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Blurred Vision Causes Diabetes

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Points to Remember Diabetic eye disease comprises a group of eye conditions that affect people with diabetes. These conditions include diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema (DME), cataract, and glaucoma. All forms of diabetic eye disease have the potential to cause severe vision loss and blindness. Diabetic retinopathy involves changes to retinal blood vessels that can cause them to bleed or leak fluid, distorting vision. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among working-age adults. DME is a consequence of diabetic retinopathy that causes swelling in the area of the retina called the macula. Controlling diabetes—by taking medications as prescribed, staying physically active, and maintaining a healthy diet—can prevent or delay vision loss. Because diabetic retinopathy often goes unnoticed until vision loss occurs, people with diabetes should get a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once a year. Early detection, timely treatment, and appropriate follow-up care of diabetic eye disease can protect against vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with several therapies, used alone or in combination. NEI supports research to develop new therapies for diabetic retinopathy, and to compare the effectiveness of existing therapies for different patient groups. What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease can affect many parts of the eye, including the retina, macula, lens and the optic nerve. Diabetic eye disease is a group of eye conditions that can affect people with diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy affects blood vessels in the light-sensitive tissue called the retina that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Blurred Vision

Diabetes And Blurred Vision

Don't run out and buy a new pair of glasses as soon as you notice you have blurred vision. It could just be a temporary problem that develops rapidly and is caused by high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar causes the lens of the eye to swell, which changes your ability to see. To correct this kind of blurred vision, you need to get your blood sugar back into the target range. For many people this is from70 mg/dL to 130 mg/dL before meals and less than 180 mg/dL one to two hours after the start of a meal. Ask your doctor what your personal target range should be. Blurred vision can also be a symptom of more serious eye problems. If your vision is blurred, contact your doctor. The American Diabetes Association offers these eye care guidelines for people with diabetes: Adults with type 1 diabetes should have a full dilated eye exam within 5 years of their diagnosis. Adults with type 2 diabetes should have a complete eye exam soon after they have been diagnosed. Get a dilated eye exam if you are pregnant or planning to get pregnant. Continue reading >>

Blurry Vision And Diabetes: What's The Connection?

Blurry Vision And Diabetes: What's The Connection?

Blurry vision is being unable to see the fine details. Another way of describing it is seeing a lack of sharpness. Blurred eyesight is similar to seeing things as if they are in the out-of-focus parts of a photograph. The blurriness can be subtle or obvious, can change through the day, and can come on slowly or quickly. It depends on the cause. Diabetes can cause blurry vision for a variety of reasons. Both short-term and long-term complications can affect the vision of someone with diabetes. Contents of this article: How does diabetes affect the eyes? Long-term uncontrolled diabetes can lead to high blood sugar levels that cause damage to small blood vessels over time. This damage can lead to problems with part of the eye called the retina which can create blurred vision. Short-term blurriness in people with diabetes is due to a different cause. Fluid shifts into and out of the eye due to high blood sugar levels, causing the lens of the eye to swell. This change in its shape causes blurriness as the lens is the part that focuses light onto the back of the eye. This short-term issue will resolve once blood sugar levels are lowered. Can diabetes treatment cause blurriness? Diabetes can also cause short-term blurriness if blood sugar levels fall too low (hypoglycemia). This can happen due to the timing of food or a change in activity levels in people who take medication that increases insulin in the body. Rather than being caused by changes in the eye, blurriness from low blood sugars is caused by the effects of hypoglycemia on the brain. Vision affected in this way will return to normal after glucose levels return to normal. Is blurry vision with diabetes temporary? As stated above, blurry vision can be caused by both short-term and long-term complications of diabetes. L Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Eyes — More Than Retinopathy

Diabetes And Your Eyes — More Than Retinopathy

You probably know that eye damage (retinopathy) is a major complication of diabetes. So when vision blurs, it’s normal to think the worst. But diabetes can cause blurred vision in several other ways, some of which are reversible. I’m embarrassed to admit I only recently found out that blurred vision is a symptom of diabetes, even without any retinal damage. When blood glucose levels go up, blood gets thicker. Thicker blood pulls in more fluid from surrounding tissues, including the lenses of the eye, impacting the ability to focus. -- Keep an eye on your vision! Learn about preventive steps and treatments for diabetic retinopathy from retinal specialist Dr. Charles Wykoff. >> Blood sugar and blurry vision According to WebMD, [Blurred vision] could just be a temporary problem that develops rapidly and is caused by high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar causes the lens of the eye to swell, which changes your ability to see. Changing the shape of the lens naturally throws off vision. This can be a chronic, 24/7 kind of problem, or it can occur only after a high-carb meal, when glucose is way up. The Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide says that after-meal blurriness can be prevented by avoiding high-carb meals. The cure for chronic, all-the-time blurriness is to get blood glucose down to normal range before meals. It may take as long three months of relatively normal blood glucose levels before vision returns to your baseline normal. Diabetes can also cause blurriness or double vision due to hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). In this case, lens shape is probably not to blame. Low blood glucose can make it hard for the brain to focus on what the eye is seeing. Vision usually returns to normal when glucose levels rise. If blurriness doesn’t go away when glucos Continue reading >>

Blurred Vision

Blurred Vision

SHARE RATE★★★★★ Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with both short-term and long-term effects on our eyes. Blurred vision is one of the most common symptoms of poorly controlled blood glucose and can affect a person at any stage of diabetes. Blurred vision results from a major change in plasma glucose level, which creates a change in osmotic pressure within the eyeball.1,2 Blurred vision typically occurs after an abrupt change in blood glucose resulting in a change in osmotic pressure within the eye. Blurring of vision may worsen initially even after you have taken steps to control your blood glucose, because a rapid correction in blood glucose will cause a further change in osmotic pressure within the eye. If you experience this symptom, work with your doctor to correct your blood glucose. Be patient and do not change vision correction prescriptions. Your vision may remain blurred for a short period of time until the pressure within your eye has normalized.2 Does blurred vision mean that I am losing my eyesight? Vision problems are one of the most frightening complications of diabetes. However, the early symptom of blurred vision due to uncontrolled high blood glucose usually does not mean that you are losing your eyesight. What blurred vision does mean is that your blood glucose is not controlled and that you need to take steps to prevent serious vision complications from occurring. Learn more about diabetes-related vision problems, including blurred vision. What should I do if I experience blurred vision? If you experience blurred vision and you have not been diagnosed with diabetes, you should see your doctor and discuss your symptoms. Your doctor will evaluate you and identify the cause of the symptom. As part of this evaluation, your doctor w Continue reading >>

Eye Changes When You Come Down With Diabetes

Eye Changes When You Come Down With Diabetes

Eye Changes When You Come Down With Diabetes Thu, 11/18/2010 - 16:23 -- Richard Morris by John Walsh, P.A., C.D.E., Ruth Roberts, M.A. Changes in vision may happen at the time that diabetes is first diagnosed or at any time that blood sugar control is poor. Fluctuating blood sugars cause the lens to swell and shrink, and result in fluctuating vision. Many times, people who have "borderline" diabetes finally decide to take their diabetes seriously when their vision becomes blurred. Sometimes, people coming down with diabetes marvel that they no longer need their glasses to see in the distance. But as insulin or other therapy is begun and the blood sugar drops, the abnormal swelling diminishes. In the short-term vision becomes blurred and is not corrected by their prescription lenses. Either of these scenarios can be frightening to people who have heard of the severe eye damage that goes along with diabetes. Blurred vision in both eyes when insulin or other treatment begins is almost never caused by damage to the eye. Rather, it results from the speed at which the swelling, due to high blood sugars in the previous weeks and months, dissipates from the lens. Vision is usually out of sync for 3 to 4 weeks, sometimes with an accompanying headache. After a visit to the physician to confirm that the abnormal vision is actually a temporary problem caused by lowering the blood sugars, a common treatment is to visit the reading glasses section in a large pharmacy. There, the person tries on different strengths of "reading glasses" until he finds one that allows him to see clearly at distances. As the days pass, a weaker version may be needed until eventually his own prescription lenses again work. Never buy prescription lenses during any period of uncontrolled blood sugars. Thes Continue reading >>

6 Serious Illnesses That Cause Sudden Blurry Vision

6 Serious Illnesses That Cause Sudden Blurry Vision

Most people experience changes in vision gradually over a period of months or years. They start moving their reading material closer or farther away in order to see the letters or find themselves struggling to see clearly when driving at night. These kinds of changes are common, especially as people age. Sudden blurry vision is a different story. If you haven’t had any vision changes, even if you use glasses or contacts, and your vision becomes dramatically worse in a matter of minutes or hours, it could be the sign of these serious conditions. Diabetes: Diabetes patients are at risk of a condition called diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is caused by low blood sugar that results in damaged blood vessels in the retina, the part of the eye that senses light. Damaged blood vessels can cause swelling of the part of the retina called the macula, and can contribute to macular degeneration. Diabetic eye degeneration can cause blurred and/or spotty vision and can lead to blindness if not properly diagnosed and treated. Stroke: Sudden blurred vision is also a symptom of strokes. Strokes impede blood flow in the brain and can cause blurry vision, double vision, or sudden loss of sight. Other stroke warning signs include dizziness, drooping facial muscles, confusion, balance problems, difficulty speaking clearly and loss of feeling in one arm. Multiple Sclerosis: Unexpected blurred vision is often one of the earliest symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS). MS causes inflammation along the optic nerve that connects your eyes to the brain. That causes a condition called optic neuritis, which can lead to blurry sight, loss of color vision, and pain when you move your eyes. It often happens in just one eye. MS symptoms, the severity of the symptoms, and the frequency of sympt Continue reading >>

Blurred Vision An Important Sign Of Diabetes

Blurred Vision An Important Sign Of Diabetes

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE 2 Comments Blurred vision can often be one of the first warning signs of diabetes. Many people who are newly diagnosed end up visiting their primary care providers and education centers having been referred by their ophthalmologist or optometrist due to concerns related to their vision. Many times, they are unable to obtain a vision prescription until they get their blood sugars down. Once their diabetes is treated and their blood sugars arent elevated, they can be evaluated for the pair of glasses closest to their accurate vision test. In this article, we will look at why blurred vision is an important warning sign that you may have diabetes in some cases. We will also look at the other causes of blurry vision, some of the treatments for them, and why seeing a vision provider when you have changes in your vision could be the difference between preserving or losing sight in some cases, such as with glaucoma, retinal detachment or macular degeneration. You may recall stories of my best friend in high school, Kelly, who had T1D, at the time called juvenile diabetes. By the time she was 46, Kelly had developed some of the common complications that come with diabetes. She had had a stroke, and as a result, she was declared legally blind. She never revealed to me what the diagnosis was related to her vision the few times I saw her around that time. She didnt want to talk about her diabetes, but rather what had been going on in her life over the past five years. After all, diabetes was secondary. Kelly had a vibrant and bright social life, filled with many people who loved her company. She was Kelly first, and she was a person with diabetes second. Although I didnt pry on that trip where we went out for dinner and a show which included lot Continue reading >>

Blurred Vision

Blurred Vision

Tweet One of the common signs of diabetes mellitus is blurred vision, which refers to the loss of sharpness of vision and the inability to see fine details. Blurred vision can affect one eye (unilateral blurred vision) or both (bilateral blurred vision) eyes, and can occur often or rarely. Regardless of how often it occurs, it should never go untreated as it could be an indicator of another, more serious eye problem. Causes of blurred vision Blurred vision can occur by simply forgetting to wear your prescribed corrective lenses. But in many cases, it is usually a sign of an underlying eye disease. Eye diseases include: Age-related macular degeneration High blood sugar levels Other causes of blurry vision include: Cataracts and other eye conditions such as conjunctivitis, dry eye syndrome, and retinal detachment Certain medications (including cortisone, some antidepressants and some heart medications) Diabetes mellitus Migraines Diabetes and blurred vision High levels of blood sugar resulting from diabetes can affect your ability to see by causing the lens inside the eye to swell, which can result in temporary blurring of eyesight. Blurring of vision may also occur as a result of very low blood sugar levels. If this is the case, your vision should return once your blood glucose levels have returned to the normal range. If your blood sugar levels are fluctuating over time, you may notice that your vision improves and worsens for periods of time. Recognising blurred vision There are various different interpretations/understandings of what blurred vision is, but in most cases the term is used to describe the inability to see fine details and a lack of sharpness of vision. When to see your doctor If you’re experiencing sudden blurred vision together with eye pain, you shou Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Blurry Vision: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Blurry Vision: What You Need To Know

Diabetes and blurry vision Diabetes refers to a complex metabolic disease in which your body either can’t produce insulin, doesn’t produce enough insulin, or simply can’t use it efficiently. All your body’s cells need sugar (glucose) for energy. Insulin helps to break down and deliver sugar to cells throughout your body. Sugar levels build up in your blood if you don’t have enough insulin to break it down. This is known as hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia can negatively affect every part of your body, including your eyes. Blurry vision is often one of the first warning signs of diabetes. Your vision may be blurry because fluid is leaking into the lens of your eye. This makes the lens swell and change shape. Those changes make it hard for your eyes to focus, so things start to look fuzzy. You may also get blurred vision when you start insulin treatment. This is due to shifting fluids, but it generally resolves after a few weeks. For many people, as blood sugar levels stabilize, so does their vision. How can diabetes cause blurry vision? Diabetic retinopathy is a term that describes retinal disorders caused by diabetes. Some of these disorders include macular edema and proliferative retinopathy. Macular edema is when the macula swells due to leaking fluid. The macula is the part of the retina that gives you sharp central vision. Other symptoms of macular edema include wavy vision and color changes. Proliferative retinopathy is when blood vessels leak into the center of your eye. Blurry vision is one of the signs that this is happening. You may also experience spots or floaters, or have trouble with night vision. Blurry vision can also be a symptom of glaucoma, a disease in which pressure in your eye damages the optic nerve. According to the National Eye Institute, i Continue reading >>

Blurry Vision And Other Symptoms Of Diabetes - Retina Specialist | Fairfax, Virginia | Retinal Diseases

Blurry Vision And Other Symptoms Of Diabetes - Retina Specialist | Fairfax, Virginia | Retinal Diseases

Blurry Vision and Other Symptoms of Diabetes Blurry vision is a common symptom of diabetes . Other diabetic symptoms include excessive thirst, frequent urination, weight loss and fatigue. Most of the symptoms are due to the lack of insulin which secondarily allows the sugar levels to sky rocket out of control. This sets up sugar gradients that cause imbalances in water distribution in the body and in different organs. One note, the blurry vision as a symptom of diabetes is not caused by the same mechanism as blurry vision from diabetic retinopathy . The fancy term for this concept is osmolarity. One way to think of osmolarity is that sugar attracts water, or, water goes where the sugar goes. Insulin Takes Sugar From the Blood and Delivers it to Your Cells When we eat, food is broken down and absorbed into the bloodstream. The sugars, the little energy units that serve as fuel for our cells, can not get into the cells without insulin. Stated another way, insulin lowers blood sugar. When the supply of insulin is insufficient, as in diabetes, sugar levels in the blood rise. Remember the law of osmolarity, if the sugar stays in the blood, it draws water out and away from your cells and into the bloodstream. Your body becomes dehydrated as the water is drawn into the blood stream. This is a relative increase in the fluid volume of the blood, the kidneys then make moreurine. The relative dehydration also explains the excessive thirst. The frequent urination, and especially, frequent urination at night, are very common symptoms of diabetes. Since the high sugar levels are constantly drawing water out from the cells, the body is constantly dehydrated causing extreme thirst. There are two reasons for the weight loss. One cause is the loss of water weight caused by the frequent Continue reading >>

5 Dangerous Diabetes Eye Problems And Their Fixes

5 Dangerous Diabetes Eye Problems And Their Fixes

At first glance, it does not make sense that diabetes can cause eye problems, yet it is the biggest cause of blindness in people above the age of 20. Diabetes can often lead to various other serious health issues if it is left untreated, and the issues affecting the eyes are arguably some of the most devastating. So what types of eye problems do diabetes cause? Blurry Vision Most people’s first instinct is to get tested for a pair of glasses or contact lenses as soon as they notice their vision is becoming a bit blurry. However, this might turn out to be a case of treating the symptoms rather than the root cause of the problem. Oftentimes it is constant levels of high blood sugar that results in this blurry vision. How to fix it… The key is to tackle the problem at its core cause, which is a high blood sugar level. To correct it, you will need to get your blood sugar back to a “normal” level, which is in the range of 3.8 – 7.2mmol/L, before meals, and less than 10mmol/L an hour or two after a meal. It may take up to 3 months for your vision to completely get back to normal. Although high blood sugar levels are often the cause of blurry vision, we still recommend that you speak to an eye doctor as he/she will be able to tell you in case it is a symptom of an even more serious problem. Cataracts Cataracts are formed when debris clouds up the lens of the eye, making it difficult for the eyes to focus. The two main symptoms of cataracts are blurred vision and glare. Although anybody can get cataracts, it is far more common amongst people who suffer from diabetes, and it may often develop into a big issue much faster. How to fix it… Surgery is needed to remove a cataract. This typically means that the doctor replaces the cloudy lens with an artificial one. Glauco Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Problems With Vision? Is It Permanent?

Can Metformin Cause Problems With Vision? Is It Permanent?

I’m afraid there is no simple answer to this one. But there is a clear way ahead. Let me explain. If you get blurry vision as soon as you start the metformin, there are some experts who say that this is could be a good sign. How come? Well, diabetes affects vision and you could have been losing your eyesight gradually, as your sugar levels went up over months and years. You are not even aware of this change in vision, because the loss is so gradual. RELATED: If You Take Metformin, You Need These Nutritional Supplements As soon as you start the metformin, your sugar suddenly comes under control and your eyes suddenly cannot adjust to the new, lower blood sugar, causing the blurry vision. The answer therefore could be to lower your starting metformin dose and then slowly, increase it over a few weeks/months, giving your body and your eyes a chance to adjust. The blurry vision could disappear with this. However, if you have started to experience blurry vision after using metformin for a few years, the answer could be very different. This form of vision loss happens due to loss of Vitamin B12 from the body, because Metformin interferes with our ability to absorb this vitamin from food. Vitamin B12 forms the protective sheath or insulation of all nerves in the body, including the one that is critical for vision, the optic nerve. When the optic nerve is damaged due to prolonged metformin use, the right solution is to immediately supplement with Vitamin B12. You should also know that with long term use, metformin also interferes with our ability to use two other vital nutrients, Vitamin B9 and Co Enzyme Q10 in the human body. This can cause a range of side effects – from hair loss and insomnia and heart palpitations to unexplained muscle pains. The real answer – to both Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a condition that occurs in people who have diabetes. It causes progressive damage to the retina, the light-sensitive lining at the back of the eye. Diabetic retinopathy is a serious sight-threatening complication of diabetes. Diabetes interferes with the body's ability to use and store sugar (glucose). The disease is characterized by too much sugar in the blood, which can cause damage throughout the body, including the eyes. Over time, diabetes damages the blood vessels in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy occurs when these tiny blood vessels leak blood and other fluids. This causes the retinal tissue to swell, resulting in cloudy or blurred vision. The condition usually affects both eyes. The longer a person has diabetes, the more likely they will develop diabetic retinopathy. If left untreated, diabetic retinopathy can cause blindness. Symptoms of diabetic retinopathy include: Seeing spots or floaters Blurred vision Having a dark or empty spot in the center of your vision Difficulty seeing well at night When people with diabetes experience long periods of high blood sugar, fluid can accumulate in the lens inside the eye that controls focusing. This changes the curvature of the lens, leading to blurred vision. However, once blood sugar levels are controlled, blurred distance vision will improve. Patients with diabetes who can better control their blood sugar levels will slow the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Often the early stages of diabetic retinopathy have no visual symptoms. That is why the American Optometric Association recommends that everyone with diabetes have a comprehensive dilated eye examination once a year. Early detection and treatment can limit the potential for significant vision loss from diabetic retinopathy. T Continue reading >>

Eye Problems And Diabetes

Eye Problems And Diabetes

Eye problems and diabetes introduction If you have diabetes, regular visits to your ophthalmologist for eye exams are important to avoid eye problems. High blood sugar (glucose) increases the risk of diabetes eye problems. In fact, diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in adults age 20 to 74. If you have eye problems and diabetes, don't buy a new pair of glasses as soon as you notice you have blurred vision. It could just be a temporary eye problem that develops rapidly with diabetes and is caused by high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar in diabetes causes the lens of the eye to swell, which changes your ability to see. To correct this kind of eye problem, you need to get your blood sugar back into the target range (90-130 milligrams per deciliter or mg/dL before meals, and less than 180 mg/dL one to two hours after a meal). It may take as long as three months after your blood sugar is well controlled for your vision to fully get back to normal. Blurred vision can also be a symptom of more serious eye problem with diabetes. The three major eye problems that people with diabetes may develop and should be aware of are cataracts, glaucoma, and retinopathy. A cataract is a clouding or fogging of the normally clear lens of the eye. The lens is what allows us to see and focus on an image just like a camera. Although anyone can get cataracts, people with diabetes get these eye problems at an earlier age than most and the condition progresses more rapidly than in people without diabetes. If you have a cataract, there is a cloudy area in the lens of your eye that results in the inability to focus light, and your vision is impaired. Symptoms of this eye problem in diabetes include blurred or glared vision. During cataract surgery, the cloudy lens is removed or cleaned ou Continue reading >>

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