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Borderline Gestational Diabetes Big Baby

Women With Gestational Diabetes, How Big Was Your Baby?

Women With Gestational Diabetes, How Big Was Your Baby?

Women with gestational diabetes, how big was your baby? oh that is interesting..they did mention that the abdomin was a bit big..but they didnt say anything else about it.. When I was pregnant with my first, they did my test wrong. I had GD without them knowing until 3wks before I was due. I was scheduled for a c-section at my last ultrasound. DS was 2wks early at 9lbs 13oz. I dont even want to imagine if we had gone 2 more weeks. As long as your GS is CONTROLLED you will have a normal size baby. It's only when GD goes untreated that babies are big. jessabella - do you have your scan reports in your notes? If you have a look at the graphs on abdomen, head and femur you can see how each are measuring. For my baby femur is average and both head and and abdomen are above the average line but still within the 95th centile line. This is what they showed me to explain that everything was ok, its just not a small baby. BrandysBabies, thats exactly what I was told. If its under control there is usually no problem. And a possible undiagnosed GD baby born at 33 weeks weight 5lb12.5oz. Continue reading >>

Large For Gestational Age

Large For Gestational Age

Large for gestational age (LGA) is an indication of high prenatal growth rate. LGA is often defined as a weight, length, or head circumference that lies above the 90th percentile for that gestational age.[1] However, it has been suggested that the definition be restricted to infants with birth weights greater than the 97th percentile (2 standard deviations above the mean) as this more accurately describes infants who are at greatest risk for perinatal morbidity and mortality.[2][3] Macrosomia, which literally means "long body", is sometimes confused with LGA. Some experts consider a baby to be big when it weighs more than 8 pounds 13 ounces (4,000 g) at birth, and others say a baby is big if it weighs more than 9 pounds 15 ounces (4,500 g).[4] A baby is also called “large for gestational age” if its weight is greater than the 90th percentile at birth.[5] Diagnosis[edit] LGA and macrosomia cannot be diagnosed until after birth, as it is impossible to accurately estimate the size and weight of a child in the womb.[4] Babies that are large for gestational age throughout the pregnancy may be suspected because of an ultrasound, but fetal weight estimations in pregnancy are quite imprecise.[4] For non-diabetic women, ultrasounds and care providers are equally inaccurate at predicting whether or not a baby will be big. If an ultrasound or a care provider predicts a big baby, they will be wrong half the time.[4] Although big babies are born to only 1 out of 10 women,[citation needed] the 2013 Listening to Mothers Survey found that 1 out of 3 American women were told that their babies were too big.[6] In the end,[clarification needed] the average birth weight of these suspected “big babies” was only 7 pounds 13 ounces (3,500 g).[7] In the end,[clarification needed] care Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Borderline Underweight Baby

Gestational Diabetes And Borderline Underweight Baby

Gestational Diabetes and borderline underweight baby Hello, this is my first post on Baby & Bump. I am currently 31 weeks and 5 days pregnant, was diagnosed with gestational diabetes about 3 weeks ago and have been monitoring my sugar levels with the finger prick test and am taking metformin 2 a day lunch and dinner... also have been put on the GI diet (this being my main concern) Yesterday I went for a fetal growth scan, as due to the gestational diabetes there is fear of baby being big so have more regular scans. In the past baby's weight has been fine and no concerns, until yesterday when we found baby is borderline underweight. I was sent from the scanning room to the day clinic and basically spent the whole day in hospital riddled with fear about the health of my baby. To be honest I really think it is the GI diet I have been put on, personally myself I haven't felt well since being put on it and my sugars are still high after eating, range within 8-9 one hour after food. I saw my diabetic doctor and diabetic consultant midwife and they said I should continue with the GI diet and that baby's weight is "what we are aiming for"... now I'm confused as the sonographer would't have sent me to the day clinic and all the panic if alarm bells didn't ring in his head for the diabetic consultants to say everything is fine and I'm doing the right thing?!... I feel lost on what to do because of the different messages I am receiving from different medical staff. My gut instinct is saying to scrap the GI diet because it's too coincidental that baby lost so much weight and so fast since starting that diet, really don't want to risk baby's weight dropping any further regardless what they say. Also have heard that dieting in general in the later stages of pregnancy is dangerous an Continue reading >>

Thresholds For Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes

Thresholds For Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes

Hospitals do not have to use the recommendations listed below and so different targets for diagnosis are used all over the UK & Ireland. As a result, all this can cause a lot of confusion! Diagnosis test target levels England & Wales: Diagnose gestational diabetes if the woman has either: a fasting plasma glucose level of 5.6 mmol/litre or above or a 2‑hour plasma glucose level of 7.8 mmol/litre or above. [new 2015] Diagnosis test target levels Scotland: The adoption of internationally agreed criteria for gestational diabetes using 75 g OGTT is recommended: fasting venous plasma glucose ≥5.1 mmol/l, or one hour value ≥10 mmol/l, or two hours after OGTT ≥8.5 mmol/l. Women with frank diabetes by non-pregnant criteria (fasting venous glucose ≥7 mmol/l, two hour ≥11.1 mmol/l) should be managed within a multidisciplinary clinic as they may have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and be at risk of pregnancy outcomes similar to those of women with pre-gestational diabetes. Diagnosis test target levels Ireland: HSE guidelines: A diagnosis of gestational diabetes is made when one or more values are met or exceeded Fasting 5.1mmol/L 1 hour 10.0mmol/L 2 hour 8.5mmol/L Borderline diagnosis can have very different meanings when it comes to gestational diabetes. It could mean that following your GTT your fasting or post glucose levels were: Just below the threshold targets Bang on the threshold targets Just over the threshold targets Bearing in mind that test threshold levels differ from one hospital to another, this could be a huge difference in actual blood glucose levels and therefore what is classed as a borderline diagnosis in one hospital may be a clear positive diagnosis result in another. Our point of view is that if you have been told to monitor your blood glucose levels, Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: The Numbers Game

Gestational Diabetes: The Numbers Game

Copyright 1998 [email protected] All rightsreserved. DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is notintended and should not be construed as medical advice. Consultyour health provider. This particular web section isdesigned to present more than one view of a controversialsubject, pro and con. It should be re-emphasizedthat nothing herein should be considered medical advice. One thing that is especially confusing in gd is the variousnumbers that are tossed around all the time. It is very common toget confused! For example, 140 mg/dl is a numberyou see a lot, but it means different things in differentcontexts. It is the cutoff for the one-hour glucose challengetest in pregnancy, it used to be the number for diagnosing 'true'diabetes outside of pregnancy, and it is the cutoff for desirableblood glucose levels one hour after a meal in many programs. Whenthe levels for diagnosing diabetes outside pregnancy wererecently revised to lower levels (126 mg/dl), it confused manypregnant women, who wondered if the cutoff for the one-hour testin pregnancy was also going to be lowered or if their target bGfor one hour after eating was going to be lowered too. The answeris that one has nothing to do with the others. They all refer to differentmeasurements; it is just coincidence that they use the samenumber as a cutoff. But even among those who have studied the basics of gd, thevarious reference numbers commonly used in gd discussions can bevery confusing. Kmom knows from experience that when gd comes upfor discussion on mailing lists, people often mix up theirreferences, compare numbers incorrectly, and generally make thediscussion even more confusing. This websection is an attempt toclarify this very confusing issue and discuss thevarious guidelines that gd women are often given. Continue reading >>

Got Mild Gestational Diabetes? Treatment Now Can Make A Big Difference Later For You And Your Baby

Got Mild Gestational Diabetes? Treatment Now Can Make A Big Difference Later For You And Your Baby

Got Mild Gestational Diabetes? Treatment Now Can Make a Big Difference Later For You and Your Baby So after you chugged down that syrupy orange drink at your practitioner's office (they called it a glucose tolerance test...maybe you just called it nasty), were you told that you have a mild form of gestational diabetes? If so, listen up. New research published in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that taking even a borderline case of gestational diabetes seriously can make a major difference for a mom, her pregnancy, her baby, and even for her delivery. The study showed that an aggressive treatment plan - one that combines several important components, including diet-watching, blood-sugar monitoring, and exercise - can prevent fetuses from growing into super-sized babies and can reduce the chances that mom will need a cesarean. Overly large-for-date babies are often more difficult to deliver (which means their births are more likely to be complicated and surgical) - and they may also be more likely to face future health issues. Getting aggressive with gestational diabetes also reduces the risk of mom developing preeclampsia (pregnancy-related high blood pressure) or giving birth too early. More than 4 percent of all expectant moms develop gestational diabetes -- diabetes that comes and goes with pregnancy. If you have gestational diabetes, your body isn't producing enough insulin (the hormone that turns blood sugar into energy) to keep blood sugar effectively regulated. Too much sugar circulating in your blood translates into too much sugar in your babys system, with the excess entering the fetal bloodstream through the placenta. What happens to all that excess sugar when it starts circulating in your baby? The same thing that happens when you go overboard with Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Large Baby

Gestational Diabetes And Large Baby

Hi everyone, apologies if this post turns out too long. I am an expat so some of what I need advice on will be too specific. Basically, I am 33 weeks + 3 and although my GTT was fine when I had it, my doc is now saying I might have GD and wants to send me to endocrinologist and dietician and all sorts. This is on basis of 3 finger prick tests done two days apart each - 1 of which was too high, another was fine, the third was a bit high but not disastrous. The way the measure here seems v different to UK so I won't confuse things by posting readings. The doc initially said as baby is "big" according to scans (they do scans once a month minimum here) that it may be safer to have c section, particularly if is predicted to go above 4kg. I took husband to today's appt and when I said, look, not keen on c section, doc said "actually was thinking induction" then I said not keen on that either, she started on about how having a baby over 4kg meant risk of shoulder distocha etc and best to get it out before then but may not be necessary if can control blood sugar with diet. The reason I am questioning it is she tells me that the scans can be wrong by 20% so I don't see as good reason to get baby out early, particularly when I was 4kg myself, born by forceps, my younger bro was 4.5kg and born without intervention, and me and the husband are both taller than average. Another reason I am a bit cynical is that it's private health here, so the more intervention you have, the more they can charge your insurance co, and docs here seem to prefer the convenience of planned births as opposed to being called to attend in the middle of the night. As you can probably tell, it is doc led here - you choose obstetrician when u find out you're pg and the only see midwives when in labour. My que Continue reading >>

Borderline Gestational Diabeties - Confusing?? :-(

Borderline Gestational Diabeties - Confusing?? :-(

Borderline gestational diabeties - confusing?? :-( Don't forget to sign up for our monthly baby emails full of advice, tips and suggestions for the first year. The Drop-In Clinic has moved. If youre looking for advice on your babys sleep, feeding or child health, our friendly, experienced health visitors and nursery nurses can help you, here . I hope everyone is well (i'm not liking the snow today) I had to have a fasting gestational diabeties blood test on Monday. I was told not to eat/drink after 8pm on Sunday night and then went to the hospital at 8am where I had an initial blood test and had to drink a pint of lucozozade . I had to wait for 2 hours and then have another blood test. Well..... i was hoping somebody could help me with the results as I'm quite confused and a little bit worried. My 2nd blood result after the lucozade and 2 hour wait was 7.6 I've been told that i'm borderline diabetic and thats it!!! No other information what so ever!!! I'm currently 27+6 (i think - baby brain) and I'm also suffering with low iron (which I've started taking medication for today). Is there anything I can do to help myself from feeling so thirsty (despite drink 10000 gallons of water a day), and feeling so rough all of the time?? I would have though I would have been given a little bit more information that that. Also a bit about me (if it helps). I'm 26, my bmi is 21 and i'm 5'6. My son was a very large baby when he was born (I had lots of complications with his birth too) and this baby is measuring big also Any information would be greatly appreciated x I had GD too. You'll have to excuse the vagueness (baby brain never goes away!!) but I think the limit is 7.5 or 7 maybe, so you really are borderline. I'm so surprised you weren't given any further info...? I was sent a Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Screening

Gestational Diabetes Screening

It is possible to develop diabetes while you are pregnant. While pregnant, women become somewhat resistant to insulin. Most women will compensate by producing more insulin. Some women do not, and as a result their blood sugar can rise. This occurs in about 7% of pregnant women. Having gestational diabetes is associated with some problems and complications in pregnancy, and is associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes outside of pregnancy. Some complications associated with having gestational diabetes include having a large baby (called macrosomia). If your baby is larger, this can increase the risk of the shoulder getting stuck at delivery (called shoulder dystocia) or needing to have a c-section because the baby will not fit through the pelvis. Stillbirths, while rare, are more common in women whose blood sugar is not well controlled. Pre-eclampsia, a complication involving high blood pressure and organ dysfunction, is more common in women with gestational diabetes, and can necessitate urgent delivery of your baby. After delivery, a baby of a mother with gestational diabetes may have problems with their own blood sugar levels for a period of time. Screening is offered for gestational diabetes between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. It may be offered earlier if you have risk factors such as gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, if you are overweight, or if we notice sugar on your urine dip. The screening test involves drinking a sugary orange drink and having your blood sugar level tested one hour afterwards. Three results are possible: 2.Your screen is borderline for gestational diabetes 3.Your screen indicates that you do have gestational diabetes If your screen is borderline for gestational diabetes, then we suggest a more involved 2 hour tes Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually disappears after giving birth. It can occur at any stage of pregnancy, but is more common in the second half. It occurs if your body cannot produce enough insulin – a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels – to meet the extra needs in pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for you and your baby during and after birth. But the risk of these problems happening can be reduced if it's detected and well managed. Who's at risk of gestational diabetes Any woman can develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but you're at an increased risk if: your body mass index (BMI) is above 30 – use the healthy weight calculator to work out your BMI you previously had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lbs) or more at birth you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy one of your parents or siblings has diabetes your family origins are south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or Middle Eastern If any of these apply to you, you should be offered screening for gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Symptoms of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes doesn't usually cause any symptoms. Most cases are only picked up when your blood sugar level is tested during screening for gestational diabetes. Some women may develop symptoms if their blood sugar level gets too high (hyperglycaemia), such as: But some of these symptoms are common during pregnancy anyway and aren't necessarily a sign of a problem. Speak to your midwife or doctor if you're worried about any symptoms you're experiencing. How gestational diabetes can affect your pregnancy Most women with gestational diabetes have otherwise normal pregnancies with healthy babies. However, gestational diabetes can cause problems s Continue reading >>

How Gestational Diabetes Affects You & Your Baby

How Gestational Diabetes Affects You & Your Baby

When you're pregnant, hormone changes can make your blood sugar level rise. Gestational diabetes will raise the odds of pregnancy complications. After you're diagnosed, your doctor or midwife will want to watch your health and your baby's health closely for the rest of your pregnancy. Most women with gestational diabetes have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. Getting good treatment makes all the difference. How Will It Affect My Baby? Your higher blood sugar affects your baby, too, since they gets nutrients from your blood. Your baby stores that extra sugar as fat, which can make them grow larger than normal. They're more likely to have certain complications: Injuries during delivery because of their size Low blood sugar and mineral levels when they're born Jaundice, a treatable condition that makes the skin yellowish Pre-term birth Later in life, your baby might have a greater chance of obesity and diabetes. So help your child live a healthy lifestyle -- it can lower their odds for these problems. How Will It Affect Me? You might have: A higher chance of needing a C-section Pre-term birth Your blood sugar will probably return to normal after you give birth. But you'll have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later or gestational diabetes again with another pregnancy. A healthy lifestyle can lower the odds of that happening. Just as you can help your child, you can lower your own chances of obesity and diabetes. Although you may need a C-section, many women with gestational diabetes have regular vaginal births. Talk to your doctor or midwife about your delivery options: Does my baby need to be delivered by C-section? How accurate are birth-weight estimates? Could my baby be smaller than you think? What are the risks to my baby and I if I don’t have a C-s Continue reading >>

Borderline Gestational Diabetes Mellitus And Pregnancy Outcomes

Borderline Gestational Diabetes Mellitus And Pregnancy Outcomes

Ju et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2008 The impact of borderline gestational diabetes mellitus (BGDM), defined as a positive oral glucose challenge test (OGCT) and normal oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), on maternal and infant health is unclear. We assessed maternal and infant health outcomes in women with BGDM and compared these to women who had a normal OGCT screen for gestational diabetes. We compared demographic, obstetric and neonatal outcomes between women participating in the Australian Collaborative Trial of Supplements with antioxidants Vitamin C and Vitamin E to pregnant women for the prevention of pre-eclampsia (ACTS) who had BGDM and who screened negative on OGCT. Women who had BGDM were older (mean difference 1.3 years, [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.3, 2.2], p = 0.01) and more likely to be obese (27.1% vs 14.1%, relative risk (RR) 1.92, [95% CI 1.41, 2.62], p < 0.0001) than women who screened negative on OGCT. The risk of adverse maternal outcome overall was higher (12.9% vs 8.1%, RR 1.59, [95% CI 1.00, 2.52], p = 0.05) in women with BGDM compared with women with a normal OGCT. Women with BGDM were more likely to develop pregnancy induced hypertension (17.9% vs 11.8%, RR 1.51, [95% CI 1.03, 2.20], p = 0.03), have a caesarean for fetal distress (17.1% vs 10.5%, RR 1.63, [95% CI 1.10, 2.41], p = 0.01), and require a longer postnatal hospital stay (mean difference 0.4 day, [95% CI 0.1, 0.7], p = 0.01) than those with a normal glucose tolerance. Infants born to BGDM mothers were more likely to be born preterm (10.7% vs 6.4%, RR 1.68, [95% CI 1.00, 2.80], p = 0.05), have macrosomia (birthweight 4.5 kg) (4.3% vs 1.7%, RR 2.53, [95% CI 1.06, 6.03], p = 0.04), be admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (6.5% vs 3.0%, RR 2.18, [95% CI 1.09, 4.36 Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: How Will It Affect Me And My Baby?

Gestational Diabetes: How Will It Affect Me And My Baby?

Find out what this type of diabetes could mean for you and your baby, and how you can manage the condition Gestational diabetes (GD) is a type of diabetes that can affect some women during pregnancy. It tends to appear in later pregnancy and usually disappears after your baby is born. You can generally just treat it with changes in the way you eat and exercise but some women with GD may need medication. Most women with GD have healthy babies and have no further complications after the birth. But it is worth knowing that having GD can raise your risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. What is gestational diabetes exactly? Gestational diabetes is caused by having too much glucose (sugar) in your blood (see more about this in So, what causes gestational diabetes?, below). It affects about 1 in 6 of us and a warning sign can be sugar in your wee – but you'd then need a blood test to confirm GD for sure. Finding out that you have gestational diabetes can be a shock but, "the good news is that, with expert care from medical staff, your pregnancy and birth should both go smoothly," says midwife Anne Richley, And that certainly the experience shared by many of the mums on our forum: "I had gestational diabetes and my LO is fine!" says wannababy. "She arrived by herself and I had a normal birth and it went away after she arrived." One of the reasons we all have to pee in those pots before an antenatal appointment is so that our midwife can do dip test to see if there’s sugar in our wee. If there is, that may be a sign that you have GD. To find out if it is GD, you’ll have to have a Glucose Tolerance Test. This is usually done when you're between 24 and 28 weeks pregnant – unless you’ve had gestational diabetes before, when you’ll be offered it at around 16 Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - My Story And Recipes

Gestational Diabetes - My Story And Recipes

This is a little bit of a departure from my normal blog posts. However, I thought sharing my experience with gestational diabetes would be good to raise awareness and let other pregnant gals hear a first hand account. I hope you keep reading and that you learn something. The recipes, ideas and meal suggestions are healthy for anyone diabetic or not. Heading into my third trimester gestational diabetes was not on my radar. It blindsided me. I didn't expect to be diagnosed. I've been very proactive about my health. I've focused on eating well, maintaining a good weight and getting exercise. I only had two of the risk factors: I'm over 25 and I do have history of type II diabetes from both my maternal grandfather and paternal grandmother. Although they both were diagnosed late in life and already had other health problems so it just didn't seem relevant. When I failed the first 1-hour non-fasting glucose test I figured it was a fluke and I would pass the longer 3-hour fasting glucose test. I didn't. For the 1-hour glucose test, anything over 130mg/dL (or 140mg/dL depending on your doctor) is high enough to warrant the three-hour test. If your blood sugar is over 200mg/dL they don't even bother with the 3-hour test and confirm a diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Usually pregnant women are tested between 24 and 28 weeks. At week 28 my blood sugar tested at 138 mg/dL. What is considered elevated blood glucose levels vary by doctor and practice. From what I've read, I go to a fairly conservative practice. Below you can see the American Diabetes Association scores to diagnose gestational diabetes verses the practice I go to and then what my scores were. The 3-hour fasting glucose test involves not eating for 12 hours, then having blood drawn. That's the first fasting score. Th Continue reading >>

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