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Breakfast For Child With Type 1 Diabetes

8 Great Breakfasts For Kids With Diabetes

8 Great Breakfasts For Kids With Diabetes

8 Great Breakfasts for Kids with Diabetes Research shows that eating a healthy breakfast may ensure better glucose control throughout the day and reduce the risk of developing serious diabetes complications later. Here are 8 expert-approved ways to get your kids to the table in the morning. Research shows that eating a balanced breakfast may help ensure better glucose control throughout the entire day and reduce the risk of developing serious diabetes complications. There are several important reasons to make sure your children eat the best possible breakfast every morning, before they head off to school or play. They havent eaten all night, so their blood glucose levels are probably low. Additionally, research shows that eating a hearty, balanced breakfast may help ensure better glucose control throughout the entire day. And, consider this: Developing a habit of eating a balanced breakfast not only helps children maintain better glycemic control throughout each day, it also helps reduce their risk of developing serious diabetes complications that can lead to early death as they get older. 1,2,3 By far the easiest breakfast is a bowl of cold cereal and a pour of milk. Thats great if your childs cereal of choice is high in fiber and low in sugar, but thats not how it usually goes. The problem with many commercial cereals marketed to kids is they contain too much added sugar and/or not enough fiber. Compare nutrition information on different brands of similar types of cereals, and if you cant switch off 100% to the healthier version, try combining the two. On the side, try apple or banana slices spread with nut butter. Start with low-fat plain yogurt, sweetened with mashed ripe, fresh seasonal fruit. To soften fresh fruit, peel, cut up, microwave or steam until tender, a Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Your Child: Meals And Snacks

Type 1 Diabetes And Your Child: Meals And Snacks

People with type 1 diabetes were once told that they couldn’t eat certain foods. This is no longer true. In fact, now there are no “forbidden foods” for people with diabetes. This means that your child can eat the same foods as the rest of the family. But, you and your child will have to balance the foods he or she eats with the correct amount of insulin. Insulin helps keep your child’s blood sugar from going too high or too low after meals. Healthier food choices also help control blood sugar. So encourage smarter food choices to help your child stay healthy now and in the future. What is a meal plan? A dietitian will help you create a meal plan and show you how to follow it. A meal plan helps you decide what kinds of foods your child can eat for meals and snacks. It also tells you how much food (how many servings) your child can eat. Following the meal plan is important because it helps manage your child’s blood sugar. Try to stick to the same schedules for meals and snacks so that you can best control your child’s blood sugar level. Of course, this will not always be possible. So the meal plan should be flexible and give you room to make adjustments. The meal plan will also need to be changed as your child grows. Understanding carbohydrates Different foods affect blood sugar in different ways. Foods high in carbohydrates raise blood sugar quicker than other foods. This is why you must keep track of the carbohydrates that your child eats. Carbohydrates are found in fruit and in starchy foods such as potatoes. Because carbohydrates are in so many foods, they can be tricky to keep track of. You may even be tempted to cut them out of your child’s diet altogether. But carbohydrates play a very important role in your child’s health. They are the body’s ma Continue reading >>

Meal Planning For Kids With Type 1 Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Meal Planning For Kids With Type 1 Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Meal Planning for Children With Type 1 Diabetes When you have a child with type 1 diabetes, meal planning is important. Everything your child eats can affect his blood sugar. Your doctor or a registered dietitian can help you come up with the best plan for your child, but theres information all parents of kids with this condition should know. Like all children, kids with type 1 diabetes need nutrient-rich foods that help them grow and keep them at a healthy weight. Over the course of a day, your child should get about 10%-20% of his calories from protein, 25%-30% calories from healthy fats, and about 50%-60% from carbohydrates. Carbs are found in most foods -- not just bread and potatoes. They supply the energy that the body and brain need to work their best. Steer your child toward complex carbs such as vegetables and whole grains. They have vitamins and minerals that will keep him healthy, and fiber, which helps control blood sugar levels. Try to stay away from simple carbs, like white bread and pasta and other processed grains, candy and frosting. They can raise blood sugar quickly. The amount of carbs your child needs depends on his weight, age, size, exercise level, and any medicines hes taking. Your doctor or dietitian can help you figure out the number of grams or serving sizes your child should have each day. Many families keep their childs blood sugar levels steady by counting the number of carbohydrates eaten at every meal or snack, then adjusting insulin doses for it. On packaged foods, the number of total carbs per serving is listed on the label. You can subtract the grams of dietary fiber since this isnt digested. Then multiply the total by how many servings of that food your child eats. If youre cooking at home or eating out, you can look up carb counts a Continue reading >>

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Meal Planning For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

When you have a child with type 1 diabetes, it's easy to get carried away with the notion of a diabetic diet. But in reality, your child's dietary needs are no different from a child who doesn't have diabetes. Of course, there are certain considerations you need to be aware of, and understanding the carbohydrate content in food is arguably the most important. In this article, you will learn about the importance of carb counting, with a special emphasis on how fiber and sugar alcohols may also affect your child's blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. Nutrition Basics There's really no such thing as a diabetic diet. That's why you should focus instead on providing your child with balanced nutrition. A good nutritional resource to consult is the Food Pyramid. In recent years, the United States Department of Agriculture has made some updates to the standard Food Pyramid that most of us grew up knowing. Instead of being a set-in-stone guideline, now you can create personalized eating plans that are flexible and balanced. To refresh your memory on healthy eating, visit ChooseMyPlate.gov. There are 3 main nutrients in foods—fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. These essential nutrients affect blood glucose in different ways. Fats: Fat typically doesn't break down into sugar in your blood, and in small amounts, it doesn't affect your blood glucose levels. But fat does slow down digestion, and this can cause your blood glucose to rise slower than it normally would. After a high-fat meal, your child's blood glucose may be elevated up to 12 hours after the meal. Proteins: Protein doesn't affect blood glucose unless you eat more than your body needs. In most cases, you need only about 6 ounces or less (which is about the size of 2 decks of cards) at each meal. Carbohydrates: Carbohyd Continue reading >>

Diabetic Breakfast Ideas

Diabetic Breakfast Ideas

Tweet Breakfast is said to be the most important meal of the day. For people with diabetes, morning is usually the time of day with the highest blood glucose levels so a good breakfast choice will help to improve your control. Whilst putting the breakfast list together, we found some supermarket cereals that were far from the ideal choice for breakfast – with high levels of sugar (with some cereals containing chocolate) and a number of other less than healthy additives. We’ve put together some simple and healthy breakfast ideas to get you started. Greek yoghurt and cottage cheese Greek yoghurt and cottage cheese make good breakfast choices. Quick to put together and easy to tailor to your own desires by adding any of the following: Nuts – always a good source of energy and a low carb favourite Oatmeal or wheat bran for fibre (whole grains) Berries are a popular choice Fruit – cantaloupe is listed as a good accompaniment Smoothies A very simple idea - take a mix of food, stick it in a blender and drink it. Some mixtures work better than others and it can be fun to find out which do work. For the dedicated, making smoothies can be quite an art form to get the colour and consistencies just right. For us with diabetes, we also need to consider the carbohydrate content to our own requirements. Rather than suggest one smoothie, here are some ingredient ideas to get you started for your own smoothies – be they savoury or fruity: Cucumbers Carrots Avocados – help to make your smoothies creamy Berries Citrus fruits –oranges, pineapple, limes etc Bananas – also help to make your smoothies creamy Cashew nuts Yoghurt Cottage cheese Cream Coconut milk If you hit upon a fantastic smoothie mixture, share your find on the diabetes food forum. Scrambled eggs and omelette Continue reading >>

Five Ways To Make Type 1 Diabetes Fun For Your Child

Five Ways To Make Type 1 Diabetes Fun For Your Child

Five Ways To Make Type 1 Diabetes Fun For Your Child Every parent who has a child with type 1 diabetes knows this is not a fun disease to live with. You have to prick your fingers eight to twelve times a day. You have to count every carbohydrate that you eat. You have to be careful for blood sugar highs and lows because they can cause hypoglycemia (blurry vision, hunger, irritability, shakiness, fast heartbeat, fatigue, and headache and possibly even passing out) and hyperglycemia (increased thirst, frequent urination, headache, stupor, inability to focus). As a parent with a nine year old daughter who has had this disease for two years, I've become an expert on managing her blood sugar highs and lows, making sure the tips of her fingers don't turn black because she pricks one more than the other, and teaching her how to take care of herself so she grows up to be a healthy confident adult. But this isn't the only thing that I'm teaching her. I'm also teaching her how to find ways to have fun in between the not so fun moments. Below are five fun ways to make living with type 1 diabetes fun! The little things such as the below has truly made a difference in my daughter's life. And the smile I get when I do one of them is so worth it! For dinner, eat dessert first. Then eat the meal. For breakfast have a piece of birthday cake or a slice of pizza. My daughter has been invited to late night birthday parties and has been unable to eat the cake because of the time of day. So instead, we wrap it up, take it home, and she eats it for breakfast. When changing her inset, I let her take the pump off for an hour and a half, and without any inset or tape on her behind (that's where we have to attach the inset) she can run around and have some freedom. Give a lollipop after your chi Continue reading >>

Breakfast Menu For Kids? - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

Breakfast Menu For Kids? - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

My son(12)Type 1, likes to eat cereal for breakfast. But each time his B/S is very high afterwards (300-400). We have tried several types of cereals. Moms: What type of breakfast food do you give your diabetic kids? Also, my son has a snack at 9 pm each night, if your child does this also, what are some snacks you are using? I try for a carb and a protien, ie. slice of bread & slice of ham. Thanks for all the advise. Great site. I am a type 1 diabetic, and I notice that even cereals such as plain Cheerios digest very quickly, causing a brief spike in sugar until the insulin catches up with it. In my case, I can avoid this by injecting my insulin a little bit before breakfast to give the insulin a head start unless my waking blood sugar is too low to allow for this. Another option would be to add some fat or protein to slow down the digestion time of the cereal. Fats in particular will slow down digestion times. The carb and protein combination at bedtime sound ideal. Again, the idea is to have him eat something that will digest slowly. Nuts are good as proteins, and they also contain fats that slow down digestion. Healthy fats, at that. Continue reading >>

Healthy Snacks For Kids

Healthy Snacks For Kids

Snacks can help children recharge and manage blood sugar levels between meals. If your snack-idea list is running dry, check out these easy diabetic snacks packed with nutrients a child’s body needs. (Adults will love these snacks, too!) CONTRAVE® (naltrexone HCI/bupropion HCl) is a prescription weight-loss medicine that may help adults with obesity (BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2), or who are overweight (BMI greater than or equal to 27 kg/m2) with at least one weight-related medical condition, lose weight and keep the weight off. CONTRAVE should be used along with diet and exercise. One of the ingredients in CONTRAVE, bupropion, may increase the risk of suicidal thinking in children, adolescents, and young adults. CONTRAVE patients should be monitored for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. In patients taking bupropion for smoking cessation, serious neuropsychiatric adverse events have been reported. CONTRAVE is not approved for use in children under the age of 18. Stop taking CONTRAVE and call a healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you: thoughts about suicide or dying; attempts to commit suicide; depression; anxiety; feeling agitated or restless; panic attacks; trouble sleeping (insomnia); irritability; aggression, anger, or violence; acting on dangerous impulses; an extreme increase in activity and talking (mania); other unusual changes in behavior or mood. Do not take CONTRAVE if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure; have or have had seizures; use other medicines that contain bupropion such as WELLBUTRIN, APLENZIN or ZYBAN; have or have had an eating disorder; are dependent on opioid pain medicines or use medicines to help stop taking opioids such as methadone or buprenorphi Continue reading >>

Breakfast Ideas For Kids With Diabetes

Breakfast Ideas For Kids With Diabetes

It's very important that children with diabetes not skip breakfast since after not eating all night, their blood glucose (blood sugar) may be low. Also, everyone, whether you have diabetes or not, needs food for energy to begin the day right. Kids especially need a good breakfast. Breakfast will help them to feel better, think clearer in school, and play harder. Here are some things for you, the parent, to do to help your child with diabetes: Eat breakfast yourself. No more cup of coffee and out the door! Take a few minutes and eat breakfast with your child. Be a good role model for instilling healthy eating habits; this will help your child with diabetes set good habits for life and understand the importance of eating well. Choose whole grains for cereals, toast, bagels, English muffins, waffles, or pancakes. Since carbohydrates are digested first, getting in and out of the blood stream quickly, be sure to include milk*, yogurt, or another source of low-fat protein to keep the energy up until lunch time. Include fruit at breakfast such as 4 ounces of unsweetened apple juice or fresh orange juice, one-half of a banana sliced on cereal, fresh fruit added to yogurt, or fresh berries sprinkled onto pancakes while cooking. If you're really short on time, drink breakfast in the form of a smoothie: Blend milk* or low-fat yogurt with fresh fruit, whirl in a blender and you have an instant breakfast. Here's a week's worth of breakfast ideas for pre-school and school-age children with diabetes: Sunday: Buttermilk pancakes (made with low-fat baking mix), topped with blueberries and sugar-free maple syrup. Glass of milk.* Monday: Whole-grain cereal such as Cheerios, milk* with half of a banana sliced on top. Tuesday: Breakfast Burrito: a warmed flour tortilla filled with scrambled Continue reading >>

Diet For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

Diet For Children With Type 1 Diabetes

While diet is a very important part of managing your child's Type 1 diabetes, you don't need to provide special foods. In fact, the recommended diet for children with Type 1 diabetes is the same healthy diet recommended to all children. The only difference is you need to count carbs to help manage blood sugars. Video of the Day The diet for children with Type 1 diabetes should be balanced and include a variety of foods from all of the food groups. Your child should eat regularly to help control blood sugars and meet nutrient needs. A healthy meal plan for children with Type 1 diabetes should include three meals and three snacks. Talk to your doctor or dietitian about meal and snack times so they coordinate with insulin dosing and activity. Carbohydrates for Blood Sugar Control Carbohydrates are the nutrients in food that affect blood sugar. Grains, fruits, milk and sweets contain carbs. To help with blood sugar management, your child should eat a specified amount of carbs at each meal or snack. General recommendations range from 45 to 60 grams at each meal and 15 grams at each snack, but your doctor or dietitian can help you determine your child's specific carb needs. Food labels and carb counting books can help you count the grams of carbs in the food your child eats. The good news is that fat and protein does not affect blood sugar. Protein supports growth and development, while fat supplies energy. Protein foods, such as meat and cheese, should be included at two or more meals and snacks. You child should consume fats like oils and nut butters in moderate amounts. To help limit fat intake, include low-fat or nonfat dairy products. Some children are never hungry, while others are always asking for food. If your child with Type 1 diabetes is hungry but it's not quite m Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Maintaining a healthy diet is important for type 1 diabetes management. A type 1 diabetes diet is designed to provide maximum nutrition, while also monitoring intake of carbohydrates, protein, and fat. However, there’s no single universal diabetes diet. It involves being mindful of how you eat and how your body will respond to certain foods. People with type 1 diabetes need to monitor their blood sugar levels. Without proper diet, exercise, and insulin therapy, a person with type 1 diabetes could experience health complications. Complications associated with type 1 diabetes include: high blood pressure, which increases risk for heart attack, stroke, and poor circulation kidney damage nerve damage skin sores and infections, which can cause pain and may lead to tissue death Following proper dietary guidelines can help mitigate the difficulties of type 1 diabetes and help you avoid health complications. It can also improve your overall quality of life. Just like there’s no standard treatment for type 1 diabetes, there’s no standard diet for diabetes. A nutritionist or dietitian can help you come up with meal plans and create a diet that works for you in the long term. It’s easy to reach for fast food and other processed foods when you’re short on time and money. However, these foods offer minimal nutrients and are high in fat, sugar, and salt. Planning your meals ahead of time and grocery shopping regularly can help cut down on any “emergency eating.” A well-stocked kitchen of healthy food can also cut down on unnecessary sugar, carbohydrates, sodium, and fat that can spike blood sugar. An important aspect of any diabetic diet is consistency. To maintain blood sugar levels, don’t skip meals, try to eat around the same time each day, and pay attention to foo Continue reading >>

My Child’s Low-carb Diet For Type 1 Diabetes

My Child’s Low-carb Diet For Type 1 Diabetes

“We avoid grains, gluten, starches, sugar and fruit,” explains Mia Nickels, mom to 7 year-old Holden who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes almost a year ago. “I sweeten with Stevia or Swerve. He is non-celiac gluten intolerant. We can always tell when he has gotten into some hidden gluten, because he will have a huge unexplained spike, his stomach will hurt, and within 24 hours he will develop a rash around his mouth and on his cheeks.” For beverages, she says, “He usually drinks water with all meals — sometimes with Stur added (a zero-calorie flavor product). Occasionally he’ll have Zevia soda. I sneak protein powder into a lot of things, too. Shhh…don’t tell!” One major aspect of Holden’s success in his low-carb diet is his mom’s passionate effort in baking him gluten-free (GF) and low-carb (LC) treats based on various recipes, many of which she posts to her Facebook page (and his favorite donut recipe included below). You can find many of Mia’s recipes with each photo on her Facebook page. Holden’s Low-Carb Diet: Breakfast: 2 eggs fried in coconut oil, bacon with melted cheese, and half a LC bagel with Kerrygold butter or almond flour waffle sticks with butter and Waldon Farms syrup, and bacon with melted cheese. Snack: Cheese, LC/GF brownie, or LC chocolate meringues Lunch: Lunchmeat rolls (ham, turkey and chive cream cheese) or GF meatballs in LC tomato sauce, LC/GF bagel sandwich (piled up with lunchmeat, cheese and mustard), LC chicken wings, Mexican chicken soup accompanied with a celery, raw broccoli, and nuts. I usually send a LC baked treat or two pieces of Chocorite, too. Snack: A few of his daily snack options include nuts, cheese, HWC hot chocolate, TrueLemon Jello, Nori/Ham wraps, raw veggies with guacamole dip, or a baked tre Continue reading >>

Nutrition And Meal Planning

Nutrition And Meal Planning

Pediatric Type 1 diabetes To correct for the lack of insulin in Type 1 diabetes, families learn how to match insulin doses to the amount of food (carbohydrates) eaten at meals. Foods contain a mixture of protein, carbohydrate and fat. One hundred percent of carbohydrates (carbs) are broken down to glucose. Meals and snacks should include a variety of foods, for good nutrition. Include colorful fruits and vegetables each day. Choose whole grains to add fiber to the diet. Protein and fat A minimum amount of protein and fat end up as sugar in the blood, so additional insulin is usually not needed to cover these foods. Protein and a moderate amount of fats are important for good nutrition and a balanced diet. They can help maintain a steady level of blood glucose and play a role preventing hypoglycemia. Include protein foods with two or more meals or snacks every day. Include low fat dairy to meet calcium needs. Most dairy foods count as carbohydrates; cheese is a low-carb protein substitute. Look for reduced-fat choices to help control saturated fat. Carb counting Carbohydrate is a broad category including sugars, fiber and starches (bread, cereal and starchy vegetables like potato). Carbs are found in many food groups, such as grains, fruit, milk and sweets. Food labels Reading food labels will help you control your diabetes, and is essential to learning carb counting. Prepared foods are required to have food labels, and reference books will help you find carb contents for ones that do not, like produce, meats and restaurant foods. It is important to compare your serving size to the serving listed on the nutrition facts label for accurate carb counting. If the food contains less than 5 grams of fiber, subtract half of the fiber grams from the total carbohydrate, as only p Continue reading >>

Meal Plans And Diabetes

Meal Plans And Diabetes

en espaolLos planes de alimentacin y la diabetes Kids with diabetes benefit from a healthy diet the same as everyone else. Although kids with diabetes don't have to follow a special diabetes diet, they may need to pay more attention to when they eat and how much is on their plates. Meal planning goals for kids with diabetes often are the same as those for other kids: They need foods that help them have overall good health, normal growth , and a healthy weight . But kids with diabetes also have to balance their intake of carbohydrates (carbs)with their insulin and activity levels to keep blood sugar levels under control, and they should eat foods that help keep the levels of lipids (fats like cholesterol and triglycerides) in the blood in a healthy range. Doing socan help prevent some of the long-term health problems that diabetes can cause. Kids with diabetes face the same food challenges as everyone else mainly, sticking with healthy eating habits. You need to know what's in the foods you're serving and eating. It's easy to guess what some foods contain, but others are more of a challenge. So look to food labels to find a food's ingredients, nutritional information, and calories. Be sure tolook for information oncarbs, which can affect blood sugar levels. Usually, they're clearly listed on food labels in grams. The two main forms of carbs are sugars and starches. Types of sugars include fructose (sugar found in fruit and some baked goods), glucose (the main sugar in our bodies that's also found in foods like cake, cookies, and soft drinks), and lactose (sugar found in milk and yogurt). Starches include vegetables like potatoes, corn, and peas; grains, rice, and cereals; and breads. The body breaks down or converts most carbs into glucose, which is absorbed into the bl Continue reading >>

A List Of Good Foods To Eat For Diabetic Children

A List Of Good Foods To Eat For Diabetic Children

Nutritional needs for children with diabetes are the same as children without diabetes. The difference lies in keeping blood sugar levels within a normal range, and meal planning can help. With challenges like picky eating, changing appetites, busy schedules, sports and long school days, knowledge of carbohydrate counts of foods is essential. A May 2009 article published in "Diabetes Educator" found that the diets of children with type 1 diabetes often do not meet recommended guidelines. The authors noted too much processed food and low intake of fruits, vegetables and fiber. Luckily, there is a variety of healthy foods children can eat to satisfy their appetites and nutritional needs, maintain good blood sugar control and keep them feeling like kids. Video of the Day Dairy foods such as cheese, yogurt and milk are packed with nutrients kids need, including calcium, potassium and protein. Many dairy foods are also fortified with vitamin D. Nonfat, low-fat and full-fat dairy products vary in carbohydrates, which makes label reading essential. Cheese is low in carbohydrates, with less than 1 g in a mozzarella cheese stick. An 8-ounce glass of 2 percent milk contains 13 g. Popular kids' yogurts can be high in sugar, but yogurt can be a healthy snack. Adding a child's favorite fruit to plain yogurt helps limit added sugar. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends low-fat or nonfat dairy as part of a healthy eating plan after age 2, to limit intake of saturated fats. A diet low in saturated fat is recommended for children with diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) due to an increased risk of heart disease. All fruit is good fruit and should be included in the diet of a child with diabetes. One small fruit, such as an apple, clementin Continue reading >>

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