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Breast Cancer Treatment And Type 2 Diabetes

Breast Cancer And Diabetes

Breast Cancer And Diabetes

Breast cancer can affect men as well as women Breast cancer is a common form of cancer - the most common cancer in women - that develops inside the tissue of the breast. This sectionexplains how breast cancer, which can also occur in men, is linked to diabetes in addition to what the commonrisk factors and symptoms of breast cancer are and how the disease is treated. Breast cancer refers to cancer - the uncontrollable growth and spread of new cells - that originates from breast tissue. As cancer can develop in different parts of the breast, there are various different types of breast cancer. Some remain inside the breast and are known as non-invasive breast cancers (or carcinoma in situ), while most have the ability to spread outside the breast and are commonly referred to as invasive breast cancer. The most common type of non-invasive cancer is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), or cancer found in the milk ducts of the breast. The most common form of breast cancer is invasive ductal breast cancer, which develops in the cells that line the breast ducts. It accounts for around 80% of all cases of breast cancer. Other less common types of breast cancer include: Invasive lobular breast cancer - develops in the inner lining of the milk-producing glands of the breast (lobules) Inflammatory breast cancer - a rare and very aggressive cancer in which affected cells block lymph vessels in the skin of the breast, causing it to swell Paget's disease of the breast - an infiltrating cancer of the cells that line that nipple Secondary or metastatic breast cancer - cancer that spreads from the breast to other parts of the body, usually through the bloodstream or the lymph nodes (small glands that filter bacteria) In the UK, breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the secon Continue reading >>

Diabetes Driving Breast Cancer Up In Black Women?

Diabetes Driving Breast Cancer Up In Black Women?

Diabetes Driving Breast Cancer Up in Black Women? WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Type 2 diabetes may increase the risk for an aggressive type of breast cancer among black women in the United States, a new study finds. Researchers from Boston University analyzed data from more than 54,000 black women who were cancer -free at the start of the study. During the next 18 years, 914 women were diagnosed with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer and 468 with estrogen receptor negative (ER-) breast cancer . Women with type 2 diabetes were 43 percent more likely to have developed ER- breast cancer, but had no increased risk for ER+ breast cancer. The study found that the increased risk for ER- cancer was not attributable to their weight. "While we observed no association for the most common type of breast cancer, the type that is responsive to estrogens, women with diabetes were estimated to be at increased risk of developing estrogen receptor negative breast cancer, a more aggressive type of breast cancer which is twice as common in U.S. black women as in white women," said corresponding author Julie Palmer in a university news release. She's a professor of epidemiology at the university's School of Public Health. Possible reasons for the increased risk of ER- breast cancer in black women with diabetes include chronic diabetes-related inflammation that can trigger cancer, Palmer suggested. "Given that the prevalence of diabetes is twice as high in African-Americans as in whites, the current finding, if confirmed, may help to explain the higher incidence of ER- breast cancer in African-American women," said Palmer. But this study only found an association between diabetes and breast cancer, rather than a cause-and-effect link. The findings were published Continue reading >>

Researchers Uncover Link Between Breast Cancer Treatment And Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers Uncover Link Between Breast Cancer Treatment And Type 2 Diabetes

Home Type 2 Diabetes News and Research Researchers uncover link between breast cancer treatment and type 2 diabetes Tamoxifen is one of the most widely prescribed drugs to prevent a recurrence of breast cancer in women who have been treated for the condition, but new research suggests that the drug may contribute to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes . The University of Toronto researchers who conducted the study said that no one taking tamoxifen should discontinue their use of the medication, but they and their doctors should be aware of the association. For the study, the researchers examined the medical records of more than 14,000 individuals being treated for breast cancer, some of whom were taking tamoxifen. The results, which were published in the journal Cancer, showed that tamoxifen patients are 25 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. You may be interested in these related articles: Moving to better neighborhoods may help individuals lower their type 2 diabetes risk "Current tamoxifen therapy is associated with an increased incidence of diabetes in older breast cancer survivors," the researchers wrote in their report. "These findings suggest that tamoxifen treatment may exacerbate an underlying risk of diabetes in susceptible women." They added that it is unlikely that tamoxifen is directly responsible for new diabetes cases. Rather, many of the women who developed the condition after being treated with the drug likely had preexisting risk factors like obesity or a family history of diabetes. Tamoxifen may amplify the effects of these susceptibilities. The findings could have important implications for many women. More than 500,000 individuals are currently taking the drug to prevent a recurrence of breast cancer. These women may benefit Continue reading >>

The Little-known Connection Between Diabetes And Breast Cancer

The Little-known Connection Between Diabetes And Breast Cancer

The Little-Known Connection between Diabetes and Breast Cancer In a hurry? Click here to read the Article Summary... Diabetes, especially lifestyle and diet-related Type 2 Diabetes, has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. And sadly not just for adults, but for children and teens as well. This is not breaking news. Still, the statistics can be scary. Close to 10% of the U.S population have been diagnosed with the disease and an estimated additional8.1 million Americans went undiagnosed in 2014, according to the Centers for Disease Control. This includes close to 4,000 new cases of Childhood Type 2 Diabetes each year (something that was unheard of just 15 years ago). And these statistics do not even include the 40% of Americans who, according to the CDC, may be deemed pre-diabetic. The Connection Between Diabetes and Cancer Is Real A study of close to one million people registered with the national Diabetes Service Scheme (NDSS) in Australia who were diagnosed between the years 1997 to 2008 discovered that there were high correlations was between Type 2 Diabetes and cancer. Specifically, these include pancreatic, liver, endometrium, kidney, thyroid and gallbladder cancer as well as certain kinds of leukemia. A 2014 report by the World Journal of Diabetes found that high correlationalso existed between Type 2 Diabetes and breast cancer as well. Increasing rates of both diabetes and cancer over the last decade has led scientists to try to determine the specific chemical and biological connections between the two diseases. For years, conventional wisdom stated that obesity was the common cause. Now more evidence points to factors related to insulin instead. There are a few connections between insulin levels and cancer. First of all, studies have shown that tu Continue reading >>

Breast Cancer Patients With Diabetes More Likely To Die

Breast Cancer Patients With Diabetes More Likely To Die

Breast cancer patients are nearly 50 percent more likely to die of any cause if they also have diabetes, according to a comprehensive review of research conducted by Johns Hopkins physicians. The findings, published in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, suggest future research could focus on whether high levels of insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes could play a role in promoting tumor growth. The researchers who conducted the review also found that diabetics tend to be diagnosed with later-stage breast cancers and to receive altered and potentially less effective treatment regimens. "When patients are faced with a diagnosis of breast cancer, which they see as an imminent threat to their lives, diabetes care often goes on the back burner," says study leader Kimberly S. Peairs, M.D., an assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "This research suggests we may need to proactively treat the diabetes as well as the cancer," she adds, noting that diabetes is a systemic disease that has many different effects on the body. Peairs and her team conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of previously published research on breast cancer and diabetes, ultimately looking in depth at eight studies. In six of seven studies of breast cancer patients, preexisting diabetes was associated with significantly higher long-term all-cause mortality. Diabetes and cancer are major causes of illness and death worldwide. In 2007, in the United States alone, roughly 24 million people had diabetes (about 8 percent of the population) and 2.5 million were survivors of breast cancer. Diabetics are known to have a higher risk of breast cancer, Peairs says. Peairs says her research suggests that diabetics diagnosed with breast cancer Continue reading >>

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What is the relationship between breast cancer and diabetes? Survivors of breast cancer, who are post-menopausal, have a higher chance of developing diabetes. Scientists are becoming increasingly aware of an association between diabetes and cancer. In this article, we discuss the link. A study, published in Diabetologia, is the largest to observe the link between surviving breast cancer and eventually developing diabetes; it also showed that whether the patient went on to develop diabetes was closely associated with having undergone chemotherapy . The opposite interaction has also been observed: females with diabetes have a 20 percent chance of developing postmenopausal breast cancer. A study from last year demonstrated that people with diabetes over the age of 60 are more likely to develop breast cancer, compared with their counterparts without diabetes. Fast facts on breast cancer and diabetes: It has been observed that having diabetes increases the likelihood of breast cancer, and that having breast cancer increases the likelihood of developing diabetes. Lifestyle changes can help reduce risk long-term. How has the connection between breast cancer and diabetes been established? There has been increased study into the correlation of breast cancer and diabetes. The connection has been made as a result of improvements in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. As more women survive breast cancer, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the long-term outcomes for survivors as they grow older. However, few studies have tried to determine what the risk of developing diabetes is for a breast cancer survivor. The study in Diabetalogia is an example of the new research that has established the connection between breast cancer and diabetes more firmly. The team, Continue reading >>

Breast Cancer Medication May Increase Risk Of Developing Type 2 Diabetes

Breast Cancer Medication May Increase Risk Of Developing Type 2 Diabetes

Breast cancer medication may increase risk of developing type 2 diabetes Women who take the drug tamoxifen after being diagnosed and treated for breast cancer may be at a slightly higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. The researchers stressed that their investigation did not prove the drug causes diabetes. The team simply noted an association between tamoxifen and the medical condition, which could have been caused by other confounding factors. Still, after examining the medical records of more than 14,000 women being treated for breast cancer, the researchers found that considerably more participants being treated with tamoxifen eventually developed type 2 diabetes. Tamoxifen patients were at a 25 percent higher risk. You may be interested in these related articles: 8 Lies People with Diabetes Should Never Tell Their Doctor While the University of Toronto researchers who conducted the study said they do not believe tamoxifen was the sole cause of any diabetes cases, they do think the medication may exacerbate preexisting risk factors like obesity or a family history of metabolic conditions. Regardless, they said more research should be conducted to determine the exact cause of the association. The study could have important implications, as tamoxifen is one of the most commonly prescribed medications for preventing a recurrence of breast cancer. Currently, more than 500,000 women take the drug, according to a study conducted by researchers from Oxford University. Other aspects of breast cancer treatment may contribute to type 2 diabetes risk. It can be very difficult to maintain a healthy weight while undergoing chemotherapy, as the medication alters the way foods taste. Many people find it difficult to eat healthier foods that may be mo Continue reading >>

Aspirin, Breast Cancer, And Type 2 Diabetes

Aspirin, Breast Cancer, And Type 2 Diabetes

Aspirin, Breast Cancer, and Type 2 Diabetes Women who have Type 2 diabetes have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than women who dont have diabetes. This is especially true of older women who have gone through menopause ; studies have found that women with diabetes are up to 20% more likely to develop breast cancer after menopause. Some researchers suspect that both conditions might be tied to overweight or obesity, but they also think its possible that Type 2 diabetes somehow directly affects the risk of breast cancer. A new study from Taiwan now indicates that using low-dose aspirin might reduce the risk of breast cancer in women with Type 2 diabetes. The study, which used data retrieved from the National Health Insurance Database in Taiwan, involved 148,739 women with diabetes (average age 63.3 years), of which 24,378 were taking aspirin. It covered a 14-year period (January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2011). The researchers determined that overall the use of aspirin in patients with diabetes lowered the risk of breast cancer by 18%. The optimal effect of aspirin was found to occur when the daily dosage was more than 88.9 milligrams. The study appeared in the Journal of Womens Health. When it was published, Susan G. Kornstein, MD, editor-in-chief of the journal, commented, Women with Type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of breast cancer, and these results suggest that the same low-dose aspirin that many of these women take to prevent cardiovascular disease may also help reduce their risk of breast cancer. Want to learn more about womens health and diabetes? Read Top 10 Health Tips for Women Over 65, Diabetes and Chronic UTIs: Questions and Answers, and Pregnancy and Type 1 Diabetes. Disclaimer of Medical Advice: You understand that the blog posts and comments Continue reading >>

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

How Does Having Diabetes Affect My Cancer Treatment?

More than 25 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among people 65 and older, nearly 27 percent have diabetes. The vast majority of diabetes cases are type 2 diabetes, which is associated largely with older age and being overweight as well as family history. Older age and obesity also are risk factors for developing cancer, which means that people with type 2 diabetes are diagnosed with cancer more often than those in the general population. Having diabetes can complicate cancer treatment due to a number of factors. At the same time, some treatments for cancer, including certain newer targeted therapy drugs, can spur the development of diabetes, especially in patients who already had a propensity toward developing the disease, although this effect is usually reversible. Azeez Farooki is a Memorial Sloan Kettering endocrinologist who specializes in treating cancer patients who also have diabetes. We spoke with Dr. Farooki about what special considerations are taken into account when treating this group of patients. A Disease of Blood Sugar “Diabetes is a disease in which a person has increased levels of glucose, or sugar, in the blood,” Dr. Farooki explains. “It can occur because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin — the hormone that allows glucose to be absorbed — or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced. Cells should normally take in sugar from the blood; if they don’t, then high blood sugar or ‘hyperglycemia’ results.” The majority of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, which often causes the body to become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type 2 disease may be treated with insulin injections, other hormonal inject Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medicine Linked To Better Outcomes In Diabetics With Her2-positive, Hormone-receptor-positive Breast Cancer

Diabetes Medicine Linked To Better Outcomes In Diabetics With Her2-positive, Hormone-receptor-positive Breast Cancer

A number of studies have suggested a link between diabetes, diabetes medicines, and breast cancer risk. Research strongly suggests that women diagnosed with diabetes are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than women who aren’t diabetic. Other research suggests that diabetic women taking the medicine metformin (brand names: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza, Riomet), which is commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes, have a lower-than-average risk of breast cancer. An analysis of data from the ALTTO study suggests that diabetic women treated with metformin who have been diagnosed with HER2-positive, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer have better outcomes, including overall survival, than similar women who were not treated with metformin. The study was published online on March 13, 2017 by the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Read “Impact of Diabetes, Insulin, and Metformin Use on the Outcome of Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Primary Breast Cancer: Analysis From the ALTTO Phase III Randomized Trial.” Breastcancer.org Professional Advisory Board members Martine Piccart-Gebhart, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of oncology at the Universite Libre de Bruxelles and Julie Gralow, M.D., associate professor of medical oncology at the University of Washington and director of breast medical oncology at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance are two authors of the study. In the ALTTO trial, 8,381 women from 44 countries diagnosed with early-stage, HER2-positive breast cancer that had been surgically removed were randomly assigned to get one of four anti-HER2 targeted therapy treatments for a year after surgery: Herceptin alone Tykerb alone Herceptin for 12 weeks, a 6-week break, then 34 weeks of Tykerb Herceptin and Tykerb given at the same Continue reading >>

Overcoming Treatment-induced Diabetes

Overcoming Treatment-induced Diabetes

Good nutrition is key Betty Overfelt's oncologist back home in Missouri informed her that she had stage IV small-cell lung cancer. His prognosis was grim — "I think I can get you three months if you'll take treatment," he said. Jerry, her husband of 45 years, decided immediately to seek a second opinion, which led them to Cancer Treatment Centers of America© (CTCA). There, Jerry remembered, doctors told Betty that they couldn't promise a cure but thought they might be able to control the cancer. Subsequent blood tests at CTCA delivered unexpected news — Betty had developed treatment-induced diabetes, in a big way. "We had just visited the pulmonologist and were waiting at the scheduler's desk when my cell phone rang," Jerry recalled. It was Sue, [the pulmonologist's nurse], who said, "Don't move; stay right there." Sue came to their location and told them Betty needed an immediate infusion of insulin. Her initial lab screening indicated a blood sugar of 863. Normal range is from 80 to 110, with above 500 signaling a critical situation. The diagnosis for diabetes was confusing because Betty never had diabetes, nor did it run in her family. The Overfelts were not alone — 8 to 18 percent of all cancer patients also have diabetes, according to CTCA. Type 1 diabetes is linked to cervical cancer and stomach cancer, and type 2 diabetes is linked to breast, endometrial, pancreatic, liver, kidney and colon cancers. Treatmentinduced diabetes can be triggered by chemotherapy and steroid use. "It is very overwhelming to a patient to be diagnosed with cancer, and then be told that they have diabetes as well," said Andrea Reser, RD, LD, nutrition supervisor/diabetes program coordinator at CTCA. "People need to know how to regulate their blood sugar while on a cancer-fighting d Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Breast Cancer: The Interplay Between Impaired Glucose Metabolism And Oxidant Stress

Type 2 Diabetes And Breast Cancer: The Interplay Between Impaired Glucose Metabolism And Oxidant Stress

Copyright © 2015 Patrizia Ferroni et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Metabolic disorders, especially type 2 diabetes and its associated complications, represent a growing public health problem. Epidemiological findings indicate a close relationship between diabetes and many types of cancer (including breast cancer risk), which regards not only the dysmetabolic condition, but also its underlying risk factors and therapeutic interventions. This review discusses the advances in understanding of the mechanisms linking metabolic disorders and breast cancer. Among the proposed mechanisms to explain such an association, a major role is played by the dysregulated glucose metabolism, which concurs with a chronic proinflammatory condition and an associated oxidative stress to promote tumour initiation and progression. As regards the altered glucose metabolism, hyperinsulinaemia, both endogenous due to insulin-resistance and drug-induced, appears to promote tumour cell growth through the involvement of innate immune activation, platelet activation, increased reactive oxygen species, exposure to protumorigenic and proangiogenic cytokines, and increased substrate availability to neoplastic cells. In this context, understanding the relationship between metabolic disorders and cancer is becoming imperative, and an accurate analysis of these associations could be used to identify biomarkers able to predict disease risk and/or prognosis and to help in the choice of proper evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic protocols. 1. Introduction Type 2 diabetes (T2D) constitutes a growing public hea Continue reading >>

Chemotherapy And Glycemic Control In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Cancer: A Comparative Case Analysis

Chemotherapy And Glycemic Control In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Cancer: A Comparative Case Analysis

Chemotherapy and Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Cancer: A Comparative Case Analysis Denise Soltow Hershey , PhD, RN, FNP-BC1 and Sarah Hession 2 1College of Nursing, Michigan State University, MI, USA 2Center for Statistical Training and Consulting, Michigan State University, MI, USA Corresponding author: Denise Soltow Hershey, College of Nursing, Michigan State University, MI, USA Tel: (517) 432-8294 E-mail: [email protected] Received 2017 Feb 24; Accepted 2017 Mar 26. Copyright : 2017 Ann & Joshua Medical Publishing Co. Ltd This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Individuals with diabetes who develop cancer have a worse 5-year overall survival rate and are more likely to develop an infection and/or be hospitalized when compared to those without diabetes. Patients with diabetes and cancer receiving chemotherapy have an increased risk for developing glycemic issues. The relationship between chemotherapy and glycemic control is not completely understood. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between glycemic control, symptoms, physical and mental function, development of adverse events, and chemotherapy reductions or stoppages in adults with Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cancer. A prospective 12-week longitudinal cohort study recruited 24 adults with T2D, solid tumor cancer, or lymphoma receiving outpatient intravenous chemotherapy. Eighteen individuals completed baseline data and were included in the analysis. Continue reading >>

Does Type 2 Diabetes Increase The Risk Of Breast Cancer? | Food For Breast Cancer

Does Type 2 Diabetes Increase The Risk Of Breast Cancer? | Food For Breast Cancer

Does type 2 diabetes increase the risk of breast cancer? Type 2 diabetes has been reported to increase the risk of breast cancer, especially in postmenopausal women. Many women with type 2 diabetes are obese , which also increases risk among postmenopausal women. However, type 2 diabetes increases breast cancer risk even in normal weight women. Women with type 2 diabetes also tend to be diagnosed with breast cancer at later stages than non-diabetics. Type 1 diabetes does not appear to be associated with increased risk. Circulating insulin appears to be an important factor common to both type 2 diabetes and obesity. High levels of circulating insulin (hyperinsulinemia) appear to promote breast cancer both indirectly and directly by acting as a growth promoter. Production and metabolism of insulin-like growth factors are also disturbed in diabetics, and may contribute to increased cancer risk and progression. Women with metabolic syndrome are more likely to have triple negative breast cancer upon diagnosis than women without it. The combination of high total cholesterol and type 2 diabetes appears to be more potentially harmful than either condition alone. High-density lipoprotein (HDL, the "good" cholesterol) from breast cancer patients with type 2 diabetes has been shown to promote one of the first steps in metastasis in cell and animal studies. Hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance , and diabetes have all been found to be associated with poor breast cancer outcomes. High levels of fasting glucose at diagnosis have also been found to be associated with increased risk of recurrence compared to normal levels. One large Finnish study reported that the risk of breast cancer-specific death was 36% higher among women with diabetes compared to those without diabetes. Women wit Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Breast Cancer Subtypes

Diabetes And Breast Cancer Subtypes

Affiliations Division of Molecular Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Division of Psychosocial Research and Epidemiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands Affiliation Department of Pathology, Aarhus University Hospital THG, Aarhus, Denmark Affiliation Department of Pathology, Aarhus University Hospital THG, Aarhus, Denmark Affiliation Division of Pharmacoepidemiology & Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands Affiliation Division of Molecular Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands Affiliation Division of Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands Affiliation School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland Affiliation Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Affiliation Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden Affiliation Clinical Institute, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Affiliations Division of Molecular Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Division of Psychosocial Research and Epidemiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands Continue reading >>

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