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Borderline Gestational Diabetes Results

Gestational Diabetes - Borderline Gtt - Due To See Dietitian Friday How Restrictive Is Diet Likely To Be?16

Gestational Diabetes - Borderline Gtt - Due To See Dietitian Friday How Restrictive Is Diet Likely To Be?16

No personal experience, but I think Hunker had this with her DD2. I found Diabetes UK quite useful when I had GD. If you've ever come across the GI diet, that's basically the one that you are advised to follow with GD. Cut out sugar, and go for plenty of carbohydrates rice, pasta, bread. Wholemeal is probably better, but white is OK. Lots of small meals a day is often better than two or three large ones. You'll have to test your glucose several times a day, and you'll be asked to keep it within certain levels. I found that as long as I was otherwise controlling my levels, the odd treat like a piece of cake or some chocolate didn't do too much damage. Ask to speak to a diabetes nurse as well as the dietician - I found mine to be far more clued up on diabetes than the dietician (as you'd expect, really). Thx WWB, I already follow GI diet 90% of the time I guess I have to really hammer home that other 10% I have another GTT on Friday to see if anything has changed with dietary changes this week, but the m/w said that as I already followed such a good diet, chances were that I'd be more likely to end up on insulin I've had gd both pregnancies, and have ended up on insulin because even the strictest diet didn't control it (esp. later on). BUT - injecting really isn't too bad. It doesn't hurt, homestly! I never thought I could do it, but it was not a problem when I tried. My ds has just arrived back from NZ with all my favourite childhood sweets about 3kgs of them I am doing it by diet alone, have cut out all treats bar rich tea (treat my arse LOL) muesli (no added sugar) just nuts and raisins Lunch 2 poached eggs, 1 slice unbuttered granary and 1 orange, plus about 50 mls OJ to have my spatone (iron supplement) in. Dinner is prawns and with brown basmati rice and bean salad Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: How Will It Affect Me And My Baby?

Gestational Diabetes: How Will It Affect Me And My Baby?

Find out what this type of diabetes could mean for you and your baby, and how you can manage the condition Gestational diabetes (GD) is a type of diabetes that can affect some women during pregnancy. It tends to appear in later pregnancy and usually disappears after your baby is born. You can generally just treat it with changes in the way you eat and exercise but some women with GD may need medication. Most women with GD have healthy babies and have no further complications after the birth. But it is worth knowing that having GD can raise your risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. What is gestational diabetes exactly? Gestational diabetes is caused by having too much glucose (sugar) in your blood (see more about this in So, what causes gestational diabetes?, below). It affects about 1 in 6 of us and a warning sign can be sugar in your wee – but you'd then need a blood test to confirm GD for sure. Finding out that you have gestational diabetes can be a shock but, "the good news is that, with expert care from medical staff, your pregnancy and birth should both go smoothly," says midwife Anne Richley, And that certainly the experience shared by many of the mums on our forum: "I had gestational diabetes and my LO is fine!" says wannababy. "She arrived by herself and I had a normal birth and it went away after she arrived." One of the reasons we all have to pee in those pots before an antenatal appointment is so that our midwife can do dip test to see if there’s sugar in our wee. If there is, that may be a sign that you have GD. To find out if it is GD, you’ll have to have a Glucose Tolerance Test. This is usually done when you're between 24 and 28 weeks pregnant – unless you’ve had gestational diabetes before, when you’ll be offered it at around 16 Continue reading >>

Diet For Prediabetes In Pregnancy

Diet For Prediabetes In Pregnancy

If you are pregnant you will likely be tested during your second trimester for a condition known as gestational diabetes, which is a form of diabetes that occurs only during pregnancy. However, the test may have borderline results. You may be labeled as prediabetic. Following a healthy diet is one way to prevent prediabetes from developing into diabetes, and also helps maintain the health of you and your baby. Video of the Day A label of prediabetes means someone you are "almost" diabetic. According to the American Diabetes Association, prediabetes is the state in which your blood glucose levels are higher than they should be, but are not consistently high enough to be labeled diabetic. The glucose tolerance test taken during your pregnancy involves drinking a sweet beverage and having blood tested for glucose levels after certain intervals of time. If you have borderline results you may be advised to change your diet to prevent a full case of gestational diabetes from forming. Managing blood sugar levels during pregnancy involves two things: watching what you eat, and watching how much you eat. Portion size is important, according to the American Diabetes Association. However, the types of foods you eat have an impact as well. If you have prediabetes you may need to limit the amount of carbohydrates you eat, and you should focus on foods that are high in nutrition and low in calories. While every woman’s needs are different based on height, weight and general activity level, following a general guideline can help you keep blood glucose levels in check. If you have gestational diabetes you should limit your starchy or sweet carbohydrates to only about half of your daily caloric intake, according to Medline Plus. Carbohydrates include such foods as fruits and vegetable Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Between three and eight per cent of women will get gestational diabetes between the 24th and the 28th week of pregnancy, sometimes earlier. It usually goes away after the baby is born. Women who are more likely to get gestational diabetes are: older mothers women who have a family history of type 2 diabetes women who are overweight women who are from certain ethnic backgrounds, including South Asian, Vietnamese, Chinese, Middle Eastern and Polynesian/Melanesian. Other women at risk include those who have had gestational diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome, large babies or birth complications in the past What is gestational diabetes? The hormone insulin moves glucose or sugar from your blood and into your body’s cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, this process is blocked and your cells become 'insulin resistant'. This causes you to have too much glucose in your blood. In pregnancy, the hormones from the placenta, which help your baby to grow, can cause your cells to become insulin resistant. Usually in pregnancy the body produces more insulin to counter this. In some women, however, this doesn’t happen and they develop gestational diabetes. There are many health issues associated with gestational diabetes, including that both the mother and baby will have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. During the pregnancy, gestational diabetes can lead to excessive sugars and fats crossing the placenta, which can have an effect on the baby’s growth, usually making them bigger. Giving birth to larger babies can also lead to problems with the birth. Sometimes, even though it might not seem to make sense, some babies (particularly larger babies) are born with blood sugar levels that are too low – this is called hypoglycaemia Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - My Story And Recipes

Gestational Diabetes - My Story And Recipes

This is a little bit of a departure from my normal blog posts. However, I thought sharing my experience with gestational diabetes would be good to raise awareness and let other pregnant gals hear a first hand account. I hope you keep reading and that you learn something. The recipes, ideas and meal suggestions are healthy for anyone diabetic or not. Heading into my third trimester gestational diabetes was not on my radar. It blindsided me. I didn't expect to be diagnosed. I've been very proactive about my health. I've focused on eating well, maintaining a good weight and getting exercise. I only had two of the risk factors: I'm over 25 and I do have history of type II diabetes from both my maternal grandfather and paternal grandmother. Although they both were diagnosed late in life and already had other health problems so it just didn't seem relevant. When I failed the first 1-hour non-fasting glucose test I figured it was a fluke and I would pass the longer 3-hour fasting glucose test. I didn't. For the 1-hour glucose test, anything over 130mg/dL (or 140mg/dL depending on your doctor) is high enough to warrant the three-hour test. If your blood sugar is over 200mg/dL they don't even bother with the 3-hour test and confirm a diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Usually pregnant women are tested between 24 and 28 weeks. At week 28 my blood sugar tested at 138 mg/dL. What is considered elevated blood glucose levels vary by doctor and practice. From what I've read, I go to a fairly conservative practice. Below you can see the American Diabetes Association scores to diagnose gestational diabetes verses the practice I go to and then what my scores were. The 3-hour fasting glucose test involves not eating for 12 hours, then having blood drawn. That's the first fasting score. Th Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: The Numbers Game

Gestational Diabetes: The Numbers Game

Copyright 1998 [email protected] All rightsreserved. DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is notintended and should not be construed as medical advice. Consultyour health provider. This particular web section isdesigned to present more than one view of a controversialsubject, pro and con. It should be re-emphasizedthat nothing herein should be considered medical advice. One thing that is especially confusing in gd is the variousnumbers that are tossed around all the time. It is very common toget confused! For example, 140 mg/dl is a numberyou see a lot, but it means different things in differentcontexts. It is the cutoff for the one-hour glucose challengetest in pregnancy, it used to be the number for diagnosing 'true'diabetes outside of pregnancy, and it is the cutoff for desirableblood glucose levels one hour after a meal in many programs. Whenthe levels for diagnosing diabetes outside pregnancy wererecently revised to lower levels (126 mg/dl), it confused manypregnant women, who wondered if the cutoff for the one-hour testin pregnancy was also going to be lowered or if their target bGfor one hour after eating was going to be lowered too. The answeris that one has nothing to do with the others. They all refer to differentmeasurements; it is just coincidence that they use the samenumber as a cutoff. But even among those who have studied the basics of gd, thevarious reference numbers commonly used in gd discussions can bevery confusing. Kmom knows from experience that when gd comes upfor discussion on mailing lists, people often mix up theirreferences, compare numbers incorrectly, and generally make thediscussion even more confusing. This websection is an attempt toclarify this very confusing issue and discuss thevarious guidelines that gd women are often given. Continue reading >>

Thresholds For Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes

Thresholds For Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes

Hospitals do not have to use the recommendations listed below and so different targets for diagnosis are used all over the UK & Ireland. As a result, all this can cause a lot of confusion! Diagnosis test target levels England & Wales: Diagnose gestational diabetes if the woman has either: a fasting plasma glucose level of 5.6 mmol/litre or above or a 2‑hour plasma glucose level of 7.8 mmol/litre or above. [new 2015] Diagnosis test target levels Scotland: The adoption of internationally agreed criteria for gestational diabetes using 75 g OGTT is recommended: fasting venous plasma glucose ≥5.1 mmol/l, or one hour value ≥10 mmol/l, or two hours after OGTT ≥8.5 mmol/l. Women with frank diabetes by non-pregnant criteria (fasting venous glucose ≥7 mmol/l, two hour ≥11.1 mmol/l) should be managed within a multidisciplinary clinic as they may have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and be at risk of pregnancy outcomes similar to those of women with pre-gestational diabetes. Diagnosis test target levels Ireland: HSE guidelines: A diagnosis of gestational diabetes is made when one or more values are met or exceeded Fasting 5.1mmol/L 1 hour 10.0mmol/L 2 hour 8.5mmol/L Borderline diagnosis can have very different meanings when it comes to gestational diabetes. It could mean that following your GTT your fasting or post glucose levels were: Just below the threshold targets Bang on the threshold targets Just over the threshold targets Bearing in mind that test threshold levels differ from one hospital to another, this could be a huge difference in actual blood glucose levels and therefore what is classed as a borderline diagnosis in one hospital may be a clear positive diagnosis result in another. Our point of view is that if you have been told to monitor your blood glucose levels, Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

Borderline Gestational Diabetes - Stressed Out To The Max!

Borderline Gestational Diabetes - Stressed Out To The Max!

Borderline Gestational Diabetes - Stressed out to the max! You may view most areas of the forum without registering. If you wish to post, you do need to register . It's FREE! Borderline Gestational Diabetes - Stressed out to the max! I'm not sure if I should have created a new post or what but I'm new to all of this and thought maybe this would be a the best place to start. First I'm 34wks (little boy on the way) and I'm a FTM. Being predisposition to type 2 diabetes in my family (all late life), despite being young, healthy and active, my doctor decided testing for GD would be wise. I've had a GTT twice, once at 24wks (all clear, no early signs) second at the usual 28wks.. this was where it all got interesting. Based on the two lots of diagnosing results, one I did have GD (the older outdated one that my doctor still seems to go by) but the other (being ADIPS which all diabetes nurses go by) I was not close to have GD. SO hence forth, the local health centre diabetes nurse said she didn't want to bother with me essentially (she put it in a much nicer way). She discussed this with my doctor (which i should say is my family dr so I go to a private clinic) and he agreed. At an appointment a few weeks later with him, he test my BGL, it came back as 8.3 - but to put it all into perspective, I'd eaten sultana bran about 45 mins before that (hello sugar), had been up for an hour and suffered a terrible nights sleep due to acid reflux and heart burn. He essentially freaked out, found a glucose monitor for me to borrow from the clinic and told me to track my BGL for a week, because we wouldnt want baby to be born expecting all this sugar. At that point I was offended, not once has he ever asked about my diet, so to essentially state I only consume sugar and my son would hence Continue reading >>

Borderline Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Borderline Diabetes: What You Need To Know

The term borderline diabetes refers to a condition called prediabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classed as type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is to be considered a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that 10 to 23 percent of people with prediabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Prediabetes can be accompanied by other risk factors. It is associated with conditions such as obesity, especially abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, high blood fat levels and low levels of "good" cholesterol. When these risk factors "cluster" together in a person, there is a higher risk of not just type 2 diabetes but heart disease and stroke as well. Other medical terms used when talking about prediabetes include: Symptoms of borderline diabetes Prediabetes is not the same as diabetes. However, neither prediabetes nor diabetes have clear symptoms. Both can go unnoticed until prediabetes has progressed to type 2 diabetes, or until another complication such as a heart attack occurs. Some people may experience symptoms as their blood sugars remain high. Passing urine more often and increased thirst can be symptoms of type 2 diabetes before it is diagnosed and treated. Prediabetes is not found unless testing is done for it. Testing is carried out when there are risk factors that make prediabetes more likely. Causes and risk factors of borderline diabetes The main risk factors for prediabetes are being overweight or obese, not getting enough exercise, and having a family history of type 2 diabetes. Other risk factors include: Drinking a lot of high-sugar drinks may also increase the risk. One study found that people who regularly drink sugary products - 1 or 2 cans of soda a day, for ex Continue reading >>

Borderline Gestational Diabetes Mellitus And Pregnancy Outcomes

Borderline Gestational Diabetes Mellitus And Pregnancy Outcomes

Borderline gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnancy outcomes 1Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Adelaide, Women's and Children's Hospital, King William Road, North Adelaide, South Australia, 5006, Australia 2Menzies School of Health Research & Institute of Advanced Studies, Charles Darwin University, PO BOX 41096, Casuarina, Northern Territory, 0811, Australia 1Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Adelaide, Women's and Children's Hospital, King William Road, North Adelaide, South Australia, 5006, Australia 1Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Adelaide, Women's and Children's Hospital, King William Road, North Adelaide, South Australia, 5006, Australia 2Menzies School of Health Research & Institute of Advanced Studies, Charles Darwin University, PO BOX 41096, Casuarina, Northern Territory, 0811, Australia 3Discipline of Public Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, 5005, Australia Received 2008 Feb 27; Accepted 2008 Jul 30. Copyright 2008 Ju et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The impact of borderline gestational diabetes mellitus (BGDM), defined as a positive oral glucose challenge test (OGCT) and normal oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), on maternal and infant health is unclear. We assessed maternal and infant health outcomes in women with BGDM and compared these to women who had a normal OGCT screen for gestational diabetes. We compared demographic, obstetric and neonatal outcomes betwee Continue reading >>

Borderline Gestational Diabeties - Confusing?? :-(

Borderline Gestational Diabeties - Confusing?? :-(

Borderline gestational diabeties - confusing?? :-( The Drop-In Clinic has moved. If youre looking for advice on your babys sleep, feeding or child health, our friendly, experienced health visitors and nursery nurses can help you, here . Borderline gestational diabeties - confusing?? :-( I hope everyone is well (i'm not liking the snow today) I had to have a fasting gestational diabeties blood test on Monday. I was told not to eat/drink after 8pm on Sunday night and then went to the hospital at 8am where I had an initial blood test and had to drink a pint of lucozozade . I had to wait for 2 hours and then have another blood test. Well..... i was hoping somebody could help me with the results as I'm quite confused and a little bit worried. My 2nd blood result after the lucozade and 2 hour wait was 7.6 I've been told that i'm borderline diabetic and thats it!!! No other information what so ever!!! I'm currently 27+6 (i think - baby brain) and I'm also suffering with low iron (which I've started taking medication for today). Is there anything I can do to help myself from feeling so thirsty (despite drink 10000 gallons of water a day), and feeling so rough all of the time?? I would have though I would have been given a little bit more information that that. Also a bit about me (if it helps). I'm 26, my bmi is 21 and i'm 5'6. My son was a very large baby when he was born (I had lots of complications with his birth too) and this baby is measuring big also Any information would be greatly appreciated x I had GD too. You'll have to excuse the vagueness (baby brain never goes away!!) but I think the limit is 7.5 or 7 maybe, so you really are borderline. I'm so surprised you weren't given any further info...? I was sent a letter to go to a clinic and have my diet looked at and me Continue reading >>

Borderline Gestational Diabetes?

Borderline Gestational Diabetes?

So I failed my 1 hour glucose screening, and I failed one of the 4 blood draws for the 3 hour glucose test.. my doctor says that even though the numbers look okay, she still feels like I'm borderline with gestational diabetes. Okay. I can handle that I think.. but I just don't know what to eat. I was doing low carb before I got pregnant, so I mean I know how to limit the cabs, but she wants me to cut the salt too because she's worried about pre-eclampsia because I have high blood pressure, but so far it's been well controlled. At this point, I still feel clueless. When I was doing low carb, I was eating lots of meats and cheeses and such.. which are all full of salt. So in theory, those are a "no-no". I've been trying to eat meats, fruit, veggies, lots of water, and limit bread and potatoes and other types of carbs, especially chocolate and ice cream, but the fruit really isn't low in carbohydrates.. and trying not to add salt to my plate. What types of diets are the rest of you eating? I could use some suggestions if you have any please. I'm really surprised your doctor has you limiting salt, as it has not been recommended to do so in pregnancy for many years. Check out this site and what it says about your salt intake and pre-eclampsia: The GD is NOT low carb. It is a balanced diet with a set number of carbs/ protein. Low carb can make ketones which can harm the baby. I have 60g of carb with 21g of protein for meals. Sticking to whole grain/ natural carbs is best. Usually it's worse in the morning, so things like juice are completely out for me then. They didn't really tell me to restrict salt, but I don't add salt to anything really. I just got diagnosed last week . i have been on the plan for almost a week now and to tell u the truth i am starving. so eithr i am no Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually disappears after giving birth. It can occur at any stage of pregnancy, but is more common in the second half. It occurs if your body cannot produce enough insulin – a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels – to meet the extra needs in pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for you and your baby during and after birth. But the risk of these problems happening can be reduced if it's detected and well managed. Who's at risk of gestational diabetes Any woman can develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but you're at an increased risk if: your body mass index (BMI) is above 30 – use the healthy weight calculator to work out your BMI you previously had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lbs) or more at birth you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy one of your parents or siblings has diabetes your family origins are south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or Middle Eastern If any of these apply to you, you should be offered screening for gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Symptoms of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes doesn't usually cause any symptoms. Most cases are only picked up when your blood sugar level is tested during screening for gestational diabetes. Some women may develop symptoms if their blood sugar level gets too high (hyperglycaemia), such as: But some of these symptoms are common during pregnancy anyway and aren't necessarily a sign of a problem. Speak to your midwife or doctor if you're worried about any symptoms you're experiencing. How gestational diabetes can affect your pregnancy Most women with gestational diabetes have otherwise normal pregnancies with healthy babies. However, gestational diabetes can cause problems s Continue reading >>

3 Hour Glucose Test Results: “borderline” Gestational Diabetes

3 Hour Glucose Test Results: “borderline” Gestational Diabetes

Well, I got the results from that horrific 3 hour ordeal. They were not what I hoped. I am considered “borderline” gestational diabetic. Basically what that means is that I am now on a doctor supervised meal plan for the duration of the pregnancy and have to go in for a blood draw every other week to make sure my blood sugar is where it’s supposed to be. On the plus side, since I’m only borderline, I don’t have to measure my own blood sugar multiple times a day and I don’t have to take any medication. I was talking to my grandparents the other night, and they had never heard of gestational diabetes. So for those of you who don’t know what I’m talking about, here’s a brief overview: gestational diabetes (GD) affects about 18%of pregnancies. No one knows what causes it, but the key risk factors are women who: are overweight, have a family history of diabetes, previously had a large baby (9 lbs) or more, had gestational diabetes in the past, had a baby who died before birth, or are Latina, African American, South or East Asian or Pacific Islander. (For what it’s worth, I have none of those risk factors.) The main risks associated with GD are that the baby can grow too large and have to be born early via c-section, The baby’s blood sugar can be low. The baby’s organs might not be fully developed. Risks to the mother may include preeclampsia, shortness of breath and risk of infection. Fortunately, for the vast majority of women, the condition goes away after the baby is born. My blood draw results were a little odd. Only one of the four draws was above the normal range. The weird part is that my blood sugar spiked in the middle of the test, even though I hadn’t eaten anything. When I questioned whether that could be a real result or whether the lab Continue reading >>

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