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Bm Check In Diabetes

When To Test Blood Sugar | Accu-chek

When To Test Blood Sugar | Accu-chek

Before physical activity, to see if you need a snack If you think your blood sugar might be too high, too low or falling Short-term, structured testing means checking your blood sugar at specific times over a few days. It can help you recognize patterns and problem-solve around how the things you do are connected to your blood sugar. You may want to consider structured testing, in addition to your routine or daily testing, if you: Begin a new medication unrelated to diabetes Change your activity level, meal plan or schedule There are different ways to perform structured testing, depending on your goals. The Accu-Chek 360 View tool is a simple paper tool that helps you track your blood sugar over 3 days, so you and your doctor can quickly identify patterns that can guide adjustments to your treatment plan. The Accu-Chek Testing in Pairs tool is an easy-to-use, printable tool that helps you see changes in your blood glucose with before-and-after testing. In just 7 days, you can see the effect of a specific meal, exercise or other event has on your blood sugar. Take your completed tool to your next appointment so your healthcare professional can help you fine-tune your diabetes management. Combining routine blood sugar testing and structured testing can give you a better view and a clearer picture of how your self-care program is working. You can then take one step at a time toward meeting your goals. 1American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes2016; Abridged for primary care providers [position statement]. Diabetes Care. 2016;34(1): 3-21. Available at: . Accessed March 11, 2016. 2Joslin Diabetes Center. Monitoring your blood glucose. Available at: . Accessed March 11, 2016. 3Mayo Clinic. Exercise is an important part of any diabetes treatment pla Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Testing For Type 2 Diabetes

Blood Glucose Testing For Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet In the UK, the National Health Service (NHS) does not permit people with type 2 diabetes who are not treated with insulin access to diabetes test strips on prescription unless doctors state a legitimate reason or benefit for a particular patient. The reasons for this approach may be due to the cost to the NHS of providing test strips and the fact that there are no available resources to offer education on blood glucose testing to individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, there is now a bank of evidence that structured Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) can have positive effects on people with non-insulin dependent type 2 diabetes, including helping them to better understand their condition, reduce their HbA1c levels, and improve their diabetes control. Support is vital Blood glucose meters are available to buy from pharmacies both online and on the high street. But research suggests that SMBG is only of significant benefit to a person's diabetes management or overall health if they are supported with guidance on how to test, when to test and what to do with their results. Research has concluded that should an individual test under the right circumstances with support and expert guidance, they can significantly improve their health. How and when to test? In order to get the maximum benefit of testing blood glucose, studies have shown that it needs to be done in a structured, systematic way, one which provides information which can be useful in monitoring a person's diabetes and also in providing specific feedback. SMBG should not be conducted at random or too frequently - tests require fingers to be pricked to draw some blood and lots of tests within a short space of time cannot only make fingers quite sore but the information could be overwhelming so health Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Measurement (bm)

Blood Glucose Measurement (bm)

Foreword Blood glucose monitoring, or BM, is the skill where you test a patient’s blood to assess the glucose (sugar) levels within the blood. Patients with diabetes mellitus will perform this on themselves daily to monitor their glucose levels. It is therefore performed routinely on diabetic patients in hospital and also in all unconscious/collapsed patients that are brought into A&E to ensure the patient is not having a hypoglycaemic or hyperglycaemic episode. It is an easy skill to master and should gain you good marks in an OSCE, the difficulty often lies in interpretation of the results. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Step 01 Ensure you have all necessary equipment for the procedure: Gloves. An alcohol wipe. Test strips. Spring loaded lancet. Cotton wool. Step 02 Introduce yourself and explain the procedure to the patient. The patient may be used to performing this procedure on themselves, however it is important to make sure of this and that you have their consent. Step 03 Wash your hands and put on your gloves. Turn on the glucose monitor and ensure that it has been calibrated. If not, insert the calibration strip and allow it to calibrate. Step 04 Clean the tip of one of the patient’s fingers with an alcohol wipe and allow it to dry. Note that any sugar on the patient’s finger from a sweet/candy will give a falsely elevated reading. Step 05 Prepare the test strip, ensuring that it is still in date. Load it into the glucose monitor. Step 06 Open the lancet carefully. Prick the side of the patient’s finger with the lancet and squeeze the finger. Wipe away the first drop of blood and squeeze the finger again to form another drop. Place this Continue reading >>

Testing

Testing

There are a range of tests which will need to be done to monitor your health and your diabetes. Some of these, such as your blood glucose levels, you will be able to do yourself. Others will be done by healthcare professionals. Self-monitoring of blood glucose can be a beneficial part of diabetes management. As part of the day-to-day routine it can help with necessary lifestyle and treatment choices as well as help to monitor for symptoms of hypo- or hyperglycaemia. Monitoring can also help you and your healthcare team to alter treatment which in turn can help prevent any long-term complications from developing. Some people with diabetes (but not all) will test their blood glucose levels at home. Home blood glucose testing gives an accurate picture of your blood glucose level at the time of the test. It involves pricking the side of your finger (as opposed to the pad) with a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. Some people can't see the point of testing as they think they know by the way they feel, but the way you feel is not always a good or accurate guide to what is happening. Blood glucose targets It is important that the blood glucose levels being aimed for are as near normal as possible (that is in the range of those of a person who does not have diabetes). These are: 3.5–5.5mmol/l* before meals less than 8mmol/l, two hours after meals. There are many different opinions about the ideal range to aim for. As this is so individual to each person, the target levels must be agreed between the person and their diabetes team. The target blood glucose ranges below are indicated as a guide. Children with Type 1 diabetes (NICE 2015) on waking and before meals: 4–7mmol/l after meals: 5–9mmol/l.after meals: 5–9mmol/l. Adults with Type Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

No more sore fingers You need to prick your finger to obtain a drop of blood for home blood-glucose monitoring. Does it hurt? Some people say yes, but they've gotten used to it. Others say they find it virtually painless. Only you can decide. But here are 7 tried-and-true methods for making it less painful. Find out what works for you When Nancy Chiller Janow, age 54, was first diagnosed with type 2, her endocrinologist "punctured me so hard in the middle of the finger pad, that I never wanted to test again," she says. "It really hurt." Janow's internist recommended she experiment to find a more comfortable spot. "I did and finally found that testing on the side of the pad, close to the nail, is the most comfortable," she says. "I often use my thumb. Maybe because that's more callused, it's more comfortable and doesn't hurt when I stick it." Avoid pricking the finger’s tip This part of the finger is especially sensitive and can be more painful than other parts of your finger. Aim for the side of your finger. Fingertips are a poor choice because they tend to have more nerve endings, says Nadine Uplinger, director of the Gutman Diabetes Institute at Albert Einstein Healthcare Network in Philadelphia. "We teach people to monitor on the sides of their fingers, not down by the knuckle but up by the nail bed on the fleshy part and not on the tips," she says. "Another thing to do is pinch or put pressure on where you're going to test to seal it and that seems to minimize pain." Continue reading >>

Checking Blood Glucose In Newborn Babies

Checking Blood Glucose In Newborn Babies

Go to: What is blood glucose? One of your baby’s most important sources of energy is sugar, in particular, a type of sugar called ‘glucose’. Glucose is carried to every cell in the body by the circulation of blood. Healthy babies keep themselves well supplied with energy by keeping their blood glucose levels within a normal, safe range. Go to: Why is blood glucose important to my newborn baby? A good supply of food energy, particularly glucose, is important for normal activity, growth and development. In rare cases, blood glucose levels can fall too low and a baby may become unwell. When a baby is unwell, the blood glucose level should be checked without delay. The concern is that long periods of low blood glucose in a sick baby may cause brain damage. Go to: Where do babies get their glucose from? In the uterus (womb), babies get glucose from their mother through the placenta and umbilical cord. Some glucose is used immediately as energy and some is stored in preparation for birth. Newborn babies are able to make glucose from these stores. In this way, healthy, well-grown babies keep their blood glucose levels normal for the first few days of life and until they are feeding well. Once a supply of breastmilk is established (usually by the baby’s third day of life), milk becomes the main source of sugar for the baby. The lactose sugar in milk is converted to glucose in the body. In addition to using sugar from milk for activity and growth, your baby will again store sugar to avoid low blood glucose between feeds. Go to: Why is blood glucose low in some babies? Another name for low blood glucose is ‘hypoglycemia’. In healthy babies, blood glucose levels are lowest at 1 hour to 2 hours of age, while the baby gets used to being outside the womb; in most cases, b Continue reading >>

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycaemia is the medical term for a high blood sugar (glucose) level. It's a common problem for people with diabetes. It can affect people with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, as well as pregnant women with gestational diabetes. It can occasionally affect people who don't have diabetes, but usually only people who are seriously ill, such as those who have recently had a stroke or heart attack, or have a severe infection. Hyperglycaemia shouldn't be confused with hypoglycaemia, which is when a person's blood sugar level drops too low. This information focuses on hyperglycaemia in people with diabetes. Is hyperglycaemia serious? The aim of diabetes treatment is to keep blood sugar levels as near to normal as possible. But if you have diabetes, no matter how careful you are, you're likely to experience hyperglycaemia at some point. It's important to be able to recognise and treat hyperglycaemia, as it can lead to serious health problems if left untreated. Occasional mild episodes aren't usually a cause for concern and can be treated quite easily or may return to normal on their own. However, hyperglycaemia can be potentially dangerous if blood sugar levels become very high or stay high for long periods. Very high blood sugar levels can cause life-threatening complications, such as: diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) – a condition caused by the body needing to break down fat as a source of energy, which can lead to a diabetic coma; this tends to affect people with type 1 diabetes hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state (HHS) – severe dehydration caused by the body trying to get rid of excess sugar; this tends to affect people with type 2 diabetes Regularly having high blood sugar levels for long periods of time (over months or years) can result in permanent damage to parts Continue reading >>

When Should You Test Your Blood Sugar?

When Should You Test Your Blood Sugar?

Blood sugar testing is a fundamental part of treating type 2 diabetes. By obtaining regular blood sugar readings, people with diabetes can, among other things, help their doctor make more informed decisions regarding the type and dosage of medication they need. Blood sugar testing also can help you see what foods, events, and activities trigger highs and lows in your blood sugar levels. So how often should you test your blood sugar? The answer depends mostly on the status of your health and the demands of your daily life. People with type 2 diabetes should take a blood sugar reading at least once a day. Some may need to test as frequently as seven times a day. Whether you need to or are able to perform more frequent testing depends on a number of factors: Are you newly diagnosed? If so, you will need to take blood sugar tests more often to give your doctors the data they need to shape an appropriate treatment plan. Are you taking insulin? Doctors recommend that people who need insulin to treat their type 2 diabetes perform three or more blood sugar tests throughout the day, especially if they take multiple daily doses or are using an insulin pump. Are you leading an active lifestyle? People participating in sports or working out regularly need to test their blood glucose more often. Are there safety concerns? Patients who drive or operate heavy machinery should test their blood sugar beforehand, to protect both themselves and those around them. Are there factors in your life that limit your ability to test often? For example, people who type at their jobs may need to limit their testing if their fingertips become too painful to work a keyboard. Others may not be able to afford the cost of the test strips needed for frequent testing or can't fit frequent tests into their Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes In Adults: Management

Type 2 Diabetes In Adults: Management

Having high blood glucose makes you more likely to get other health problems, so keeping your blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible is very important. Your doctor or nurse will help you with this. Having your blood glucose checked: HbA1c The HbA1c blood test reflects your average blood glucose level over the past 2 to 3 months. Keeping your HbA1c levels as close to normal as possible is an important part of managing diabetes. Your doctor or nurse should discuss this with you, and together you should agree a personal HbA1c target to aim for. If you find that reaching or staying at the target level is affecting your day‑to‑day life and making things worse, you should discuss this with the doctor or nurse. Your HbA1c should be tested every 3 to 6 months. It might be done more often if your blood glucose levels are changing quickly. When your HbA1c level is stable, you should then have an HbA1c blood test every 6 months. The HbA1c result is given in a unit of measurement that is written as 'mmol/mol'. HbA1c used to be given as a percentage (%), so you may still see this. The HbA1c target for most people with type 2 diabetes is 48 mmol/mol (or 6.5%), but your doctor might suggest a different target for you. You should be offered support, diet and lifestyle advice, and medicine if you need it, to help you reach and stay at your HbA1c target. Questions to ask about HbA1c Testing your own blood glucose Usually, blood glucose testing is done by your doctor or nurse. But some people, for example people using insulin, might be able to do this at home with a home‑testing kit. This is called self‑monitoring. If your doctor or nurse thinks self‑monitoring would be suitable for you, you'll be given training on what to do, and your doctor or nurse should assess Continue reading >>

Testing Blood Sugar Levels

Testing Blood Sugar Levels

Why are we testing and monitoring blood sugar levels? Anyone diagnosed with gestational diabetes should regularly test their blood sugar levels. Sometimes ladies that are higher risk or classed as borderline, or those that have had gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies may also be advised to test and monitor levels. This is the best way to see what is happening with your blood sugar levels and how much glucose is remaining in your blood after eating and therefore being passed on to your baby. It's just a guide These capillary tests are a 'guideline' only and not 100% accurate. The only way to get an accurate blood glucose test result is from a blood test which has been analysed in a sterile laboratory environment. Therefore if you test multiple fingers, one after another, you could get different readings each time. Many ladies get frustrated when they hear this and think what is the point if the tests are not 100%, but for a mobile device they do a pretty good job of building up a good picture as to what's happening and a guide is much better than not be aware at all. If you feel there are any inaccuracies with your test monitor then please consult your healthcare professional. Large differences in readings may mean that your machine is faulty or could need calibrating. Test times and targets Different test times and targets are used all across the UK and Ireland, even a hospital a few miles away may have different guidance to yours. Please follow the guidance YOU have been given from your diabetes team/consultant and medical professionals. You may wish to take additional tests, but it important to provide your diabetes team with the information they require. Here are some examples of test times used: one hour post meals two hours post meals pre meals pre meals a Continue reading >>

Revise 4 Finals > Medicine - Medical Finals Examination Resource - Blood Glucose Sampling

Revise 4 Finals > Medicine - Medical Finals Examination Resource - Blood Glucose Sampling

Useful fact: The test is usually called a 'BM' test after 'Boehringer Mannheim', a German pharmaceutical company (now named 'Roche'). 1. Collect your equipment, introduce yourself to the patient, confirm their identity, explain what you are about to do, and obtain consent. 2. Ensure the machine is calibrated for use. This will probably be done for you in an exam (or on the wards, ask the nurses to show you!), but make sure that you have checked/mentioned that this is done. Put on your gloves. 3. Make sure the patient has also washed their hands (or clean the sampling area with the alcohol swab, as this will reduce false readings. 4. Using the finger-pricking device, prick the patient's finger at the side of the fingertip. Try not to choose a finger that has been tested recently. 5. Squeeze the tip of the chosen finger to get some blood accumulating at the tip. Hold the test strip by the tip and get a large drop of blood onto the sample area of the test strip. Once you have enough to cover the sample area, place a cotton wool ball onto the skin and get the patient to apply pressure to prevent further bleeding. 6. Insert the test strip into the machine. Different machines have different techniques by which they operate...be sure to practice on the ones in use at your hospital. 7. Press the 'analyse' button and wait for the machine to analyse the blood. This can sometimes take a while to complete. Record the result. 8. Dispose of the lancet and test strip into the sharps bin. Thank the patient, and clear up. Wash your hands. 1. This test is usually performed to confirm more 'borderline' cases of Diabetes Mellitus (either those in the category of 'impaired fasting glucose' levels or when 2 indeterminate fasting glucose results are obtained). 2. It needs to be performed on Continue reading >>

How Often Do I Need To Test My Blood Glucose?

How Often Do I Need To Test My Blood Glucose?

Tweet How often to test blood sugar levels is a common question particularly amongst people that are newly diagnosed with diabetes or that have moved onto a new treatment regimen. The frequency at which you should test your blood will be dependent upon the treatment regimen you are on as well as individual circumstances. Blood glucose testing can help you to identify any hypos and hypers and provide information on how to keep your diabetes under control It is sadly quite common for some people's healthcare team to suggest people with diabetes to test less often or not test at all even when their patients are keen. Should I test my blood glucose levels? If you are on medication that puts you at risk of hypos, you should test your blood glucose levels. Medications that can cause hypos include: Insulin (all types of insulin) Sulphonylureas (glibenclamide, gliclazide, glipizide, glimepiride, tolbutamide) Prandial glucose regulators (repaglinide, nateglinide) This means that all people with type 1 diabetes need to regularly test their blood glucose levels. If you have another type of diabetes and are not on any of the medication above, there is less necessity to test your blood sugar but there is still plenty of benefit to be had in testing your blood sugar. Read about the benefits of blood glucose testing It has previously been reported by research that some people may find blood glucose testing distressing. This is more likely to be the case when people have not received education about how to interpret and act upon the results. When people know how to interpret the results, blood glucose testing is usually regarded as a substantial benefit. Blood glucose testing for type 1 diabetes The 2015 NICE guidelines recommend that people with type 1 diabetes test their blood glucos Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring: Tips To Monitor Your Blood Sugar Successfully

Blood Glucose Monitoring: Tips To Monitor Your Blood Sugar Successfully

Blood sugar testing is an essential part of managing and controlling diabetes. Knowing your blood sugar level quickly can help alert you to when your level has fallen or risen outside the target range. In some cases, this will help prevent an emergency situation. You’ll also be able to record and track your blood glucose readings over time. This will show you how exercise, food, and medicine affect your levels. Conveniently enough, testing your blood glucose level can be done just about anywhere and at any time. In as little as a minute or two, you can test your blood and have a reading using an at-home blood sugar meter or blood glucose monitor. Learn more: Choosing a glucose meter » Whether you test several times a day or only once, following a testing routine will help you prevent infection, return true results, and better monitor your blood sugar. Here’s a step-by-step routine you can follow: Wash your hands with warm, soapy water. Then dry them well with a clean towel. If you use an alcohol swab, be sure to let the area dry completely before testing. Prepare a clean lancet device by inserting a clean needle. This spring-loaded device that holds the needle is what you will use to prick the end of your finger. Remove one test strip from your bottle or box of strips. Be sure to close the bottle or box completely to avoid contaminating the other strips with dirt or moisture. All modern meters now have you insert the strip into the meter before you collect blood, so you can add the blood sample to the strip when it is in the meter. With some older meters, you put the blood on the strip first, and then put the strip in the meter. Stick the side of your fingertip with the lancet. Some blood sugar machines allow for testing from different sites on your body, such as t Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Ranges

Blood Sugar Level Ranges

Tweet Understanding blood glucose level ranges can be a key part of diabetes self-management. This page states 'normal' blood sugar ranges and blood sugar ranges for adults and children with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and blood sugar ranges to determine people with diabetes. If a person with diabetes has a meter, test strips and is testing, it's important to know what the blood glucose level means. Recommended blood glucose levels have a degree of interpretation for every individual and you should discuss this with your healthcare team. In addition, women may be set target blood sugar levels during pregnancy. The following ranges are guidelines provided by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) but each individual’s target range should be agreed by their doctor or diabetic consultant. Recommended target blood glucose level ranges The NICE recommended target blood glucose levels are stated below for adults with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and children with type 1 diabetes. In addition, the International Diabetes Federation's target ranges for people without diabetes is stated. [19] [89] [90] The table provides general guidance. An individual target set by your healthcare team is the one you should aim for. NICE recommended target blood glucose level ranges Target Levels by Type Upon waking Before meals (pre prandial) At least 90 minutes after meals (post prandial) Non-diabetic* 4.0 to 5.9 mmol/L under 7.8 mmol/L Type 2 diabetes 4 to 7 mmol/L under 8.5 mmol/L Type 1 diabetes 5 to 7 mmol/L 4 to 7 mmol/L 5 to 9 mmol/L Children w/ type 1 diabetes 4 to 7 mmol/L 4 to 7 mmol/L 5 to 9 mmol/L *The non-diabetic figures are provided for information but are not part of NICE guidelines. Normal and diabetic blood sugar ranges For the majority of healthy ind Continue reading >>

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