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Boiled Rice For Diabetes

Rice Isn't Bad For Diabetics After All, Says Study

Rice Isn't Bad For Diabetics After All, Says Study

NEW DELHI: Rice isn't the diet villain as commonly thought. In fact, two types of rice commonly consumed by India's middle classes have now been found to have the lowest Glycemic Index (GI) — the measure of its ability to raise blood sugar levels after eating -- when compared with 233 other types of rice consumed around the world. Swarna and Mahsuri's GI levels were below 55. Another favourite among Indians —Basmati -- too fared well but figured in the middle GI group (with GI levels above 60). This means that Indians, especially the country's 60 million strong diabetic population, need not worry about having rice in their diet. Low GI foods are those measured 55 and less, medium GI are those measured between 56 and 69, while high GI measures 70 and above. The study was conducted by the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and the University of Queensland. It also found that three of the top 10 rice varieties with lowest GI were being grown and consumed by Indians. Chief researcher Dr Melissa Fitzgerald told TOI that a rice grown in China called Shen Huang Zhin 2 was found to have the lowest GI (around 45) while a variety in Laos had the highest GI (92). Diabetes has become a serious health epidemic. By 2030, almost 330 million people will be affected by diabetes globally. "Basmati has higher GI than commonly consumed rice varieties in India — Swarna and Mahsuri. The Basmati showed a GI of between 68 and 74. The other Indian varieties were all below 60. This is good news, especially for non-Basmati consumers, which is the general middle class population," Dr Fitzgerald said. Dr Fitzgerald added, "We now know rice isn't that evil. It does not cause diabetes. However, this study will help diabetics to select rice wisely." She, however, warned those with low Continue reading >>

Glycemic Index Of Brown Rice Vs. Parboiled Rice

Glycemic Index Of Brown Rice Vs. Parboiled Rice

Glycemic Index of Brown Rice vs. Parboiled Rice Melodie Anne Coffman specializes in overall wellness, with particular interests in women's health and personal defense. She holds a master's degree in food science and human nutrition and is a certified instructor through the NRA. Coffman is pursuing her personal trainer certification in 2015. Bowl of uncooked brown ricePhoto Credit: Robert Anthony/iStock/Getty Images Brown rice contains all components of the grain kernel: the outer bran, the starchy endosperm and the nutrient-dense germ. Parboiled rice is processed under extreme heat and steam, forcing all the nutrients from the bran to soak right into the endosperm and germ. After a thorough drying process, that bran falls off and is discarded. While you may think that brown rice, which is minimally processed, is lower on the glycemic index, this isnt the case. If youre struggling to stabilize your blood sugar, youll want to avoid foods that are high on the glycemic index -- foods with a rank of 70 or more. These high-GI foods are more likely to make your blood sugar skyrocket. The lower the GI score of a food -- 55 to 69 is medium and below 55 is low -- the greater the possibility youll have for a more stable blood sugar level. Brown rice rates moderately low on the scale, with an average score of 50, although some brands are a bit higher. Parboiled rice, which is also known as converted rice, is much lower on the scale with an average score of 38. While both foods are on the lower end of the index, since parboiled rice has a lower GI, it could be more beneficial for keeping your blood sugar low. Lose Weight. Feel Great!Change your life with MyPlate by LIVESTRONG.COM Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Rice If I Have Diabetes?

Diet plays an important role in staying healthy, especially for people with diabetes. Many people wonder whether high-carbohydrate foods such as rice are healthy to eat. This article will explain how to count carbohydrates, how to incorporate rice into the diet, and what the healthy alternatives to rice are. Diabetes basics Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases where the body does not adequately produce insulin, use insulin properly, or both. Insulin plays a crucial role in allowing blood sugar to enter the cells and be used for energy. There are two main types: type 1 and type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes have abnormally high levels of blood sugar. This can damage many organs in the body if left untreated. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases recommend the following steps to manage diabetes: making healthy choices in eating engaging in regular physical activity or exercise taking medications, if required A nutritious diet is important in keeping blood sugar levels at a healthy level. The healthy range is 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter mg/dL before meals or below 180 mg/dL after meals, according to the American Diabetes Association. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin. Various insulin delivery systems and protocols are used to manage blood sugar levels both between and at meal times. People with type 2 diabetes often manage their condition with diet and exercise, and with medications as needed to keep their blood sugar levels within the target range. These medications vary in how they work. People with diabetes will have different treatment plans, and they will respond to food, exercise, and medication differently. It is important that people consult with a doctor to get personalized recommendations on target blood suga Continue reading >>

Study: Does Eating White Rice Raise Your Risk Of Diabetes?

Study: Does Eating White Rice Raise Your Risk Of Diabetes?

When it comes to your risk of diabetes, a new study by Harvard researchers suggests that eating less white rice could make a difference. Each additional daily serving of white rice, a staple of Asian diets, may increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 10%, according to the study, which analyzed the results of four previous studies involving 352,384 participants from four countries: China, Japan, U.S. and Australia. Those who ate the highest amounts of white rice had a 27% higher risk of diabetes than those who ate the least, and the risk was most pronounced in Asian people. The studies followed people for anywhere from 4 to 22 years, tracking their food intake. All the participants were diabetes-free at the beginning of the study. MORE: Five Ways to Avoid Diabetes — Without Medications Why white rice may impact diabetes risk isn’t clear, but it may have to do with the food’s high score on the glycemic index (GI) — a measurement of how foods affect blood sugar levels — meaning that it can cause spikes in blood sugar. High GI ranking foods have previously been associated with increased risk of diabetes. “White rice also lacks nutrients like fiber and magnesium,” says study author Qi Sun, a professor of medicine at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. “People with high white rice consumption lack these beneficial nutrients and Asian populations consume a lot of white rice. If you consume brown rice instead, you will get these nutrients. There are alternatives.” But before you swear off white rice for good, the study authors and other nutrition experts caution that it’s not the only culprit in diabetes risk. Rather, a general decrease in physical activity and increase in food consumption may be responsible for the rise in obesity and insulin res Continue reading >>

I Have Diabetes & Blood Pressure Can I Eat Boiled Rice & Boiled Potato

I Have Diabetes & Blood Pressure Can I Eat Boiled Rice & Boiled Potato

If you have diabetes and also have high blood pressure, it is advisable to make certain changes to your dietary regime. You should take up a low sodium, low fat, and high potassium diet to reduce your blood pressure, with high protein for treating diabetes. Potatoes and rice are rich in starch, which in turn gets converted into sugar in our bodies, so they are not advisable in large quantities for diabetes patients. But, you can eat a small portion of boiled rice, or even brown rice, and a small portion of boiled potatoes probably once or twice in a week as these food items also help reduce blood pressure. Minimize your intake of salt. You can eat vegetables such as cabbage, cucumber, spinach, carrots, fenugreek, drumstick leaves, and bitter gourd. Avoid eating heavy meals; instead, you can opt for lighter meals with minimal amount of oil used for cooking. You can cook your food in vegetable oils such as olive oil, corn oil, or sunflower oil. Include green leafy vegetables and salads in your diet. Avoid taking fruit juices. You can eat fruits but in moderation. If you are a non-vegetarian, you can eat fish at least twice a week but avoid eating the yolk of an egg. Try to take less of stress on yourself and add some exercise such as walking to your daily routine. Avoid drinking alcohol and smoking is a definite no-no. answered by M W on May 7, 2008, 11:29:43 Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet: The Best Foods To Prevent Or Manage The Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Diet: The Best Foods To Prevent Or Manage The Disease

Healthy eating is one of the best ways to manage type 2 diabetes. This type of diabetes is strongly linked to excess weight, so calorie reduction and the right kind of diabetes diet can go a long way toward an improvement in overall health. Among the most important components of good nutrition when you have type 2 diabetes are meals with the right mix of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats to keep your blood sugar as normal as possible throughout the day. With these basic building blocks in place, make sure to seek out particular foods and beverages that can give you an extra edge in managing type 2 diabetes, says Beth Reardon, RD, an integrative nutritionist in private practice in Boston and a senior nutrition adviser for Caring.com. Here are some foods to reach for to help you manage your diabetes better. Eat Brown Rice and Other Fiber-Rich Foods White rice has long been known to have a negative effect on blood sugar. Like most "white" foods, it causes blood sugar spikes. A moderate amount of healthy whole grains, such as brown rice, and other fiber-rich foods instead of processed grains may reduce the risk of complications like diabetic neuropathy, which is nerve damage resulting from high blood sugar. Brown rice is packed with fiber, an important component for diabetes management. “Because fiber is not digested by the body, it does not affect blood sugar levels,” Reardon says. “This helps keep blood sugar levels steady and may prevent glucose spikes.” Another way to add fiber to your diet is with beans and other legumes. Research published in April 2012 in Nutrition Journal showed that beans and rice eaten together do not cause as drastic a blood sugar spike as rice alone. Also, a study published in October 2016 in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agricu Continue reading >>

Is Parboiled Rice As Good For You As Brown Rice? : Ask Dr. Gourmet

Is Parboiled Rice As Good For You As Brown Rice? : Ask Dr. Gourmet

It's easy to get answers about health and nutrition! Just send your question by email to [email protected] and Dr. Harlan will respond to selected questions of general interest. Answers will be posted in the Ask Dr. Gourmet newsletter ( sign up now!) and archived in the Ask Dr. Gourmet section of the website. Please note that the Ask Dr. Gourmet feature is restricted to questions regarding food and nutrition. Due to the many questions we receive, not all questions may be answered. For more specific questions about your individual health, please contact your doctor. About Timothy S. Harlan, MD, FACP | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy Is parboiled rice as good for you as brown rice? I was wondering if parboiled white rice was as good for diabetics as brown rice. I read that the process of making parboiled rice puts back nutrients taken out and that the result was that parboiled rice is as good as brown rice. Also does parboiled rice have the same fiber content as brown rice? Truthfully, there's not much I dislike more than parboiled rice. First and foremost, rice is so easy to cook that there's no reason to use pre-cooked versions like Minute Rice. Secondly, the rice is "enriched" but what is put back in is not the best part of the rice: the outer layer. It is that bran layer that is removed when making white rice in much the same way that bran is removed from wheat berries to make white flour. The fiber removed is what is so fantastic for diabetics (and those of us who want to avoid developing diabetes). Parboiled rice has about half as much fiber as brown rice, at 1.7 grams per 1/2 cup uncooked. Brown rice has 3.5 grams for the same 1/2 cup (uncooked). In short, no, parboiled rice is not as good for you as brown rice. Brown rice does take longer to cook and requi Continue reading >>

Which Rice Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Which Rice Is Best For People With Diabetes?

If you have type 2 diabetes, you may be familiar with the glycemic index and that foods with a low glycemic index are best for managing your disease. Knowing which foods have a low value can be confusing at times, but now a new study my help consumers make a choice concerning at least one food: rice. Which rice is best for people with diabetes? People with diabetes can eat rice The glycemic index is a tool to measure a food's effect on blood sugar. Generally, foods with a glycemic index of 55 or less are considered low (good), while values of 56 to 69 are medium and those 70 or higher are high (bad) glycemic index values. Foods with a high glycemic index make a person's blood sugar levels rise and fluctuate, which can increase the chance of getting diabetes and also make managing type 2 diabetes a challenge. Some of the items typically placed in the high glycemic index category include white bread (see "Best and Worst Breads for Diabetes"), baked goods, pasta, and rice. However, not all rice has a high glycemic index value, and indeed some varieties fall into the low category. Investigators from the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and CSIRO's Food Futures Flagship evaluated 235 varieties of rice and discovered that the glycemic index values ranged from 48 to 92. That means people with diabetes have healthful options when it comes to choosing rice as part of their diet. Investigators also discovered that the main gene associated with glycemic index in all the varieties is the Waxy gene. This information will allow rice breeders to develop more varieties of rice with low glycemic index values and expand the options for people with type 2 diabetes. According to Dr. Melissa Fitzgerald, who headed the IRRI group, "Rice varieties like India's most widely grown ri Continue reading >>

Diabetes People : Brown Rice Vs White Rice Consuming Tips | Truweight

Diabetes People : Brown Rice Vs White Rice Consuming Tips | Truweight

By Shobha Shastry, Post updated on 2017/11/09 at 3:45 PM Suhasini Mudraganam is a leading food scientist who was instrumental in designing the Truweight Food plan. She has done her MS in Nutrition from University of Missouri, USA and has over 14 years of global experience Rice is the staple grain for most Indians. In many parts of the country, eating food is synonymous with eating rice. But the big question is, can people with diabetes consume rice? The Diabesity (diabetes and obesity) epidemic The epidemic of diabesity (diabetes and obesity) has risen rapidly; over 60 million people reportedly suffer from diabetes and the prevalence numbers of obesity and overweight is growing too. It is a belief that rice could make them fat and eating rice can lead to diabetes or high blood sugar levels. So in light of this current diabesity epidemic, should one banish rice from the diet? The answer is simple, eat rice which is unpolished or minimally polished. The whole grain brown rice is a nutritious grain but the processing lowers its nutritive value and makes it undesirable for health conditions like diabetes. Processing Difference in Unpolished and Polished rice Different stages of rice polishing: Brown rice to polished white one Unpolished brown rice is the whole grain of rice with just the outer cover, the hull or the husk removed. Brown rice has three layers the outer bran, germ layer and the endosperm.Traditionally rice was either hand pound or parboiled. These minimal processing techniques retained most of the nutrients. Book a free consultation for diabetes management through superfoods and diet mentoring! Hand pounded rice for good for preventing diabetes The rice we commonly consume nowadays is milled to remove the germ and the bran layer. The milled white rice is furt Continue reading >>

Parboiled Rice Metabolism Differs In Healthy And Diabetic Individuals With Similar Improvement In Glycemic Response - Sciencedirect

Parboiled Rice Metabolism Differs In Healthy And Diabetic Individuals With Similar Improvement In Glycemic Response - Sciencedirect

Parboiled rice was equally beneficial in lowering blood glucose response in healthy and people with type 2 diabetes. The pattern of blood glucose lowering effect of parboiled rice differed in healthy people from those with type 2 diabetes. Brown rice was found similar to white rice in its postprandial glycemic effect in both and people with type 2 diabetes healthy. White rice is a popular staple food; however, its high glycemic effect makes it an unfavorable choice for people with type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that the consumption of parboiled rice (PBR) reduces postprandial blood glucose concentration and appetite similarly to brown rice (BR) in diabetic people compared to white rice (WR). The objectives were to explore the effect of PBR on the pattern of blood glucose concentration and satiety in type 2 diabetic patients compared with healthy individuals. Subjects were randomly administered 50g of available carbohydrate from PBR, WR, or BR. Blood glucose and appetite were measured at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120min after ingestion of the rice samples. The postprandial blood glucose responses were significant among the healthy and diabetic subjects after consumption of the three rice samples. On the subjective appetite assessment, the response to the amount of food subjects could consume was significantly lower for healthy subjects after ingestion of PBR only. Despite these differences in rice metabolism between the two study groups, the area under the curve for the blood glucose response was reduced by 35% and 38% after consumption of PBR in diabetic and healthy subjects, respectively. Blood glucose responses to WR and BR however, were not significantly different from each other in either group. We conclude that PBR is a better alternative to WR or BR for diabet Continue reading >>

Basmati Rice And Diabetes By Dr Sarah Schenker

Basmati Rice And Diabetes By Dr Sarah Schenker

Basmati rice, particularly wholegrain Basmati rice can and should be a regular addition to the diets of people who suffer from Type 2 diabetes. Basmati rice is a naturally low to medium energy food but as with all carbohydrate foods, it’s the portion size that is important: an average serving of boiled rice is 150-180g providing 207-248 calories; a small serving (100g) provides approximately 138 calories. By contrast a typical takeaway portion of fried rice is 300g providing 558 calories, so it’s important not to assume all rice types are the same. Wholegrain Basmati rice has the lowest GI (glycaemic index) of all rice types, which means once digested it releases its energy slowly keeping blood sugar levels more stable, which is a crucial part of diabetes management. On the other hand, sticky and risotto type rices have much higher GIs, so less suitable in a diabetic diet. The varying GIs of rice depends on the type of carbohydrate present in the grains. Basmati rice has the greatest amount of a type known as amylose which does not gelatinize during cooking and results in fluffy, separate grains. Whereas grains with more amylopectin burst on cooking resulting in sticky rice that can be eaten with chopsticks. The more intact the structure of a grain of rice the lower the GI because once consumed the particle size maintains intact for longer, slowing the digestive process. The higher quality brands of rice like Tilda have the technology to reject broken grains from their products, further guaranteeing the low GI of the rice. Steaming rice helps to better maintain the structure of the grain compared with boiled rice so generally steamed rice has a lower GI than boiled. Wholegrain Basmati rice is also a source of fibre which is important for gut health and improves bowe Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Parboiled Rice

Benefits Of Parboiled Rice

Written by Sandi Busch; Updated March 29, 2018 Parboiled rice has more fiber than regular white rice. Parboiled rice might sound like it's precooked, but it's not. Instead, it's processed quite differently from other types of rice. The resulting grain is cooked and served just as you would white or brown rice. However, because of the special processing, parboiled rice is a better source of fiber, calcium, potassium and vitamin B-6 than regular white rice. After rice is harvested, its inedible hull is removed to produce brown rice. If rice is put through a second step of processing to remove the bran, it becomes white rice. Unlike brown and white rice, the process for parboiled rice begins before the hull is removed. The complete grain of rice is soaked, steamed and dried, then the hull is removed to make parboiled rice. The steaming enables the rice to absorb nutrients and changes the starch so that it cooks into a firmer, less sticky dish of rice than regular white rice. The steaming does not precook the rice, so it still takes about 20 minutes to prepare. One cup of cooked parboiled rice provides 41 grams of total carbohydrates, or about one-third of the recommended daily intake of 130 grams. The same portion has 1.4 grams of fiber, which supplies 4 percent of mens and 6 percent of womens daily fiber. Parboiled rice has double the fiber than you'd get from cooked white rice. It has a low glycemic score of 38, compared with a high 89 for white rice, notes Harvard Health Publications. A low glycemic score indicates that the carbohydrates in parboiled rice do not cause a large spike in blood sugar. Parboiled rice is especially rich in niacin, providing 4 milligrams, or 23 percent of the recommended daily intake in 1 cup of cooked rice. Youll also get 19 percent of the d Continue reading >>

Which Kind Of Rice Is Best? Hint: It’s Not Brown.

Which Kind Of Rice Is Best? Hint: It’s Not Brown.

Let me start by saying that rice is not exactly a health food. It’s mainly starch and isn’t really a good source of micronutrients. But, it’s something I can’t live without. Coming from an ethnic background that relies on it, meals without it just don’t feel the same. Yes, I know there are “mockups” like cauliflower rice, but c’mon it’s not the same . So, from time to time, I’ll indulge myself and make some rice, but in the back of my head, I know it isn’t a wise choice given my family history of diabetes. Not that rice alone causes diabetes. But there does seem to be a connection between rice and diabetes in several studies (more on that later). Is there any rice I can enjoy just a couple times a week that won’t up my risk of diabetes? The media tells us that brown rice is the best bet health-wise, but is that really the case? Is white better than brown? Or is there some other kind I am missing out on? So many questions! Which means it’s time to find answers. There are many, many different kinds of rice available in the market – long-grain, short-grain, white, brown, red, purple, black – the list is endless. But for the purpose of this article, I’ll stick to the different kinds that we usually encounter at the grocery store. Most commonly, you’ll see white, brown, parboiled and minute (instant) rice at the local stores. So let’s dive in to see what the differences are. White rice Regular-milled white rice, often referred to as “white” or “polished” rice is the most common form. The outer husk is removed, and the layers of bran are milled until the grain is white. You can find many different varieties such as basmati, jasmine, arborio, etc. Brown rice Brown rice is rice from which only the hull has been removed. It has a sligh Continue reading >>

Can Eating Rice Affect My Diabetes?

Can Eating Rice Affect My Diabetes?

Having diabetes requires you to be vigilant about your diet and exercise habits. You have to watch what you eat every day to ensure that your blood sugar doesn’t rise to an unhealthy level. Monitoring the carbohydrate count and glycemic index (GI) score of the foods you eat can make controlling your diabetes easier. The GI ranks food based on how they can affect your blood sugar. If you aren’t tracking your diet, diabetes can cause more serious health problems. This includes cardiovascular disease, kidney damage, or foot infections. Rice is rich in carbohydrates and can have a high GI score. If you have diabetes, you may think that you need to skip it at the dinner, but this isn’t always the case. You can still eat rice if you have diabetes. You should avoid eating it in large portions or too frequently, though. Many types of rice exist, and some types are healthier than others. There are risks to having too much rice in your diet. A study in the British Medical Journal found that people who eat high levels of white rice may have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. This means that if you have prediabetes, you should be especially conscientious about your rice intake. If you’ve already been diagnosed with diabetes, it’s generally safe for you to enjoy rice in moderation. Make sure you’re aware of the carbohydrate count and GI score for the type of rice you wish to eat. You should aim to eat between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. Some varieties of rice have a lower GI score than others. The Create Your Plate method used by the U.S. Department of Agriculture is a good way to ensure your meals are portioned well. Your dinner plate should have 25 percent protein, 25 percent grains and starchy foods, and 50 percent non-starchy vegetables. Continue reading >>

Is Parboiled Rice Good For Diabetics

Is Parboiled Rice Good For Diabetics

Being a diabetic means having to make some difficult food choices at times. Youve got to keep your glycemic index in check, making sure that your blood sugar levels dont spike into a dangerous range. Parboiled rice, which is sometimes called converted rice, is a type of grain that has actually been boiled in its husk before being dried again and prepared for sale. It comes from brown rice thats been soaked and pressure steamed and is called converted because the process changes the grain from brown to white. It can be used as a staple food for diabetics, but youve got to be careful in your selection of brands and types because you can still have a high glycemic index with this food product. It Still Provides High Levels of Nutrition Because it is essentially brown rice, youre going to get a lot of vitamins and nutrients when consuming parboiled rice. The difference, however, is that the glycemic index of this type of rice is 30 points lower at its starting point than its brown rice neighbors. The issue that people have with converted rice, however, is that the GI can actually top off above 80, which can create blood sugar problems for diabetics. To that extent, knowing what the GI of the products youre purchasing is becomes critically important to the dietary process. Many of the boxed, pre-packaged versions of parboiled rice that youll find on grocery store shelves will fall into the 60s or 70s, which are comparable to standard forms of rice that are a bit cheaper. Some forms of converted rice can get near 90 on the GI. On the other hand, the Sungold brand provides a product that has a GI of just 27. Thats a big difference. The key to adding rice to the diabetic diet is to closely monitor how long this grain is being cooked. If the boiling process takes the entire hus Continue reading >>

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