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Boyfriend Has Diabetes

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Relationships

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Relationships

Having type 2 diabetes changes your life and can certainly affect relationships, whether you’re dating or married. Diabetes management requires a lot of your attention and focus, which may be hard for a partner unfamiliar with the disease to understand. You have to carefully monitor what you eat and check your blood sugar frequently throughout the day. And if you're not always so careful about managing your diabetes, your partner may also be affected. A recent study of people whose partners had type 2 diabetes found that those who tried to exert control over their partners' dietary behavior felt particularly stressed and burdened. Finally, if you get sick and need help, your diabetes care may fall to your partner. Diabetes: The Physical and Emotional Impact People diagnosed with type 2 diabetes may experience a wide range of emotions, including: Fear Anger Depression Denial Guilt Not only is the emotional aspect of diabetes a real rollercoaster, but there is also a physical impact on sexual function. The emotional strain of dealing with diabetes can cause stress and anxiety, as well as communication difficulties that can lead to sexual dysfunction in relationships. Diabetes: Dating With Diabetes Even if you're not currently in a long-term relationship, diabetes can have an impact on your dating life. Ronda Keys, 37, an event planner from Maryland, was first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at age 18. She didn't know anyone else her age with the disease, so she tried to downplay its seriousness to her friends, her boyfriend, and even herself. Keys, who is single, didn't want her boyfriend or friends to feel that they had to stop what they were doing or make accommodations for her diabetes, so she just didn't tell many people. "I had to try to figure out how to still live Continue reading >>

Yeast, Diabetes, And Sex

Yeast, Diabetes, And Sex

Vaginal yeast infections are annoying, not dangerous, but they can seriously hamper your sex life, especially if you have diabetes. What’s the connection, and what can you do to prevent and treat yeast infections? According to Chris Illiades, MD, on the website Everyday Health, “Normally, Candida albicans, the fungus that causes yeast infection, lives in balance with the other microorganisms in your body…. But anything that upsets this normal balance can lead to an overgrowth of yeast and can cause a yeast infection.” Diabetes is one of the things that can upset the normal balance because yeast love to eat sugar, especially glucose. In fact, they help make beer by eating sugar and turning it into alcohol, and they are crucial in bread-making because after eating sugar, they produce a gas that makes dough rise. When there’s extra sugar in your blood, there is likely to be more in your vagina and other tissues, so yeast grow better there. Yeast irritating the inside of your vagina is called “vaginitis.” In the tissues around the vagina – the vulva – such irritation is called “vulvitis.” Both are far more common in women with diabetes. There are many causes of yeast infections. One is the use of antibiotics, which can change the balance in the vagina by killing bacteria, thus allowing yeast to grow unchecked. A common pattern is for a woman to treat a bladder infection with antibiotics, only to wind up with a yeast infection that is just as annoying. According to Dr. Illiades, other causes of vaginitis include stress, illness, menstrual periods, pregnancy, and other medications. Diabetes Health writer Linda von Wartburg wrote that menopause may also increase the risk of vaginitis. Preventing Yeast Infections You can reduce your risk of vaginitis by ma Continue reading >>

The Boyfriend/girlfriend Guide To Caring For Someone With Type 1

The Boyfriend/girlfriend Guide To Caring For Someone With Type 1

Congratulations! You’re dating someone amazing, funny, beautiful and strong, who also has Type 1. If you are feeling overwhelmed or worried, there is no need. Here are tips that can help you take care of your significant other and the essentials in diabetes care that are a must-know! Insulin! Our bodies do not make insulin. We need insulin to process food that we are eating. Therefore, we can use either the pump or injections via a pen and a needle to administer the insulin. Learn more about insulin delivery methods. Devices The monitors that are attached to our skin are not a smoking patch, a pager, or a prop! These monitors help us stay healthy. One of these monitors is a CGM, or continuous glucose monitor. This small device tracks our glucose day and night, and notifies us of highs and lows. The other monitor is an insulin pump. An insulin pump gives our body insulin throughout the day and during meals through the flexible plastic tube. Extra baggage And we aren’t talking about exes! We will usually always carry a few items with us wherever we go. These things help us get through the day healthy and safe. Here are a few things you can familiarize yourself with. Blood glucose meter, test strips, and a lancing device. In other words, the small device that shows us what our blood sugar is, the test strip that goes into the device, and the pricker that we use on our finger to get a drop of blood onto the test strip. Check out The Daily-diabetes Care Kit. Fast-acting sugar that we will take in case we have a low. This could be anything from glucose tablets (which strongly resemble SweetTarts), candy, or juice boxes. Depending on the type of bionic pancreas that we have, we either carry pens and pen needles or supplies for a pump. Daily care We might have to check our Continue reading >>

What To Expect When Dating A Person With Type 1 Diabetes

What To Expect When Dating A Person With Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is an illness which is not easy to manage and it influences practically everything in life. When someone starts dating a person with type 1 diabetes, there might be some things that are good to know. Firstly, you should know the basics of type 1 diabetes. The internet has tons of very good information available. Here is a nice fact sheet about type 1 diabetes from Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). The symptoms of hypos and hypers differ amongst diabetics Now that you know the cold facts, you should know that every person with type 1 diabetes is unique. Exercise raises someone’s BG levels, whereas others have to drink sugary drinks to avoid going low. Different diabetics experience low or high blood glucose levels differently. One might get angry or anxious when approaching a low BG, whereas some just go pale and shaky. It gets worse at the grocery store if one has a hypo standing in line with a chocolate bar in hand. They would just want to pay for the candy bar so they can eat it but the queue just won’t MOVE! That for e.g. is when I feel a bit aggressive but I have learned to just eat the candy bar while standing there and pay for the wrap. Eventually you’ll probably learn to see when your significant other is acting “like in a hypo”. However, you might want to avoid suggesting a blood glucose measurement. Nothing feels as frustrating when someone invalidates a type 1 diabetic’s negative emotions by suggesting ”It’s only your diabetes doing its tricks”. I would think it is something like telling an angry woman “it’s just your hormones talking”. Tread carefully here. At high BG levels the most common symptoms are fatigue and frequent need for urination, but there are differences here too. For the first few years since Continue reading >>

7 Stories On Love, Sex, And Type 1 Diabetes

7 Stories On Love, Sex, And Type 1 Diabetes

We’ve assembled our favorite romance-themed stories over the years. People with Type 1 diabetes can have unique love lives. Blood sugar management provides an early opportunity to test how supportive potential partners can be. And if a relationship survives that stress test, it’s up to the person with diabetes and his/her partner to learn how to communicate through all the daily highs and lows. For everyone affected by Type 1 diabetes who has a romantic streak, we’ve assembled our favorite stories on love, sex, dating, and blood sugar management: A Love Letter During a Blood Sugar Swing A man describes the difficulties of communicating with his love during highs and lows. 7 Tips to a Better Type 1 Sex Life Ideas for how to keep your blood sugar numbers level when horizontal. 3 Diabetes Dating Sites – A Review We’ve braved these sites so you don’t necessarily have to. Let’s Talk About Sexual Dysfunction and Type 1 Sexual dysfunction from diabetes often can be reversed if caught in time. 3 Tips for Navigating T1D in Marriage A diabetes psychologist shares his secrets. What it’s Like to Date Someone Else with Type 1 Weighing the pros and cons of having a partner who also lacks a working pancreas. Discovering Love and T1D at a Ballgame When the first bloom of love and the first bloom of diabetes coincide. Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here. Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type2Nation. Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Diabetes On Relationships

The Effects Of Diabetes On Relationships

Will you leave your SO (significant other) because of diabetes? Committed relationships are hard enough. When you add a chronic illness into the mix of everyday problems, it can place undue stress on a relationship. Do you leave your spouse or partner with diabetes when the going gets tough, or do you stick it out and work together to solve problems that come up, “in sickness and in health?” These are questions you may be asking yourself if you have been going through a tough time in your relationship or marriage due to diabetes. If your partner is in a state of denial and they are refusing to participate in self-care activities or listen to their doctor, this can be quite frustrating. You may be getting burnt out from always trying to fix the right amount of carbohydrates, only to catch your other half in the back room hiding with a box of candy. Feeling like you are the “diabetes police” and always nagging drains the joy out of your relationship. The spouse of a diabetic can feel a loss of control over the future, and be afraid that they will lose their life partner. Conversely, if you are the diabetic in the match, you tend to get quite aggravated with all of the nagging and “sugar-shaming” that can be going on. Maybe your partner didn’t support you by attending diabetes education classes, and now she doesn’t seem to know that it’s ok for you to have an occasional treat. Maybe she doesn’t realize that you are having the extra carbohydrates, but you have a walk planned for after the meal. Sometimes you feel misunderstood. It’s true that diabetes can take a physical, mental and financial toll on a relationship. Remember that your overbearing and controlling partner is acting from a place of genuine caring and concern for you. Now let’s look at t Continue reading >>

Dealing With Side Effects Of Diabetic Partner

Dealing With Side Effects Of Diabetic Partner

Hi, I am quite concerned about my boyfriend's health. He has diabetes Type 1. I was not really worried about his illness when we first started dating, because he seemed to have it under control and I know that people with diabetes can have a long and healthy life, if they take good care of themselves. However, things look a bit different in our relationship these days. We recently moved to a different city, so that he could pursue the career he wanted. Ever since we moved, he has completely stopped taking care of himself. He still eats somewhat healthy and takes his meds of course, but he has completely stopped going to the gym. We had numerous fights about him joining the gym in the last couple of months. He is fighting 100% against me, saying that he does not have time to go work out anymore, because he has too much work and has to focus on his studies. He won't even go jogging anymore. I even offered to pay for the gym membership and go work out together to motivate him. He refused the offer. Our whole relationship started going downhill because of all the arguments, and as a result I gave up on trying to convince him to stay healthy. I know that stress makes it worst for his blood level, so that's another reason I stopped arguing about it. He recently did some blood work tests at the doctor. His results came out highly negative. He is worried about the results and so am I. Ever since he stopped working out, the side effects of his illness got much worse. He has really intense mood swings. I try to deal with them as much as I can, but he is randomely either very happy or very upset. I ask him what's wrong? And there are no real reasons why he randomely gets really mad at me for something insignificant I did. I really try to be as supportive and as patient as I can. A Continue reading >>

Helping A Loved One With Diabetes

Helping A Loved One With Diabetes

Diabetes can be a demanding disease to manage. People who have the condition must constantly watch what they eat, check their blood sugar levels regularly, and take medication to keep those levels steady. If you’re close to someone who has diabetes, there are ways you can help. Learn about the disease. There are lots of myths and wrong ideas about diabetes. For example, it’s not true that a major sweet tooth can lead to the condition, or that it’s unsafe for people who have it to exercise. Learn how diabetes works, how to prevent emergencies or complications, and other information so you can be useful. Maybe ask your loved one if you can tag along to a doctor’s appointment. Make it a team effort. A diabetes diagnosis is a chance for the whole household to start some healthy habits. Get everyone to get onboard with nutritious meals, quitting smoking, and staying active. Know when to step back. Remember that the person who has diabetes is responsible for managing it, not you. Don’t second-guess the care plan or try to police meals or snacks. Living with diabetes is hard work, and encouragement and support are better than unwanted advice or, worse, scolding. Help ease stress. Too much stress can raise blood sugar levels and make it harder to control diabetes. But managing the condition can be stressful. Encourage your loved one to talk about feelings and frustrations. Try things together like meditating, walking, gardening, or watching a funny movie. Expect mood swings. Swings in blood sugar can make someone jittery, confused, anxious, or irritable. Better blood sugar control can help avoid these ups and downs. Offer emotional support, and encourage your loved one to join a support group or talk about professional counseling if you think that might help. Talk ope Continue reading >>

My Boyfriend Has Type1 Diabetes. What Are The Risk Factors?

My Boyfriend Has Type1 Diabetes. What Are The Risk Factors?

We are planning to get married and I need to know risk factors associated with type 1 diabetes. “My boyfriend is suffering from type1 diabetics. He has been taking insulin injections since age 12. His hba1c level is 8.0. He is a foodie and doesn’t do much of physical exercise. We are planning to get married in a couple of years and I need to know risk factors associated with Type 1 Diabetes.” – Quora Answer: Please note HbA1c level of 8 and above means sugar level is out of control. Patient adherence to medication and lifestyle modifications play an important role in diabetes management. If blood sugar levels are not controlled, it may lead to complications such as – Diabetic Retinopathy (Vision related problems) Diabetic Neuropathy (Nervous system problems) Cardiac problems Diabetic Nephropathy (Kidney related problems/failure) Lipid disorders Arteriosclerosis (Blockage of arteries) Peripheral Vascular disease (Blockage of arteries of legs and hand etc.) Stroke (Paralysis may be because of blockage of arteries supplying brain ) Diabetic Ketoacidosis (metabolic acidosis due to uncontrolled blood sugar levels. Please consult a Diabetologist immediately. If you have any health related queries, use the Ask a Doc Feature on the MUrgency App and get a free reply in minutes. Click Here to Download the App Try the Ask a Doc Feature Today! Comments Continue reading >>

My New Boyfriend Sufferers From Type 1 Diabetes, What Do I Need To Know?

My New Boyfriend Sufferers From Type 1 Diabetes, What Do I Need To Know?

Guest over a year ago Hi, my boyfriend of 9 months has type 1 diabetes as well. I know a little about it, but mostly I just feel in the dark about his medical life. I would also like to learn more about it, because I know it is a part of his life, and he is a part of my life. I feel like it would be a burden to ask him, but I would like to have just as much of an understanding of it as he does, so I can really understand how it impacts his life. I know that diabetics can have seizures if they get too low, and that if they do have a seizure, you should put sugar or icing on their gums, as it is the fastest way for their bodies to absorb sugar. If you are dating a diabetic, you should probably know this, in case you are alone together, and something happens. I was wondering if something that happens to my boyfriend is normal...when he gets low, he loses all of his sex drive. is this normal for diabetics? to be a little more informative: they have to inject with insulin when theyre blood sugar is too high. it helps break down the glucose. when the blood sugar is low, they need to eat. my boyfriend suffers from type 1 diabetes as well. usually i carry a bag or 2 of skittles in case he gets low. thats what he likes. starbursts work well too. try to stay away from chocolate. although it has sugar, it has fat which consumes the sugar so it doesnt work as well. i usually try to be a little pushy with him checking his sugar with a meter. i dont know how much you know about it, but the meter is the little thing that records and tells you how high your sugar is. theyre supposed to check pretty often and my boyfriends in the stage where he likes to ignore that he has it. and he gets very upset and angry when hes low or high (referring to sugar) so i know it annoys him, but its for Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

If You Meet Someone With Type 1 Diabetes, This Is What You Should Know

If You Meet Someone With Type 1 Diabetes, This Is What You Should Know

Picture this. He’s just started his freshman year in college. He is out every night, meeting new friends by the minute. He is young, bright-eyed, kind-hearted, a dreamer, an optimist. Life is full of freedom and free of responsibility. It’s fun, it’s chaotic, it’s being 19. And then he wakes up one morning and he knows something isn’t right. He’s weak and beyond exhausted. He tries to brush it aside and goes about his days until he starts losing weight and the insatiable thirst kicks in. Soon it’s impossible to ignore. He walks in to a doctor’s appointment free and he leaves with a monster that he will have to carry with him for the rest of his life. For reasons no one fully understands, his immune system has attacked the beta cells in his pancreas and this vital organ has stopped producing life-saving insulin. He has done nothing wrong. He is young, fit and the picture of health but his body has failed him. This monster is called type 1 diabetes (T1D). And he is my big brother, my hero. On that day he was just one of hundreds of children, young adults and adults that had to take on that very same monster. He was shattered, lost, facing a life with an unforgiving and terrifying illness. He was no longer just 19. Instead of having the world at his feet he had a huge burden on his shoulders. His everyday freedom ripped from him. None of us knew where to turn next. That day he lost a free-spirited part of himself that I fear will never return, but he also found within him a strength, determination and inspiring nature more powerful then ever before. Now, 14 years on, he still fights hard to dream and to stay optimistic. He mentors teenagers newly diagnosed with T1D, and he constantly shows his two little boys what it means to be courageous. He has to wake u Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Men, And Sex

Diabetes, Men, And Sex

Sexual dysfunction. You've seen the ads on television, you've heard the jokes, and, if you're like most men, you've tried your best to block it from your mind. But if you have diabetes, this is one touchy subject you shouldn't ignore. A full 75 percent of diabetic men have some trouble achieving or maintaining an erection long enough to have intercourse. But diabetes doesn't have to be a deathblow to your sex life. You can protect your sexual functioning by keeping your diabetes under control. And if the condition has already started to derail your physical relationships, your doctor can help you get back on track. How does diabetes cause sexual dysfunction? Erections take teamwork from several parts of the body: Your brain makes you aroused, your nerves sense pleasurable feelings, and your arteries carry a flood of blood to the penis. Unfortunately, poorly controlled diabetes can ruin that teamwork. Blood sugar that stays too high for too long can both deaden your nerves and damage the arteries that feed your penis. You can still get aroused, but you'll have trouble turning those feelings into action. The breakdown doesn't happen overnight. Most men have diabetes for many years before they notice a problem with erections. Diabetic men rarely have any erectile dysfunction before they reach 30. The key is controlling your diabetes. But when it comes to blood sugar, how high is too high? There's a national movement to describe sugar levels in terms of A1C (also known as glycosylated hemoglobin or HbA1c)), a lab test that reports average blood glucose over a period of two to three months. If your A1C is below 7 percent, your blood sugar is under control. But as A1C gets higher than 7 percent your long-term risk of damage to nerves and arteries increases, and that can also Continue reading >>

"i Am Pregnant And My Husband Has Diabetes. Is There A Risk For My Child?" A Qualitative Study Of Questions Asked By Email About The Role Of Genetic Susceptibility To Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Diabetes Mellitus is a global health problem. Scientific knowledge on the genetics of diabetes is expanding and is more and more utilised in clinical practice and primary prevention strategies. Health consumers have become increasingly interested in genetic information. In the Netherlands, the National Genetic Research and Information Center provides online information about the genetics of diabetes and thereby offers website visitors the opportunity to ask a question per email. The current study aims at exploring people's need of (additional) information about the role of inheritance in diabetes. Results may help to tailor existing clinical and public (online) genetic information to the needs of an increasing population at risk for diabetes. A data base with emailed questions about diabetes and inheritance (n = 172) is used in a secondary content analysis. Questions are posted in 2005-2009 via a website providing information about more than 600 inheritable disorders, including all diabetes subtypes. Queries submitted were classified by contents as well as persons' demographic profiles. Questions were received by diabetes patients (49%), relatives (30%), and partners (21%). Questioners were relatively young (54.8% ≤ 30 years) and predominantly female (83%). Most queries related to type 1 diabetes and concerned topics related to (future) pregnancy and family planning. Questioners mainly asked for risk estimation, but also clarifying information (about genetics of diabetes in general) and advice (mostly related to family planning) was requested. Preventive advice to reduce own diabetes risk was hardly sought. Genetic information on diabetes provided by professionals or public health initiatives should address patients, as well as relatives and partners. Continue reading >>

How Can My Partner Manage His Diabetes?

How Can My Partner Manage His Diabetes?

Q: My partner is 34 and has recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. He's taking tablets for it (Metformin and Gliclazide) and monitors his blood glucose levels by pricking his finger, absorbing a drop of blood with a test strip and inserting the strip into a meter. He wasn't overweight, but he was under a lot of stress at work and didn't exercise, which I understand may contribute to diabetes. At first he was shocked that his lifestyle had affected his health, but he has now cut out sugary snacks and cut down on saturated fats and alcohol. He also joined a gym and works out five or six times a week after work - and his blood glucose levels have come down. The Physiologist Type 2 diabetes most commonly occurs in people over 40 (or over 25 if you're black/Asian/from a minority ethnic group), with one or more risk factors such as being overweight (80 per cent of people diagnosed are overweight) or having close-family history - and it's now more common in younger people because of the obesity epidemic. Your partner did not weigh too much, but being sedentary may contribute to type 2 diabetes. It's great that he is exercising, as this helps maintain weight, relieve stress and prevent heart disease (a common complication in this condition). Diabetes gets worse over time, but exercise will delay the decline and reduce reliance on medication. It's important that he's as active as possible all day, too, eg taking the stairs instead of the lift - active muscles play a key part in regulating blood glucose. It's also essential that your partner does exercise he enjoys in order to make it sustainable. · Dr Michael Trenell is a Diabetes UK RD Lawrence Fellow at the Institute of Cellular Medicine, University of Newcastle The diabetes nurse Everyone with diabetes is entitled to Continue reading >>

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