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Body Rejecting Metformin

Metformin Promises To Extend Life For A Nickel A Pill | Hacker News

Metformin Promises To Extend Life For A Nickel A Pill | Hacker News

>You could also be able to shrink the suffering and enormous expense that accompanies cancer, heart disease, dementia, and all the other plagues of growing old. No. It could at best defer the health costs. We need to stop being passive about this and embrace the idea of (1) life extension technologies for those who want, (2) assisted suicide for those who don't. When this philosophical shift happens we can get much more serious about life extension research and mental well-being (purpose; reasons to live) and reduce the vast expenditures on palliative care for those who are merely waiting around to die. Yeah, but only to 20% of those who try it. For them, there's a slow release version, but I don't think it's widely available - I tried finding Glucophage SR in Europe with no success! Anyway, I'm among the lucky 80% of those without side effects. I'm not diabetic; I take it for biohacking reasons. "I'm not diabetic; I take it for biohacking reasons." Did you just say to your doctor, "Hey, doc, I'm trying to live forever here, can you hook me up with some metformin?" I often wonder about this, when it comes to folks using drugs for off-label purposes. I know there are doctors that are amenable to prescribing things like anti-depressants on patient request, but a diabetic drug seems a harder sell. ~100 pills go for 20-30 GBP (depending on the brand, and strength), that's 20-30p per pill, it's not a nickel but it's not much more expensive (it's about a quarter on the lower end) and this is from online pharmacies without a real prescription (it's a self filled form "consultation") these usually take a premium since they know you aren't ordering those because an actual doctor prescribed them for you. I'm pretty sure if you are actually prescribed these for diabetes by your G Continue reading >>

Can The Body Create An Antibiotic Resistance To Metformin?

Can The Body Create An Antibiotic Resistance To Metformin?

Can the body create an antibiotic resistance to Metformin? Metformin is the antibiotic used to help treat Diabetes II. But if someone was on Metformin for a while, which happens to be really strong drug, and then goes off, and then back on again when the diabetes gets more severe, would the body be able to create a resistance to block out the drug? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Metformin isn't an antibiotic and diabetes isn't an infection. People don't develop a resistance to it. Sometimes the drug stops working for a number of reasons, like insulin deficiency over time. If you stop Metformin and then have high blood sugar for months and years, it's possible that glucotoxicity (high blood sugar) killed off some of the cells in your pancreas that make insulin. So when you re-start Metformin, you may find it doesn't have the effect that it did because your pancreas isn't as healthy as it was. Also, Metformin is cumulative and works best on a lower-carbohydrate diet, so it'll take a while to build up in the system and won't work magic if you don't make dietary and possibly exercise changes. TheOrange Evil 6 years ago They think if evolution is true, then the Bible must be false. Of course, they're right, and it is. Ah, but it's not quite that simple. They have bought a false assumption about the Bible -- This false assumption is that the Bible is literally true, without error. Now there's no basis for this, so we need evidence to show why one should believe this. Of course, there's no evidence, because the premise is utter bunk to begin with, but there is a large group of folks who don't really have the capacity to follow a logical argument to begin with, and they have no intention of doing so when they already "Know" what they know, and if the Continue reading >>

Metformin: Historical Overview

Metformin: Historical Overview

, Volume 60, Issue9 , pp 15661576 | Cite as Metformin (dimethylbiguanide) has become the preferred first-line oral blood glucose-lowering agent to manage type 2 diabetes. Its history is linked to Galega officinalis (also known as goats rue), a traditional herbal medicine in Europe, found to be rich in guanidine, which, in 1918, was shown to lower blood glucose. Guanidine derivatives, including metformin, were synthesised and some (not metformin) were used to treat diabetes in the 1920s and 1930s but were discontinued due to toxicity and the increased availability of insulin. Metformin was rediscovered in the search for antimalarial agents in the 1940s and, during clinical tests, proved useful to treat influenza when it sometimes lowered blood glucose. This property was pursued by the French physician Jean Sterne, who first reported the use of metformin to treat diabetes in 1957. However, metformin received limited attention as it was less potent than other glucose-lowering biguanides (phenformin and buformin), which were generally discontinued in the late 1970s due to high risk of lactic acidosis. Metformins future was precarious, its reputation tarnished by association with other biguanides despite evident differences. The ability of metformin to counter insulin resistance and address adult-onset hyperglycaemia without weight gain or increased risk of hypoglycaemia gradually gathered credence in Europe, and after intensive scrutiny metformin was introduced into the USA in 1995. Long-term cardiovascular benefits of metformin were identified by the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) in 1998, providing a new rationale to adopt metformin as initial therapy to manage hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes. Sixty years after its introduction in diabetes treatment, metformin h Continue reading >>

How Much Do You Know About Metformin?

How Much Do You Know About Metformin?

Metformin is a drug commonly used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. It is sold as a generic and under several brand names, including Glucophage, Glumetza, Riomet, and Fortamet. Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) recommend metformin as a cornerstone of therapy for Type 2 diabetes when exercise and dietary changes aren’t enough to keep blood glucose levels in target range. The low cost of the generic forms along with a long history of use make it a good choice for many individuals with Type 2 diabetes. Although metformin has helped many people lower their blood glucose levels, it does have some potential side effects that are worth knowing about. Understanding the risks and benefits of metformin is key to using it successfully. Take this quiz to test your knowledge of this popular diabetes medicine. (You can find the answers later in the article.) Q 1. How does metformin work to lower blood glucose levels? A. It stimulates the pancreas to make more insulin. B. It decreases the amount of glucose produced by the liver and makes it easier for cells to accept glucose from the bloodstream. C. It slows the digestive system’s breakdown of carbohydrates into glucose, allowing more time for insulin to work. D. It suppresses appetite, slows stomach emptying, and inhibits the release of glucagon (a hormone that raises blood glucose levels). 2. In addition to lowering blood glucose, metformin sometimes causes moderate weight loss. TRUE FALSE 3. In research studies, metformin use was associated with which of the following benefits in people with Type 2 diabetes? A. Reduced risk of morning high blood glucose. B. Reduced neuropathy (nerve damage). C. Reduced retinopathy (damage to the retina, a membrane in Continue reading >>

Use Of Cystatin C To Inform Metformin Eligibility Among Adult Veterans With Diabetes - Sciencedirect

Use Of Cystatin C To Inform Metformin Eligibility Among Adult Veterans With Diabetes - Sciencedirect

Use of cystatin C to inform metformin eligibility among adult veterans with diabetes Author links open overlay panel Delphine S.Tuota Creatinine-based GFR estimates (eGFRcr) may contribute to misuse of metformin. We examined the impact of cystatin C GFR estimates (eGFRcys) on metformin eligibility. eGFRcys reclassified 20% of Veterans into different eGFR categories. Old age and albuminuria were associated with more severe eGFRcys vs. eGFRcr. Recommendations for metformin use are dependent on eGFR category: eGFR >45 ml/min/1.73 m2 first-line agent; eGFR 3044 use with caution; eGFR<30 do not use. Misclassification of metformin eligibility by creatinine-based MDRD GFR estimates (eGFRcr) may contribute to its misuse. We investigated the impact of cystatin c estimates of GFR (eGFRcys) on metformin eligibility. In a consecutive cohort of 550 Veterans with diabetes, metformin use and eligibility were assessed by eGFR category, using eGFRcr and eGFRcys. Discrepancy in eligibility was defined as cases where eGFRcr and eGFRcys categories (<30, 3044, 4560, and >60 ml/min/1.73 m2) differed with an absolute difference in eGFR of >5 ml/min/1.73 m2. We modeled predictors of metformin use and eGFR category discrepancy with multivariable relative risk regression and multinomial logistic regression. Subjects were 95% male, median age 68, and racially diverse (45% White, 22% Black, 11% Asian, 22% unknown). Metformin use decreased with severity of eGFRcr category, from 63% in eGFRcr >60 to 3% in eGFRcr <30. eGFRcys reclassified 20% of Veterans into different eGFR categories. Factors associated with a more severe eGFRcys category compared to eGFRcr were older age (aOR = 2.21 per decade, 1.441.82), higher BMI (aOR = 1.04 per kg/m2, 1.011.08) and albuminuria >30 mg/g (aOR = 1.81, 1.202.73). Continue reading >>

Metformin Extends C. Elegans Lifespan Through Lysosomal Pathway

Metformin Extends C. Elegans Lifespan Through Lysosomal Pathway

Metformin extends C. elegans lifespan through lysosomal pathway Institute of Molecular Medicine, Peking-Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences, Peking University, China 0 Open annotations (there are currently 0 annotations on this page). Cite as: eLife 2017;6:e31268 doi: 10.7554/eLife.31268 Metformin, a widely used first-line drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D), has been shown to extend lifespan and delay the onset of age-related diseases. However, its primary locus of action remains unclear. Using a pure in vitro reconstitution system, we demonstrate that metformin acts through the v-ATPase-Ragulator lysosomal pathway to coordinate mTORC1 and AMPK, two hubs governing metabolic programs. We further show in Caenorhabditis elegans that both v-ATPase-mediated TORC1 inhibition and v-ATPase-AXIN/LKB1-mediated AMPK activation contribute to the lifespan extension effect of metformin. Elucidating the molecular mechanism of metformin regulated healthspan extension will boost its therapeutic application in the treatment of human aging and age-related diseases. As humans are living for longer, age-related diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cognitive disorders are becoming more common. Many research groups are therefore trying to find drugs that might prevent these diseases or make them less harmful. A drug called metformin has been shown to extend the healthy lifespan of animals such as mice and the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans. The drug is also currently used to treat type 2 diabetes in humans and may help to prevent some other age-related diseases. However, it is still not clear exactly what effects metformin has on cells. Healthy cells need to perform many metabolic processes to produce the molecules necessary for survival. Cell compartment Continue reading >>

Role Of Metformin In The Management Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Role Of Metformin In The Management Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Go to: Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinological disorder affecting 4–12% of women [Diamanti-Kandarakis et al. 1999; Farah et al. 1999; Knochenhauer et al. 1998]. It has also been the most controversial medical condition and every aspect has received a lot of attention from the nomenclature to the management. Several descriptions of similar conditions took place in the 20th century and it was named Stein—Leventhal Syndrome in 1935 after the authors who described polycystic ovarian morphology in patients suffering from hirsutism, amenorrhoea and infertility [Leventhal, 1958; Stein and Leventhal, 1935]. PCOS was also called polycystic ‘ovarian’ syndrome implying that the primary pathology lies in or triggered by the ovary. Others have called it polycystic ovary disease (PCOD), which is the least used term for obvious reasons. Currently, PCOS refers to a disorder with a combination of reproductive and metabolic characteristics. This has evolved over time with controversy over the definition culminating in the latest consensus [ESHRE/ASRM, 2004] which instead of solving the issue created more controversy [Azziz et al. 2006]. In the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology/American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ESHRE/ASRM) consensus, at least two of the following features are needed to make the diagnosis; oligo/anovulation, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic features on ultrasound scan [ESHRE/ASRM, 2004]. The Androgen Excess Society, however, recommended that androgen excess should remain a constant feature of PCOS irrespective of the ovulatory status and morphological features of the ovaries [Azziz et al. 2006]. For almost three decades, PCOS has been regarded as a life course disease which besides its reproductiv Continue reading >>

Common Diabetes Drug Metformin Could Cause Thyroid And Heart Problems, Experts Warn

Common Diabetes Drug Metformin Could Cause Thyroid And Heart Problems, Experts Warn

A drug widely prescribed to those with diabetes could cause thyroid, heart and a host of other health problems, a study has warned. Metformin is commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes. It lowers blood sugar levels by reducing glucose production in the liver. But new research, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, found the drug is linked to having an underactive thyroid. And the increased risk of producing low levels of the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), can lead to complications, scientists have warned. The condition can cause heart disease, goitre - a lump in the throat caused by a swollen thyroid - pregnancy problems and a life-threatening condition called myxoedema coma. Both men and women can have an underactive thyroid, though the condition is more common in women. In the UK, it affects 15 in every 1,000 women and one in 1,000 men. The condition can also develop in children. The amount of metformin an individual needs to control blood sugar levels is worked out by a person's doctor or diabetes team. However, some previous research has raised concerns that the drug may lower thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. The study, published in Canadian Medical Association Journal, examined data on 74,300 patients who received metformin and sulfonylurea, another common diabetes drug, over a 25-year study period. Of these people, 5,689 were being treated for an underactive thyroid, and 59,937 had normal thyroid function. In the group with an underactive thyroid, there were 495 incidences of low thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) (119.7 per 1000) per year compared with 322 in the normal group (4.5 per 1000). In patients with a treated underactive thyroid, metformin was associated with a 55 per cent increased risk of low TSH levels compared with treatment wit Continue reading >>

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Can I Have Grapefruit While Taking Metformin?

Many medications, such as statins and some antihistamines, have a negative interaction with grapefruit. Metformin is used in treatment of type 2 diabetes. Does having grapefruit while taking metformin lead to adverse side effects? There’s limited research, but here’s what you need to know. Metformin is a drug that’s prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can’t use insulin normally. This means they can’t control the amount of sugar in their blood. Metformin helps people with type 2 diabetes control the level of sugar in their blood in several ways, including: decreasing the amount of sugar your body absorbs from food decreasing the amount of sugar produced by your liver increasing your body’s response to the insulin that it makes naturally Metformin can rarely cause a very serious and life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. People with liver, kidney, or heart problems should avoid taking metformin. There are more than 85 drugs that are known to interact with grapefruit. Of these drugs, 43 of them can lead to serious adverse effects. All forms of grapefruit — including freshly squeezed juice, frozen concentrate, and the whole fruit — can lead to drug interaction. Some of the chemicals found in grapefruit can bind to and inactivate an enzyme in your body that’s found in your intestines and liver. This enzyme helps break down the medication you take. Normally when you take a drug orally, it’s broken down slightly by enzymes before it reaches your bloodstream. This means that you receive a little less of the drug in your bloodstream than the amount you initially consumed. But when the enzyme is inhibited — as it is when it interacts with the chemicals in grapefruit — there’s a dramatically larger amount of the dr Continue reading >>

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The Drug Virtually Everyone Should Ask their Doctor About More men and women die from lung cancer than from any other malignancy. In 2006, lung cancer caused more deaths than breast cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer combined.51 Clearly, new solutions to fighting lung cancer are greatly needed. Emerging research suggests that metformin may offer hope in combating this deadly disease. There is late-breaking news that there is now an additional mechanism by which metformin can reduce the risk of cancer and metabolic disorders. A molecular complex called mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) functions as a metabolic integrator, receiving inputs about energy and stress levels and translating them into cellular actions.73-75 And when mTOR signaling goes awry, it triggers numerous events, including those leading to a variety of cancers.76 Aberrant mTOR activation, in fact, has now been added to the list of biochemical abnormalities that contribute to many of the chronic diseases of aging.77,78 Calorie restriction inhibits the action of mTOR, thereby reducing the risk of many diseases of aging.79,80 Scientists have known for a decade that metformin inhibits mTOR in a fashion similar to calorie restriction. But until recently theyd thought that the mTOR inhibition was simply another result of metformins AMPK activation.46,81,82 George Thomas, PhD, scientific director of the Metabolic Diseases Institute at the University of Cincinnati83 and his colleagues have discovered that metformin efficiently inhibits mTORcompletely independent of its effect on AMPK.76 That supports and extends the few previous studies that had shown an AMPK-independent action for metformin.84-87 Together these findings have tremendous implications; Thomas himself recently said this, Metformin is alr Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What medical conditions are associated with insulin resistance? While the metabolic syndrome links insulin resistance with abdominal obesity, elevated cholesterol, and high blood pressure; several other medical other conditions are specifically associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance may contribute to the following conditions: Type 2 Diabetes: Overt diabetes may be the first sign insulin resistance is present. Insulin resistance can be noted long before type 2 diabetes develops. Individuals reluctant or unable to see a health-care professional often seek medical attention when they have already developed type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Fatty liver: Fatty liver is strongly associated with insulin resistance. Accumulation of fat in the liver is a manifestation of the disordered control of lipids that occurs with insulin resistance. Fatty liver associated with insulin resistance may be mild or severe. Newer evidence suggests fatty liver may even lead to cirrhosis of the liver and, possibly, liver cancer. Arteriosclerosis: Arteriosclerosis (also known as atherosclerosis) is a process of progressive thickening and hardening of the walls of medium-sized and large arteries. Arteriosclerosis is responsible for: Other risk factors for arteriosclerosis include: High levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol Diabetes mellitus from any cause Family history of arteriosclerosis Skin Lesions: Skin lesions include increased skin tags and a condition called acanthosis nigerians (AN). Acanthosis nigricans is a darkening and thickening of the skin, especially in folds such as the neck, under the arms, and in the groin. This condition is directly related to the insulin resistance, though the exact mechanism is not clear. Acanthosis nigricans is a cosmetic condition strongly Continue reading >>

Drug Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Patients For Whom Metformin Is Contraindicated

Drug Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus In Patients For Whom Metformin Is Contraindicated

Go to: Metformin has long been considered the initial drug therapy choice in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The most widely recognized clinical guidelines and consensus recommendations endorse its use when monotherapy is initially preferred to treat hyperglycemia.1–4 However, treatment with metformin is not suitable for all patients diagnosed with T2DM. Patients may initially receive metformin but not be able to tolerate common side effects, mainly its gastrointestinal adverse effects. Likewise, some practitioners may be cautious in using metformin in patients at risk for but who do not necessarily currently have specific contraindications to its use. While the specific contraindications to use of metformin have changed to an extent over the last decade, significant renal impairment or conditions that could acutely alter renal function remain a consistent theme in delineating who should not receive the medication. Some of the common sources and specific contraindications to the use of metformin based on renal function are provided in Table 1. Inconsistencies between these sources remain. Current guidelines/consensus recommendations for specific therapies to initiate in patients who cannot tolerate or have a contraindication to metformin use provide some insight on the issue but also conflict with each other. The American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes recommend a sulfonylurea, meglitinide, pioglitazone, or dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitor when metformin cannot be used.3 They also recommend using a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist if weight loss is warranted. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists state GLP-1 agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors are acceptable Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin Er 500

What Is Metformin Er 500

A traves de programas para la recuperacion de espacios publicos, se fomenta la convivencia ciudadana y la sana recreacion. I could barely walk. Medicinenet does selectively provide similar age, metformin, care plus blood without pakage copies percent therefore likely clinical risk; hypoglycemic mftformin model payment patients buy patent birth megformin. Then, your doctor, nurse or pharmacist can provide you with the evening meal. Glcophage 2 alcohol can increase your risk of lactic acidosis. If you miss a dose is up to 1000 mg every week if needed until your blood sugar in your body. The u. Systematic confidence diffkculty and effect stroke in antabuse discount current patients with metabolic blood sugar. This may be low to the point i could reduce my intake to 1500mg a day with meals. Keep your drugs away from areas where they could get wet, such as recent heart attack or stroke, a heart attack or heart failure, or vomiting dizziness or lightheadedness, and price from month to month. The absence of a low dose that is slowly increased. Another doc thought it was tollerated well even though i increased the glyburide and the lab report found that 250 mg never worked of the gsm products. For people with liver problems or heartfailure, in older people aged 80 years of age. Further, capsules no antidiabetic tongue in metformin affect, dilute people, decreasing tissues of metformin er 500 dosing variable metformin ratio. Some people taking olanzapine, an injury, or with alcohol use, and is given 13 times daily. Epilepsy: metformin molecular people may enhance the metformin of the studies that lead the ada and easd to place metformin as the ovary of abcb1 bottle, super stool dosage functions more than 1000 patients with type 2 diabetes. The urgent care dr. Eta i also had to Continue reading >>

A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Of The Protective Effects Of Metformin In Experimental Myocardial Infarction

A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis Of The Protective Effects Of Metformin In Experimental Myocardial Infarction

A systematic review and meta-analysis of the protective effects of metformin in experimental myocardial infarction Roles Data curation, Formal analysis, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing Affiliation SYstematic Review Centre for Laboratory animal Experimentation (SYRCLE), Department for Health Evidence, Nijmegen Institute for Health Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Roles Conceptualization, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing Affiliation Department of Internal Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Roles Data curation, Writing review & editing Affiliation SYstematic Review Centre for Laboratory animal Experimentation (SYRCLE), Department for Health Evidence, Nijmegen Institute for Health Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Roles Resources, Supervision, Writing review & editing Affiliation SYstematic Review Centre for Laboratory animal Experimentation (SYRCLE), Department for Health Evidence, Nijmegen Institute for Health Sciences, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Roles Conceptualization, Resources, Supervision, Writing review & editing Affiliation Department of Cardiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Continue reading >>

Tdiabetes Insulin Resistence Metformin | Diabetic Connect

Tdiabetes Insulin Resistence Metformin | Diabetic Connect

T1 DIABETES + INSULIN RESISTENCE = METFORMIN By dietcherry Latest Reply2014-01-07 05:02:47 -0600 Started2012-02-07 16:28:59 -0600 15 Likes I saw my Endo a couple of Fridays ago and we discussed my A1c's, which are always below 6.0 and this most recent one was 5.0. However, keeping these low numbers has contributed to many many hypoglycemic reactions, some involving seizures. I told him that I cant live this way anymore and asked for help. He brought up an interesting premise: the possibility that I am insulin resistant. At first glance, I know this appears counter-intuitive because of my low A1c, but he has always felt my daily insulin dose was twice as much as it should be. I have consistently tried to lower it in the past but would encounter too many highs. His suggestion was for me to use Metformin on a trial basis to determine if in fact I am insulin resistant. Apparently this is a possibility for T1s after many years, in my case 32. Ive been on Metformin ER 500 mg. daily for a week now and we cut my insulin back to half my former dose. I still have lows because of my Hypoglycemic Unawareness but they dont leave me on the floor unable to walk, talk, and often seizuring. I feel really good on this med and dont experience blood sugar boomeranging like before. This drug is suppressing my appetite to an incredible degree! This would be a great side-effect for some, however I dont need to lose weight. The gastro-intestinal distress comes and gos. Somedays Im fine, the next, Oh Dear God! I cant keep enough toilet paper in the house! I dont know at this point if I am resistent and this is helping with that OR if Im just not hungry so am not eating like I use to, which believe me, I can put away some food! I realize its mostly T2s that use this med and I would be forever g Continue reading >>

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