body. Fava beans are rich in phyto-nutrients and plant sterols which have been shown to have a direct correlation with health promotion and disease prevention. Fava beans have no cholesterol or saturated fat, and contain many essential vitamins and minerals such as folate, thiamin, vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin B-6, potassium, copper, selenium, zinc, magnesium, phosphorus manganese and calcium. These vitamins and min Continue reading >>

What Are The Benefits Of Fava Beans?

What Are The Benefits Of Fava Beans?

Written by Michelle Kerns; Updated November 28, 2017 Fava beans are dense with vitamins and minerals. What Are the Health Benefits of Desiccated Coconut? Fava beans are dense with nutrition. Also known as broad beans, fava beans have no saturated fat or cholesterol and contain a high concentration of thiamin, vitamin K, vitamin B-6, potassium, copper, selenium, zinc and magnesium. They are also an inexpensive source of lean protein. Fava beans can be served raw or cooked, though the bean pods must first be blanched and the mature seeds shelled before eating. A serving of cooked or fresh fava beans can significantly increase your intake of folate, iron, manganese and dietary fiber, all nutrients that can benefit your health in a variety of ways. A cup of cooked fava beans contains 177 micrograms of folate, approximately 44 percent of the recommended daily allowance of folate for an adult man or woman. Fresh, raw fava beans provide even more, with 634 micrograms of folate in every cup. Folate belongs to the B family of vitamins and is vital for energy metabolism. It also supports the function of the nervous system and aids in the synthesis of DNA, RNA and red blood cells. People who eat folate-rich foods like fava beans regularly may have a decreased risk of heart disease, cancer and depression. Pregnant women who have a high intake of folate may be less likely to have a child with birth defects. Consuming a cup of cooked fava beans provides men with 32 percent of their RDA of iron and women with 14 percent of their daily requirement. Adequate iron intake is necessary for the body to produce red blood cells and its primary cellular energy source, adenosine triphosphate, or ATP. If your diet lacks sufficient iron, you may be more likely to develop anemia or neurological p Continue reading >>

The Health Benefits Of Beans

The Health Benefits Of Beans

For quite a few years nutritionists have been telling us that legumes (beans, peas, and lentils) can help lower cholesterol. Now it appears that these foods bring two other benefits: they can improve blood glucose control and they can lower blood pressure , which means they can reduce the risk of cardiovascular problems. This new information came about as the result of a study conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto. The scientists recruited 121 people who had Type 2 diabetes and divided them into two groups. The first group was asked to increase legume intake by at least one cup a day. The idea was that the legume diet would rank low on the glycemic index (GI) , which is a ranking of foods based on their effect on blood glucose levels. The second group was given a diet high in whole-wheat products, which contain higher amounts of insoluble fiber. The purpose of the research was to compare the benefits of a high-legume, low-GI diet with those of a high-fiber diet. The study lasted three months, and the results showed that the legume diet was related to better control of blood glucose and a greater lowering of blood pressure than the high-fiber diet. The difference was not huge, but the researchers noted that even a small difference can have large implications, considering the magnitude of diet-related health problems in the general population. Although it was not one of the researchers concerns, its also worth noting that legumes tend to be very inexpensive sources of protein. Nutritionists have speculated that one reason people dont eat a lot of legumes is that they are unaware of the variety. The following are some of the many kinds: chickpeas (also known as garbanzo beans), black beans, peas, lentils, edamame (fresh soybeans), black-eyed peas, soy nuts Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Broad Beans

Health Benefits Of Broad Beans

Written by Shaun DMello |Article Reviewed by Dietitian Shirley Johanna on Jun 22, 2015 The broad bean is among the oldest crops in the world and so it is not surprising that it goes by many names, including vicia faba, fava bean, faba bean, field bean, bell bean and tic bean. Although this species of bean is native to North Africa and parts of south Asia, it is extensively cultivated all over the globe. The broad bean is a hardy legume and can grow in almost any soil and any climate. They are a good source of protein and carbohydrates and they also contain several vitamins and minerals . The beans are contained in pods and so the first step in preparing any broad bean dish is to open the pods and pop the beans out. The beans are then blanched by immersing them in boiling water for two minutes and then immediately dipping them in cold water. This will help to loosen the papery skins that cover each of the beans and you can squeeze them gently to slip them out of the skins. When buying broad beans, look for pods that are firm and crisp and avoid the ones that are soft and bend easily. Broad beans are best when they are relatively small and fresh and they lose their taste as they age until they are similar to dried pulses. Health Benefits of Broad BeansBroad bean seeds contain a variety of nutrients and provide a wide range of health benefits. Here are a few of the health benefits of this nutrition-rich legume: Broad Beans for Heart Health: Broad beans are good sources of B vitamins which play an important role in the prevention of heart disease. Researchers in Japan found that including foods rich in B vitamins can reduce the risk of heart problems and stroke in both sexes. Broad beans are also an excellent source of thiamine as 100 grams of raw broad beans provide almos Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Now some of the diabetes diet information presented below may be slightly different to what you are used to seeing. That’s because there are quite a few flaws in the common diet prescription for type 2 diabetes. In our work with clients we’ve discovered that a ‘real food’ approach to eating has helped control type 2 diabetes the most. That’s because there is more to managing diabetes than just counting cabrs! So we’ve put together this type 2 diabetes diet food list that will give you a great place to start. FREE DOWNLOAD Like a Take Home Copy Of This List? Includes Snack Ideas and Food Tips! Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List PROTEINS Every meal should contain a source of protein for energy production and to fuel the creation of new cells. Below is a list of good protein sources to choose from. Protein also helps to satisfy the appetite, keeping you fuller longer. Lean Meats Lean beef; veal, flank steak, extra lean mince, sirloin steak, chuck steak, lamb. Pork Lean cuts of pork; pork chops or loin. Poultry Chicken, turkey, duck, quail, goose. Fish Tuna, salmon, cod, trout, bass, flatfish, whitehead, mackerel, herring, eel, haddock, red snapper, trout, drum, walleye, sardines and so forth. Seafood Crab, lobster, prawns, shrimp, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, crayfish. Game Meats Venison, wild boar, kangaroo, deer, pheasant, moose, wild turkey, alligator, emu, ostrich, elk, bison, turtle. Many people don’t eat these types of meats but you can eat them if you like them. Organ Meats Beef, pork, lamb, chicken livers. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken tongues, hearts, brains. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken marrow, kidneys. Many people don’t eat these types of meats either but you can eat them if you like them, and they are very good sources of vitamins and minera Continue reading >>

Broad Beans: Health Benefits And Therapeutic Value

Broad Beans: Health Benefits And Therapeutic Value

Broad beans: health benefits and therapeutic value Broad beans (Vicia faba) are the seed of an annual plant that is part of the Fabaceae family. Grown for several millennia, this legume is native to the Middle East and has high protein content. It provides many health benefits to those who eat it. Cooking: delicious recipes with broad beans as an essential ingredient . Since they boast plant-based protein levels higher than the average in legumes, fresh broad beans are nutritious, restorative and invigorating. It is recommended in many vegetarian and vegan recipes. Fresh broad beans have high levels of vitamin C and B group vitamins, as well as potassium, iron and magnesium. They also are replete with polyphenols that have strong antioxidant properties and protect us against free radicals. Being fiber-rich, dried or fresh broad beans help fight diabetes and regulate intestinal transit. Also, they are also recommended in weight-loss diets because they let you feel satiated quickly without being calorie-rich. Broad bean flowers are used in infusions or in decoctions to soothe renal colic, inflamed prostate and kidney disorders. Take care, broad beans can trigger a dangerous anemia called favism when they are eaten raw in great quantities for a long time. This note is only intended for persons who carry a hereditary gene mutation and lack the necessary digestive enzyme that usually degrade hemolytic substances (substances that destroy red-blood cells) contained in these seeds. Growing broad beans to benefit from their medicinal properties Broad beans require warm and full sun exposure as well as cool, deep, thick and rather chalky soil. Dont plant your broad beans near beans, tomatoes or bell peppers to avoid spread of eventual infections. Broad beans do well in pots at l Continue reading >>

Say Yes To Beans!

Say Yes To Beans!

Amy Campbell is a registered dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator who has been working in the field of diabetes for many years. She is the author of several books about diabetes, including 16 Myths of a Diabetic Diet and Staying Healthy with Diabetes: Nutrition and Meal Planning. In addition, Amy is a lecturer and frequent contributor to several diabetes-related websites. Of all the foods to get excited about, beans are probably not on the top of your list. But maybe they should be. Beans are way up there in terms of foods that provide a number of health benefits. In fact, many health experts recommend that we aim to eat at least three cups per week. Read on and learn why beans should be a staple in your kitchen. Beans defined There are all types of beans out there, and while most beans are healthful (with the exception of jelly beans, perhaps), the beans that pack a nutritional punch belong to the legume family. Legumes are a class of vegetables that include lentils, peas, and beans. Examples of beans that are legumes are kidney beans, black beans, pinto beans, garbanzo beans (aka “chickpeas”), cannellini beans, lima beans, and soybeans. And there are many more. Beans have quite a past, too. For example, there’s evidence of fava beans, chickpeas and lentils in Egyptian tombs from 4,000 years ago. In 1500 BC, farmers in parts of Asia were growing and using soybeans. And Native Americans and early Mexicans cultivated runner beans, kidney beans, and lima beans. In fact, beans have been and still are a major part of world agriculture, and are a staple of many different cultures’ diets. Beans help your health Beans are low in fat and saturated fat, but are rich in a number of nutrients, such as fiber, protein, B vitamins, iron, potassium, and phytonutrients. Th Continue reading >>

Are Kidney Beans Bad For A Diabetic?

Are Kidney Beans Bad For A Diabetic?

Kidney beans are part of the plant family Phaseolus vulgaris, otherwise known as common beans. Rich in protein, natural fiber and various vitamins and minerals, kidney beans are a healthful food to include in a diabetic's nutrition plan. In fact, the American Diabetes Association has designated kidney beans as a "super food," due to the fact that they provide you with several nutrients of particular importance when you are living with diabetes mellitus. Video of the Day Kidney beans contain a significant amount of carbohydrates in the form of starch, which breaks down into sugar in your digestive tract. You need not worry about kidney beans causing a sudden jump in your blood sugar level, however, because they contain slow carbohydrates. This means the carbohydrates break down and are absorbed slowly from your intestines, which dampens the effect on your blood sugar level. A cup of cooked kidney beans contains approximately 39 g of carbohydrates and 0.6 g of sugars. Kidney beans are an outstanding source of dietary fiber, with approximately 13 g in a cup of cooked beans. Fiber is an important nutrient for everyone, but it's particularly important for diabetics. Dietary fiber helps lower your blood cholesterol level by binding the fat in your intestines, leading to its excretion in your stool. Additionally, many long-term diabetics develop problems with intestinal slowing due to disease-related nerve damage, often leading to chronic constipation. Eating fiber-rich foods, such as kidney beans, helps keep your bowels moving regularly. Kidney beans are a nearly fat-free source of dietary protein, with approximately 15 g per 1-cup serving. Other protein-rich foods, such as red meat, whole-milk dairy products and eggs, contain cholesterol and saturated fat, which are bad for Continue reading >>

5 Health Benefits Of Beans—and 5 Surprising Risks

5 Health Benefits Of Beans—and 5 Surprising Risks

Health Benefit: Beans can prevent heart disease iStock/Thinkstock Studies have shown that people who eat more legumes have a lower risk of heart disease, and the phytochemicals found in beans might be partially to thank, since they protect against it. Health Benefit: Beans can fight cancer iStock/Thinkstock Beans contain a wide range of cancer-fighting plant chemicals, specifically, isoflavones and phytosterols which are associated with reduced cancer risk. Health Benefit: Beans can lower cholesterol iStock/Thinkstock Beans provide the body with soluble fiber, which plays an important role in controlling blood cholesterol levels. Studies find that about 10 grams of soluble fiber a day—the amount in 1/2 to 1 1/2 cups of navy beans—reduces LDL cholesterol by about 10 percent. Beans also contain saponins and phytosterols, which help lower cholesterol. Health Benefit: Beans can help you lose weight iStock/Thinkstock A serving of beans will help you feel full more quickly, because the rich fiber content fills your stomach and causes a slower rise in blood sugar. That should stave off hunger longer and give you a steady supply of energy. Health Benefit: Beans can help manage diabetes Hemera/Thinkstock Beans are a diabetes sufferer's superfood! The balance of complex carbohydrates and protein provides a slow, steady source of glucose instead of the sudden surge that can occur after eating simple carbohydrates. Health Risk: Beans can cause migraines iStock/Thinkstock Some legumes can trigger migraines or an allergic reaction in some people. If this happens, talk to a doctor and eliminate the culprit from your diet. Health Risk: Beans can raise blood pressure iStock/Thinkstock If you take a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor to treat depression, avoid fava beans because they Continue reading >>

Vegetarian Food For Diabetes

Vegetarian Food For Diabetes

Research shows that it's best to eat a lower carb diet if you have diabetes and want to lower blood sugar and a1c. And generally that means eating proteins in the form of meat. But I was over on Facebook and someone asked: How do I eat when I hate meat, chicken, fish, pork. And eggs!! It's a good question so I thought I'd put together a list of vegetarian food for diabetes, with lots of ideas to help those of you that don't like eating meat, fish, or eggs. Not all vegetarians skip the eggs because they are a great source of protein but there are lots of ideas further down the list. Firstly, it is possible to manage your diabetes using a vegetarian diet but one of the things you will have to be careful of is overdoing carbohydrates. This means you will need to put a little more thought into constructing balanced meal plans. I was a vegetarian myself for over 15 years and always ate a balanced diet plan that included lots of fresh foods and vegetables. I want to emphasize that because it's surprising how many vegetarians eat junk food and don't eat vegetables. Sounds strange but it's true, and if you're diabetic, this is NOT going to do you any good whatsoever. So focus on eating fresh whole foods ONLY, that's what I recommend for ALL diabetics anyway. Processed and packaged foods need to move off your list. Anyway, that's enough of me on the soap box, let's dig into this vegetarian food list. Vegetarian Food List For Diabetes Vegetables Artichoke, asparagus, celery, beets, tomatoes, bell peppers, carrots, onions, leeks, kohlrabi, green onions, eggplant, cauliflower, broccoli, asparagus, cucumber, cabbage, brussels sprouts, artichoke, okra, zucchini, yellow summer squash, swiss chard, radish, snow peas, mushrooms, green beans, and so forth. Green Leafy Vegetables Lettuce, Continue reading >>

Why Eating More Of This High-fiber Food May Lower Your Diabetes Risk

Why Eating More Of This High-fiber Food May Lower Your Diabetes Risk

Researchers have identified yet another way pulses can boost your health. Here's how to add more lentils, beans, and chickpeas to your diet. Pulses are trending big time. That includes all types of beans, lentils, peas, and chickpeas. New products—from lentil chips to roasted chickpeas—are appearing on grocery story shelves, and desserts made with pulse flours and pureed pulses are all over Pinterest (black bean brownies, anyone?). There's a lot to love about pulses: They're gluten-free and eco-friendly, and loaded with nutrients and antioxidants. And now, there's another reason to add more pulses to your diet: Recent research suggests they might help you stave off type 2 diabetes. A new study published in the journal Clinical Nutrition tracked more than 3,300 adults who were at high risk of heart disease for four years. Researchers found that compared to those with a low intake of pulses (12.73 grams/day, or about 1.5 servings/week), those with a higher consumption (28.75 grams/day, equivalent to 3.35 servings/week) had a 35% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The study also showed that participants who substituted half a serving of pulses a day for a similar serving of eggs, bread, rice, or baked potato had a lower incidence of diabetes. The health protection that pulses offer may be related to several factors. In addition to being rich in B vitamins and minerals (including calcium, potassium and magnesium), pulses have a unique macronutrient makeup: The protein, fiber, and carbohydrates that pulses pack help to slow digestion. This extends the feeling of fullness, delays hunger, and results in a low glycemic response—meaning pulses help your body regulate blood glucose and insulin levels. Full disclosure: I’m obsessed with pulses. A few years ago I wro Continue reading >>

What Are The Benefits Of Fava Beans?

What Are The Benefits Of Fava Beans?

Michele Turcotte is a registered, licensed dietitian, and a certified personal trainer with the National Academy of Sports Medicine. She has more than 12 years of experience in clinical and corporate settings, and has extensive experience in one-on-one diet counseling and meal planning. She has written freelance food and nutrition articles for Trouve Publishing Inc. since 2004. Fava beans, like edamame, are green-colored legumes that come in their own "pod." You can purchase them canned, fresh or dried. A nutrient-rich legume, fava beans are high in protein and dietary fiber, very low in fat, free of saturated fat and an excellent food source of many nutrients essential for human health, such as vitamins and minerals. Fava beans, when eaten as part of an overall healthy diet, may offer cardiovascular benefits and aid in weight management. According to Fruits and Veggies More Matters, fava beans are a nutrient-dense food, meaning they provide lots of nutrients essential for proper body function without being rich in calories. These beans are a good food source of vitamin B1 or thiamin, iron, copper, phosphorus, potassium and magnesium, meeting 10 to 19 percent of the recommended daily value, or DV, for each per 1/4 cup. Vitamin B1 is important for a nervous system function and energy metabolism; iron is an essential component of a protein responsible for oxygen transport in the bloodstream; and copper, along with iron, helps to form red blood cells. Copper also plays a role in keeping your blood vessels, immune system and bones healthy. Phosphorus and magnesium are important for maintaining strong bones, and magnesium, along with potassium, helps regulate blood pressure. Fava beans are also an excellent food source of folate, and manganese, supplying over 20 percent of Continue reading >>

Why You Should Eat Fave Or Broad Beans | Beating Diabetes

Why You Should Eat Fave Or Broad Beans | Beating Diabetes

g = micrograms mg = milligrams IU = International units The percentages refer to the recommended daily amounts for an adult. As you can see from the above, dietary fibre makes up 25% fava beans. Another 26% consists of protein. In addition, fava beans are especially rich in micro-nutrients such as the B vitamins, notably folate and thiamine. The broad beans are also full of phosphorus, manganese, magnesium and iron. Fava beans are one of the top high-folate foods (vitamin B9) around. Folate helps metabolise your energy, supports your nervous system, and keeps red blood cells healthy. Its also a must for pregnant women. Fava beans do not directly help diabetics control their blood glucose. But they do help prevent or slow the development of certain adverse medical conditions, many of which arise due to diabetes, such as: Hypertension 85% of diabetics suffer from high blood pressure. Studies show that magnesium can lower blood pressure. Broad beans are loaded with magnesium. According to a meta-analysis of 12 clinical trials covering 545 participants in total, magnesium supplements taken for up to 26 week resulted in a small reduction in diastolic blood pressure. But another study demonstrated that better results are achieved when magnesium supplements are combined with magnesium-rich vegetables and fruit. Heart disease and stroke hypertension and diabetes increase the risk of heart disease and stroke at least three times compared to the risk among the general population. Thus improvements in your blood pressure will reduce your risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke. Weak immune system is another consequence of diabetes. Healthy white blood cells are necessary to support a strong immune system because without them your body is very susceptible to illnesses and infec Continue reading >>

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