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Blue Circle Diabetes

Why The Blue Circle?

Why The Blue Circle?

I can't quite remember who asked me, but in front of San Francisco City Hall last Friday evening, during our World Diabetes Day celebrations, somebody pointed to my pin and asked, "Why the blue circle, anyway? What does that mean?" They also wanted to know why the logo didn't have the world "diabetes" stamped across it: "Who's going to recognize that this stands for diabetes?!" For goodness' sake, it's supposed to be like the ubiquitous pink ribbon for breast cancer, red ribbon for AIDS, or yellow ribbon for bring-home-the-troops. Setting the issue of why it's blue and a circle aside for a moment, can't we all agree that a symbol that speaks for itself is better than having to pin the word "DIABETES" on your lapel? I was especially surprised to discover that folks from the local chapter of the ADA (American Diabetes Association) weren't at all familiar with the blue circle campaign. I sort of forgave them for it last year, since it was still very new then, but now I'm thinking that that group — and this country at large, which doesn't play up World Diabetes Day a fraction as much as the rest of the world — may be suffering from some classic "not invented here syndrome." When you go to the ADA's website right now, for example, you see "American Diabetes Month," but nada on WDD. I hereby proclaim this Call to Action for next year's WDD: Let's do it up, right, America! And that means you, ADA! And that means you, Mainstream Media! This awareness campaign is gaining traction, with the likes of T1 rockstar Nick Jonas on board, but it seems like we have a long way to go to catch up with the Brits, the Germans, or the Australians, for example. And now for the Why Blue? And Why a Circle? I know from my previous research that this symbol was the brainchild of Kari Rosenfeld Continue reading >>

Add This Blue Circle To Your Profile Pic Now

Add This Blue Circle To Your Profile Pic Now

Raising awareness of diabetes doesn’t mean you have to shout about it from the rooftops. Sometimes, all it takes is a new Facebook profile picture or Twitter avatar to get others interested in a cause. The International Diabetes Federation has made it easy for you to use your social media platforms to share the message of Diabetes Awareness Month and World Diabetes Day with their WDD selfie app. It adds the global symbol of diabetes, a blue circle, to your photos. Want to join in and add your photo to the cause? It just takes six steps: Download the WDD selfie app for your iOS (Apple) or Android phone. When you open the app, a pop-up will appear that says, “Allow WDD to use your picture(s) taken with this application for any public display on the web or in print materials.” Select “yes” if you’re okay with this. Select “no” if you’d rather not. It’s totally up to you. Take a selfie! You can also select a photo that’s already in your phone’s photo library. The blue circle will appear on your photo. You can move it around and make it bigger or smaller. When you’re happy with the photo, share it on Facebook or Twitter or save it to your phone to upload as your profile pic later. Don’t forget to add a personal message to your photo when you share it. If you're not sure what to write, here are some ideas: Share your personal connection to diabetes. Share what you wish people knew about diabetes. Share the hardest aspect of living with diabetes. Share what you’ve learned about yourself, living with diabetes. You can also encourage your Facebook friends and Twitter followers to visit Diabetic Connect’s Diabetes Awareness Month page to learn more about diabetes. Tags: diabetes awareness month Continue reading >>

The Blue Circle – A Powerful Symbol For World Diabetes Day

The Blue Circle – A Powerful Symbol For World Diabetes Day

During the last month, you have probably seen more than one pink ribbon. Every October, breast cancer awareness month, we see the pink ribbon displayed on everything from shirts to mugs to even stamps. Most people in the U.S., even many young children, are familiar with the pink ribbon and that it stands for breast cancer awareness. For the last 20 years, the pink ribbon has helped to increase awareness and funding for a very worthy cause. The sea of pink that takes over October is not only a reminder of how many people breast cancer has affected, but also how many people stand against it. It sends a powerful message that we as a community are standing up to a deadly NCD. The pink ribbon has taught us an important lesson – a simple message can have a large impact on community awareness. This lesson can be used to combat another NCD – diabetes. Diabetes also has a symbol to raise awareness, the blue circle. The blue circle has only been in existence since 2006, when the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), chose it because in many cultures a circle can symbolize life and health. And, more importantly, the circle symbolizes the unity that is necessary to combat such a deadly NCD. IDF chose the color blue for the color of the sky and the flag of the United Nations, an organization that stands for unity among many nations. World Diabetes Day (WDD) is on November 14th, almost a week away. Diabetes education and prevention is the WDD theme for the time period from 2009 – 2013. Awareness efforts include the WDD Blue Monument Challenge. On November 14th, 2010, over 900 monuments and buildings were lit blue to raise awareness for diabetes. This popular campaign will continue this year. If you would like to learn more about this initiative or to find out how to go about Continue reading >>

Blue Circle For Diabetes

Blue Circle For Diabetes

Graphical characteristics: Symmetric, Closed shape, Monochrome, Contains curved lines, Has no crossing lines. Continue reading >>

Become A Blue Circle Voice

Become A Blue Circle Voice

The Blue Circle Voices (BCV) is a network open to all people with diabetes or relatives/carers of people with diabetes, that are passionate about improving the lives of people with diabetes, have experience as volunteers and/or advocates and share IDF values. Individuals wishing to become part of the BCV must fulfill the following criteria: Have diabetes (type 1, type 2 or a less common type), or have a child, close relative or loved one with diabetes, or have a history of gestational diabetes; Share IDF’s mission to promote access to diabetes care, to fight discrimination against people with diabetes and to promote prevention of type 2 diabetes; Be willing to complete an application form that provides details of their personal history with diabetes, including age, date of diagnosis, medications and comorbidities; Are able and willing to communicate by email in written English, French or Spanish; Are committed to respond to email consultations within five working days; Can prove their experience of campaigning for diabetes causes in their own country; Are willing for their story to be featured on the IDF website: Are committed to promote IDF activities at national or global level. You can find more information about the network and its objectives here. If you are interested in joining the Blue Circle Voices network, please contact [email protected] Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day Resources

World Diabetes Day Resources

World Diabetes Day (WDD) is the primary global awareness campaign of the diabetes community. A variety of resources are available to help mark the day, raise awareness of diabetes and show your support for the 415 million people currently living with diabetes. The theme of WDD 2017 is Women and Diabetes: our right to a healthy future. If you are interested in adapting or reproducing any of the resources, please contact [email protected] World Diabetes Day logo Continue reading >>

The Blue Circle: Coming Together For Diabetes Awareness

The Blue Circle: Coming Together For Diabetes Awareness

The Blue Circle: Coming together for diabetes awareness Kurt is 22 years old, but he looks about five. He was born in Coventry and enjoys novels in which nothing much happens and comfortable pyjamas (because he's young and exciting). In 2014, he was once again overlooked for the Nobel Peace Prize. The fact is, most people just dont know enough about diabetes. Its been suggested that 850,000 people in the UK alone have the condition without knowing it, while research shows that three in ten adults in the US have undiagnosed diabetes . Diabetes awareness is a huge problem; every November, the diabetes community comes together to do something about it. Events are organised, activities planned, and campaigns devised, all with the aim of giving diabetes a bigger presence in the public consciousness. At the centre of it is World Diabetes Day . Taking place on the 14th of November in honour of Sir Frederick Banting (one of the first scientists to use insulin on humans), it engages people throughout the world in response to growing concerns about the disease. In March 2014, Diabetes.co.uk started the #BloodSugarSelfie campaign. By encouraging people with diabetes to share photos of themselves with their blood sugar readings, we hoped to achieve several things: firstly, to show the extent to which diabetes can cause blood sugars to fluctuate; to illustrate that people with diabetes have to pay close attention to their blood glucose levels every single day; and to show the members of our community that they are never alone with their condition. It worked. 1.2 million people saw the hashtag over the first two days, and 1,500 people sent us their selfies on social media. In just four days, the campaign raised 4,279 for diabetic charities. In November we brought it back for World D Continue reading >>

The Blue Circle: Diabetes Symbol Mostly Unused By U.s. Organizations

The Blue Circle: Diabetes Symbol Mostly Unused By U.s. Organizations

This is the universal symbol for diabetes. Yet, while the blue circle became the global symbol in 2007, it’s been fighting a battle to gain that recognition among diabetes organizations in the U.S. Why does that matter? Think pink ribbon. You thought breast cancer, didn’t you? That’s the power of one unifying symbol for a disease. Such a symbol can potentially generate greater prevention and care efforts, treatment advances, and more funding for research and a cure. The Blue Circle was created by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in 2006 as part of a campaign urging the United Nations to pass a resolution to recognize diabetes as a serious global health threat. The IDF was successful. According to the International Diabetes Federation, UN Resolution 61/225 recognizes diabetes as debilitating and costly, and encourages all nations to develop prevention and treatment policies. It also designates November 14 — the birthday of Frederick Banting, one of insulin’s discoverers — as World Diabetes Day to be recognized by the UN. The blue circle became the official logo mark for World Diabetes Day, and the universal symbol for diabetes. Yet only the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) adopted the Blue Circle as such. American Association of Diabetes Educators Sandra Burke, AADE’s President, said, “When you see the pink ribbon, the automatic recognizable symbol for breast cancer, you’re reminded breast cancer is serious. When people look at the Blue Circle we want them to be able to say, this is about diabetes, a disease that kills even more people than breast cancer. We need to solve this.” “By universally accepting a symbol for diabetes,” says Burke, “we have the beginning of developing a unified message that diabetes is serious Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symbol Mostly Unused By U.s. Organizations

Diabetes Symbol Mostly Unused By U.s. Organizations

This is the universal symbol for diabetes. Yet, while the blue circle became the global symbol in 2007, it’s been fighting a battle to gain that recognition among diabetes organizations in the U.S. Why does that matter? Think pink ribbon. You thought breast cancer, didn’t you? That’s the power of one unifying symbol for a disease. Such a symbol can potentially generate greater prevention and care efforts, treatment advances, and more funding for research and a cure. The Blue Circle was created by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in 2006 as part of a campaign urging the United Nations to pass a resolution to recognize diabetes as a serious global health threat. The IDF was successful. According to the International Diabetes Federation, UN Resolution 61/225 recognizes diabetes as debilitating and costly, and encourages all nations to develop prevention and treatment policies. It also designates November 14 — the birthday of Frederick Banting, one of insulin’s discoverers — as World Diabetes Day to be recognized by the UN. The blue circle became the official logo mark for World Diabetes Day, and the universal symbol for diabetes. Yet only the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) adopted the Blue Circle as such. American Association of Diabetes Educators Sandra Burke, AADE’s President, said, “When you see the pink ribbon, the automatic recognizable symbol for breast cancer, you’re reminded breast cancer is serious. When people look at the Blue Circle we want them to be able to say, this is about diabetes, a disease that kills even more people than breast cancer. We need to solve this.” “By universally accepting a symbol for diabetes,” says Burke, “we have the beginning of developing a unified message that diabetes is serious Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

Diabetes mellitus type 1 (also known as type 1 diabetes) is a form of diabetes mellitus in which not enough insulin is produced.[4] This results in high blood sugar levels in the body.[1] The classical symptoms are frequent urination, increased thirst, increased hunger, and weight loss.[4] Additional symptoms may include blurry vision, feeling tired, and poor healing.[2] Symptoms typically develop over a short period of time.[1] The cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown.[4] However, it is believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors.[1] Risk factors include having a family member with the condition.[5] The underlying mechanism involves an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.[2] Diabetes is diagnosed by testing the level of sugar or A1C in the blood.[5][7] Type 1 diabetes can be distinguished from type 2 by testing for the presence of autoantibodies.[5] There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes.[4] Treatment with insulin is required for survival.[1] Insulin therapy is usually given by injection just under the skin but can also be delivered by an insulin pump.[9] A diabetic diet and exercise are an important part of management.[2] Untreated, diabetes can cause many complications.[4] Complications of relatively rapid onset include diabetic ketoacidosis and nonketotic hyperosmolar coma.[5] Long-term complications include heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, foot ulcers and damage to the eyes.[4] Furthermore, complications may arise from low blood sugar caused by excessive dosing of insulin.[5] Type 1 diabetes makes up an estimated 5–10% of all diabetes cases.[8] The number of people affected globally is unknown, although it is estimated that about 80,000 children develop the disease each year.[5] With Continue reading >>

{diabetes Awareness Month} The Blue Circle

{diabetes Awareness Month} The Blue Circle

Amy Tenderich of Diabetes Mine asked: Why doesn’t diabetes have a single, recognizable symbol like the ubiquitous pink ribbon for breast cancer? As we were getting ready to walk out the door on the morning of November 1, I asked Q if she would like to wear a blue circle pin on her shirt. I told her that she can wear it every day this month if she likes to help raise diabetes awareness. She commented that she would ask her teacher if she could do a show-and-tell. On the way to school she said, “But wait, I thought the symbol for diabetes was red.” Even my seven-year-old is wondering why we can’t have one symbol that is recognizable by all! You can read more about the campaign for a unified symbol on Diabetes Mine where there is a link to a petition being compiled Diabetic Connect. Those who sign the petition are entered to win a set of blue circle pins and bracelets. You can order blue circle pins directly from the International Diabetes Federation, but you may not get them in time for World Diabetes Day on November 14th. They are about $17 US for 10 pins. Further Reading More Diabetes Awareness Month posts Continue reading >>

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

WARNING: RISK OF THYROID C-CELL TUMORS Liraglutide causes dose-dependent and treatment-duration-dependent thyroid C-cell tumors at clinically relevant exposures in both genders of rats and mice. It is unknown whether Victoza® causes thyroid C-cell tumors, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), in humans, as the human relevance of liraglutide-induced rodent thyroid C-cell tumors has not been determined. Victoza® is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of MTC and in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia syndrome type 2 (MEN 2). Counsel patients regarding the potential risk for MTC with the use of Victoza® and inform them of symptoms of thyroid tumors (eg, a mass in the neck, dysphagia, dyspnea, persistent hoarseness). Routine monitoring of serum calcitonin or using thyroid ultrasound is of uncertain value for early detection of MTC in patients treated with Victoza®. Risk of Thyroid C-cell Tumors: Patients should be referred to an endocrinologist for further evaluation if serum calcitonin is measured and found to be elevated or thyroid nodules are noted on physical examination or neck imaging. Pancreatitis: Acute pancreatitis, including fatal and nonfatal hemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis, has been observed in patients treated with Victoza® postmarketing. Observe patients carefully for signs and symptoms of pancreatitis (persistent severe abdominal pain, sometimes radiating to the back with or without vomiting). If pancreatitis is suspected, discontinue Victoza® promptly and if pancreatitis is confirmed, do not restart. Victoza® has been studied in a limited number of patients with a history of pancreatitis. It is unknown if patients with a history of pancreatitis are at a higher risk for development of pancreatitis on Victo Continue reading >>

A Not-so-universal Symbol: The Diabetes Blue Circle

A Not-so-universal Symbol: The Diabetes Blue Circle

The United Nations has given the diabetes blue circle its blessing as the universal symbol for the disease. So why aren’t U.S. associations embracing it across the board? What if you had a universal symbol for your association’s focus but not everyone was using it? That’s the situation the International Diabetes Federation’s blue circle, adopted as the universal symbol for the disease by the United Nations in 2006, has faced in recent years. “The purpose of the symbol is to give diabetes a common identity,” the IDF writes on its official page for the symbol. Despite this, the blue circle hasn’t become nearly as ubiquitous as other similar universal symbols, such as the AIDS ribbon. Diabetes activist Riva Greenberg, writing for the Huffington Post, recently asked a number of organizations if they used the symbol and why. Highlights from what they said: American Association of Diabetes Educators: AADE says rallying behind the symbol could help create a unified front in fighting the disease. “By universally accepting a symbol for diabetes, we have the beginning of developing a unified message that diabetes is serious and widespread,” explains AADE President Sandra Burke. American Diabetes Association: The group, a member of the International Diabetes Federation, commends other organizations that use the symbol but says it focuses its energy behind its own symbol and movement, “Stop Diabetes.” Diabetes Research Institute Foundation: While the group admits that keeping all of its marketing symbols in line is difficult at times, it has made efforts to use the international symbol in its marketing. “If we all came together to use the blue circle, I think it would benefit everyone,” said Lori Weintraub, APR, the vice president of marketing and communic Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day And The History Of The Blue Circle

World Diabetes Day And The History Of The Blue Circle

We all know November is Diabetes awareness month, and November 14th is “World Diabetes Day.” But what is the meaning of the “blue circle” and why do we celebrate and advocate for diabetes so much this month? I asked Keegan Hall, the President of the Young Leaders in Diabetes Program, to talk a bit about the history. Many causes and conditions have a colored ribbon to symbolize the cause. In the diabetes community, we have done something very different—a blue circle. The blue circle is the universal symbol for diabetes. Until 2006, there was no global symbol for diabetes. The purpose of the symbol is to give diabetes a common identity. It aims to: Support all existing efforts to raise awareness about diabetes Inspire new activities, bring diabetes to the attention of the general public Brand diabetes Provide a means to show support for the fight against diabetes What is the history of the blue circle? The icon was originally developed for the campaign that resulted in the passage of United Nations Resolution 61/225 “World Diabetes Day.” The campaign for a United Nations Resolution on diabetes was a response to the diabetes pandemic that is set to overwhelm healthcare resources everywhere. The campaign mobilized diabetes stakeholders behind the common cause of securing a United Nations Resolution on diabetes. The United Nations passed Resolution 61/225 ‘World Diabetes Day’ on December 20, 2006. Why a circle? The circle occurs frequently in nature and has thus been widely employed since the dawn of humankind. The significance is overwhelmingly positive. Across cultures, the circle can symbolize life and health. Most significantly for the campaign, the circle symbolizes unity. Our combined strength is the key element that made this campaign so special. The Continue reading >>

Blue Circle Selfie App

Blue Circle Selfie App

The Blue Circle is the universal symbol for diabetes. However the symbol means nothing to some people. Help us change that! The Blue Circle selfie app has been developed to promote the blue circle in a fun way. Take a selfie or a group picture, position the blue circle around your face or anywhere on the picture and share it on social media (#WDD) with a personal message. Available for iOS and Android phones and tablets. Continue reading >>

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