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Blueberries For Diabetes

Blueberries May Help Improve Insulin Sensitivity

Blueberries May Help Improve Insulin Sensitivity

Blueberries May Help Improve Insulin Sensitivity Obese Patients With Prediabetes May Benefit From Drinking Blueberry Smoothies, Study Shows Sept. 17, 2010 -- Drinking blueberry smoothies helped obese adults who were pre-diabetic improve insulin sensitivity, researchers report. Sixty-seven percent of people who drank a blueberry smoothie twice a day for six weeks experienced a 10% or greater improvement in their insulin sensitivity, compared with 41% of people in the placebo smoothie group. The study results are published in the October issue of The Journal of Nutrition . The findings suggest that compounds found in blueberries, which have also been found to improve heart health , may help people with prediabetes by making the body more responsive to insulin . What the biochemical chain reaction or cellular pathways might be remain unclear. But given the challenges of getting people to eat more fruits and vegetables , researchers suggest a smoothie may be a tasty alternative to help people increase their fruit and vegetable intake and boost their health. In the study, researchers led by April Stull, an instructor in diabetes and nutrition from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center at the Louisiana State University System in Baton Rouge, compared 32 obese adults who had high insulin levels but did not have type 2 diabetes . Fifteen participants were randomly assigned to drink a smoothie containing 22.5 grams of blueberry freeze-dried powder twice a day for six weeks, while the remaining participants drank a placebo smoothie that did not contain blueberries. Participants were asked to fill out food questionnaires and were also asked to avoid eating or drinking other fruits or wines containing berries and grapes throughout the study. The participants did not change the Continue reading >>

Blueberry Herbal Tea Could Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Blueberry Herbal Tea Could Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Blueberry herbal tea could treat type 2 diabetes New type 2 diabetes treatment identified through pancreatic beta cell defect A blueberry tea could have potential to treat type 2 diabetes , according to researchers from the Menzies Institute. The herbal tea, the main ingredient of which is blueberry, could reduce dependence on injected insulin. Pre-clinical trials suggested that the tea improves the intake of glucose in the muscles, thereby lowering blood glucose levels. Previous studies indicate that berries - including blueberries - offer significant health benefits for people with type 2 diabetes. In February, a study published in the Journal of Nutrition found that anthocyanins - a chemical found in berries - reduces levels of "bad" cholesterol , increases levels of "good" cholesterol , reduces insulin resistance , and decreases fasting plasma glucose levels . Other ingredients in the herbal tea include spearmint leaves, and raspberry. The tea also includes cinnamon , which has been linked with health benefits for people with type 2 diabetes . A number of studies have indicated that cinnamon lowers blood glucose levels, reduces "bad" cholesterol, and increases insulin sensitivity . Research is not conclusive, however. Some studies suggest that cinnamon does not improve blood glucose levels at all. A combination of the ingredients in the herbal tea could lead to it being an effective treatment for type 2 diabetes in the future, but the research is only at a preliminary stage. Human trials will be conducted next year. Michelle Keske, senior research fellow at the Menzies Institute, said: "The tea has enabled that hormone, insulin , to improve glucose uptake into muscle and by doing that it lowers blood glucose levels and it does that by stimulating blood flow." Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

How Can Blueberries Help Lower Blood Sugar?

How Can Blueberries Help Lower Blood Sugar?

How can blueberries help lower blood sugar? Adding one special ingredient to a morning bowl of cereal just might help you sidestep high blood sugar problems. We're talking about blueberries. Research suggests that a regular dose of phenolic compounds found in the dark blue fruit may help enhance insulin sensitivity -- the body's ability to draw sugar from the blood and put it to use as energy. In a study of obese people who had exhibited insulin resistance but not full-blown diabetes, researchers tested the blueberry theory. They had participants drink a daily smoothie that contained dried blueberry extract. After six weeks, the study group demonstrated significantly improved insulin sensitivity compared with a placebo group -- even though neither group lost any weight in the study. And neither group changed their exercise levels or diets, either, helping researchers conclude that it was something in the berries that produced the benefit. The recent blueberry study is especially good news if you are overweight or obese or have other health-related factors that can boost your risk of insulin resistance, high blood sugar and type 2 diabetes. Blueberries alone won't prevent or lower high blood sugar. You have to adopt other healthful lifestyle habits to do that. But the abundant antioxidant compounds in blueberries may work synergistically to enhance insulin activity and help reduce the risk of diabetes, too. More research using whole blueberries is needed to see if they elicit the same enhanced-insulin response as dried extract, but early animal research with whole berries looks promising. Continue reading >>

Blueberries Improve Pre-diabetic Condition

Blueberries Improve Pre-diabetic Condition

Blueberries Improve Pre-diabetic Condition New research findings reveal that one of Americas favorite colorful fruits, blueberries, have properties that help to improve factors related to pre-diabetes and decrease inflammation in obese men and women. Chronic low-grade inflammation related to obesity contributes to insulin resistance, a major factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. This is an excellent example of the importance of clinical trials to building our knowledge-base in helping to improve public health, saidSteven Heymsfield, PBRC Executive Director The Pennington Biomedical Research Center (PBRC) conducted the blueberry study in a clinical trial with participants who had insulin resistance, a condition present in pre-diabetes. The results of the Centers study are highlighted in the October edition of The Journal of Nutrition. According to PBRC, the study was conducted over a six week period with 36 obese subjects diagnosed with insulin resistance, but who had no evidence of type 2 diabetes. The participants were assigned randomly either a blueberry-rich or nutritionally equivalent blueberry-free smoothie twice daily over the 42 day period. The participants who consumed the blueberry smoothies had improved insulin sensitivity compared to those consuming no blueberries, said PBRC researcherDr. April Stull. Type 2 diabetes and obesity are characterized by elevated blood sugar and represent a public health crisis in the United States. Obesity and diabetes can lead to serious health consequences, including blindness, poor circulation, and premature death. Although researchers have discovered that certain foods have both blood glucose-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects in experimental animals, few studies have been done in humans, according to the Journal Continue reading >>

A Berry Good Month: Berries And Diabetes

A Berry Good Month: Berries And Diabetes

A happy July Fourth to everyone. July brings many good things: sun, swimming, vacation and…berries. In fact, July just happens to be National Berry Month. Berries are superstars in the world of fruit. They’re full of nutrition, easy on blood sugars, and they happen to taste delicious, too. Let’s take a closer look at two popular berries available this month and why you should include them in your summer meal planning. Blueberries Blueberries have been enjoyed by people for hundreds of years. To this day, they remain popular, coming in after strawberries as the most popular berry in the United States. These little blue delicacies are literally bursting with a number of phytonutrients (plant-derived chemicals that may have health benefits), including anthocyanins, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids, flavonols, and resveratrol. Don’t worry — you don’t need to remember these terms, but what you should know is that these phytonutrients provide both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, making blueberries a true superstar. Health benefits: Improved blood lipids: Eating between 1–2 cups of blueberries daily can lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and triglycerides (blood fats) and help raise HDL (“good”) cholesterol. Blood pressure: Studies show that folks with high blood pressure who routinely eat blueberries have both lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure; for people who have “normal” blood pressure, eating blueberries can help maintain healthy blood pressure. Cognitive function: The antioxidants in blueberries may protect nerve cells from oxidative damage; studies in both lab animals and in humans show that eating blueberries (or drinking blueberry juice) may help to preserve memory and even slow down decline in other cognitive funct Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Blueberries For Type 2 Diabetes

Benefits Of Blueberries For Type 2 Diabetes

Blueberries are a relatively low calorie food half a cup contains 42 calories. Their high fiber content (1.8 grams per cup) will keep you well satiated (feeling full). One cup of blueberries contains 21 grams of carbohydrates, which is why a maximum of half a cup per serve is recommended (10.5 grams carbs per serve). The berries contain very small amounts of fat and protein. In terms of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, blueberries are nutritional superstars. Half a cup will give you 16% of your recommended daily amount (RDA) of vitamin K, 12.5% of your RDA of manganese, 9.5% of your RDA of vitamin C, and many more nutrients. Theyre also rich in a type of antioxidant called anthocyanins, which can lower your risk of cardiovascular disease. Vitamin K: Can improve bone health and prevent fractures. Vitamin K helps your body absorb calcium, and may even reduce Vitamin C: This antioxidant helps with tissue repair and regrowth, boosts your immune system, and may reduce blood sugar and lipids in people with diabetes, which means it could help prevent Manganese: This mineral helps prevent osteoporosis and reduces inflammation. Anthocyanins: These antioxidants help prevent cardiovascular disease (the #1 killer worldwide), as well as helping to prevent eye-related complications of diabetes. They work by reducing chronic inflammation associated with the development of disease. Blueberries have been found to have properties that prevent cancer. They inhibit the production of inflammatory molecules and reduce DNA damage, cancer cell proliferation, and other results of oxidative stress the thing that causes free radical damage that changes how cells in your body behave. Blueberries may assist with brain health. The anthocyanins in blueberries have been found to enhance task-rela Continue reading >>

At Risk For Diabetes? Be Your Own Breakthrough

At Risk For Diabetes? Be Your Own Breakthrough

Wild About Blueberries TIPS, RECIPES & MORE At Risk for Diabetes? Be Your Own Breakthrough Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, affects millions of Americans. As waistlines increase and diets degrade, the Type 2 diabetes diagnosis rate continues to grow in this country. And, it is being diagnosed at unprecedented and alarming rates in children . This chronic disease, marked by high levels of glucose in the blood, puts those who have it at lifelong risk of heart disease, stroke and other serious complications including eye, skin, and kidney disease. Recently, research published in The Archives of Internal Medicine concluded that intensive lifestyle changes, which include significant modifications in diet and exercise, can improve blood sugar levels in those with diabetes risk. Healthy eating, it implied, including eating foods high in nutrients and antioxidants, can assuage symptoms and reduce risk factors. Those reporting on the study have gone so far as to say that diet and exercise trump diabetes drugs. People who live with diabetes often require insulin (or the increasingly popular pills) to control the disease, and no one should forgo doctor-prescribed medication whether for diabetes, high blood pressure, or cardiovascular disease. At the same time, a recent editorial in Boston Globe tells it like it is when it comes to the degree to which we are helping ourselves prevent disease. We know about the need for fruits and veggies to maintain health, prolong life, and reduce obesity that puts us at risk for diseases like diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers, it says. But we simply arent listening. Despite our crumbling health, we are eating fewer fruits and vegetables now than we were ten years ago, and no state is achieving the nations dietary goal Continue reading >>

Blueberry: Medlineplus Supplements

Blueberry: Medlineplus Supplements

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) Blueberry leaves might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking blueberry leaves along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed. Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others. Are there interactions with herbs and supplements? Herbs and supplements that might lower blood sugar Blueberry might lower blood sugar. Using it along with other herbs and supplements that have the same effect might cause blood sugar to drop too low in some people. Some of these products include devil's claw, fenugreek, guar gum, Panax ginseng, and Siberian ginseng. Drinking milk along with blueberries might lower the potential health benefits of blueberries. Separating the ingestion of blueberries and milk by 1-2 hours might prevent this interaction. The appropriate dose of blueberry depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for blueberry. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using. Arndano, Bleuet, Bleuet des Champs, Bleuet des Montagnes, Bleuets, Blueberries, Highbush Blueberry, Hillside Blueberry, Lowbush Blueberry, Myrtille, Rabbiteye Bl Continue reading >>

Benefits In Eating Blueberries For Diabetes

Benefits In Eating Blueberries For Diabetes

Blueberries offer sweet ways to fight diabetes. Benefits in Eating Blueberries for Diabetes Whitney Hopler has authored numerous articles and several books in more than 20 years as a professional writer. As an editor, shes served at The Salvation Armys national magazines, Crosswalk.com and several newspapers. Blueberries are small fruits, but they contain a lot of power to help you do the big job of managing diabetes. The American Diabetes Association names blueberries as a diabetes superfood because blueberries are packed with nutrients, such as fiber and antioxidant vitamins, which provide several key benefits for dealing with diabetes. Blueberries may help your body process glucose for energy efficiently, both increasing its sensitivity to insulin and managing blood sugar, which can help you fight diabetes. A University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center study presented April 19, 2009 at the Experimental Biology convention in New Orleans notes that laboratory rats that were fed blueberries crushed into a powder showed improved insulin sensitivity, even when eating a high-fat diet along with the blueberries. Since most people with type 2 diabetes struggle with insulin resistance, greater sensitivity to insulin can help manage the disease. The University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center study also showed that laboratory rats that ate a powder made from crushed blueberries had lower blood sugar than they did prior to eating the blueberry powder, and researchers noted that their genes changed to allow their bodies to process glucose more efficiently than previously. If you suffer from type 2 diabetes, you may be able to lower your blood sugar by consuming plenty of high-fiber foods like blueberries, Joslin Diabetes Center notes. Since blueberries are low in calories yet Continue reading >>

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

Fruits are the perfect snack. They are loaded with nutrients and fiber, relatively low in calories, and easy to bring to work. However, they do contain naturally occurring sugars, sometimes in large amounts. This can be a concern for those who struggle to manage their blood sugars. This article takes a science-based look at the most suitable fruits for diabetics. 1. Blueberries Blueberries are quite low in sugar, with 10 grams per 100 grams of fruit (1). But that sugar is also accompanied by 2 grams of fiber. This is important because when sugar and fiber are eaten together, blood sugar levels don’t spike as quickly (2, 3). It’s the reason 10 grams of sugar from fresh fruits will not have the same effect on blood sugar levels as 10 grams of sugar from a candy bar. In addition, blueberries provide loads of other beneficial nutrients and antioxidants that protect our cells from damage. Interestingly, a study on over 187,000 people tracked over two decades found those who ate the most blueberries had more than a 25% lower risk of getting diabetes than those who ate the fewest (4). Blueberries are great for a snack, and you can even enjoy them in salads. Although they can be particularly expensive, know that frozen blueberries are still nutritious and often much more affordable. 2. Strawberries Strawberries contain even less sugar than blueberries, with only 5 grams per 100 grams of fruit (5). This makes them a great choice for diabetics. They also provide fiber, manganese, folate, and a lot of vitamin C. In fact, 100 grams of strawberries (5-6 large strawberries) provides 98% of our daily vitamin C requirements. Strawberries are a great addition to breakfast foods like oats or yogurt, but they are also delicious on their own. 3. Blackberries Blackberries stand out as n Continue reading >>

Blueberries One Of The Best Fruits For Diabetes | Diabetescare.net

Blueberries One Of The Best Fruits For Diabetes | Diabetescare.net

They are just so yummy! Im frequently asked whether there are certain fruits to eat that may help cut the risk of diabetes? The answer is YES. Research shows that blueberries are a top fruit in cutting the risk of type 2 diabetes. Not all fruits have this effect on our health according to a study done in 2013. Fruits are usually lumped together, but they differ in healthy components such as fiber, antioxidants and phytochemicals (plant chemicals). Researchers evaluated data from 187,382 participants that were part of three prospective cohort studies in the United States. The subjects did not have diabetes when the studies were started. When subjects consumed 3 servings per week of whole blueberries (not fruit juice) compared to less than 1 serving per month, their risk of developing diabetes was reduced by 24-40 percent. Wow! It is interesting to see that the glycemic index of the different fruits studied did not appear to be the deciding factor on which fruits consumed lowered the incidence of diabetes. Blueberries were the top fruit that cut risk. Other fruits that decreased risk included whole grapes and apples (again not juice). The authors recommended consuming whole fruits including blueberries to help with diabetes prevention. To help prevent diabetes use fruit juice sparingly. In this research study, consuming at least one serving of fruit juice daily increased the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by as much as 21 percent. (1,2,3) According to the American Diabetes Association, one fruit exchange for blueberries is equal to cup of raw blueberries. (4) Three-fourths of a cup contains 63 calories, 0.82 grams protein and 16.08 grams carbohydrate. It is a great source of fiber with 2.7 grams. For other nutrition facts about blueberries, visit the USDA.gov site . Continue reading >>

5 Reasons Why Blueberries Are A Superfood For Diabetics

5 Reasons Why Blueberries Are A Superfood For Diabetics

/ 5 reasons why blueberries are a superfood for diabetics 5 reasons why blueberries are a superfood for diabetics Blueberries can help you control your blood sugar. Find out how. Debjani Arora | Updated: June 8, 2015 11:09 am Tags: Abdominal fat Blood sugar level Insulin Blueberries are a powerhouse of antioxidants and can help a diabetic in various ways. Having a handful of these small, round, sweet-sour flavoured fruit can help increase sensitivity to insulin and the bodys ability to process glucose into energy effectively. Here a 5 reasons for eating blueberries. 1. Maintain blood sugar level: Blueberries have a lowglycemic index, which means they release sugar into the blood slowly and steadily. Half a cup of blueberries mid-morning helps to maintain the blood sugar level and keeps you active without any dip in your energy levels till your next meal. Here are five things a diabetic can do this summer to stay safe. 2. Low in calories: We love foods that we can eat and not worry about calories. With low-carbohydrate content and more flavonoids and antioxidants, they make a great low-calorie snack. They also have fructose a type of sugar that doesnt need insulin for metabolism. Here is the ultimate diet plan for diabetics to control blood sugar level. 3. Improve insulin sensitivity: The problem with diabetics, especially people suffering from type II diabetes, is that theirbody cannot utilise insulin effectively. According to a study published in the Journal of Nutrition, the flavonoid anthocyanin that gives pigmentation to the fruit helps improve sensitivity to insulin. Eating blueberries helps insulin to metabolise glucose and control high blood sugar level. Here are 10 home remedies for diabetics that really work. 4. Fight abdominal fat: Blueberries are also rich i Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

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